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Importance
1
Link
by Education: DC Area Education News, Education Policy, School Information - The Washington Post

Apr 07, 2014
“America’s Most Challenging High Schools ranks schools through an index invented by Washington Post education columnist Jay Mathews. The index formula is a simple ratio: The number of Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate and Advanced International Certificate of Education tests given at a school in 2013, divided by the number of graduates that year. Noted in our national and local tables is the percentage of students eligible for government meal subsidies — a common benchmark for poverty — and each schools’s average SAT score, a common college entrance exam with a national average of 1498 out of 2400. This year, the list also notes whether each school has an 11-person football team as an indicator of changing school cultures, the subject of Mathews’ analysis of the 2014 results. The list includes some private schools — noted with a (P) — for comparison. Certain public schools with highly selective admissions are omitted from the list, but information about them can be found online, along with full local and national lists, at www.washingtonpost.com/highschoolchallenge. Read full article >>”
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Importance
1
Student's Lego resume goes viral
by CNN.com - Top Stories

Mar 28, 2014
“A college student finds a way to incorporate her passion for LEGOs into her internship applications. Maribel Aber reports.”
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Importance
1
Inside the admissions process at George Washington University
by Education: DC Area Education News, Education Policy, School Information - The Washington Post

Mar 22, 2014
“Britt Freitag, an admissions officer at George Washington University , confessed she was “slightly nervous” about a candidate for the Class of 2018. His grades were solid, but not stellar. The student had taken some tough courses, but not as many as Freitag would have liked. Test scores, she said, were “definitely on the low side.” Read full article >>        ”
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Importance
1
Top leaders defend counseling services in front of admitted students' parents
by The GW Hatchet

Apr 22, 2014
“Media Credit: Katie Causey | Hatchet Photographer
University Counseling Center director Silvio Weisner said he attended the admitted students panel Friday because GW had anticipated some families would bring questions about mental health resources after a string of suicides on campus.
Administrators defended GW’s counseling services Friday after the parents of newly admitted students used the bulk of an hour-long information session to ask about the recent string of suicides on campus.
The academics and student life-focused presentation, which brought hundreds of families to Lisner Auditorium, drew questions from a handful of parents about the quality of campus mental health resources.
Two students committed suicide this semester and another student died from an unconfirmed cause. A fourth student was killed in a car accident off campus.
Forrest Maltzman, a top academic administrator at GW who led the event, told parents he believed the counseling center’s services were strong and that top officials often evaluate the program's effectiveness.
“I cannot promise you that these sorts of tragedies will never occur on campus because they probably occur on a number of campuses, throughout high schools and all sorts of places in America,” Maltzman said. “But I think we’re doing a pretty good job in spite of the several instances that you’re referring to.”
Parents also asked about alcohol policies, campus security and freshman orientation programs – but the majority of the event’s Q&A centered on counseling.
University Counseling Center director Silvio Weisner, who attended the panel because GW had anticipated questions from parents, listed the center’s hours, call-in services and policies. He also explained that it had extended services on the Foggy Bottom and Mount Vernon campuses and will soon add permanent counseling services to the Vern, where two students died this semester of apparent suicides.
“The community is struggling, but we are banding together,” Weisner said. “The University is currently working hard to make sure the students who are here in the community are getting the emotional support that they need to be able to grieve and to heal and to move forward.”
Weisner said he attended the panel and joined families at breakfast and lunch during the admissions visit because he anticipated parents would want information about mental health services.
He and Maltzman touted the CARE Network, a referral system launched two years ago to act as a safety net for students. Last year, about 275 students had been reported through the system, but dozens of professors surveyed by The Hatchet last year said they had little or no knowledge of the program . GW declined to provide updated numbers this year.
“One of the things that we’re trying to do is make sure that there are as many tools as possible for people to raise red flags,” Maltzman said.
Several parents asked whether the students who died, Sean Keefer, Benjamin Asma and Lynley Redwood, had used counseling services. Weisner said confidentiality laws prevented GW from sharing that information.
The administrators urged parents to talk to their students about GW’s physical and mental health resources, adding that the counseling center encourages students to sign waivers so counselors can share information with their parents.
“Sometimes that takes a parent’s help to go ahead and encourage their sons or daughters to get the help they need,” Maltzman said.
Several parents said after the session that the conversation dwelled on the tragedies for too long when they hoped to hear more about academics, residential life and freshman transition programs.
Henry Connors, a father who knew about the deaths before visiting campus Friday, said he hoped there would be “serious time” spent at Colonial Inauguration addressing mental health resources. But he also said he wanted to know more about how GW reaches out to students who show signs of distress.
“What immediately struck me was they seemed to put a little bit more responsibility on students seeking the help as opposed to vice versa,” Connors said. “Very often, I think there may be signals that unfortunately get missed in any mental health situation – not just in the schools but in the general populace.””

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Importance
1
Calendar
by The GW Hatchet

Apr 14, 2014
“Monday, April 14
Talk with Law School Dean
Law School Dean Gregory Maggs will discuss admissions, law school life and career options in a talk hosted by the Pre-Law Student Association.
7:30 p.m.
Marvin Center
Wednesday, April 16
29th Annual Excellence in Student Life Awards
The ceremony will honor students and student groups with awards for outstanding achievement.
7 p.m.
Lisner Auditorium
Saturday, April 19
Funk Academy X
For Capital Funk's 10-year anniversary, they will host hip-hop dance crews, singers and spoken word artists.
Noon
Kogan Plaza
Sunday, April 20
Holi on the Quad
Throw colored powder at your friends to celebrate Holi, the annual celebration of the spring.
1 p.m.
Square 80”

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Importance
1
Your guide to Spring Fling alternatives
by The GW Hatchet

Apr 11, 2014
“Media Credit: Sam Johnson | Hatchet Photographer
Not interested in watching Jay Sean or Wavves on Saturday? Head to the Tidal Basin.
If you’re not exactly Jay Sean’s No. 1 fan or want to escape the hordes of drunken GW students who will crowd University Yard on Saturday, there are plenty of other events outside Foggy Bottom to check out. Here are a few highlights from across the city.
MUSIC
In the mood to dance to something other than “Down?” You’re in luck. Swedish rock band The Sounds will headline the 9:30 Club on Saturday ($20, doors open at 5 p.m.). Having been on the road for the better part of the last 10 years, playing shows like Warped Tour, supporting Panic! and at the Disco and embarking their own world tour, The Sounds’ latest North American stint is in support of their newest album, “Weekend.”
In the mood for a gay dance party that isn’t at Town? Black Cat will host MIXTAPE, a monthly dance party featuring an eclectic mix of music genres ($10, doors at 9:30 p.m.). Washingtonian Magazine dubbed the event D.C.’s “Best Gay Dance Party.”
No way was Program Board going to book Daft Punk for Spring Fling. But if you pay $10 – and don’t actually need to see the famed robot duo – U Street Music Hall will host a Daft Punk tribute night with local DJs and producers Will Eastman and OZKER (doors at 10 p.m.)
Media Credit: Desiree Halpern | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Head to Nationals Park for D.C. Beer Festival on Saturday.
BEER
If you’re 21 or older and have some cash to spare, you can enjoy a more sophisticated boozy festival Saturday. Head to Nationals Parks, D.C.’s best springtime venue, for the second annual D.C. Beer Festival.
The event – the second in a lineup of four spring beer festivals – will feature 60 craft breweries, 120 beers, games, music and food. It’s no Bacon and Beer fest (the Penn Social event sold out within weeks), but the park will offer food sold separately from the ticket. Look forward to tasting local, regional, and rare national brews.
Admission to the festival is $40. You can choose from one of two sessions: 1 to 4 p.m. or 6 to 9 p.m. Buy tickets here.
CHERRY BLOSSOMS
Start the Spring Fling revelry early by watching the National Cherry Blossom Festival Parade Saturday morning. Jay Sean will make an early performance at the festival before heading over to Foggy Bottom for Spring Fling.
The lineup includes more talent than just ‘90s heartthrob Aaron Carter. “American Idol” champ Candice Glover is set to perform alongside Grammy award-winning singer Sheena Easton.
But, aside from some big throwback names, this year’s festival also included the first annual “Sing Into Spring Competition,” which searched for local artists to perform in the parade. The GW Vibes is one of five acts chosen from the competition, along with Reverb, an award-winning a capella group, and eight-year-old singer Kelvin Dukes.
The parade on Constitution Avenue between Seventh and 17th streets will start at 10 a.m. Spectators can stand on the sidewalk along the parade route between Ninth and 15th streets for free. Grandstand seating prices start at $20.”

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Importance
1
Calendar
by The GW Hatchet

Apr 07, 2014
“Monday, April 7
Why Teach? Panel with Arne Duncan
Join Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, GW faculty and alumni for a panel discussion on the teaching profession.
2:45 p.m.
Marvin Center Continental Ballroom
Tuesday, April 8
Evening with the Experts
Meet with alumni who have studied abroad and learn more about their experiences.
7 p.m.
1918 F St.
Wednesday, April 9
GW School of Business Graduate Programs Information Session
Network with deans, faculty and admissions counselors in the School of Business.
6 p.m.
Duquès Hall
Saturday, April 12
Skeet Shooting with GW TRAiLS
Go skeet shooting in Prince George’s County with GW TRAiLS. No experience is necessary.
11 a.m.
Meet in Marvin Center Great Hall”

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Importance
1
GW misrepresented namesake for years
by The GW Hatchet

Apr 02, 2014
“Media Credit: Camera Lenscaster | A Fine Pilsner
George Washington Carver, a 19th century inventor, teacher and botanist, is the university's true namesake, officials admitted April 1.
Reader's note: This story is satirical in nature and published in a spoof issue.
The University revealed Friday that it has been misrepresenting its namesake as George Washington, the first president of the United States, for over a century.
University President Stephen Klapp acknowledged that GW was in fact renamed in 1904, as a tribute to scientist George Washington Carver.
Klapp has created a task force to investigate how the University was named George Washington Carver University before the renowned researcher was even that famous.
“We are not sure how this error could have been miscommunicated unnoticed for so many years, but we are looking into the root causes of the miscommunication,” Klapp said in a statement. “I speak for myself and the entire administration when I say that George Washington Carver was a great man and a true innovator, and we are excited about our University’s new identity.”
Sources close to the president’s office said Klapp would likely blame former admissions dean Kathy Napsack for the misstep. “How convenient,” the source said.
Born in Missouri in 1864, Carver was a successful scientist, botanist, educator and inventor – one of his most noteworthy accomplishments was the creation of peanut butter. Time magazine recognized him as a “Black Leonardo” in 1941, according to his Wikipedia page.
Klapp said the true namesake is still an appropriate match with GW’s core values of education and spreadable meat substitutes. He said the University will not be renamed “The George Washington Carver University” because it is just too many syllables.
The University will also add peanut-tasting stations in front of each residence hall and academic building on the Foggy Bottom Campus to honor Washington Carver. To appease students and faculty with peanut allergies, the Mount Vernon Campus will be renamed the Mount Vernon Peanut-free Campus.
Michael Lessberger, vice president for lack of development and alumni apathy, said the Colonial mascot will be phased out over the next few weeks and replaced with something that works better with two slices of Wonder Bread and strawberry jelly.
“We’re not too upset about it because quite frankly, our current mascot looks like an even scarier version of the Burger King guy,” Lessberger said.
Administrators have seemingly spread themselves too thin with keeping other secrets from the student body, they will be accepting suggestions for the new mascot through the end of the month.
So far, the top submissions are a jar of peanut butter, a peanut, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich and a dancing clitoris.”

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Importance
1
Administrators, faculty to star in 'Real Housewives'-themed reality show
by The GW Hatchet

Apr 02, 2014
“Media Credit: Camera Lenscapster | A Fine Pilsner
Reader's note: This story is satirical in nature and published in a spoof issue.
When Bravo producers visited the Foggy Bottom Campus last fall, they knew they had struck gold.
The network will soon make GW the first college in the country with its own reality show, using the campus’ penchant for petty infighting and wild accusations to bring “The Real Administrators of Foggy Bottom” to primetime cable.
“Usually with reality television, we have to fake some drama. With GW, it’s already there!” producer Biz Snarkey said. “Admissions officials lie to teenagers. They lie about documents. There's alleged bullying AND gay threesomes."
“Jesus Christ, we’re going to make a fortune off these ratings!” he added.
The producer said the mega-network’s interest was piqued once GW’s fourth dean was pushed out of a job in as many years.
Once a plot twist unfolded and one ex-dean accused a professor of secretly reporting false financial embezzlement and sex with colleagues, the television officials said they knew they had to ink the deal.
“That’s absolutely fucked up,” he said. “We think the nation is going to fall in love with GW administrators and faculty. And I mean fall in love like the way America falls in love with (but also really hates) everyone on ‘The Bachelor.’”
Nelly Johnson, a gay male sophomore, said he expected the show to become his new “guilty pleasure.”
“It’s amazing because it’s not something you’d expect from a top-rate university,” Johnson said. “But I think me and my friends are totally going to identify with GW administrators now. I’ll be the sassy one who doesn’t take shit, Joey will be the one who’s always trying to start a fight.”
The University’s student life office is planning an elaborate watch party in the Smith Center for the show’s pilot – complete with cardboard cutouts of GW administrators and faculty, as well as free t-shirts with the show’s tagline, “Something Bizarre and Immature Happens Here.”
According to pilot clips obtained by The Butter Knife, the show will start with scenes from the secretive Board of Trustees retreat in which University President Stephen Klapp drops his champagne glass and flips over a table when confronted by dean Smug Runfree. “He shouldn’t be able to sit with us,” Klapp said in the clip.
Producers are also in talks with GW officials to plan a full suite of reality shows. Sources say administrators have pitched a show in which students who pay full tuition go on blind dates with financially needy students whose scholarships they’re helping pay for.
GW officials would not disclose potential earnings from the historic deal, but Klapp pledged that the revenue would be invested back in students.
“We will continue to use our educational, nonprofit status as a shield when we want to do stuff that makes us a lot of money,” Klapp said. “Don’t ask questions about it, just smile and nod.””

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Importance
1
A 1993 Cinderella team that helped transform GW
by The GW Hatchet

Mar 20, 2014
“Even if GW pulls together an unlikely string of wins this week to write its own Cinderella story, it still would not live up to the drama and consequences of the program’s first spell of postseason magic two decades ago.
Media Credit: From the Hatchet archives
A front page from 1993 blares a headline for GW's first ever trip to the Sweet 16.
That’s because the 1993 Colonials team – which improbably went from last pick in the tournament to a Sweet 16 finalist that stuck with Michigan’s Fab Five down to the final minute – didn't just stoke a fan base and generate national excitement. It helped change the University for good.
After the team’s March Madness run, which was the program’s first appearance in the tournament in 32 years, undergraduate applications shot up 23 percent . The athletic success branded GW with more name recognition, setting the stage for a University with higher selectivity, more tuition dollars and plans of campus expansion.
“GW, from an athletic point of view, had never experienced that kind of notoriety or success,” said Robert Chernak, who oversaw the athletics department for 24 years as a top administrator. “From an economic point of view, you could never afford to buy the kind of publicity GW was receiving nationally.”
Media Credit: Courtesy of the University archives
The team, led by head coach Mike Jarvis and Nigerian seven-foot-one center Yinka Dare, toppled University of New Mexico and Southern University in the opening NCAA rounds that year. The New York Times noted in its game summary that without Dare, "George Washington would not be confused with Georgetown today."
After going down early to Chris Webber's University of Michigan in the Sweet 16, GW battled back to take the lead in the second half, before the Wolverines’ star players became too much to halt.
The week after the loss, a front-page Hatchet headline blared: "Admissions benefits from Colonials' wins."
The moment in the spotlight made GW a national Cinderella story – 1993 version of Florida Gulf Coast University , which busted brackets last year and generated name recognition for the small school. To capitalize on its moment, GW invited television and radio stations to broadcast from Marvin Center watch parties.
“We made as much of a fuss as we could,” former University President Stephen Joel Trachtenberg said in an interview.
Universities across the country have burst onto the national scene – improving selectivity, fundraising and branding – by seizing newfound athletic success. The phenomenon even has a name: the Flutie Effect , after the buzz Boston College generated after quarterback Doug Flutie’s Hail Mary against University of Miami in 1984.
Doug Chung, a Harvard business professor, published a study last year that showed applications increasing by 18 percent at schools with sudden college football success. To reach the same number, a school would have to lower tuition by nearly 4 percent.
The research backs up the strategy put forth by Trachtenberg and Chernak two decades ago, who early in their tenures made athletics a priority for the first time in years.
“It was pretty clear that they were going to put an emphasis on sports. It was clear this was one of their strategies to get name recognition. A Sweet 16 clearly did that,” said Chris Deering, a political science professor who was an administrator under Trachtenberg in 1993.
Now, GW’s name is mostly solidified among the ranks of selective colleges. But the on-court success that started in 1993, which Chernak said created “inertia” for the University as a whole, was part of an early wave of change at GW. Then, the University enrolled only about 1,300 freshmen – about half the size of its current class.
More applications and selectivity meant a rising academic prowess, punctuated by GW's first appearance in the U.S. News & World Report top 50 rankings in 1997. Higher enrollment meant more tuition dollars to spend on faculty hires and required the aquisition of the Mount Vernon Campus that year.
Michael Freedman, who led Trachtenberg’s public affairs operation, said GW then doubled down on the renown of its location, finally penning the phrase “four blocks from the White House” on every press release. After the 1992 election, GW also housed the temporary media hub for a Clinton administration waiting to move to the White House, putting a stronger spotlight on Foggy Bottom.
“You could begin to tangibly see the differences being made at the institution. After we had things like the NCAA run, Trachtenberg once said to me, ‘Now it’s time to transform this series of flashing lights into a steady glow,’” Freedman said.
The wins also made for a happier campus and alumni base, Chernak said, allowing the University “more margin of error for things to go wrong.”
“You’re proud to wear a shirt that wears George Washington,” he said. “It’s fleeting, you’re not necessarily going to win a game or you might win a couple games, but you got a whole week to celebrate before you get on the court.””

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14
Tufts University  
8.6
A- 8.5
15
Marist College  
8.5
A- 8.5
16
University of Chicago  
8.6
A- 8.5
17
Cornell University  
8.5
A- 8.4
18
Rice University  
8.5
A- 8.4
19
Washington University in St Louis  
8.5
A- 8.4
20
Wake Forest University  
8.5
A- 8.4
21
Massachusetts Institute of Technology  
8.5
A- 8.4
22
Johns Hopkins University  
8.4
A- 8.4
23
University of Virginia   
8.5
A- 8.4
24
Duke University  
8.5
A- 8.4
25
Villanova University  
8.4
A- 8.4
26
Texas A & M University College Station  
8.4
A- 8.3
27
Bucknell University  
8.4
A- 8.3
28
Mount Holyoke College  
8.4
A- 8.3
29
Saint Joseph's University  
8.4
A- 8.3
30
University of Rochester  
8.4
A- 8.3
31
Northwestern University  
8.3
A- 8.2
32
University of Missouri Columbia  
8.3
A- 8.2
33
Purdue University   
8.3
A- 8.2
34
University of California Santa Barbara  
8.3
A- 8.2
35
Michigan State University  
8.2
A- 8.2
36
American University  
8.3
A- 8.2
37
College of William and Mary  
8.2
A- 8.2
38
University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Campus  
8.2
A- 8.1
39
Indiana University Bloomington  
8.1
A- 8.1
40
The University of Alabama  
8.2
A- 8.1
41
Syracuse University  
8.1
A- 8.1
42
University of Oregon  
8.2
A- 8.1
43
James Madison University  
8.1
A- 8.1
44
University of California Berkeley  
8.1
A- 8.1
45
Christopher Newport University  
8.1
B+ 8.0
46
Lehigh University  
8.1
B+ 8.0
47
Brandeis University  
8.1
B+ 8.0
48
Clemson University  
8.1
B+ 8.0
49
University of Wisconsin Madison  
8.0
B+ 8.0
50
Tulane University of Louisiana  
8.0
B+ 8.0

 

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