StudentsReview ™ :: Malformed University Name, Uncategorized Surveys
  
-or-
Search for Schools by Region
 

or within distance of city


  Students, Review Malformed!

Undergraduate, Graduate, Medical School, Distance Education, Distance Education, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, Distance Education, Law school, Distance Education, Distance Education, Distance Education, Distance Education, Medical School, Distance Education, Law school, Distance Education, Distance Education, Law school, Distance Education, Distance Education, Law school, Law school, Distance Education, Medical School, Distance Education, Medical School, Medical School, Medical School, Distance Education, Distance Education, Distance Education, Distance Education, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, Law school, Medical School, Law school, Medical School, Medical School, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, Medical School, Law school, Law school, Distance Education, Law school, Law school, Distance Education, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Medical School, Medical School, Distance Education, Law school, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Law school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Medical School, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, Medical School, Medical School, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Distance Education, Distance Education, Medical School, MBA/Business school, Law school, Medical School, Law school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, Law school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Medical School, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Law school, Law school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Law school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Law school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, Law school, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Law school, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Medical School, Law school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Medical School, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Distance Education, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Medical School, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Medical School, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Medical School, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, MBA/Business school, Distance Education, Medical School, Medical School, Medical School, MBA/Business school, Medical School, Medical School, Alumni, Upload a campus photo, Add a campus video

Rate your professor, Casual Comment


  Who's got da Best?

Perceptual Rankings:
You Make 'Em.
We Post 'Em.
You Vote 'Em Up.
You Vote 'Em Down.
Aww yeah.


Undergraduate Graduate Medical School Distance Education Distance Education Distance Education MBA/Business school Distance Education Distance Education Law school Distance Education Distance Education Distance Education Distance Education Medical School Distance Education Law school Distance Education Distance Education Law school Distance Education Distance Education Law school Law school Distance Education Medical School Distance Education Medical School Medical School Medical School Distance Education Distance Education Distance Education Distance Education Distance Education MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Distance Education MBA/Business school Law school Medical School Law school Medical School Medical School MBA/Business school Medical School Distance Education MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Distance Education Medical School Law school Law school Distance Education Law school Law school Distance Education Distance Education MBA/Business school Distance Education Distance Education MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school Medical School Medical School Medical School Distance Education Law school Distance Education MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School Distance Education MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Law school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School Medical School Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Distance Education Medical School Medical School MBA/Business school Distance Education MBA/Business school Medical School Distance Education Distance Education Medical School MBA/Business school Law school Medical School Law school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Distance Education Law school Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school Distance Education MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School Medical School Distance Education MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Distance Education MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Law school Law school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Distance Education MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Distance Education MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Law school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Law school MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school Law school Distance Education MBA/Business school Medical School Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Law school Distance Education MBA/Business school Distance Education MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School Medical School Law school Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school Medical School Medical School Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School Distance Education Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school Medical School Medical School MBA/Business school Medical School Medical School Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Medical School MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school MBA/Business school Distance Education Medical School Medical School Medical School MBA/Business school Medical School Medical School Alumni Upload a campus photo Add a campus video Rate your professor Casual Comment

Malformed University Name, Uncategorized Surveys

Financial Aid
Malformed Campus News
Importance
1
Republican Rubio offers bill on new education financing vehicles
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News

Apr 09, 2014
“By Caren Bohan and Julia Edwards WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. Republican Senator Marco Rubio, a possible 2016 White House contender, unveiled legislation on Wednesday to broaden the use of financial vehicles known as "income share agreements" that students can use to fund their higher education costs. Under the agreements, which are marketed as an alternative to traditional student loans, private investors or organizations provide students with financing for their education costs in exchange for a percentage of their future earnings. "The same way that private investors invest in a business idea, they could invest in a person who basically says: ‘This is who I am. This is what my career goals are.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Lawmakers press Obama administration on Sallie Mae contract renewal
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News

Mar 27, 2014
“By Elvina Nawaguna WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. lawmakers on Thursday grilled an Obama administration official on the government's decision to renew a contract with student loan servicing company SLM Corp, the subject of numerous government investigations. "Sallie Mae has repeatedly broken the rules and violated its contracts with the government, and yet Sallie Mae continues to make millions on its federal contracts with the Department of Education," Warren said of SLM, popularly known as Sallie Mae. A spokeswoman for Sallie Mae, Patricia Christel, commented in an email to Reuters: "Americans with federal loans serviced by Sallie Mae are 30 percent less likely to default than others. Sallie Mae, the largest U.S. student loan provider, serviced 5.7 million student loan accounts on behalf of the U.S. Department of Education as of December 2013, according to a company spokeswoman.”
respond
 
Importance
1
GWU to receive $80 million for public health; donors are Milken and Redstone
by Education: DC Area Education News, Education Policy, School Information - The Washington Post

Mar 11, 2014
“George Washington University will receive $80 million to support public health scholarship through three gifts connected to philanthropists Michael Milken and Sumner M. Redstone, setting a donation record for the private university. Read full article >>        ”
respond
 
Importance
1
After fleeing Iraq, senior reflects on opportunities at GW
by The GW Hatchet

Apr 15, 2014
“When militants began targeting Marwan Sulaiman’s family in 2007, it became unsafe for the Baghdad-native to go to school.
Then a family in New Canaan, Conn. read about his family's situation in a New York Times story and offered him the chance to move thousands of miles away form his war-torn country and receive a top-quality education.
He moved in with the family and attended private school in U.S. Three years later he was accepted to GW in its early decision round, setting off a weeks-long wait to see if he would win financial aid.
With no word from GW, Sulaiman thought he would have to put college on hold until he found out that he had been given a full-ride scholarship created to support political refugees pursuing higher education.
“It was everything I dreamt of because it allowed me to be just another student,” Sulaiman said. “I didn’t want to struggle. I just wanted to focus on classes and social life and the GW experience.”
That scholarship was donated in honor of Dirk Brady, who went to GW after escaping Nazi Germany in 1936. Working his way through school, it took him seven years to earn a degree. Years later, his nephew donated funds to help other students who are facing adverse circumstances.
The scholarship is one of many funds supported by GW donors as part of the University’s Power and Promise scholarship fund.
GW added 14 endowed scholarships and fellowships this year, including gifts to the GW Law School and the Milken Institute School of Public Health.
“I didn’t want to struggle. I just wanted to focus on classes and social life and the GW experience.”
The Power and Promise scholarships fund, which has raised $100 million over the last five years, grew about 13 percent last year.
The University raised $15.6 million for the fund this past fiscal year, which was about 15 percent of its total fundraising haul.
Now, Sulaiman, an international affairs major, said he sometimes feels more American than Iraqi. Since he moved to the U.S. seven years ago, he has only returned home once to visit his family, who still live in constant fear.
Media Credit: Elise Apelian | Senior Staf Photographer
Senior Marwan Sulaiman escaped a war-torn Iraq in 2007 with the help of a family from New Canaan, Conn. He will graduate this May from the Elliott School of International Affairs after receiving a scholarship for students who faced political turmoil in their home countries.
His mother commutes to work at the World Bank office in Baghdad, located in one of the most dangerous areas of the city. His father, an engineer, was once nearly hit by bullets from a militant who opened fire on a crowd with a machine gun. His father narrowly escaped, jumping into a construction hole while dozens of people around him died.
“That’s how we live. It’s just basic everyday things. When I talk about it, people get uncomfortable but then I realize it’s not normal,” Sulaiman said.
When he graduates in May, Sulaiman will continue working at a nonprofit news station called Middle East Broadcasting Networks, where he has worked full-time as a production assistant since his sophomore year.
Sulaiman, a member of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity, said his friends from Iraq would probably be shocked by his transformation in the U.S., including his openness to discussing political topics like gay marriage.
“It’s not even a subject. They’re not even there yet. They can’t even discuss it,” he said.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Administrators, faculty to star in 'Real Housewives'-themed reality show
by The GW Hatchet

Apr 02, 2014
“Media Credit: Camera Lenscapster | A Fine Pilsner
Reader's note: This story is satirical in nature and published in a spoof issue.
When Bravo producers visited the Foggy Bottom Campus last fall, they knew they had struck gold.
The network will soon make GW the first college in the country with its own reality show, using the campus’ penchant for petty infighting and wild accusations to bring “The Real Administrators of Foggy Bottom” to primetime cable.
“Usually with reality television, we have to fake some drama. With GW, it’s already there!” producer Biz Snarkey said. “Admissions officials lie to teenagers. They lie about documents. There's alleged bullying AND gay threesomes."
“Jesus Christ, we’re going to make a fortune off these ratings!” he added.
The producer said the mega-network’s interest was piqued once GW’s fourth dean was pushed out of a job in as many years.
Once a plot twist unfolded and one ex-dean accused a professor of secretly reporting false financial embezzlement and sex with colleagues, the television officials said they knew they had to ink the deal.
“That’s absolutely fucked up,” he said. “We think the nation is going to fall in love with GW administrators and faculty. And I mean fall in love like the way America falls in love with (but also really hates) everyone on ‘The Bachelor.’”
Nelly Johnson, a gay male sophomore, said he expected the show to become his new “guilty pleasure.”
“It’s amazing because it’s not something you’d expect from a top-rate university,” Johnson said. “But I think me and my friends are totally going to identify with GW administrators now. I’ll be the sassy one who doesn’t take shit, Joey will be the one who’s always trying to start a fight.”
The University’s student life office is planning an elaborate watch party in the Smith Center for the show’s pilot – complete with cardboard cutouts of GW administrators and faculty, as well as free t-shirts with the show’s tagline, “Something Bizarre and Immature Happens Here.”
According to pilot clips obtained by The Butter Knife, the show will start with scenes from the secretive Board of Trustees retreat in which University President Stephen Klapp drops his champagne glass and flips over a table when confronted by dean Smug Runfree. “He shouldn’t be able to sit with us,” Klapp said in the clip.
Producers are also in talks with GW officials to plan a full suite of reality shows. Sources say administrators have pitched a show in which students who pay full tuition go on blind dates with financially needy students whose scholarships they’re helping pay for.
GW officials would not disclose potential earnings from the historic deal, but Klapp pledged that the revenue would be invested back in students.
“We will continue to use our educational, nonprofit status as a shield when we want to do stuff that makes us a lot of money,” Klapp said. “Don’t ask questions about it, just smile and nod.””

respond
 
Importance
1
GW lands largest-ever gifts, renames public health school
by The GW Hatchet

Mar 11, 2014
“Media Credit: GW Media Relations.
Public health school dean Lynn Goldman speaks with philanthropist and financier Mike Milken at an alumni event in New York, N.Y. last October.
Updated: March 11 at 12:57 a.m.
The public health school will receive $80 million to boost research and scholarships over the next five years, a burst of funding that includes the University's two largest-ever gifts.
The three-part donation, which will help prevent chronic diseases such as obesity, comes from billionaire philanthropists Michael Milken and Sumner Redstone. The gift far surpasses GW's previous record of $25 million for its Textile Museum in 2011 .
The Milken Institute, an economic think tank in Santa Monica, Calif., will supply half the funds, totaling $40 million. It is also now the namesake of the public health school, which has been renamed the Milken Institute School of Public Health.
The foundation run by Redstone, whose family owns Viacom, donated $30 million to create a global center for health and wellness on campus. Another $10 million comes from Milken Family Foundation to endow the dean's position and several scholarship funds.
“These new resources will greatly enhance our university’s capacity to address global health challenges with life-altering solutions," University President Steven Knapp said in a release.
Knapp, along with public health school dean Lynn Goldman, are currently in California to receive the gifts, which are years in the making. Goldman, who arrived from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, was hired by GW in 2010. She has recently overseen the construction of the school's $75 million building on 24th Street, which will open this month.
Media Credit: GW Media Relations.
Sumner Redstone, who serves as board chairman of both CBS Corporation and Viacom, is 90 years old and a survivor of prostate cancer.
The announcement also buoys the University's fundraising effort, which has long lagged behind its competitor schools. Until now, GW had counted just 10 gifts that top $10 million though it relies heavily on fundraising to cover the cost of programs and buildings while avoiding tuition hikes.
Milken and Redstone also partnered for a $105 million gift for burn recovery and cancer research for a trio of organizations in 2007. They are both survivors of prostate cancer and Redstone was once told he had only three months to live.
Redstone earned an honorary degree from GW in 2006 and is the grandfather of an alumnus, according to a report by the Washington Post .
“I am proud to join the Milken Institute and Milken Family Foundation in supporting this great institution’s efforts to help fight some of the biggest health issues of our time, and give millions access to healthier and longer lives,” Redstone, who is 90 years old, said in a release.
The University's fundraising chief had hinted at upcoming big gifts earlier this year. Fundraising figures declined by about 14 percent last year, which was grim news for an office that is preparing to launch a campaign that's expected to ask for $1 billion over a decade.
Vice President for Development and Alumni Relations Mike Morsberger said in January that he was “pretty confident” that the expected gifts would make 2014 a record-breaking fundraising year overall, beating out the $120 million raised in 2012, which included the Textile Museum gift.
This post was updated March 11 at 9:36 a.m. to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly spelled the name of Sumner Redstone. We regret this error.
)”

respond
 
Importance
1
Kiplinger’s names Clark U. a top ten best value in New England colleges
by Clark News Hub » News Releases

Mar 11, 2014
“Kiplinger’s Personal Finance has named Clark University one of the top ten best values in New England private colleges, in a ranking of 35 colleges and universities published in the magazine’s March issue. Clark is ranked at number 10 on the list. In December, Clark appeared at number 35 on Kiplinger’s annual ranking of the country’s top 100 private universities. Kiplinger’s full college rankings are available online now .
Other colleges in the top ten of on the Best College Values in New England list include Yale University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston College and Worcester Polytechnic Institute.
Clark University and the other schools included in the 2014 lists represent the colleges that provide high-quality academics at a reasonable cost during these continued tough economic times. The colleges exemplify the attributes parents and students look for in higher education, including small class sizes, a good freshman retention rate and a high four-year graduation rate. Many schools, including Clark, have appeared on the list multiple times.
Donald Honeman, Clark University Dean of  Admissions  and Financial Aid, cites Clark’s generous financial aid and scholarship options, tuition-free  fifth year Master’s Program for strong undergraduate students, affordable room and board program, and an educational program framed by the University’s LEEP (Liberal Education & Effective Practice) curriculum as examples of its value.
Kiplinger’s rankings measure academic quality and affordability. Academic criteria include the student admission rate (the number of students accepted out of those who apply), the test scores of incoming freshmen, the ratio of students to faculty members, and the four- and five-year graduation rates. On the cost side, Kiplinger’s measures the sticker price, the availability and average amount of need-based and merit-based financial aid, and the average student debt at graduation. Many of the schools on the top 200 list have appeared in Kiplinger’s rankings in previous years, demonstrating that these schools consistently deliver good value.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Colleges experience record-high applications
by The Miscellany News | Since 1866

Apr 17, 2014
“Brian Farkas News Editor
This April, high school seniors around the country will conclude their thorny struggle with the college admissions process. 2008 and 2009 will mark the demographic peak of applications to colleges and universities, meaning that Vassar and many of its peer institutions have received record numbers of applications and, in turn, rejected a record numbers of students.
“We received a record number of applications this year, with nearly 1,000 more than a year ago for a 15 percent increase,” said Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid David Borus. Vassar admitted just 1,758 of the 7,361 applicants, an admission rate of 23.9 percent, down from 28.6 percent last year. This year’s admission rate is the lowest in the College’s history.
According to Borus, admitted students have increasingly excellent credentials. “Average GPAs of those who were admitted remain very high, between an A and an A-minus,” said Borus.
Their average critical reading and math SAT scores rose about seven points as well, and approximately 80 percent of those with class ranks were in the top 10 percent of their high school classes. Admitted students come from 49 states, Washington, D.C., Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and 48 foreign countries.
The Office of Admissions is looking to admit about 640 students this year.
“We are aiming for a slightly smaller class this year, both because of last year’s high yield, which resulted in the Class of 2011 being about 20 students larger than expected, and because of Davison House being out of service next year for renovations,” explained Borus.
Vassar is far from alone in its rising numbers of applications and declining numbers of accepted students. Middlebury College received 7,823 applications and admitted only 1,400 students—18 percent, which is down from 23 percent last year. Harvard University broke all records by far, accepting just 7.1 percent of applicants, while Yale University accepted 8.3 percent, and Williams College accepted 16.3.
Many analysts have suggested that Harvard and Princeton’s elimination of their early decision programs could also have affected the unprecedented number of applicants at smaller liberal arts colleges, as well as the number of students who will accept their offers of admission.
Demographic trend lines project that next year will see a peak in 18-year-old high school seniors in the United States. About 2.9 million students will graduate from high school, a number that has steadily climbed over the past 15 years.
The demographic changes also include large geographic and socio-economic variations. Many anticipate a decline in affluent high school graduates, and an increase in lower- and middle-class students. Colleges and universities, in response, have increased financial aid spending.
Notably, Harvard and Yale have announced significant increases for financial aid to families with incomes up to $180,000 and $200,000, respectively.
Last May, Vassar announced a return to need-blind admissions, and in year, the College will eliminate loans for students with family incomes under $60,000.
Those students who have been admitted to the Class of 2012 must reply to the Office of Admissions by May 1 to accept or decline their spot.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Former Bears take NHL ice
by Brown Daily Herald

Apr 18, 2014
“Three men’s hockey alums, Ryan Garbutt ’09, Aaron Volpatti ’10 and Harry Zolnierczyk ’11, have broken into the highest level of hockey thanks to a combination of hard work, natural talent and guidance from their Brunonian coaches. This year, defenseman Dennis Robertson ’14 will attempt to follow in their footsteps.
Though Brown hockey hasn’t claimed a winning season in nearly a decade, its best and brightest have drawn on their strengths and attitudes to carve out careers playing hockey against the world’s premier competition.
Whether the players reached the NHL through alternate pro leagues or entered directly, all four have drawn on similar qualities to achieve success.
 
Garbutt
Garbutt, a native of Winnipeg, Manitoba, was a relatively sought-after recruit in 2005, choosing Brown over other notable programs at the University of Alaska at Anchorage, Rensselaer, Princeton and St. Lawrence.
“I really enjoyed the city of Providence and the campus of Brown, and all the players on the team seemed like great guys,” Garbutt said. “I was really impressed with the quality of people in the Brown hockey program.”
Garbutt was never a prolific scorer during his time with the Bears, posting a career-high 23 points in his junior year and scoring just six goals as a senior. His tenure came at a dark time during the program’s history, as Bruno went just 27-79-22 during his four years, a .211 winning percentage. After Garbutt’s senior year, Head Coach Roger Grillo resigned and was replaced by Brendan Whittet ’94. Garbutt has since been impressed by Whittet’s success during the first few years of his tenure.
“I wish I would’ve gotten to play under Whittet for one year,” Garbutt said.
After graduation, Garbutt took a somewhat circuitous route to the NHL, playing a season with the Corpus Christi Ice Rays of the Central Hockey League and the beginning of another with the Gwinnett Gladiators of the East Coast Hockey League before gathering any mainstream attention.
“I didn’t receive any (NHL) interest until after my second year pro,” Garbutt said.
He joined the American Hockey League’s Chicago Wolves on loan during the 2010-11 season and then signed an entry-level contract with the Dallas Stars to join the minor league Texas Stars the next year. He was called up to the NHL midway through the year and never looked back. He has since thrived with the Stars, who signed him to a three-year, $5.4 million contract extension this past January.
The path to the NHL is difficult even for highly regarded prospects, so Garbutt’s tale is extraordinary by any standard. He credits his success to his work ethic, preparation and focus.
“You need to prepare yourself each and every day and focus on hockey,” he said.
Moving from college through three minor leagues on his way to the NHL, Garbutt had to continually adjust for more talented competition, but said he “enjoyed the challenge.”
“You definitely notice a step up,” he said. “It’s a pretty unique challenge to be able to play up to your competition at each level, and that was something I really relished.”
 
Volpatti
Volpatti was a top target of the Bears’ when he came out of junior hockey in Revelstoke, British Columbia, before the 2006-07 season.
“They recruited me pretty hard, and I actually flew out to Brown, which obviously (was) a pretty big factor in coming there,” he said. “I really enjoyed it.”
He struggled under Grillo, recording 30 points in 86 games over his first three seasons. But he bloomed with Whittet, scoring 17 goals and 15 assists in his senior year to be named Third Team All-ECAC.
Although the coaching change greatly benefited him, Volpatti did not sense a significant cause for it when it happened.
“It’s not necessarily always about the coach, but unfortunately sometimes there’s just a change needed,” he said. “I really liked playing for Roger, and Coach Whittet was just kind of a new voice. … Sometimes change is good.”
Whittet allowed Volpatti to play to his strengths, contributing to his breakout year.
“Aaron was a guy, when I came in, … that played the game really hard, played it really, really tough, and sometimes that toughness, that physicality put him in the box, and so be it,” Whittet said.
Despite his struggles on the scoresheet, Volpatti started garnering professional attention after his junior year, propelling the Bears to a successful 2009-10 season that saw them make the semifinals of the ECAC tournament. In the end, he chose to sign with his hometown team, the Vancouver Canucks.
Shortly after signing, Volpatti went to the Canucks’ AHL affiliate, the Manitoba Moose. The increase in the quality of his opponents was surprising, but what he least expected was how much bigger his peers would be.
“It was a pretty big wake-up call getting to professional where … I was kind of more average-sized,” he said.
While he did not score often during his time in Manitoba, with just 13 points in 61 games over two seasons, he made enough of an impact to earn a short stint with Manitoba’s  parent club late in the 2010-11 season and a permanent spot with the team for the next two seasons. But an injury cut his 2012-13 season short, and he was put on waivers to be sent to the AHL again. Instead, he was claimed by the Washington Capitals.
“I had a lot of emotions going through waivers just because there’s a lot of uncertainty,” he said. “Could you go back to the minors? Are you going to get picked up? Things can go a lot of different ways.”
Since the Capitals acquired him Feb. 28, 2013, Volpatti has been a full-time player, despite a recent shoulder injury sidelining him for two months of this past season.
Volpatti believes the key to his post-Brown success has been parallel to his experiences at Brown — playing to his strengths and adhering to the style of play he knows best.
“I think it’s just not changing who you are,” he said. “My game’s never going to change, so it’s just about getting better every day.”
 
Zolnierczyk
Unlike Garbutt, Zolnierczyk was somewhat unheralded coming out of the junior hockey ranks from Toronto in 2007.
“I didn’t have a ton of options out of juniors to pick out of colleges,” he said. “I just wasn’t sure how far or how long I’d keep playing hockey.”
With doubt about his hockey future, Zolnierczyk opted for the best education he could find ­— Brown was the only Ivy to offer him a spot. “To have the opportunity to go to an Ivy League school and get a degree from one of the best institutions in the world was key,” he said, adding that he was glad to have “something to fall back on if hockey didn’t pan out.”
His first two seasons at Brown were challenging. Playing on the lowest lines, Zolnierczyk tallied just five total points over 47 games. But everything changed after the 2008-09 season.
Zolnierczyk exploded onto the scene, tallying 33 points in his junior year and 31 the next, on his way to the Ivy League Player of the Year award his senior season. It was no coincidence that his breakout came in Whittet’s first season, just like Volpatti’s. Zolnierczyk fully credited his new coach with the turnaround.
“I was really given a great opportunity to play big-time minutes and fill a big-time role,” he said. “My career just really turned around with Coach Whittet.”
Whittet said the key to making Zolnierczyk a star was allowing him to play his own style of hockey.
“When I came in, what we needed to do was allow Harry to play to his strengths,” he said. “Harry’s strengths are he plays with an unbelievable pace and an unbelievable aggressiveness, yet he plays a little bit on the edge. And some coaches, they stifle that. They say, ‘You know what, we want you to be more in control.’ … I wanted him to play that style that would allow him to succeed.”
With success came attention, and by the end of Zolnierczyk’s senior season, nearly half the NHL had expressed interest in signing him. He ultimately chose to join the Philadelphia Flyers.
“We thought Philadelphia was the best fit for me in order to get a chance to play in the NHL right away, and I was fortunate enough to get that opportunity … in my first year with them,” he said. “It was a good spot for me to start my pro career.”
Zolnierczyk split the 2011-12 season between Philadelphia and its AHL affiliate, the Adirondack Phantoms. In 37 NHL games, he accumulated six points. He was later traded both during and after the season, ending up on the Pittsburgh Penguins. He played 13 games with the Penguins this season, scoring just two goals.
Much like how his coaches at Brown molded him into the Ivy League’s best player, maximizing his capabilities on the ice has allowed Zolnierczyk to achieve professional success.
“The biggest thing for myself is my speed and my grit and my determination,” he said. “Speed is something that all teams look for and I’ve been fortunate enough to be able to carry that attribute. … I think that’s something that a lot of coaches find valuable.”
 
Robertson
With three highly successful role models paving the way, Robertson is Brown’s next player with a great NHL shot.
He just completed his senior season with the Bears, culminating one of the most decorated years for a Brown athlete. He was named First Team All-Ivy and Third Team All-ECAC and co-won the Best Defensive Defenseman award. The two-time captain was a true leader for the Bears, finishing fourth on the team in points.
As the 176th overall pick in the 2011 NHL Entry Draft, Robertson was selected by the Toronto Maple Leafs after his first-year season. The Maple Leafs traded his rights to the Carolina Hurricanes on New Year’s Day this year, so signing an entry-level contract was simple for him upon the conclusion of the Bears’ 2013-14 season. He was assigned to the team’s AHL affiliate, the Charlotte Checkers.
Robertson’s teammate Garnet Hathaway ’14 is also turning pro as an undrafted free agent, having signed with the Abbotsford Heat of the AHL, a Calgary Flames affiliate. He had 15 points in 31 games for Bruno this season.
Before Robertson went to Charlotte, he spoke to The Herald about his expectations.
“It’s going to be a little different, for sure, it’s going to be much faster and bigger, stronger guys out there, so it’s going to be a challenge,” he said. “But I have to rise to that challenge, and hopefully I can have some success here early and continue that down the road.”
The players who have already trodden a similar path had a few insights about what Robertson will experience. Zolnierczyk, when discussing the challenges of being an undrafted free agent, mentioned the privilege a drafted player like Robertson will have.
“Your draft picks are always going to get a fair shot and a good look,” he said, adding that he also agreed with Robertson’s assessment that professional players are more physically imposing, describing them as “a lot faster, a lot stronger.”
“Now it’s your job,” Volpatti said of the difference Robertson will experience between college and professional hockey. “There’s obviously a lot more pressure now than in college. … Obviously I still enjoy it and still love it, but it’s a career and there’s a lot of pressure, and you worry about it a little more.”
Whittet is optimistic about the chances of his departing stars making an NFL roster.
Robertson and Hathaway “have that same trait that (Volpatti and Zolnierczyk) did. They’re just driven individuals who just play the game really hard,” Whittet said. “They’re competitive people, so those are the kind of people that ultimately succeed.”
Signed contract in hand, Robertson is prepared to chase his dream.
“I feel ready,” he said. If he can follow the examples of his fellow former Bears, he just might be.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Letter: On train strikes and skipping class
by Brown Daily Herald

Apr 18, 2014
“To the Editor:
 
In response to the April 17 article “Busy schedules, boring lectures drive students to skip classes” : As a student commuting to school in London many years ago, I was dependent on train service. When there was a train strike, I rode my bike more than 20 miles each way through rough traffic until I ran into a fellow villager whose dad was giving her a car ride to her college — he worked nearby — and could squeeze in one more. I couldn’t think of missing classes: It was close to finals, there were no make-ups and I was on scholarship. With all that, I felt I had a responsibility to get there. The strike went on long enough that the rails went rusty.
 
Peter Richardson
Professor of Engineering and Physiology”

respond
 
News Topics








(showing 10) Show All

Recently Reviewed Schools!

 University of Mary Hardin Baylor (TX) 1:negative

 Fairmont State University (WV) 1:positive

 East Stroudsburg University of Pennsylvania (PA) 1:neutral

 Western Illinois University (IL) 1:negative

 There are 72 more!


Ranking Similar Schools by Education Quality

#School Prog
Score
1
Columbia Southern University  
9.1
A 9.0
2
Colgate University  
9.1
A 9.0
3
Brown University  
9.0
A 8.9
4
University of California Irvine  
8.9
A- 8.8
5
Dartmouth College  
8.9
A- 8.8
6
University of Notre Dame  
8.7
A- 8.7
7
The University of West Florida  
8.7
A- 8.6
8
Emory University  
8.7
A- 8.6
9
Knox College  
8.7
A- 8.6
10
Yale University  
8.7
A- 8.6
11
University of Pennsylvania  
8.7
A- 8.6
12
Milwaukee School of Engineering  
8.7
A- 8.6
13
College of the Holy Cross  
8.6
A- 8.5
14
Tufts University  
8.6
A- 8.5
15
Marist College  
8.5
A- 8.5
16
University of Chicago  
8.6
A- 8.5
17
Cornell University  
8.5
A- 8.4
18
Rice University  
8.5
A- 8.4
19
Washington University in St Louis  
8.5
A- 8.4
20
Wake Forest University  
8.5
A- 8.4
21
Massachusetts Institute of Technology  
8.5
A- 8.4
22
Johns Hopkins University  
8.4
A- 8.4
23
University of Virginia   
8.5
A- 8.4
24
Duke University  
8.5
A- 8.4
25
Villanova University  
8.4
A- 8.4
26
Texas A & M University College Station  
8.4
A- 8.3
27
Bucknell University  
8.4
A- 8.3
28
Mount Holyoke College  
8.4
A- 8.3
29
Saint Joseph's University  
8.4
A- 8.3
30
University of Rochester  
8.4
A- 8.3
31
Northwestern University  
8.3
A- 8.2
32
University of Missouri Columbia  
8.3
A- 8.2
33
Purdue University   
8.3
A- 8.2
34
College of William and Mary  
8.3
A- 8.2
35
University of California Santa Barbara  
8.3
A- 8.2
36
Michigan State University  
8.2
A- 8.2
37
American University  
8.3
A- 8.2
38
University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh Campus  
8.2
A- 8.1
39
Indiana University Bloomington  
8.1
A- 8.1
40
The University of Alabama  
8.2
A- 8.1
41
Syracuse University  
8.1
A- 8.1
42
University of Oregon  
8.2
A- 8.1
43
James Madison University  
8.1
A- 8.1
44
University of California Berkeley  
8.1
A- 8.1
45
Christopher Newport University  
8.1
B+ 8.0
46
Lehigh University  
8.1
B+ 8.0
47
Brandeis University  
8.1
B+ 8.0
48
Clemson University  
8.1
B+ 8.0
49
University of Wisconsin Madison  
8.0
B+ 8.0
50
Tulane University of Louisiana  
8.0
B+ 8.0

 

Want to Learn More?
Powered by CampusExplorer.com
 

About Us | Advertise! | Press
Send Comments/Suggestions to: sradmin@studentsreview.com.

Copyright © 2000-2014. StudentsReview, All Rights Reserved.

Disclaimer: StudentsReview makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents of this site, and expressly disclaims liability for errors and omissions in the contents of this site. Furthermore, StudentsReview is not affiliated with any University or Institution.

All Universities in XX, College Search, College Rankings