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Malformed University Name, Uncategorized Surveys

Admissions
Malformed Campus News
Importance
1
Federal immigration actions pose questions for colleges about undocumented students
by Education: DC Area Education News, Education Policy, School Information - The Washington Post

Nov 20, 2014
“New federal measures to halt deportation of many illegal immigrants will spotlight a question of growing urgency for colleges: How should they handle applications from undocumented students for admissions and financial aid? Read full article >>”
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Importance
1
Some Colleges May Use the FAFSA in Unexpected Ways
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News

Nov 18, 2014
“College applicants can demonstrate their desire to attend a school by visiting campus, interviewing with admissions counselors and following up on their applications.”
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Importance
1
Lawsuits allege unlawful racial bias in admissions at Harvard, UNC-Chapel Hill
by Education: DC Area Education News, Education Policy, School Information - The Washington Post

Nov 18, 2014
“A prominent opponent of racial preferences in college admissions announced Monday two lawsuits alleging unlawful bias in admission policies at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Read full article >>”
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Importance
1
Connecticut school lifts ban on girl barred over Ebola fears
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News

Oct 31, 2014
“(Reuters) - A 7-year-old girl banned from attending school in Connecticut over fears that she may be carrying the Ebola virus after a trip to Nigeria will be allowed back on Friday, according to a joint statement by the school district and the girl's father. A widely publicized lawsuit brought by the father, Stephen Opayemi, against Milford Public Schools demanding her readmission will be settled, according to the statement, without giving further details. "The student has had no contact with any Ebola patients and she does not have Ebola," the statement said. ...”
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Importance
1
Cheating concerns force delay in SAT scores for South Koreans and Chinese
by Education: DC Area Education News, Education Policy, School Information - The Washington Post

Oct 31, 2014
“Concerns about possible cheating on the SAT in Asia have led test overseers to withhold scores for students from China and South Korea who took the college admission exam nearly three weeks ago.
The nature and extent of the alleged security breach were unclear Thursday because the College Board and its contractor, the Educational Testing Service, revealed few details about the unfolding investigation. But the score-reporting delay could affect thousands of students seeking admission to U.S. colleges as November deadlines loom for early applications. Read full article >>”

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Importance
4
Strauss: An intriguing way to remake the college admissions process
by Education: DC Area Education News, Education Policy, School Information - The Washington Post

Oct 27, 2014
“Every year high school seniors across the country apply to college in what can only be described for most as a nerve-wracking and even soul-draining experience. They — and their parents — rail about the time-consuming and complicated process, but year after year the process survives.  What, though, if it were changed in a really big way? In this post, Dennis Eller, college counselor at the private Canterbury School in Fort Wayne, Indiana, imagines how a new college admissions process could work. He has been the Canterbury college counselor since 1988 and has led sessions on this topic and others at both state and national conferences of high school and college admission counselors. His college counseling program at Canterbury School was recently featured in the Fort Wayne Journal Gazette for its innovation and comprehension. Read full article >>”
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Importance
1
Average Prince George’s SAT score declines
by Education: DC Area Education News, Education Policy, School Information - The Washington Post

Oct 23, 2014
“The average SAT score for the Class of 2014 in Prince George’s County was 1197, down 10 points from the year before, according to figures released by county school system officials.
This year’s students in Prince George’s County also fared worse on the SAT test than students nationally, who scored an average of 1497 on the college admission test that has a perfect score of 2400 for critical reading, math and writing. Read full article >>”

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Importance
1
Struggling education school to offer new degree in research methods
by The GW Hatchet

Nov 10, 2014
“Media Credit: Anna McGarrigle | Senior Designer
GW’s education school could offer its first master’s degree in research methods as soon as this summer, as the struggling graduate school looks to draw in more applicants.
The degree would better prepare students in the Graduate School of Education and Human Development to analyze standardized and other types of testing that are completed in schools across the country, professors said. It could also be a way for the school, which has seen its enrollment drop 22 percent in the last five years, to attract new students to Foggy Bottom.
Students will take courses that will prepare them to assess the measurements and testing that schools use to gauge how their students are doing, said Joel Gomez, chair of the educational leadership department at GSEHD.
“I think it fills a gap,” Gomez said. “We’re a graduate school of education and we know we’re right in the middle of policymakers and researchers in D.C., and I think it helps us with our desire to pay more attention to the school’s research interests and policy interests.”
Students would be able to complete the 30-credit program in about a year, taking some courses in Foggy Bottom and others online. Many of the courses that students will take already exist within the school, but a few will be created from scratch.
“The hours are arranged so that the students can take the course in the summer through the fall and spring, and finish in the summer,” Gomez said. “This means students will have to be away from home and work less often.”
Gomez said before deciding if any new faculty members would have to be hired, the school would have to begin marketing the degree and determine the size of its inaugural class.
“It depends on whether we get 10 new people or 100 new students coming in,” Gomez said. “Right now, we’re testing the market in terms of demand.”
The degree is the first new program the school has announced since unveiling its strategic plan, Vision 2020 , last spring. Dean Michael Feuer has said he hopes to also launch a doctoral program in education research in the next year.
GW’s 10 colleges have been under pressure to roll out new online and hybrid programs, which combine face-to-face and online courses, to rebound from a 2 percent decrease in graduate enrollment last year.
That decline stripped $10 million from the University’s budget, which forced it to tighten spending across departments this year. Online programs have been highlighted as a way for the University to target a new group of potential students and bring in more revenue.
Professors in the education school have spent about two years developing the research methods curriculum, and will also offer an 18-credit certificate in assessment, testing and measurement.
Jaewha Choi, the GSEHD professor who led the creation of the program, said it could catch the eye of some students because it’s compressed from a two-year format to just one year.
“International students, who ideally will only spend one year here, they can finish the master's program,” he said.”

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Importance
1
Fan Guide: GW basketball 101
by The GW Hatchet

Nov 03, 2014
“Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo by Cameron Lancaster | Assistant News Editor
Haven't been a fan of GW basketball? Here is everything you need to know about Foggy Bottom hoops.
Two guys walk into McFadden's.
The first one starts up a conversation about the men's basketball team's first game of the season, which will be Nov. 14 against Grambling State in the Smith Center.
"We'll beat them easy. They went 5-24 last season. GW went 24-9, and A-10 coaches think we'll finish second in the conference this year," he says.
The second guy stops and says, “Wow, you must really know your stuff.” He’s impressed, and buys the first guy a beer.
So there you have it, knowing some facts about GW basketball means you get free beer.
Jokes aside, with hoops fever spreading across campus, students may want to know what all the fuss is about. Think of this as a cheat sheet for what you missed last season, who’s who on the team and what to expect this year. Use it if you want to carry on a conversation about GW basketball at the bar or anywhere else.
The players
Men’s team
The “Core Four”
The junior quartet of Patricio Garino, Kethan Savage, Joe McDonald and Kevin Larsen.
1. Kevin Larsen: The Muscle
Coming off a sophomore season in which he was voted the most improved player in the conference, Larsen will be the one to watch around the basket skying for rebounds or throwing down a two-handed dunk.
2. Joe McDonald: The Facilitator
The third-year point guard is returning healthy after undergoing left-hip surgery. Look for McDonald to drive to the basket from beyond the three-point line or find the open player on the court for an open shot.
3. Patricio Garino: The Slasher
The Mar del Plata, Argentina native is the team's strongest defensive presence and has the ability to get to the free throw line. The guard-forward totaled 41 steals and averaged 12.1 points per game last season.
4. Kethan Savage: The Comeback Kid
Savage returns to the Colonials' lineup after a broken foot kept him off the court for the last two months of the season. Savage is predicted to be one of the top scorers in the nation.
Plus: He’s big in Japan
Freshman Yuta Watanabe should attract international attention to the men’s basketball team. Watanabe is a 6-foot-8 forward from Kagawa, Japan. He’s the first Japanese-born player to earn a Division I men’s basketball scholarship and is just the third to place in Division I college basketball. The Japan Times has named Watanabe his hometown’s “chosen one.”
Women’s team
Jonquel Jones
A 6-foot-4 forward from Freeport, Bahamas, Jones transferred to GW after playing one season at Clemson. She will be able to play a full season with the Colonials after transfer rules forced her to sit out the first 11 games of the season. Look for Jones to score all over the floor, from the three-point line to right next to the rim.
Caira Washington
A native of Brandywine, Md., Washington solidified herself as the team’s inside threat and finished the season with 314 rebounds and 381 total points. Washington was last season’s conference Rookie of the Year and was selected to the All-Conference Second Team.
(The coaches within the Atlantic 10 determine the All-Conference teams. The top five players who are considered the best in the league will be named to the first team, the next best five players to the second team and the following five players on the third team.)
Lauren Chase
The 5-foot-5 guard will make her first appearance after a medical condition kept her off the floor last season. Chase, who transferred to GW in 2013 from UMBC, is a strong passer who also has the ability to score.
Key chatting questions
Men’s team
What happened last year?
The Colonials won their most games in a season since 2005-06, posting an overall record of 24-9. GW took its first trip to the NCAA tournament since 2007-08, earning a No. 9 seed. The Colonials fell to Memphis in the second round of the NCAA tournament, also known as the Big Dance. The 64-team tournament is divided into four regions, with each containing seeds from No. 1 to No. 16. The men's team's No. 9 seeding last season was considered middle of the pack but solid.
Can the team live up to the hype?
After they were selected to finish 10th in the conference in last season’s preseason poll, the Colonials were picked to finish second in 2014-15. Coaches in the league believe GW has the right pieces to make a run at the A-10 championship.
Will the free-throw shooting woes subside?
Last season, the Colonials were the second-worst free throw shooting team in the conference, making just 65.2 percent of their foul shots. GW will be without its first- and fourth-best free throw shooters from last season in Maurice Creek and Isaiah Armwood, which means remaining players will need to improve.
Is the frontcourt strong enough in the absence of Armwood?
With the departure of Armwood, the team’s top rebounder and perennial shot blocker, GW will need multiple players to step up in his absence, especially Larsen and senior forward John Kopriva.
Women’s team
What happened last year?
The women won more than 20 games and earned their first post-season victory for the first time since 2007-08. The team was eliminated in the third round of the WNIT, falling to the University of South Florida 74-59. Four players earned conference honors.
How are the new players?
Joining the Colonials roster this season are five newcomers, who together make up arguably the best recruiting class in the A-10. Head coach Jonathan Tsipis’ second GW recruiting class includes guards Brianna Cummings, Camila Tapias and Mia Farmer, as well as forwards Kelli Prange and Jada Matthews.
Can the Colonials top the conference?
The Colonials rose three spots and were selected to finish second behind front-runner Dayton. Senior Chakecia Miller, Jones and Washington were each selected to the preseason All-Defensive team. Jones was also selected to the All-Conference first team, while Washington was chosen for the All-Conference second team.
Mark your calendars
Men’s team
GW vs. UVA
Nov. 21
GW will play on the road at the University of Virginia. Sure, it’s not a home game, but the non-conference matchup was a big get for the Colonials in terms of strength of schedule. Students can watch the game on ESPN3 – it's one of at least 14 nationwide broadcasts of the team, so set up on your couch with your roommates and watch GW try to hang with last year’s ACC champs.
BB&T Classic
Dec. 7
After defeating the University of Maryland last season thanks to late-game heroics from Creek, GW will return to the Verizon Center to take on former A-10 member Charlotte. Also featured in the Classic will be a matchup between Georgetown and Towson.
Diamond Head Classic
Dec. 22 to 25
The men’s basketball team will spend the holidays in Honolulu, Hawaii for the fifth annual Diamond Head Classic, a three-day invitational that features eight collegiate teams. The Colonials will open the tournament against Ohio University and then will play either Colorado or DePaul in the second round. Their final game could come against Nebraska, Loyola Marymount, Hawaii or Wichita State.
Women’s team
GW vs. UMD
Nov. 22
GW will host Maryland looking to rewrite (recent) history. Though GW had upset its last opponent fresh off a final-four run when it beat then-No. 10 California last November, the Colonials were toppled by the Terps just days later. Maryland was recently selected as preseason No. 1.
Junkanoo Jam
Nov. 28 to 29
Jonquel Jones is going home. The junior big for women’s basketball said she is excited to show the team the food and beaches that she knew growing up. GW will play in the Junkanoo Jam Tournament in Freeport, Bahamas over Thanksgiving break along with North Carolina State, Purdue and Texas Tech.
Tips for the casual fan
Admission
All games are free to undergraduate students.
Get to the game early
Last season, as the men’s basketball team started to generate some buzz on campus, students flocked to the Smith Center and eventually filled the entire arena to capacity. To avoid being turned away or having to watch the game from the Colonials Club, get a seat early.
Free food
During most weekend contests, the athletic department puts on a pre-game tailgate for fans to grab barbecue staples like hamburgers and hotdogs.
Beer (kind of)
Beer will now be served at the Smith Center in the Champions Club, men’s basketball head coach Mike Lonergan announced at the team’s annual Buff and Blue scrimmage last week. Fans can purchase beer 90 minutes before the game, but must drink it before returning to their seats. The Champions Club will also serve as a concession stand during the game.”

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Importance
1
How should GW fill the Science and Engineering Hall? Faculty create wish lists for labs
by The GW Hatchet

Oct 31, 2014
“Media Credit: Kiana Robertson | Hatchet Photographer
Graduate student Jarod Fincher works in a lab in Corcoran Hall. Researchers have created wish lists of equipment they hope to have donated to their lab spaces.
If Lawrence Bennett had an AC susceptometer in his lab, he said he’d be able to study the applications of magnetic properties like submarine mine detection, and even test experimental cancer treatments.
Bennett, a research professor of electrical engineering, said the $400,000 machine could help him and other researchers study magnetic storage or waste water treatment. To secure the six-figure machine, Bennett has placed it on a growing list of materials faculty hope to have donated to fill the Science and Engineering Hall.
The machines that make it onto researchers' growing wish lists will have some of the greatest impacts on what happens inside GW's $275 million Science and Engineering Hall. Fundraisers will pitch that lab equipment to donors, and whatever is funded will end up steering research focuses.
“The research we do is very dependent on the results we get from that,” he said. “We don’t do the research as well as we should because we don’t have the machine.”
Professors are preparing to move into the Science and Engineering Hall this winter. Wish lists give fundraisers specific items to point to and show potential donors how certain tools would move forward faculty work.
Can Korman, associate dean of research and graduate studies in the School of Engineering and Applied Science, said he has worked with faculty to create and update lists of resources that would improve their research abilities.
Korman said he tries to show potential donors how certain materials will advance the school’s research overall.
“I explain the science and the academic aspects of what is possible and what type of research will be conducted. I also explain how the SEH will function and the key role the core facilities will play in this multi-department and multi-school enterprise,” he said.
As part of GW’s $1 billion fundraising campaign, the University is aiming to bring in a combined $100 million to pay for the hall's construction costs, the machines that will fill its labs and the professorships to be housed in the building.
Biology professor Robert Donaldson said his colleagues in chemistry and his own department are hoping to bring in a confocal microscopy machine, which would let them see inside living cells.
“I think that lots of professors are trying to identify equipment that would have a broad impact,” Donaldson said.
The quality and number of machines that fundraisers will be able to secure will also impact how likely professors are to secure grants to conduct cutting-edge research.
Donaldson pointed to institutions like the National Institutes of Health, which require researchers to demonstrate that their facilities are equipped to handle sensitive research before they sign a check.
“To get funding from institutes like the NIH, they need to see that the institution has the necessary scientific instrumentation to do the studies that are being proposed in the best way," he said. "We need to be competitive with other people at other universities.”
Provost Steven Lerman said professors in the different departments have worked together to plan which materials to prioritize among all the departments that will be in the building.
“Obviously the amount of equipment you wish you had is vastly greater than the amount you can afford,” he said. “But we’ve already ordered some of the equipment, we’ve gotten some donations, and we’re looking for others.”
Professors can also form partnerships with manufacturers that might donate or give discounted rates on equipment, like professors in the forensic science department have done, he added.
Forensic science faculty members are looking to bring in donations to support research equipment that the building can support, including an imaging core and a nanofabrication core.
Researchers have already brought in electron microscopes and some nanotechnology, Lerman said.
William Briscoe, the chair of the physics department, said professors across departments are looking for oscilloscopes, vacuum pumps, signal generators and other high-quality power supplies.
When the University renovates lab space in Corcoran and Bell halls after departments move into the Science and Engineering Hall, Briscoe said researchers will also want new equipment for those spaces. He said science faculty in the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences are starting to make lists for how they plan to outfit those areas.
“Having a list can help the fundraiser look for specific items instead of generalizations. Most fundraisers would have no idea of our specialized needs,” he said.
Faculty are partnering with researchers on the Virginia Science and Technology Campus to see how they can best spread out research tools. Lerman said he could see science and engineering professors looking to focus on an area for genomics research in the new building as well.
Keith Crandall, director of the Computational Biology Institute, said wish lists help the development office have go-to options to pitch to donors that will most benefit researchers.
He said he hopes to bring in DNA sequencing equipment, which several departments would be able to use.
“Having these wish lists allows donors to target donations across a diversity of interests and to make sure that those targets are things that will actually help faculty be more productive at the University,” he said.”

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