StudentsReview :: Drexel University
-or-
Search for Schools by Region
 

or within distance of city

Similar Schools
New York University -- New York, NY
Boston University -- Boston, MA
Villanova University -- Villanova, PA


  Who's got the Best?

Perceptual Rankings:
You Make 'Em.
We Post 'Em.
You Vote 'Em Up.
You Vote 'Em Down.
Aww yeah.


Drexel University

Safety
DRU Campus News
Importance
1
Students design patch for final shuttle crew
by The Triangle

Jan 01, 2014
“Very few objects have ever been launched into space, but a few Drexel students will have the distinct experience of having their creations carried into orbit.
A team of graphic design students has given the crew on the final space shuttle mission something that the astronauts will hold close to their hearts, literally, by designing the special mission patch that astronauts will be carrying into space to be left at the International Space Station.
 
David.Stephenson
The mission patches were designed as part of an independent project conducted by a team of five upperclassmen directed by associate teaching professor Don Haring Jr. and graphic design program director Jody Graff.
“Spaceswan” by Jen Choy and “Waves” by Jeremy Bloom were selected as the patches the astronauts will be wearing during the scheduled launch Friday, July 8. The other students that participated were Cara Brobst, Herbie Hickmott and Evan Raisner.
“I’m very honored to be picked,” Bloom, a graphic design junior currently on co-op at Electronic Ink, said. “I looked at a lot of older NASA patches, but I wasn’t very inspired by them because they were so generic, just pictures of space shuttles and stars and kind of plain.”
Bloom said he looked to more terrestrial sources for influences.
“I looked at YouTube videos of jets and was really interested in the way that a jet engine created a vortex around itself, so I took that and made it a little abstract while trying to keep the space theme,” Bloom said.
Choy, who recently graduated with a degree in graphic design, said she looked more at the motion of spaceflight to design her patch.
“When I was sketching patch designs, I was inspired by motion — a launching shuttle at blastoff, the gracefulness of an astronaut floating in space,” Choy said. “My focus was to portray the shape and motion of the space shuttle as graceful and elegant but also strong, so I’d say Spaceswan is quite a fitting name.”
Each of the patches will hold a special but bittersweet place in history as the launch of STS-115 is the final space flight of the shuttle program.
Drexel will be represented by more than just the patches on the astronauts during the historic flight, as the commander of the mission is Drexel mechanical engineering alumnus Christopher Ferguson, ’84, an astronaut since 1998.
 
Photo Courtesy Drexel University
Ferguson, who has been to space on two prior shuttle missions, will have the distinct honor of commanding the four-astronaut team that will make up the last American manned spaceflight until a replacement vehicle is built.
“I would like to personally thank the Drexel community for their support and encouragement throughout the years,” Ferguson said. “Like all of the fine Drexel students, the foundation of what I became was set during my years as a Dragon. For as much as you might learn during your years as an undergraduate student, the ultimate benefit will be that you learn how be adaptable to the world around you.”
Ferguson was named the University 2009 Engineer of the Year and has spent more than 28 days in space. He came to Drexel March 16 to meet with the students who designed the patches for his mission and spoke with them about the end of the shuttle program.
“I watched STS-1 launch from the Creese Student Center,” Ferguson said. “Never in my wildest dreams did I ever imagine that 30 years later I personally would command the mission that put the period at the end of the space shuttle program. If you can imagine it, you can do it.”
Choy said she enjoyed the involvement that Ferguson had in designing the patch.
“He is a really nice, funny, down-to-earth (no pun intended), all around cool guy. I never thought I’d get to meet an astronaut, so it was a neat experience,” Choy said.
In addition to Ferguson, two other Drexel alumni have reached space aboard the space shuttle, James Bagian, ’73, who spent 15 years with NASA and flew in 1989 and 1991, and Paul Richards, ’87, who voyaged to space aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery in 2001.
Professors involved with the design of the patch were proud of the strong connections that Drexel has with the elite Shuttle program.
“We were incredibly honored when shuttle commander Chris Ferguson first approached the graphic design program about designing a mission patch,” said Haring. “The students couldn’t believe they had a chance to design for NASA, and I couldn’t have been more excited to advise and help them, especially considering the importance of this last shuttle flight. It was an amazing opportunity for all of us, and as always, we’re incredibly proud of creativity and skill in our students.”
The University will be channeling a young Ferguson watching STS-1 by holding a launch party July 8 to watch the final shuttle blast off. The party starts at 11 a.m., and the 11:26 a.m. launch will be shown on a large screen in the Bossone lobby. It is open to the public, and food and drinks will be served. In attendance are expected to be 140 children from the Drexel STAR summer scholars program and the NASA Summer Program who might, one day, remember when they watched the last shuttle flight at Drexel as they wait for their turn to journey into space.
 
—————————–
Updated July 5, 2011 9:00 A.M.
Correction: The astronauts will be carrying the patches into space and leaving the patches aboard the International Space Station as tokens of their visit. The previous version of the article misstated that the patches would be worn on the uniforms of the astronauts.
 
 
 
 
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Sodexo corrects sanitation issues
by The Triangle

Jan 01, 2014
“The Handschumacher Dining Center was found to be out of compliance with several provisions of the Pennsylvania Food Code during an inspection Dec. 30, 2010.
The violations recorded in the report included mouse feces found in the kitchens and storage areas, fruit flies observed underneath a self-serve beverage station and lack of a dedicated sink for mop-water disposal, among other violations.
Retail Management Director Jackelyn Eliassen said in a written statement that all of the problems reported in the inspection have since been resolved.
“Sodexo worked closely with their corporate food safety and quality assurance teams and the Drexel University Facilities team to rectify the violations immediately,” Eliassen said. “When the dining center reopened for winter 2011, all food service and many of the facility issues were corrected. No fines or penalties were imposed.”
Eliassen went on to say that that the dining hall received a nearly perfect score in a Feb. 16 inspection by the National Sanitation Foundation, and that no problems were found during internal audits by Sodexo in May.
“Sodexo was awarded the highest possible score in an NSF audit, a third-party health inspection that sets the industry standard for food, physical and equipment safety. Sodexo scored 99.5 percent on food safety and 98 percent on physical safety. Drexel Dining Services also has regularly scheduled service and inspections from a licensed pest control company. Measures taken have been very effective,” Eliassen said.
Although the dining hall staff took measures to eliminate the specific problems reported in December, other similar flaws were found in a June 6 inspection by city officials.
“These violations included gnats present in the soda area, the need for additional breath guards in the counter and bread prep area, and uncovered food in the walk-in box, which was corrected immediately. Overall, the [Philadelphia] Board of Health was impressed with the steps taken since the last inspection and saw no need to reinspect in the near future,” Eliassen said.
Despite the actions taken to improve sanitation in the dining hall, student opinions of the facility remain widely unfavorable. Communication major Megan Halicek was shocked upon reading the December inspection report.
“I had no idea that this was happening, and it’s very disgusting,” Halicek said. “It appears that they’re taking care of it, but I still don’t feel that great about it because all this was happening initially.”
While Retail Management and Sodexo appear to have made significant improvements to the dining hall, at least one sign of remaining flaws has been observed since the start of the summer term. Digital media major Seth Garber reported in a Facebook post that he saw a mouse in the dining hall June 21.
“[I] just saw a mouse run around the dining hall floor. New low for Drexel Dining,” Garber wrote.
The full report on the December inspection is available online for those who wish to learn more details.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Pop culture overhaul at Comic Con
by The Triangle

Jan 01, 2014
“The mob of costumed fanatics wrapped around the Philadelphia Convention Center the weekend of June 17-19 must have had onlookers and passersby a little confused. Summer just started, so why are we acting like it’s Halloween?
Well, because for closet nerds as well as self-proclaimed ones, geeks and fervent fans alike, Wizard World’s Philadelphia Comic-Con provides the magic of a favorite holiday: spreading joy and bringing Magic players, Ghost Busters, and Star Wars enthusiasts together, while only coming once a year. Last month’s affair marked the 11th return of the annual touring Comic-Convention to Philadelphia, and it was, by many measures, a success. Photo Courtesy Hope Lanphear A team of Ghostbusters attracted many onlookers to their booth during the Wizard World's Philadelphia chapter of Comic Con, held at the Convention Center Friday, June 17 through Sunday, June 19.
For one, the line of teenagers, old heads, parents and children anxious to get inside wrapped three-quarters of the way around the Convention Center. Stuart Sayger, an artist on the main floor told us that customers were reporting an average waiting time of an hour and a half, just to register and get a wristband. One could measure its progress by the number of A- and B-list celebrities present or the amount of time between Philadelphia’s chapter of Comic-Con ending and the impressive press announcement for next year’s debut being released. Hell, you could even measure by the number of sexy Slave Leia sightings.
Each year, Wizard World entices smaller cities across the U.S. with the frenetic allure of San Diego’s legendary Comic-Con convention. Industry members in the world of comic books, video games, gamer technology, movies and television gather and meet with other fans, artists, actors and filmmakers in the unanimous celebration of beloved characters and series. Patrons flooded the showroom floor, stopping for photos with stars like Bruce Campbell (“Burn Notice,” “Army of Darkness”), heralded artists such as Bill Sienkiewicz (Batman: The Widening Gyre covers) and iconic vehicles like the “Scooby Doo” Mystery Van and “Back to The Future” Delorean. Perusing and massing through dozens of booths worth of art, comics and merchandise, our Friday, Saturday and Sunday were filled with non-stop people-watching and window-shopping, and always ended with our trudging back to the Spring Garden bus stop feeling exquisitely tired but content, armed with bags of new clothing items, comics, prints and illustrations and significantly lighter wallets.
Friday was spent acquainting ourselves with the new layout of the greatly expanded Convention Center, the showroom and the packed tables of merchandise, which we made ourselves wait for before scouring seriously. Besides, work made us late to the festivities, and we had panels to attend. We heard from Michael Biehn (“Terminator,” “The Rock”) and Kristanna Loken (“Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines,” “Painkiller Jane”) in promotion for Biehn’s directorial debut of “The Victim” — though the open conversation quickly converted from Biehn’s career and his “Terminator” experiences to some of the most random tangents we’ve yet to experience, most of which were very NSFW.
A panel on the digital age of comic books was a bit more enlightening, lead by artists and businessmen of largely different calibers, including representatives from Cosmixology. Principles during their discussion included the benefits of publishing independently and targeting audiences and niches without the help of today’s newspapers, which are more conservative with the choices they make in selecting comics to publish, rarely choosing stories that were created in the last 10 years. Salary was also a hot topic of the hour, as a corporate participant stated, “There is so much possible tension here when I talk [about] if comics pays as a full time job.” Another started adamantly on an rant, stating concretely: “The attitude of ‘I’m not a business guy; I just do comics’ is unacceptable in this day and age.” This led to a discussion about the integration of technology into the comic art form. Though many panelists were wary of the effects technology seems to be having on their sales and salaries, most seemed simultaneously excited about the opportunity digital media creates. The iPad, in particular, is not only making comics more accessible, but the device’s guided view has begun changing and transforming the motion of graphics and panels and how each separate piece of art is revealed and experienced.
Friday’s highlights also included Q&As with Margot Kidder (Lois Lane in the original 1978 “Superman”) and Claudia Christian (“Babylon 5″).
Comic-Con patrons seemed to take the entire couple blocks around the Convention Center hostage for all of Saturday, as anywhere you went (most definitely including Wawa — we were witnesses) you could not escape caped, masked and costumed heroes and villains, and the essential barely clothed femme fatales. And nowhere was the excitement and fever more tangible than in the Center itself, where the convention boasted more than 270 in-person “superstar creators,” sketching and selling away while kids, teens and adults milled about the various booths and tables. Saturday afternoon played host to a slew of Q&As with new and old movie and television stars. Among them were Julie Benz (“Dexter”) and a “Buffy The Vampire Slayer” panel with twin brothers Nicholas Brendon and Kelly Donovan. We didn’t leave our second row seats for a full three hours, in attendance for consecutive Star Wars-themed Q&As with Chewbacca, young Anakin Skywalker, young Boba Fett, and Lando Calrissian. (Or, you know, Peter Mayhew, Jake Lloyd, Daniel Logan and Billy Dee Williams, respectively). First up was Mayhew, Lloyd and Logan, who were seated to the side of the stage to accommodate Mayhew who was in a wheelchair with an injured leg. Nearly every question posed to the trio was preceded by fans, myself (Mike) included, simply thanking the actors for being a part of a franchise that means so much to so many people. Logan, in particular was quite energetic throughout the panel, and on the floor as well. This, I believe, is due to the fact that he is, reportedly, the only actor of the three that is still involved in the franchise, what with heavy rumors of his return to the role of Boba Fett in the live-action Star Wars television show that Lucas is working on. Summing up all their thoughts on Lucas, Mayhew said, “I think we were all lucky for trusting a man with a story. In the acting world, parts like this are very few and far between.” Logan echoed this sentiment, saying, “It’s amazing what George Lucas has created for us all.” Lloyd was particularly unenthusiastic, but one must keep in mind that he was only eight years old when he took on the infamous role of Anakin Skywalker, and has stated on many occasions that he simply doesn’t remember much of the filming.
Following that trio, the moment we all had been waiting for had finally arrived: Billy Dee Williams, or as most people know him, Lando Calrissian, the gambler, swindler, pirate, and downright scoundrel. And at 74, he hasn’t lost one iota of his swag; if anything, he has more swag than ever. The sexy Slave Leia sitting in front of us, after asking Williams who his favorite character in Star Wars was (Nien Nunb), made a point to tell him that all of her friends still referred to him as ‘Hot Chocolate’. Without missing a beat, Lando gave her the once-over, and declared her ‘Hot Vanilla’. Billy Dee admitted that he hasn’t kept up with his character in the novels, but he was quite interested in the idea of Lando’s marriage, and when asked how Lando would have seduced Leia if he got to her before Han, Williams simply laughed and simply said “Oh, you wouldn’t want to know that,” followed by his signature grin.
Other highlights included panels for the Green Lantern comic series, “The Boondock Saints” with Norman Reedus and Sean Patrick Flanery, independent filmmaking with Dan Fogler (“Fanboys,” “Balls of Fury”) and a Batman and Robin duo Q&A with Adam West and Burt Ward. Additionally, guests of Wizard World had the opportunity to flaunt their homemade and store-bought ensembles in a costume contest, then sat back and watched as the 501st Legion taught the right way to build and improve on costumes. There was light saber training for the younglings and a zombie beach party for teens and young adults. And wrapping things up Sunday afternoon, Ethan van Sciver (“Flash: Rebirth”) performed an hour-long “musical” of sorts — if musicals often have you “trapped in a small room discussing cannibalism, Wolverine, deviancy and all manner of filth and disease through the art of song.”
Offbeat and well rounded, Philadelphia’s Comic-Con was impressive but also eloquently intimate. At next year’s convention, taking place June 1-3, 2012, guests will be joined by Greg Hildebrandt, Greg Capullo, Michael Golden and Mark Teixeira and a promised “bevy of famous international creators.” Wizard World CEO Gareb Shamus announced, “Philadelphia Comic-Con is a flagship event that went extremely well … We’re excited to announce our 2012 dates with such a prestigious group of artists … I’m already impressed with our lineup, and we have 12 months left to go.”
Needless to say, we will be returning.
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Sodexo corrects sanitation issues
by The Triangle

Jan 01, 2013
“The Handschumacher Dining Center was found to be out of compliance with several provisions of the Pennsylvania Food Code during an inspection Dec. 30, 2010.
The violations recorded in the report included mouse feces found in the kitchens and storage areas, fruit flies observed underneath a self-serve beverage station and lack of a dedicated sink for mop-water disposal, among other violations.
Retail Management Director Jackelyn Eliassen said in a written statement that all of the problems reported in the inspection have since been resolved.
“Sodexo worked closely with their corporate food safety and quality assurance teams and the Drexel University Facilities team to rectify the violations immediately,” Eliassen said. “When the dining center reopened for winter 2011, all food service and many of the facility issues were corrected. No fines or penalties were imposed.”
Eliassen went on to say that that the dining hall received a nearly perfect score in a Feb. 16 inspection by the National Sanitation Foundation, and that no problems were found during internal audits by Sodexo in May.
“Sodexo was awarded the highest possible score in an NSF audit, a third-party health inspection that sets the industry standard for food, physical and equipment safety. Sodexo scored 99.5 percent on food safety and 98 percent on physical safety. Drexel Dining Services also has regularly scheduled service and inspections from a licensed pest control company. Measures taken have been very effective,” Eliassen said.
Although the dining hall staff took measures to eliminate the specific problems reported in December, other similar flaws were found in a June 6 inspection by city officials.
“These violations included gnats present in the soda area, the need for additional breath guards in the counter and bread prep area, and uncovered food in the walk-in box, which was corrected immediately. Overall, the [Philadelphia] Board of Health was impressed with the steps taken since the last inspection and saw no need to reinspect in the near future,” Eliassen said.
Despite the actions taken to improve sanitation in the dining hall, student opinions of the facility remain widely unfavorable. Communication major Megan Halicek was shocked upon reading the December inspection report.
“I had no idea that this was happening, and it’s very disgusting,” Halicek said. “It appears that they’re taking care of it, but I still don’t feel that great about it because all this was happening initially.”
While Retail Management and Sodexo appear to have made significant improvements to the dining hall, at least one sign of remaining flaws has been observed since the start of the summer term. Digital media major Seth Garber reported in a Facebook post that he saw a mouse in the dining hall June 21.
“[I] just saw a mouse run around the dining hall floor. New low for Drexel Dining,” Garber wrote.
The full report on the December inspection is available online for those who wish to learn more details.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Pop culture overhaul at Comic Con
by The Triangle

Jan 01, 2013
“The mob of costumed fanatics wrapped around the Philadelphia Convention Center the weekend of June 17-19 must have had onlookers and passersby a little confused. Summer just started, so why are we acting like it’s Halloween?
Well, because for closet nerds as well as self-proclaimed ones, geeks and fervent fans alike, Wizard World’s Philadelphia Comic-Con provides the magic of a favorite holiday: spreading joy and bringing Magic players, Ghost Busters, and Star Wars enthusiasts together, while only coming once a year. Last month’s affair marked the 11th return of the annual touring Comic-Convention to Philadelphia, and it was, by many measures, a success. Photo Courtesy Hope Lanphear A team of Ghostbusters attracted many onlookers to their booth during the Wizard World's Philadelphia chapter of Comic Con, held at the Convention Center Friday, June 17 through Sunday, June 19.
For one, the line of teenagers, old heads, parents and children anxious to get inside wrapped three-quarters of the way around the Convention Center. Stuart Sayger, an artist on the main floor told us that customers were reporting an average waiting time of an hour and a half, just to register and get a wristband. One could measure its progress by the number of A- and B-list celebrities present or the amount of time between Philadelphia’s chapter of Comic-Con ending and the impressive press announcement for next year’s debut being released. Hell, you could even measure by the number of sexy Slave Leia sightings.
Each year, Wizard World entices smaller cities across the U.S. with the frenetic allure of San Diego’s legendary Comic-Con convention. Industry members in the world of comic books, video games, gamer technology, movies and television gather and meet with other fans, artists, actors and filmmakers in the unanimous celebration of beloved characters and series. Patrons flooded the showroom floor, stopping for photos with stars like Bruce Campbell (“Burn Notice,” “Army of Darkness”), heralded artists such as Bill Sienkiewicz (Batman: The Widening Gyre covers) and iconic vehicles like the “Scooby Doo” Mystery Van and “Back to The Future” Delorean. Perusing and massing through dozens of booths worth of art, comics and merchandise, our Friday, Saturday and Sunday were filled with non-stop people-watching and window-shopping, and always ended with our trudging back to the Spring Garden bus stop feeling exquisitely tired but content, armed with bags of new clothing items, comics, prints and illustrations and significantly lighter wallets.
Friday was spent acquainting ourselves with the new layout of the greatly expanded Convention Center, the showroom and the packed tables of merchandise, which we made ourselves wait for before scouring seriously. Besides, work made us late to the festivities, and we had panels to attend. We heard from Michael Biehn (“Terminator,” “The Rock”) and Kristanna Loken (“Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines,” “Painkiller Jane”) in promotion for Biehn’s directorial debut of “The Victim” — though the open conversation quickly converted from Biehn’s career and his “Terminator” experiences to some of the most random tangents we’ve yet to experience, most of which were very NSFW.
A panel on the digital age of comic books was a bit more enlightening, lead by artists and businessmen of largely different calibers, including representatives from Cosmixology. Principles during their discussion included the benefits of publishing independently and targeting audiences and niches without the help of today’s newspapers, which are more conservative with the choices they make in selecting comics to publish, rarely choosing stories that were created in the last 10 years. Salary was also a hot topic of the hour, as a corporate participant stated, “There is so much possible tension here when I talk [about] if comics pays as a full time job.” Another started adamantly on an rant, stating concretely: “The attitude of ‘I’m not a business guy; I just do comics’ is unacceptable in this day and age.” This led to a discussion about the integration of technology into the comic art form. Though many panelists were wary of the effects technology seems to be having on their sales and salaries, most seemed simultaneously excited about the opportunity digital media creates. The iPad, in particular, is not only making comics more accessible, but the device’s guided view has begun changing and transforming the motion of graphics and panels and how each separate piece of art is revealed and experienced.
Friday’s highlights also included Q&As with Margot Kidder (Lois Lane in the original 1978 “Superman”) and Claudia Christian (“Babylon 5″).
Comic-Con patrons seemed to take the entire couple blocks around the Convention Center hostage for all of Saturday, as anywhere you went (most definitely including Wawa — we were witnesses) you could not escape caped, masked and costumed heroes and villains, and the essential barely clothed femme fatales. And nowhere was the excitement and fever more tangible than in the Center itself, where the convention boasted more than 270 in-person “superstar creators,” sketching and selling away while kids, teens and adults milled about the various booths and tables. Saturday afternoon played host to a slew of Q&As with new and old movie and television stars. Among them were Julie Benz (“Dexter”) and a “Buffy The Vampire Slayer” panel with twin brothers Nicholas Brendon and Kelly Donovan. We didn’t leave our second row seats for a full three hours, in attendance for consecutive Star Wars-themed Q&As with Chewbacca, young Anakin Skywalker, young Boba Fett, and Lando Calrissian. (Or, you know, Peter Mayhew, Jake Lloyd, Daniel Logan and Billy Dee Williams, respectively). First up was Mayhew, Lloyd and Logan, who were seated to the side of the stage to accommodate Mayhew who was in a wheelchair with an injured leg. Nearly every question posed to the trio was preceded by fans, myself (Mike) included, simply thanking the actors for being a part of a franchise that means so much to so many people. Logan, in particular was quite energetic throughout the panel, and on the floor as well. This, I believe, is due to the fact that he is, reportedly, the only actor of the three that is still involved in the franchise, what with heavy rumors of his return to the role of Boba Fett in the live-action Star Wars television show that Lucas is working on. Summing up all their thoughts on Lucas, Mayhew said, “I think we were all lucky for trusting a man with a story. In the acting world, parts like this are very few and far between.” Logan echoed this sentiment, saying, “It’s amazing what George Lucas has created for us all.” Lloyd was particularly unenthusiastic, but one must keep in mind that he was only eight years old when he took on the infamous role of Anakin Skywalker, and has stated on many occasions that he simply doesn’t remember much of the filming.
Following that trio, the moment we all had been waiting for had finally arrived: Billy Dee Williams, or as most people know him, Lando Calrissian, the gambler, swindler, pirate, and downright scoundrel. And at 74, he hasn’t lost one iota of his swag; if anything, he has more swag than ever. The sexy Slave Leia sitting in front of us, after asking Williams who his favorite character in Star Wars was (Nien Nunb), made a point to tell him that all of her friends still referred to him as ‘Hot Chocolate’. Without missing a beat, Lando gave her the once-over, and declared her ‘Hot Vanilla’. Billy Dee admitted that he hasn’t kept up with his character in the novels, but he was quite interested in the idea of Lando’s marriage, and when asked how Lando would have seduced Leia if he got to her before Han, Williams simply laughed and simply said “Oh, you wouldn’t want to know that,” followed by his signature grin.
Other highlights included panels for the Green Lantern comic series, “The Boondock Saints” with Norman Reedus and Sean Patrick Flanery, independent filmmaking with Dan Fogler (“Fanboys,” “Balls of Fury”) and a Batman and Robin duo Q&A with Adam West and Burt Ward. Additionally, guests of Wizard World had the opportunity to flaunt their homemade and store-bought ensembles in a costume contest, then sat back and watched as the 501st Legion taught the right way to build and improve on costumes. There was light saber training for the younglings and a zombie beach party for teens and young adults. And wrapping things up Sunday afternoon, Ethan van Sciver (“Flash: Rebirth”) performed an hour-long “musical” of sorts — if musicals often have you “trapped in a small room discussing cannibalism, Wolverine, deviancy and all manner of filth and disease through the art of song.”
Offbeat and well rounded, Philadelphia’s Comic-Con was impressive but also eloquently intimate. At next year’s convention, taking place June 1-3, 2012, guests will be joined by Greg Hildebrandt, Greg Capullo, Michael Golden and Mark Teixeira and a promised “bevy of famous international creators.” Wizard World CEO Gareb Shamus announced, “Philadelphia Comic-Con is a flagship event that went extremely well … We’re excited to announce our 2012 dates with such a prestigious group of artists … I’m already impressed with our lineup, and we have 12 months left to go.”
Needless to say, we will be returning.
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Students design patch for final shuttle crew
by The Triangle

Jan 01, 2013
“Very few objects have ever been launched into space, but a few Drexel students will have the distinct experience of having their creations carried into orbit.
A team of graphic design students has given the crew on the final space shuttle mission something that the astronauts will hold close to their hearts, literally, by designing the special mission patch that astronauts will be carrying into space to be left at the International Space Station.
 
David.Stephenson
The mission patches were designed as part of an independent project conducted by a team of five upperclassmen directed by associate teaching professor Don Haring Jr. and graphic design program director Jody Graff.
“Spaceswan” by Jen Choy and “Waves” by Jeremy Bloom were selected as the patches the astronauts will be wearing during the scheduled launch Friday, July 8. The other students that participated were Cara Brobst, Herbie Hickmott and Evan Raisner.
“I’m very honored to be picked,” Bloom, a graphic design junior currently on co-op at Electronic Ink, said. “I looked at a lot of older NASA patches, but I wasn’t very inspired by them because they were so generic, just pictures of space shuttles and stars and kind of plain.”
Bloom said he looked to more terrestrial sources for influences.
“I looked at YouTube videos of jets and was really interested in the way that a jet engine created a vortex around itself, so I took that and made it a little abstract while trying to keep the space theme,” Bloom said.
Choy, who recently graduated with a degree in graphic design, said she looked more at the motion of spaceflight to design her patch.
“When I was sketching patch designs, I was inspired by motion — a launching shuttle at blastoff, the gracefulness of an astronaut floating in space,” Choy said. “My focus was to portray the shape and motion of the space shuttle as graceful and elegant but also strong, so I’d say Spaceswan is quite a fitting name.”
Each of the patches will hold a special but bittersweet place in history as the launch of STS-115 is the final space flight of the shuttle program.
Drexel will be represented by more than just the patches on the astronauts during the historic flight, as the commander of the mission is Drexel mechanical engineering alumnus Christopher Ferguson, ’84, an astronaut since 1998.
 
Photo Courtesy Drexel University
Ferguson, who has been to space on two prior shuttle missions, will have the distinct honor of commanding the four-astronaut team that will make up the last American manned spaceflight until a replacement vehicle is built.
“I would like to personally thank the Drexel community for their support and encouragement throughout the years,” Ferguson said. “Like all of the fine Drexel students, the foundation of what I became was set during my years as a Dragon. For as much as you might learn during your years as an undergraduate student, the ultimate benefit will be that you learn how be adaptable to the world around you.”
Ferguson was named the University 2009 Engineer of the Year and has spent more than 28 days in space. He came to Drexel March 16 to meet with the students who designed the patches for his mission and spoke with them about the end of the shuttle program.
“I watched STS-1 launch from the Creese Student Center,” Ferguson said. “Never in my wildest dreams did I ever imagine that 30 years later I personally would command the mission that put the period at the end of the space shuttle program. If you can imagine it, you can do it.”
Choy said she enjoyed the involvement that Ferguson had in designing the patch.
“He is a really nice, funny, down-to-earth (no pun intended), all around cool guy. I never thought I’d get to meet an astronaut, so it was a neat experience,” Choy said.
In addition to Ferguson, two other Drexel alumni have reached space aboard the space shuttle, James Bagian, ’73, who spent 15 years with NASA and flew in 1989 and 1991, and Paul Richards, ’87, who voyaged to space aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery in 2001.
Professors involved with the design of the patch were proud of the strong connections that Drexel has with the elite Shuttle program.
“We were incredibly honored when shuttle commander Chris Ferguson first approached the graphic design program about designing a mission patch,” said Haring. “The students couldn’t believe they had a chance to design for NASA, and I couldn’t have been more excited to advise and help them, especially considering the importance of this last shuttle flight. It was an amazing opportunity for all of us, and as always, we’re incredibly proud of creativity and skill in our students.”
The University will be channeling a young Ferguson watching STS-1 by holding a launch party July 8 to watch the final shuttle blast off. The party starts at 11 a.m., and the 11:26 a.m. launch will be shown on a large screen in the Bossone lobby. It is open to the public, and food and drinks will be served. In attendance are expected to be 140 children from the Drexel STAR summer scholars program and the NASA Summer Program who might, one day, remember when they watched the last shuttle flight at Drexel as they wait for their turn to journey into space.
 
—————————–
Updated July 5, 2011 9:00 A.M.
Correction: The astronauts will be carrying the patches into space and leaving the patches aboard the International Space Station as tokens of their visit. The previous version of the article misstated that the patches would be worn on the uniforms of the astronauts.
 
 
 
 
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Sodexo corrects sanitation issues
by The Triangle

Jan 01, 2012
“The Handschumacher Dining Center was found to be out of compliance with several provisions of the Pennsylvania Food Code during an inspection Dec. 30, 2010.
The violations recorded in the report included mouse feces found in the kitchens and storage areas, fruit flies observed underneath a self-serve beverage station and lack of a dedicated sink for mop-water disposal, among other violations.
Retail Management Director Jackelyn Eliassen said in a written statement that all of the problems reported in the inspection have since been resolved.
“Sodexo worked closely with their corporate food safety and quality assurance teams and the Drexel University Facilities team to rectify the violations immediately,” Eliassen said. “When the dining center reopened for winter 2011, all food service and many of the facility issues were corrected. No fines or penalties were imposed.”
Eliassen went on to say that that the dining hall received a nearly perfect score in a Feb. 16 inspection by the National Sanitation Foundation, and that no problems were found during internal audits by Sodexo in May.
“Sodexo was awarded the highest possible score in an NSF audit, a third-party health inspection that sets the industry standard for food, physical and equipment safety. Sodexo scored 99.5 percent on food safety and 98 percent on physical safety. Drexel Dining Services also has regularly scheduled service and inspections from a licensed pest control company. Measures taken have been very effective,” Eliassen said.
Although the dining hall staff took measures to eliminate the specific problems reported in December, other similar flaws were found in a June 6 inspection by city officials.
“These violations included gnats present in the soda area, the need for additional breath guards in the counter and bread prep area, and uncovered food in the walk-in box, which was corrected immediately. Overall, the [Philadelphia] Board of Health was impressed with the steps taken since the last inspection and saw no need to reinspect in the near future,” Eliassen said.
Despite the actions taken to improve sanitation in the dining hall, student opinions of the facility remain widely unfavorable. Communication major Megan Halicek was shocked upon reading the December inspection report.
“I had no idea that this was happening, and it’s very disgusting,” Halicek said. “It appears that they’re taking care of it, but I still don’t feel that great about it because all this was happening initially.”
While Retail Management and Sodexo appear to have made significant improvements to the dining hall, at least one sign of remaining flaws has been observed since the start of the summer term. Digital media major Seth Garber reported in a Facebook post that he saw a mouse in the dining hall June 21.
“[I] just saw a mouse run around the dining hall floor. New low for Drexel Dining,” Garber wrote.
The full report on the December inspection is available online for those who wish to learn more details.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Pop culture overhaul at Comic Con
by The Triangle

Jan 01, 2012
“The mob of costumed fanatics wrapped around the Philadelphia Convention Center the weekend of June 17-19 must have had onlookers and passersby a little confused. Summer just started, so why are we acting like it’s Halloween?
Well, because for closet nerds as well as self-proclaimed ones, geeks and fervent fans alike, Wizard World’s Philadelphia Comic-Con provides the magic of a favorite holiday: spreading joy and bringing Magic players, Ghost Busters, and Star Wars enthusiasts together, while only coming once a year. Last month’s affair marked the 11th return of the annual touring Comic-Convention to Philadelphia, and it was, by many measures, a success. Photo Courtesy Hope Lanphear A team of Ghostbusters attracted many onlookers to their booth during the Wizard World's Philadelphia chapter of Comic Con, held at the Convention Center Friday, June 17 through Sunday, June 19.
For one, the line of teenagers, old heads, parents and children anxious to get inside wrapped three-quarters of the way around the Convention Center. Stuart Sayger, an artist on the main floor told us that customers were reporting an average waiting time of an hour and a half, just to register and get a wristband. One could measure its progress by the number of A- and B-list celebrities present or the amount of time between Philadelphia’s chapter of Comic-Con ending and the impressive press announcement for next year’s debut being released. Hell, you could even measure by the number of sexy Slave Leia sightings.
Each year, Wizard World entices smaller cities across the U.S. with the frenetic allure of San Diego’s legendary Comic-Con convention. Industry members in the world of comic books, video games, gamer technology, movies and television gather and meet with other fans, artists, actors and filmmakers in the unanimous celebration of beloved characters and series. Patrons flooded the showroom floor, stopping for photos with stars like Bruce Campbell (“Burn Notice,” “Army of Darkness”), heralded artists such as Bill Sienkiewicz (Batman: The Widening Gyre covers) and iconic vehicles like the “Scooby Doo” Mystery Van and “Back to The Future” Delorean. Perusing and massing through dozens of booths worth of art, comics and merchandise, our Friday, Saturday and Sunday were filled with non-stop people-watching and window-shopping, and always ended with our trudging back to the Spring Garden bus stop feeling exquisitely tired but content, armed with bags of new clothing items, comics, prints and illustrations and significantly lighter wallets.
Friday was spent acquainting ourselves with the new layout of the greatly expanded Convention Center, the showroom and the packed tables of merchandise, which we made ourselves wait for before scouring seriously. Besides, work made us late to the festivities, and we had panels to attend. We heard from Michael Biehn (“Terminator,” “The Rock”) and Kristanna Loken (“Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines,” “Painkiller Jane”) in promotion for Biehn’s directorial debut of “The Victim” — though the open conversation quickly converted from Biehn’s career and his “Terminator” experiences to some of the most random tangents we’ve yet to experience, most of which were very NSFW.
A panel on the digital age of comic books was a bit more enlightening, lead by artists and businessmen of largely different calibers, including representatives from Cosmixology. Principles during their discussion included the benefits of publishing independently and targeting audiences and niches without the help of today’s newspapers, which are more conservative with the choices they make in selecting comics to publish, rarely choosing stories that were created in the last 10 years. Salary was also a hot topic of the hour, as a corporate participant stated, “There is so much possible tension here when I talk [about] if comics pays as a full time job.” Another started adamantly on an rant, stating concretely: “The attitude of ‘I’m not a business guy; I just do comics’ is unacceptable in this day and age.” This led to a discussion about the integration of technology into the comic art form. Though many panelists were wary of the effects technology seems to be having on their sales and salaries, most seemed simultaneously excited about the opportunity digital media creates. The iPad, in particular, is not only making comics more accessible, but the device’s guided view has begun changing and transforming the motion of graphics and panels and how each separate piece of art is revealed and experienced.
Friday’s highlights also included Q&As with Margot Kidder (Lois Lane in the original 1978 “Superman”) and Claudia Christian (“Babylon 5″).
Comic-Con patrons seemed to take the entire couple blocks around the Convention Center hostage for all of Saturday, as anywhere you went (most definitely including Wawa — we were witnesses) you could not escape caped, masked and costumed heroes and villains, and the essential barely clothed femme fatales. And nowhere was the excitement and fever more tangible than in the Center itself, where the convention boasted more than 270 in-person “superstar creators,” sketching and selling away while kids, teens and adults milled about the various booths and tables. Saturday afternoon played host to a slew of Q&As with new and old movie and television stars. Among them were Julie Benz (“Dexter”) and a “Buffy The Vampire Slayer” panel with twin brothers Nicholas Brendon and Kelly Donovan. We didn’t leave our second row seats for a full three hours, in attendance for consecutive Star Wars-themed Q&As with Chewbacca, young Anakin Skywalker, young Boba Fett, and Lando Calrissian. (Or, you know, Peter Mayhew, Jake Lloyd, Daniel Logan and Billy Dee Williams, respectively). First up was Mayhew, Lloyd and Logan, who were seated to the side of the stage to accommodate Mayhew who was in a wheelchair with an injured leg. Nearly every question posed to the trio was preceded by fans, myself (Mike) included, simply thanking the actors for being a part of a franchise that means so much to so many people. Logan, in particular was quite energetic throughout the panel, and on the floor as well. This, I believe, is due to the fact that he is, reportedly, the only actor of the three that is still involved in the franchise, what with heavy rumors of his return to the role of Boba Fett in the live-action Star Wars television show that Lucas is working on. Summing up all their thoughts on Lucas, Mayhew said, “I think we were all lucky for trusting a man with a story. In the acting world, parts like this are very few and far between.” Logan echoed this sentiment, saying, “It’s amazing what George Lucas has created for us all.” Lloyd was particularly unenthusiastic, but one must keep in mind that he was only eight years old when he took on the infamous role of Anakin Skywalker, and has stated on many occasions that he simply doesn’t remember much of the filming.
Following that trio, the moment we all had been waiting for had finally arrived: Billy Dee Williams, or as most people know him, Lando Calrissian, the gambler, swindler, pirate, and downright scoundrel. And at 74, he hasn’t lost one iota of his swag; if anything, he has more swag than ever. The sexy Slave Leia sitting in front of us, after asking Williams who his favorite character in Star Wars was (Nien Nunb), made a point to tell him that all of her friends still referred to him as ‘Hot Chocolate’. Without missing a beat, Lando gave her the once-over, and declared her ‘Hot Vanilla’. Billy Dee admitted that he hasn’t kept up with his character in the novels, but he was quite interested in the idea of Lando’s marriage, and when asked how Lando would have seduced Leia if he got to her before Han, Williams simply laughed and simply said “Oh, you wouldn’t want to know that,” followed by his signature grin.
Other highlights included panels for the Green Lantern comic series, “The Boondock Saints” with Norman Reedus and Sean Patrick Flanery, independent filmmaking with Dan Fogler (“Fanboys,” “Balls of Fury”) and a Batman and Robin duo Q&A with Adam West and Burt Ward. Additionally, guests of Wizard World had the opportunity to flaunt their homemade and store-bought ensembles in a costume contest, then sat back and watched as the 501st Legion taught the right way to build and improve on costumes. There was light saber training for the younglings and a zombie beach party for teens and young adults. And wrapping things up Sunday afternoon, Ethan van Sciver (“Flash: Rebirth”) performed an hour-long “musical” of sorts — if musicals often have you “trapped in a small room discussing cannibalism, Wolverine, deviancy and all manner of filth and disease through the art of song.”
Offbeat and well rounded, Philadelphia’s Comic-Con was impressive but also eloquently intimate. At next year’s convention, taking place June 1-3, 2012, guests will be joined by Greg Hildebrandt, Greg Capullo, Michael Golden and Mark Teixeira and a promised “bevy of famous international creators.” Wizard World CEO Gareb Shamus announced, “Philadelphia Comic-Con is a flagship event that went extremely well … We’re excited to announce our 2012 dates with such a prestigious group of artists … I’m already impressed with our lineup, and we have 12 months left to go.”
Needless to say, we will be returning.
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Students design patch for final shuttle crew
by The Triangle

Jan 01, 2012
“Very few objects have ever been launched into space, but a few Drexel students will have the distinct experience of having their creations carried into orbit.
A team of graphic design students has given the crew on the final space shuttle mission something that the astronauts will hold close to their hearts, literally, by designing the special mission patch that astronauts will be carrying into space to be left at the International Space Station.
 
David.Stephenson
The mission patches were designed as part of an independent project conducted by a team of five upperclassmen directed by associate teaching professor Don Haring Jr. and graphic design program director Jody Graff.
“Spaceswan” by Jen Choy and “Waves” by Jeremy Bloom were selected as the patches the astronauts will be wearing during the scheduled launch Friday, July 8. The other students that participated were Cara Brobst, Herbie Hickmott and Evan Raisner.
“I’m very honored to be picked,” Bloom, a graphic design junior currently on co-op at Electronic Ink, said. “I looked at a lot of older NASA patches, but I wasn’t very inspired by them because they were so generic, just pictures of space shuttles and stars and kind of plain.”
Bloom said he looked to more terrestrial sources for influences.
“I looked at YouTube videos of jets and was really interested in the way that a jet engine created a vortex around itself, so I took that and made it a little abstract while trying to keep the space theme,” Bloom said.
Choy, who recently graduated with a degree in graphic design, said she looked more at the motion of spaceflight to design her patch.
“When I was sketching patch designs, I was inspired by motion — a launching shuttle at blastoff, the gracefulness of an astronaut floating in space,” Choy said. “My focus was to portray the shape and motion of the space shuttle as graceful and elegant but also strong, so I’d say Spaceswan is quite a fitting name.”
Each of the patches will hold a special but bittersweet place in history as the launch of STS-115 is the final space flight of the shuttle program.
Drexel will be represented by more than just the patches on the astronauts during the historic flight, as the commander of the mission is Drexel mechanical engineering alumnus Christopher Ferguson, ’84, an astronaut since 1998.
 
Photo Courtesy Drexel University
Ferguson, who has been to space on two prior shuttle missions, will have the distinct honor of commanding the four-astronaut team that will make up the last American manned spaceflight until a replacement vehicle is built.
“I would like to personally thank the Drexel community for their support and encouragement throughout the years,” Ferguson said. “Like all of the fine Drexel students, the foundation of what I became was set during my years as a Dragon. For as much as you might learn during your years as an undergraduate student, the ultimate benefit will be that you learn how be adaptable to the world around you.”
Ferguson was named the University 2009 Engineer of the Year and has spent more than 28 days in space. He came to Drexel March 16 to meet with the students who designed the patches for his mission and spoke with them about the end of the shuttle program.
“I watched STS-1 launch from the Creese Student Center,” Ferguson said. “Never in my wildest dreams did I ever imagine that 30 years later I personally would command the mission that put the period at the end of the space shuttle program. If you can imagine it, you can do it.”
Choy said she enjoyed the involvement that Ferguson had in designing the patch.
“He is a really nice, funny, down-to-earth (no pun intended), all around cool guy. I never thought I’d get to meet an astronaut, so it was a neat experience,” Choy said.
In addition to Ferguson, two other Drexel alumni have reached space aboard the space shuttle, James Bagian, ’73, who spent 15 years with NASA and flew in 1989 and 1991, and Paul Richards, ’87, who voyaged to space aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery in 2001.
Professors involved with the design of the patch were proud of the strong connections that Drexel has with the elite Shuttle program.
“We were incredibly honored when shuttle commander Chris Ferguson first approached the graphic design program about designing a mission patch,” said Haring. “The students couldn’t believe they had a chance to design for NASA, and I couldn’t have been more excited to advise and help them, especially considering the importance of this last shuttle flight. It was an amazing opportunity for all of us, and as always, we’re incredibly proud of creativity and skill in our students.”
The University will be channeling a young Ferguson watching STS-1 by holding a launch party July 8 to watch the final shuttle blast off. The party starts at 11 a.m., and the 11:26 a.m. launch will be shown on a large screen in the Bossone lobby. It is open to the public, and food and drinks will be served. In attendance are expected to be 140 children from the Drexel STAR summer scholars program and the NASA Summer Program who might, one day, remember when they watched the last shuttle flight at Drexel as they wait for their turn to journey into space.
 
—————————–
Updated July 5, 2011 9:00 A.M.
Correction: The astronauts will be carrying the patches into space and leaving the patches aboard the International Space Station as tokens of their visit. The previous version of the article misstated that the patches would be worn on the uniforms of the astronauts.
 
 
 
 
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Sodexo corrects sanitation issues
by The Triangle

Jul 02, 2011
“The Handschumacher Dining Center was found to be out of compliance with several provisions of the Pennsylvania Food Code during an inspection Dec. 30, 2010.
The violations recorded in the report included mouse feces found in the kitchens and storage areas, fruit flies observed underneath a self-serve beverage station and lack of a dedicated sink for mop-water disposal, among other violations.
Retail Management Director Jackelyn Eliassen said in a written statement that all of the problems reported in the inspection have since been resolved.
“Sodexo worked closely with their corporate food safety and quality assurance teams and the Drexel University Facilities team to rectify the violations immediately,” Eliassen said. “When the dining center reopened for winter 2011, all food service and many of the facility issues were corrected. No fines or penalties were imposed.”
Eliassen went on to say that that the dining hall received a nearly perfect score in a Feb. 16 inspection by the National Sanitation Foundation, and that no problems were found during internal audits by Sodexo in May.
“Sodexo was awarded the highest possible score in an NSF audit, a third-party health inspection that sets the industry standard for food, physical and equipment safety. Sodexo scored 99.5 percent on food safety and 98 percent on physical safety. Drexel Dining Services also has regularly scheduled service and inspections from a licensed pest control company. Measures taken have been very effective,” Eliassen said.
Although the dining hall staff took measures to eliminate the specific problems reported in December, other similar flaws were found in a June 6 inspection by city officials.
“These violations included gnats present in the soda area, the need for additional breath guards in the counter and bread prep area, and uncovered food in the walk-in box, which was corrected immediately. Overall, the [Philadelphia] Board of Health was impressed with the steps taken since the last inspection and saw no need to reinspect in the near future,” Eliassen said.
Despite the actions taken to improve sanitation in the dining hall, student opinions of the facility remain widely unfavorable. Communication major Megan Halicek was shocked upon reading the December inspection report.
“I had no idea that this was happening, and it’s very disgusting,” Halicek said. “It appears that they’re taking care of it, but I still don’t feel that great about it because all this was happening initially.”
While Retail Management and Sodexo appear to have made significant improvements to the dining hall, at least one sign of remaining flaws has been observed since the start of the summer term. Digital media major Seth Garber reported in a Facebook post that he saw a mouse in the dining hall June 21.
“[I] just saw a mouse run around the dining hall floor. New low for Drexel Dining,” Garber wrote.
The full report on the December inspection is available online for those who wish to learn more details.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Pop culture overhaul at Comic Con
by The Triangle

Jul 02, 2011
“The mob of costumed fanatics wrapped around the Philadelphia Convention Center the weekend of June 17-19 must have had onlookers and passersby a little confused. Summer just started, so why are we acting like it’s Halloween?
Well, because for closet nerds as well as self-proclaimed ones, geeks and fervent fans alike, Wizard World’s Philadelphia Comic-Con provides the magic of a favorite holiday: spreading joy and bringing Magic players, Ghost Busters, and Star Wars enthusiasts together, while only coming once a year. Last month’s affair marked the 11th return of the annual touring Comic-Convention to Philadelphia, and it was, by many measures, a success. Photo Courtesy Hope Lanphear A team of Ghostbusters attracted many onlookers to their booth during the Wizard World's Philadelphia chapter of Comic Con, held at the Convention Center Friday, June 17 through Sunday, June 19.
For one, the line of teenagers, old heads, parents and children anxious to get inside wrapped three-quarters of the way around the Convention Center. Stuart Sayger, an artist on the main floor told us that customers were reporting an average waiting time of an hour and a half, just to register and get a wristband. One could measure its progress by the number of A- and B-list celebrities present or the amount of time between Philadelphia’s chapter of Comic-Con ending and the impressive press announcement for next year’s debut being released. Hell, you could even measure by the number of sexy Slave Leia sightings.
Each year, Wizard World entices smaller cities across the U.S. with the frenetic allure of San Diego’s legendary Comic-Con convention. Industry members in the world of comic books, video games, gamer technology, movies and television gather and meet with other fans, artists, actors and filmmakers in the unanimous celebration of beloved characters and series. Patrons flooded the showroom floor, stopping for photos with stars like Bruce Campbell (“Burn Notice,” “Army of Darkness”), heralded artists such as Bill Sienkiewicz (Batman: The Widening Gyre covers) and iconic vehicles like the “Scooby Doo” Mystery Van and “Back to The Future” Delorean. Perusing and massing through dozens of booths worth of art, comics and merchandise, our Friday, Saturday and Sunday were filled with non-stop people-watching and window-shopping, and always ended with our trudging back to the Spring Garden bus stop feeling exquisitely tired but content, armed with bags of new clothing items, comics, prints and illustrations and significantly lighter wallets.
Friday was spent acquainting ourselves with the new layout of the greatly expanded Convention Center, the showroom and the packed tables of merchandise, which we made ourselves wait for before scouring seriously. Besides, work made us late to the festivities, and we had panels to attend. We heard from Michael Biehn (“Terminator,” “The Rock”) and Kristanna Loken (“Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines,” “Painkiller Jane”) in promotion for Biehn’s directorial debut of “The Victim” — though the open conversation quickly converted from Biehn’s career and his “Terminator” experiences to some of the most random tangents we’ve yet to experience, most of which were very NSFW.
A panel on the digital age of comic books was a bit more enlightening, lead by artists and businessmen of largely different calibers, including representatives from Cosmixology. Principles during their discussion included the benefits of publishing independently and targeting audiences and niches without the help of today’s newspapers, which are more conservative with the choices they make in selecting comics to publish, rarely choosing stories that were created in the last 10 years. Salary was also a hot topic of the hour, as a corporate participant stated, “There is so much possible tension here when I talk [about] if comics pays as a full time job.” Another started adamantly on an rant, stating concretely: “The attitude of ‘I’m not a business guy; I just do comics’ is unacceptable in this day and age.” This led to a discussion about the integration of technology into the comic art form. Though many panelists were wary of the effects technology seems to be having on their sales and salaries, most seemed simultaneously excited about the opportunity digital media creates. The iPad, in particular, is not only making comics more accessible, but the device’s guided view has begun changing and transforming the motion of graphics and panels and how each separate piece of art is revealed and experienced.
Friday’s highlights also included Q&As with Margot Kidder (Lois Lane in the original 1978 “Superman”) and Claudia Christian (“Babylon 5″).
Comic-Con patrons seemed to take the entire couple blocks around the Convention Center hostage for all of Saturday, as anywhere you went (most definitely including Wawa — we were witnesses) you could not escape caped, masked and costumed heroes and villains, and the essential barely clothed femme fatales. And nowhere was the excitement and fever more tangible than in the Center itself, where the convention boasted more than 270 in-person “superstar creators,” sketching and selling away while kids, teens and adults milled about the various booths and tables. Saturday afternoon played host to a slew of Q&As with new and old movie and television stars. Among them were Julie Benz (“Dexter”) and a “Buffy The Vampire Slayer” panel with twin brothers Nicholas Brendon and Kelly Donovan. We didn’t leave our second row seats for a full three hours, in attendance for consecutive Star Wars-themed Q&As with Chewbacca, young Anakin Skywalker, young Boba Fett, and Lando Calrissian. (Or, you know, Peter Mayhew, Jake Lloyd, Daniel Logan and Billy Dee Williams, respectively). First up was Mayhew, Lloyd and Logan, who were seated to the side of the stage to accommodate Mayhew who was in a wheelchair with an injured leg. Nearly every question posed to the trio was preceded by fans, myself (Mike) included, simply thanking the actors for being a part of a franchise that means so much to so many people. Logan, in particular was quite energetic throughout the panel, and on the floor as well. This, I believe, is due to the fact that he is, reportedly, the only actor of the three that is still involved in the franchise, what with heavy rumors of his return to the role of Boba Fett in the live-action Star Wars television show that Lucas is working on. Summing up all their thoughts on Lucas, Mayhew said, “I think we were all lucky for trusting a man with a story. In the acting world, parts like this are very few and far between.” Logan echoed this sentiment, saying, “It’s amazing what George Lucas has created for us all.” Lloyd was particularly unenthusiastic, but one must keep in mind that he was only eight years old when he took on the infamous role of Anakin Skywalker, and has stated on many occasions that he simply doesn’t remember much of the filming.
Following that trio, the moment we all had been waiting for had finally arrived: Billy Dee Williams, or as most people know him, Lando Calrissian, the gambler, swindler, pirate, and downright scoundrel. And at 74, he hasn’t lost one iota of his swag; if anything, he has more swag than ever. The sexy Slave Leia sitting in front of us, after asking Williams who his favorite character in Star Wars was (Nien Nunb), made a point to tell him that all of her friends still referred to him as ‘Hot Chocolate’. Without missing a beat, Lando gave her the once-over, and declared her ‘Hot Vanilla’. Billy Dee admitted that he hasn’t kept up with his character in the novels, but he was quite interested in the idea of Lando’s marriage, and when asked how Lando would have seduced Leia if he got to her before Han, Williams simply laughed and simply said “Oh, you wouldn’t want to know that,” followed by his signature grin.
Other highlights included panels for the Green Lantern comic series, “The Boondock Saints” with Norman Reedus and Sean Patrick Flanery, independent filmmaking with Dan Fogler (“Fanboys,” “Balls of Fury”) and a Batman and Robin duo Q&A with Adam West and Burt Ward. Additionally, guests of Wizard World had the opportunity to flaunt their homemade and store-bought ensembles in a costume contest, then sat back and watched as the 501st Legion taught the right way to build and improve on costumes. There was light saber training for the younglings and a zombie beach party for teens and young adults. And wrapping things up Sunday afternoon, Ethan van Sciver (“Flash: Rebirth”) performed an hour-long “musical” of sorts — if musicals often have you “trapped in a small room discussing cannibalism, Wolverine, deviancy and all manner of filth and disease through the art of song.”
Offbeat and well rounded, Philadelphia’s Comic-Con was impressive but also eloquently intimate. At next year’s convention, taking place June 1-3, 2012, guests will be joined by Greg Hildebrandt, Greg Capullo, Michael Golden and Mark Teixeira and a promised “bevy of famous international creators.” Wizard World CEO Gareb Shamus announced, “Philadelphia Comic-Con is a flagship event that went extremely well … We’re excited to announce our 2012 dates with such a prestigious group of artists … I’m already impressed with our lineup, and we have 12 months left to go.”
Needless to say, we will be returning.
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Students design patch for final shuttle crew
by The Triangle

Jul 02, 2011
“Very few objects have ever been launched into space, but a few Drexel students will have the distinct experience of having their creations carried into orbit.
A team of graphic design students has given the crew on the final space shuttle mission something that the astronauts will hold close to their hearts, literally, by designing the special mission patch that will be attached to the astronauts’ uniforms.
David.Stephenson
The mission patches were designed as part of an independent project conducted by a team of five upperclassmen directed by associate teaching professor Don Haring Jr. and graphic design program director Jody Graff.
“Spaceswan” by Jen Choy and “Waves” by Jeremy Bloom were selected as the patches the astronauts will be wearing during the scheduled launch Friday, July 8. The other students that participated were Cara Brobst, Herbie Hickmott and Evan Raisner.
“I’m very honored to be picked,” Bloom, a graphic design junior currently on co-op at Electronic Ink, said. “I looked at a lot of older NASA patches, but I wasn’t very inspired by them because they were so generic, just pictures of space shuttles and stars and kind of plain.”
Bloom said he looked to more terrestrial sources for influences.
“I looked at YouTube videos of jets and was really interested in the way that a jet engine created a vortex around itself, so I took that and made it a little abstract while trying to keep the space theme,” Bloom said.
Choy, who recently graduated with a degree in graphic design, said she looked more at the motion of spaceflight to design her patch.
“When I was sketching patch designs, I was inspired by motion — a launching shuttle at blastoff, the gracefulness of an astronaut floating in space,” Choy said. “My focus was to portray the shape and motion of the space shuttle as graceful and elegant but also strong, so I’d say Spaceswan is quite a fitting name.”
Each of the patches will hold a special but bittersweet place in history as the launch of STS-115 is the final space flight of the shuttle program.
Drexel will be represented by more than just the patches on the astronauts during the historic flight, as the commander of the mission is Drexel mechanical engineering alumnus Christopher Ferguson, ’84, an astronaut since 1998.
Photo Courtesy Drexel University
Ferguson, who has been to space on two prior shuttle missions, will have the distinct honor of commanding the four-astronaut team that will make up the last American manned spaceflight until a replacement vehicle is built.
“I would like to personally thank the Drexel community for their support and encouragement throughout the years,” Ferguson said. “Like all of the fine Drexel students, the foundation of what I became was set during my years as a Dragon. For as much as you might learn during your years as an undergraduate student, the ultimate benefit will be that you learn how be adaptable to the world around you.”
Ferguson was named the University 2009 Engineer of the Year and has spent more than 28 days in space. He came to Drexel March 16 to meet with the students who designed the patches for his mission and spoke with them about the end of the shuttle program.
“I watched STS-1 launch from the Creese Student Center,” Ferguson said. “Never in my wildest dreams did I ever imagine that 30 years later I personally would command the mission that put the period at the end of the space shuttle program. If you can imagine it, you can do it.”
Choy said she enjoyed the involvement that Ferguson had in designing the patch.
“He is a really nice, funny, down-to-earth (no pun intended), all around cool guy. I never thought I’d get to meet an astronaut, so it was a neat experience,” Choy said.
In addition to Ferguson, two other Drexel alumni have reached space aboard the space shuttle, James Bagian, ’73, who spent 15 years with NASA and flew in 1989 and 1991, and Paul Richards, ’87, who voyaged to space aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery in 2001.
Professors involved with the design of the patch were proud of the strong connections that Drexel has with the elite Shuttle program.
“We were incredibly honored when shuttle commander Chris Ferguson first approached the graphic design program about designing a mission patch,” said Haring. “The students couldn’t believe they had a chance to design for NASA, and I couldn’t have been more excited to advise and help them, especially considering the importance of this last shuttle flight. It was an amazing opportunity for all of us, and as always, we’re incredibly proud of creativity and skill in our students.”
The University will be channeling a young Ferguson watching STS-1 by holding a launch party July 8 to watch the final shuttle blast off. The party starts at 11 a.m., and the 11:26 a.m. launch will be shown on a large screen in the Bossone lobby. It is open to the public, and food and drinks will be served. In attendance are expected to be 140 children from the Drexel STAR summer scholars program and the NASA Summer Program who might, one day, remember when they watched the last shuttle flight at Drexel as they wait for their turn to journey into space.
 
 
 
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Celebrity chef Morimoto partners with brewery
by The Triangle

Jun 03, 2011
“Celebrity chefs are nothing new to the American food scene, but over the past several years they have begun to pay more attention to beer. While I think this is good overall – especially as they begin to bring high quality craft beers into higher class establishments traditionally reserved for wine and liquor – it has also resulted in the permeation of their brands into the beer market.
The poster child for this is Morimoto’s collaboration with Rogue Brewing Company, which has brought at least four different beers under the Morimoto name to Philadelphia. According to Rogue’s website, three of these beers were brewed specifically for Morimoto (Soba Ale, Black Obi and Imperial Pilsner), while the fourth is simply a rebottling of Rogue’s Hazelnut Brown Nectar under the name Morimoto Hazelnut Brown. This fourth beer was the only one of the series in stock at the Foodery, so I decided to give it a chance.
Rogue Brewery opened in October 1988 as a brewpub in Ashland, Ore., by Jack Joyce, Bob Woodell and Rob Strasser. The company struggled at first and decided that if they were going to succeed they needed to expand beyond Ashland. Mohave Niemi, director of the Port of Newport, convinced Joyce to open up their second brewpub in a vacant storefront, which she rented to them on two conditions: that the brewery give back to the community once they were established, and that they always display a picture of her naked in a bathtub in the bar (and they still do, even after her death).
Masaharu Morimoto came to the United States in 1985 after operating a restaurant in Japan and quickly established himself in New York City. While working at an esteemed Japanese restaurant named Nobu, he gained fame from the TV show Iron Chef. In 2001, he opened his eponymous restaurant here in Philadelphia and he began working with Rogue to develop beers in 2005. This was a perfect fit for both parties, as Morimoto’s expertise is with fusion food styles and Rogue has always designed their beers to be consumed with food.
The Hazelnut Brown pours a clear, dark brown, which appears a golden red when held up to a light. The head forms as only half a finger of coarse, light coffee colored foam, which dissipates in less than two minutes. There is a ring of foam left around the glass and the beer leaves a little bit of lacing as it is drunk, but overall the head disappears surprisingly quickly. The aroma is dominated by a roasted coffee scent, but some sweet malt and hazelnut notes serve to add a much-needed complexity. The body is moderately thin, but the carbonation is quite odd. It is very fine and sharp, but not sparkly at all. This is a very interesting sensation that I don’t often experience in beer, and serves as a nice counterpoint to many of the highly carbonated, almost champagne-like beers I’ve had recently.
Overall the body is quite creamy, but does not linger; I found this quite impressive, as most beers I’ve had with any significant body at all seem to coat my mouth and linger for several minutes afterwards. The initial taste for this beer is of sweet malt, but that is quickly displaced by a roasted malt, almost like a good stout, in the middle of the taste. The big finish for this beer is a massive hazelnut taste, which also leaves a very dry impression behind.
Overall, I thought the beer was fairly well balanced, although the amount of hazelnut in the finish was a bit of overkill. The beer went down quite easily, but the strong hazelnut character means that I’ll reserve this beer for interesting food pairings, rather than an every day beer.
Alcohol: 6.2%
Price: $5.99/22 oz
Appearance: 4
Aroma: 4
Mouthfeel: 4
Taste: 3.5
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Entry-level jobs hard to secure
by The Triangle

Jun 03, 2011
“Mikhail Furman
Are you moving home after graduation? If so, you’re not alone. According to The Huffington Post, 85 percent of college students moved back in with their parents upon finishing school in 2011. It’s not a stretch to say that the average college degree doesn’t go as far as it once used to. Unfortunately, greater numbers of graduating students are beginning to see that going to college is hardly any guarantee of employment. In the U.S., 22.4 percent of 2009 college graduates under the age of 25 are currently not working, according to Andrew Sum of Northeastern University. This age group has not witnessed unemployment this high since 1970.
Irrespective of the difficulties that large numbers of recent college graduates are dealing with finding jobs in the current economy, many still have tens of thousands of dollars worth of loans accumulated during their college years, which they must pay off with interest. Consequently, the pressure to pay the monthly bills forces many graduates into working in areas such as food services and data entry, which do not require a college degree at all. This phenomenon may have quite severe long-term effects upon the likelihood of recent graduates later being hired for the kinds of jobs that are closely related to their college major(s). There is also a high risk of college students’ major-related job skills falling into disuse and disrepair at their irrelevant, short-term jobs. Employers are likely to view these students with skepticism and negativity, as a result of their having gone through multiple part-time jobs unrelated to their professional field of training. Rutgers University labor economist Carl Van Horn’s refrain that “[students’] salary history follows them wherever they go” is a major concern to the aforementioned graduates because it may largely doom them to a working life of relatively low wages and little potential for upward mobility.
Even the 56 percent of college graduates who are fortunate enough to be working in jobs that require a college degree have seen their median starting salaries dip to $27,000 from $30,000 several years earlier, according to a study done by the John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development at Rutgers University.
The intense competitive challenge of the current entry-level job market has recent graduates particularly desperate to showcase themselves as valuable candidates to every potential employer. In the present job climate, however, even students who show lots of effort and resourcefulness in their job search may still get left out in the cold.
In order to alleviate the potential for unfortunate situations like this, Steven Rothberg, president and founder of CollegeRecruiter.com , argues that the sooner 2011 college graduates start searching for a job, the greater their chances of success will be.
“Everyone should be looking for their next job all the time, because networking is integral to any successful job search,” Rothberg said in an earlier interview.
Katherine Brooks, director of the career center for the Liberal Arts College at the University of Texas at Austin added that, in order to maximize their job opportunities coming out of school, college graduates should expand their job search beyond just the field that they majored in. According to “The Wall Street Journal,” she said that “the major doesn’t necessarily equal their career.”
In the WSJ Cornell University’s Director of Career Services, Rebecca Sparrow argued that “… most people are not going to stay in that first job for 10 years.” Consequently, you should not necessarily perceive it as the job that will perfectly set up the rest of your career. The bottom line is that in order to avoid the humbling experience of moving back in with your parents, going the extra mile to land your first job is no longer optional.
Mikhail Furman is majoring in economics. He can be reached at op-ed@thetriangle.org.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Crime & Policy Violation Report
by The Triangle

Jun 04, 2011
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety between May 15, 2011 and May 23, 2011. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
Assault 1
May 21, 1:55 a.m. 100 Block of North 34th St.
On May 21 at 1:55 a.m., a Drexel student reported that he was punched by an unknown male, causing injuries to his mouth.
Burglary 6
May 17, 12:20 p.m. 3100 Block of J.F.K. Blvd.
On May 17, between 12:20 p.m. and 12:30 p.m., two Drexel students reported that unknown person(s) entered their unlocked room and took a computer and electronics.
May 17, 12:30 p.m. 3100 Block of J.F.K. Blvd.
On May 17, between 12:30 p.m. and 12:35 p.m., two Drexel students reported that unknown person(s) entered their unlocked room and took two MacBook computers.
May 20, 4:10 a.m. 3100 Block of J.F.K. Blvd.
On May 20, between 4:10 a.m. and 4:15 a.m., a Drexel student reported that an unknown male entered her room through an unlocked door and took her iPod touch.
May 20, 2 p.m. 3100 Block of J.F.K. Blvd.
On May 20, between 2 p.m. and 4:45 p.m., two Drexel students reported that unknown person(s) entered their unlocked room and took two MacBook computers.
May 20, 7:30 p.m. 200 Block of North 34th St.
On May 20, between 7:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) entered his unlocked room and took a MacBook computer.
May 23, 1:30 a.m. 3100 Block of Market St.
On May 23, between 1:30 a.m. and 9:30 a.m., a Drexel staff member reported that unknown person(s) entered an unlocked lab room and took four laptop computers.
Theft 9
May 15, 7 p.m. Unit Block of North 30th St.
On May 15, between 7 p.m. and 7:57 p.m., a non-Drexel affiliate reported that unknown person(s) took his laptop computer that was left unattended.
May 15, 9:30 p.m. 3400 Block of Warren St.
Between May 15 at 9:30 p.m. and May 16 at 10 a.m., a non-Drexel affiliate reported that unknown person(s) broke the window to his truck and took tools and personal items left in view.
May 16, 1 p.m. 400 Block of North 32nd St.
On May 16, between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m., a non-Drexel affiliate reported that unknown person(s) took two outdoor chairs that were left unsecured on her porch.
May 17, 9:30 a.m. 3200 Block of Summer St.
Between May 17 at 9:30 a.m. and May 18 at 9 p.m., a Drexel student reported that her car window was broken and a bag containing personal items was taken. Philadelphia Police arrested Prentice Thomas, 42, for this offense.
May 17, noon 3200 Block of Chestnut St.
On May 17, between noon. and 5 p.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) took his bike that was secured to a bike rack with a chain lock.
May 19, 9:30 a.m. 3300 Block of Arch St.
Between May 19 at 9:30 a.m. and May 22 at 6 p.m., a Drexel Student reported that unknown person(s) entered her unlocked room and took her iPod that was left unsecured.
May 19, 11 a.m. 3200 Block of Chestnut St.
On May 19, between 11 a.m. and 12:45 p.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) took his bike that was secured to a bike rack with a cable lock.
May 21, 8:45 p.m. 3300 Block of Market St.
On May 21, between 8:45 p.m. and 9 p.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) took his laptop computer that was left unattended on a table.
May 23, 5:55 p.m. 3200 Block of Chestnut St.
On May 23, between 5:55 p.m. and 6:05 p.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) took his bike that was secured to a tree with a spiral lock.
Trespassing 1
May 18, 1:18 p.m. 3100 Block of J.F.K. Blvd.
On May 18 at 1:18 p.m., Drexel Police arrested a male non-Drexel affiliate identified as Stephen Kelly for trespassing and intoxication after he was found in an unauthorized area.
Vandalism 1
May 17, 1 p.m. 400 Block of North 42nd St.
Between May 17 at 1 p.m. and May 19 at 3 p.m., a Drexel staff member reported that unknown person(s) cut a hole into the fence of the athletic field.
Alcohol and Drug Policy Violations 2
During the period covered by this report, there were three (3) reported policy violations for alcohol. The reports were sent to the Office of Student Conduct for review.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Westphal seniors get one last show
by The Triangle

May 27, 2011
“Spring term’s end is around the corner and Drexel is presenting the Westphal College Senior Shows. This is an exciting time of year and the senior shows are a great way to celebrate the work accomplished by the end the term.
The Film and Video majors gathered Saturday, May 21 in Bossone’s Mitchell Auditorium to enjoy 30 separate film features, directed and produced by the senior class. A number of projects boasted the use of one of Hollywood’s most sought-after cameras, the Red One, used in blockbusters such as “District 9” and “The Hobbit.”
On June 3, the interior design show will be held in the Bossone Research Center’s 3rd floor Atrium at 6 p.m. Refreshments will be served as the interior design students are able to commemorate and display their talented work for faculty, students and peers to enjoy. Some of the designs that will be shown include thesis projects, furniture designs and a model of Dranoff’s apartment building, among many other creations. Saturday, June 4 kicks off another event, which brings the fashion design students to the Urban Outfitters Corporate Headquarters at 4 p.m. (tickets are $25) and 8 p.m. (tickets are $50). This show will exhibit clothing that had been constructed and made by the design students after seven months of research into different cultures, such as Indian, Moroccan and Japanese. The artwork, as well as artists that have influenced each design, will be strutted down the runway. After the 8 p.m. fashion show, everyone will commence at a reception.
The digital media program will present their show from 1-3 p.m. and 3-5 p.m. Sunday, June 5. The teams will reveal the projects they have been working on and the event will be followed by a reception. Taking place in Bossone’s Mitchell Auditorium, the students will show demos of their technological advances such as video games, 3D simulation, net design and digital productions.
The next show that takes place starts with a reception open to all for the Senior Photography Show June 3, as well as from June 6-9, where the students’ photography will be unveiled at Skybox 2424 Studios in Fishtown. Seventeen photographers will gain recognition for their masterful photography skills, featuring a wide range of modern and older looking photographs.
The Gallery at 3401 Filbert will hold a show for graphic designers Thursday, June 9 at 6 p.m. The graphic designer majors have an array of projects, such as web design, construction of publications, the award-winning “Paper Cloud” and other countless impressive models to showcase.
From the performing arts department, numerous ensembles and music groups will be performing their class repertoire, which started May 22 with the Mediterranean ensemble. On May 27, at 4 p.m., the keyboard ensemble class will host a show in the Mandell lobby. The Jazz Ensemble will stage their music in Bossone’s Mitchell Auditorium at 8 p.m. Thursday, June 2. The Drexel String Orchestra and All College Choir will share the stage of the Main Auditorium in the Main Building June 3 at 7:30 p.m. The String Orchestra’s theme, “Spring Mix,” will include works by masters such as Mozart, Debussy, Puccini and Brahms.
Also on June 3 on another side of campus, students and faculty can look forward to the Fusion Band, Rock Ensemble, Percussion Ensemble and Guitar Ensemble’s performances in the Spring Music Festival, taking place in the Quad at 4 p.m. These performances are set to feature hypnotizing songs and music that will also be benefiting To Write Love on Her Arms , a non-profit organization to help people who battle with depression, suicide, addiction and other self-harming causes. On Saturday, June 4, the Stein Auditorium will entertain guests with the Gospel Choir’s “Night of Ministries,” and on Sunday, June 5, the University Chorus and Chamber Singers will sing in the Main Auditorium in the Main Building, performing the Great Court Concert at 3 p.m.
In addition, the dance program’s concerts will occur June 2-5, introducing the Dance Ensemble, FreshDance and Youth Performance Exchange. The title of the Dance Ensemble’s show is “Bridges Over the Walls” and the performance will be at 8 p.m., from June 2 to June 4. “Forward Motion,” by FreshDance (the freshman-only dancers at Drexel), will make their appearance June 4 at 3 p.m. and June 5 at 1 p.m. in the Mandell Theater. Tickets will be sold to students with an ID for $5 or $8 for the general public.
At 11 a.m. Friday, June 3, students from local areas will come to the Mandell Theater to support their fellow students in the Youth Performance Exchange.
The Architecture Annual Exhibit of Student Work will be held in the fall.
Congratulations to the graduating seniors and the impressive shows at which they will be displaying many months of hard work. Be sure to come join in on the fun and support the seniors by saying farewell and attending the many exhibits and performances!
 ”

respond
 
Importance
2
Innovations awarded by foundation
by The Triangle

May 28, 2011
“The Wallace H. Coulter Foundation recently awarded Drexel University $10 million, which the University matched in order to endow the Coulter Translational Research Partnership program to support its development of biomedical innovations, as announced April 26.
According to Drexel’s press release, the now $20 million joint funding will “bring life saving solutions to clinical practice by moving promising biomedical discoveries to commercialization.”
Banu Onaral, H.H. Sun professor and director of the School of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Health Systems, stressed the impact this endowment has on the University as a whole.
“The impact of the program on our school and our partner academic units, particularly the College of Medicine has been significant,” Onaral wrote in an email, noting that developing innovations requires interdisciplinary collaboration.
Photo Courtesy Steve Detofsky
The Coulter Foundation’s translational research partnership operates with “the goal of accelerating the introduction of new technologies into patient care,” according to its website. It frequently endows various universities with grant money to make this possible.
Drexel’s endowment comes after a five-year trial period that ended on April 1.
“Our students, faculty and staff have worked very hard over the last five years to earn this national recognition,” Onaral wrote. “Often referred as the ‘Grand Experiment,’ we worked together with 10 top universities selected out of more than 80 contenders.”
University representatives had to prove that their research was both excellent and sustainable before funding would be considered. Onaral noted that the funding was only awarded to universities that complied with strict criteria in the areas of academia and technology transfer.
“We have tested, validated and institutionalized the processes and positions necessary to commercialize our research outcomes,” Onaral explained.
Working closely with the Office of Technology Commercialization, alumni and Coulter project directors, Dr. Robert Loring and Davood Tashayyod have spearheaded the partnership between the University and the Foundation.
“They have served as our interface to the commercialization, business and investment community as well as our alumni and friends,” Onaral wrote.
Part of the commercialization process necessary for the endowment was adopting the Coulter Process, a development process for innovations. This requires establishing intellectual property, adhering to the Food and Drug Association’s requirements and noting critical milestones, among other things.
Representatives from the Coulter Foundation staff came to Philadelphia for a lab audit Dec. 14, later discussing an endowment agreement with University representatives. By Dec. 16, the BIOMED school staff knew of the upcoming endowment.
Tashayyod explained how the money would be allocated now that the partnership has been finalized.
“As was the case during the five year trial period the same amount of money will continue to be allocated to deserving technologies and proposals by an Oversight Committee of 10 people made up from members of Academia … industry representatives as well as representatives from the financing community,” he said.
“The spirit of the grant is fully consistent with the mandate of the School of Biomedical Engineering and our commitment to work on life saving health solutions with our partners within the University and our region,” Onaral said. “We were meant for it and worked hard for it.”
The partnership has already helped license certain innovations for the University, including a wound monitor to help heal diabetes-associated wounds and a non-invasive, radiation-free, portable breast cancer-screening device.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Honoris causa: no honor, all cause
by The Triangle

May 20, 2011
“Robert Zaller
I have always been mildly puzzled by the institution of the honorary degree. Prizes in general I think are a dubious commodity, but at least one can understand them: they exist for the purpose of being conferred. Academic degrees, though, normally have to be worked for. They’re given in recognition of the successful completion of a course of study or the production of a work of scholarship duly vetted by those already admitted to the fraternity. I am the humble possessor of three such degrees, and I can attest that they do indeed require labor.
An honorary degree, though, is one bestowed on someone who hasn’t worked for it. It’s a sort of prize for having done something else. Sometimes, the something else is having made a lot of money and given some of it to the granting institution. Occasionally, it’s in the hope the degree recipient will give money, or access to influence in high places; in other words, as an enticement, or, in less polite language, a bribe. This doesn’t make those who have worked for their degrees feel them to be more valuable or selective.
Where such motives are not at issue, at least directly, honorary degrees are ritual exchanges of prestige. So-and-so has achieved great distinction in some nonacademic walk of life, occasionally as a robber baron or war criminal but perhaps as an artist, scientist, athlete or politician. The granting institution confers some of its own prestige on the honoree, and receives in turn a tincture of whatever prestige — or notoriety — said honoree has earned.
Sometimes, a political statement is being made, which is why people such as Desmond Tutu and Elie Wiesel are honored so often. During the reign of Constantine Papadakis, after Drexel had unctuously hosted a visit by the then-President of China, Jiang Zemin, on whose hands the blood of the Tiananmen massacre was still fairly fresh, I suggested that it award its next honorary degree to a prominent Chinese dissident. This proposal received no second. Perhaps that was just as well, because I have now come to the conclusion that honorary degrees are simply a bad idea — bad for the recipient, who is given something he hasn’t earned, and bad for universities, because it cheapens the value of degrees actually earned. It also, on occasion, involves universities in controversies they would do well to stay out of.
A case in point is the current fracas over the decision to deny an honorary doctorate to the playwright Tony Kushner by the City College of New York. Such decisions typically require the consent of university boards of trustees. On this occasion, a dissent to the proposed award of a degree to Kushner by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice was voiced by a trustee, Jeffrey S. Weisenfeld, who was unexpectedly joined by four other trustees. The board decided to shelve the nomination, which lacked the required three-quarters vote of approval.
Weisenfeld, an investment banker and political advisor to former Governor George Patacki, had no expertise on the subject of Kushner’s plays; but then, neither did a college of criminal justice. His objection was to certain political views expressed by Kushner on the subject of Israel and the Palestinians. Kushner, himself a Jew, is on record as having denounced Israel for having practiced “ethnic cleansing” against the Arab population of Palestine during its war of independence, and of continuing to practice, what amounts to today as, cultural genocide toward Palestinians.
The background to this episode must be noted. Two years ago, John Jay gave a medal to Mary Robinson, who had presided over a conference on racism in Durban, South Africa that had degenerated into a crude exercise in anti-Semitism and from which the United States had withdrawn. Weisenfeld had registered his objections to that award, but, having no formal say in the matter, found himself brushed off by John Jay’s president, Jeremy Travers. So there was institutional history here, and on Weisenfeld’s part, bruised feelings.
All politically correct hell broke loose. CUNY’s decision was denounced in a New York Times editorial. Calls came for Weisenfeld’s resignation. Kushner, for his part, said that his views had been misrepresented. He also received a huge windfall of publicity for his new play, which has just opened in New York.
Tony Kushner has already received 15 honorary degrees, and a 16th would certainly be of marginal utility to him. John Jay wouldn’t be getting much luster for joining a line as long as it is to honor a playwright whose one significant work, overlong and over praised, is nearly 20 years old. You have to think a political agenda was in play; in fact, John Jay’s faculty senate cited Kushner’s “work” as a public intellectual — in other words, his political opinions — as a prime reason for proposing to honor him. The idea backfired. However this dust-up ends, it’s going to leave egg on CUNY’s face.
I don’t imagine the university as an ivory tower isolated from the world of politics. I think, in fact, that it can be a distinctive and even indispensable arena for engaging it. But it has no business sponsoring anyone’s opinions as an institution, whether by direct citation or, as in this case, by implication (Kushner had been embroiled in a similar controversy at Brandeis in 2006). If John Jay’s faculty wants to commend Tony Kushner, it should do so by resolution of its own, and take whatever heat results on its own head. Better yet, it should get out of the awards business entirely. A university is a very proper place to debate differences of political opinion and action. It is no place at all to honor opinion as such.
Robert Zaller is a professor of history. He can be reached at op-ed@thetriangle.org.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel crew wins two medals at Dad Vail - Triangle assistant sports editor participates in eight-boat race and emerges victorious
by The Triangle

May 20, 2011
“Ajon.Brodie | The New Triangle The varsity eight boat of the Drexel women’s crew team made it all the way to the second finals after advancing through the semi-finals of the 2011 Dad Vail Regatta. The boat also just missed out on a grand finale. The legendary Aberdeen Dad Vail Regatta took place on the Schuylkill River May 14. College crews from across the nation trained year-round in preparation for this one event. The teams had early practices on the water, two-a-days in the off-season and a miniscule social life — all for what? For the love of the game, and more importantly, to win.
 
As an outsider it’s hard to understand why rowers put their bodies and minds through such a grueling process. The only way to understand the mind of a rower is to become one — so that’s what I did. What better time to row than at the crème-de-la-crème of rowing — the Dad Vail.
Since I am not a collegiate rower, there was only one way I could partake in the races — to row in the corporate challenge. My mother’s company, Hope Paige Designs, entered a novice eight into the race — and lo and behold, we won our heat.
I can honestly say I get it now.
Winning was a perk, but the experience was unexplainable. Rowing in tandem with seven other people takes teamwork and dedication. There’s something to be said about training year-round for a race that only lasts about five minutes.
But racing in the Dad Vail made me wonder: what comes next? What happens if you leave your heart on the water and then you lose? When I spoke with a former Princeton rower, I asked him that very question — he laughed at me and said, “There will always be winners and losers in sports, It’s how the losing team bounces back that truly defines their success.”
Over 400 boats raced on the Schuylkill that Saturday, and only 71 of them won. That means that more than three-fourths of the competition lost, and yet the colleges — winners and losers alike — come back each year to do it all over again.
Drexel is one of those teams that never gives up. Last year at the 2010 Dad Vail, the Dragons medaled at the race for the first time since 2005 and earned a pair of gold medals from the men’s varsity pair and the men’s second varsity eight. They also took silver in the men’s freshman eight, and earned third in the women’s varsity eight. Needless to say, the team had high expectations leading up to the 2011 Dad Vail.
The Dragons sent five boats into the grand finals at the 2011 races — two of which came away with medals. Veteran varsity pair, gold medalists Liam O’Neill and Peter Schmidt, came in first and earned the Bob Negaard Trophy with the 7:17.70 time.
The men’s novice eight, which consists of coxswain Marc Smith, stroke John Pieper, Vanja Busic, Sebastian Ryan, Marcus DeMarici, Ryan McSpedon, Steven Miner, Matthew Ryan and bow Ross Morris, took home the silver for the Dragons.
The director of the Dad Vail and Chairman of the Gold Cup, Hebert Lotman, said that the crews’ hard work came across in more ways than one.
“In the three years I have been involved, this year has been by far the best,” Lotman said. “Everyone I have spoken to said it was one of the best regatta events they have ever seen on the Schuylkill River — and they couldn’t believe the amount of TV exposure we had — no other rowing event has been broadcasted across the United States like we were.”
The Dad Vail was televised on 6ABC and ESPN3. The ratings and responses from this year’s event have been higher than any in the past. And for those who actually attended the Dad Vail, there was no shortage of tents, food and of course, Port-O-Potties!
Though accommodations were quite the hype, the real center of attention was the Gold Cup races.
The Gold Cup is the Stanley Cup of rowing. It has returned to the Dad Vail for the first time in nearly 50 years and is awarded to the top male and female international single sculling winner.
“1966 was the last inscription on the Gold Cup and now they will have a man, and the first woman ever, inscribed on the Gold Cup,” Lotman stated. “And I really enjoyed watching the international rowers compete — the four men and four ladies competing for their names on the Cup were outstanding.”
For an oarsman or woman to have his or her name engraved on the Gold Cup instantly makes them rowing royalty. For the fortunate attendees and viewers of the Dad Vail, they witnessed history when the Czech Republic’s Mirka Knapkova won on the women’s side, and Slovenia’s Iztok Cop won on the men’s.
The Dad Vail seemed to make a splash not only in the rowing community, but also in hearts of sports fans nationwide.
As far as plans for next year’s races, Lotman said, “We are certainly going to try to improve what we are doing and have it larger, bigger and better.”
The Dad Vail marks an important day for rowers nationwide. For crews that won medals, congratulations. For crews that lost, well, there’s always next year.
As for Drexel, they will take the momentum they’ve gained by winning two medals at the Dad Vail Regatta and use it on the water for their next regatta June 2-4 on the Cooper River in Camden, N.J., for the IRA National Championship.
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Surveillance controversy explored
by The Triangle

May 20, 2011
“Tara Giancaspro | The New Triangle Part of a joint exhibit titled "Conflation," held at the Leonard Pearlstein Gallery in Nesbitt Hall, Mark Campbell and Blaise Tobia showcased their series entitled "Living Above a Store" and "Virtual Presence," respectively. The opening of a joint exhibit called “Conflation” was held at the Leonard Pearlstein Gallery in Nesbitt Hall May 18. The gallery features “Living Above the Store,” a multi-media installation by Mark Campbell and “Virtual Presence,” a series of works utilizing video, web sources and sequential photography by Blaise Tobia.
 
 
 
Upon first entering the exhibit, Campbell’s piece can be seen: a large, white figure containing over 200 individual architectural structures. Made of wood, resin and white lacquer, Campbell spent a year in his studio building this imaginary environment that is both an abstract architectural model and a piece of sculpture. This is his response to suburban planning and the social and political issues that it causes. It may look like a city, Campbell said, “but all the parts that are in it are derived from suburban environments like Cherry Hill, N.J.” Campbell went there, took lots of photographs and used aerials as references, and then, he said, “I made all the building types that I saw: shopping malls, industrial parks, institutional buildings, churches, schools, houses and so forth. I made all these buildings, and rather than put them in the places I found them, I rearranged them by clustering and stacking them … so I was just playing with blocks, stacking them in a kind of way, rather than separating different functions, integrating them, like in a city.”
After adding video and sound elements to the project, Campbell collaborated with Anthony Angelicola, a former student of his at University of the Arts majoring in film, and Peter Rose, an international artist specializing in film, performances and installation art. The three created what Campbell described as “an experience that has a richness to it that will engage you and your senses through sight, sound and physicality.” Rose created the video aspect and Angelicola put together the audio, and the three artists combined creative forces to make “Living Above the Store” a surprisingly powerful experience.
The audience, which consisted of Drexel students and professors, friends of the artists and students from the University of the Arts, all seemed to approve.
David Raizman, professor of art history, commented, “I was looking forward to it and was here last week when Mark was installing it … I liked the way it looked just as a construction, and then seeing in animated with light and sound really made it much more engaging … it takes it to a different level.”
Campbell stated that his goal was to create a story that will sustain and, “that has a rich reward in the experience.”
It was not hard to see why Campbell and Tobia chose to share an exhibition. Having worked together in the past, the two artists seem to share the same passion for creating not just art, but an experience.
Tobia, primarily a still photographer, decided to create a series of media works to bring up issues about the continually growing technology of surveillance cameras, along with proposals for a website hosting real-time cameras in the city of Philadelphia. With five different monitors playing at the same time, three of which filled with real-time video surveillance, Tobia brings up the question: “Who’s watching you at this moment?”
“Campus Surveillance” is a real-time video feed and slideshow of the many different cameras that are often over-looked on Drexel’s campus.
“This is [showing] 50 surveillance cameras around Drexel’s campus that people don’t realize are there. So I’m sort of reminding people … I’m referring to the fact that we should all be aware that we are under constant watch under Drexel’s campus, for whatever that means, for good or bad. Sure, it’s good when a crime happens and we know it’s taped … but on the other hand, how do we feel about always being taped?” Tobia said.
On another monitor, “Proposals for a ‘24-hour Rocky Cam’ and ‘24-hour Thinker Cam’” portrayed a mock website of what it would look like if there were cameras in front of the two popular statues by museum. When asked why he chose these statues, particularly the Rocky statue, Tobia replied, “Right now it’s probably Philadelphia’s best known feature. I’ve known people that the only place they have been in the U.S. has been Philadelphia, and they came here specifically to go to the rocky statue.”
Tobia went on to say that the exhibit is “meant to be a little bit funny, but on the other hand it is absolutely true that this is where people come.”
Kate Maakestad, a senior majoring in business at UArts, didn’t quite agree with Tobia’s proposal, saying, “It’s a little bit of an invasion of privacy, because anybody can look at you there.”
Another monitor called “Streaming Cam Collage” is an animated web-source collage with real-time streaming video. The background consists of web images of people watching surveillance cameras, and Tobia pointed out that the videos are “real-time stream from around the world. Times Square, the large sign in Las Vegas, a bar in London … this is real people, real-time …this is kind of a technological marvel that we now have this sort of access to all these places around the world … that’s part of what it’s about.”
Both exhibits play to a viewer that is expected to be immediately immersed in the environment. Campbell added that the exhibit is more than art; “it’s an experience in art. It’s an involvement of the senses that lead to ideas and concepts underlying what you see in here.”
“Conflation: a Joint Exhibit by Mark Campbell and Blaise Tobia” is free and open to the public from May 18 to June 3, Monday to Friday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
 
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
The Onion staff offers up laughs
by The Triangle

May 20, 2011
“If you haven’t heard of the highly acclaimed satirical newspaper The Onion, you’ve probably been living under a rock. The Onion, founded in 1988 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison by juniors Tim Keck and Christopher Johnson, is one of the most entertaining news sources that will both make you laugh and really put worldly matters in perspective.
Features editor Joe Garden and senior writer Chad Nackers came to Drexel Wednesday, May 11, to speak at the Bossone Center auditorium. Garden and Nackers gave a hilariously witty multi-media presentation, covering issues pertaining to pop culture, politics and anything else that was newsworthy.
The Onion was Keck and Johnson’s chance to add a comical twist to demure newspapers that flooded the University of Wisconsin. “It was kind of a reaction against the self-serious publications at Madison at the time,” Garden explained.
“Madison, at the time, was full of other papers … but everything kind of took itself a little seriously,” Garden continued. “So, The Onion came along, and it didn’t take itself at all seriously.”  Keith Hobin The Onion's features editor, Joe Garden and senior writer, Chad Nackers spoke at Drexel Wednesday, May 11 in the Bossone Auditorium to discuss the start of The Onion and the different topics the paper covers.
Keck and Johnson did not expect The Onion’s success, and sold the paper a year later to Editor-in-Chief Scott Dikkers and Advertising Sales Manager Peter Haise. In 1996, The Onion’s website was launched, helping the newspaper spread to larger cities, including New York City, N.Y. The Onion News Network was later launched in 2007.
Garden began writing at The Onion in 1993, and later became the features editor. Nackers joined the Onion in 1997 at Appleton, Wis., and transferred to The Onion’s headquarters in New York in 2001.
One thing that Garden and Nackers were very good at was making the audience feel comfortable right away. There was no boring introduction; they just plunged straight into the comedy, leaving no time to waste. Sometimes it was hard to tell when this comedic duo was joking or telling the truth. At times though, it was quite obvious, such as when they claimed that The Onion was launched in 1763. They displayed a colonial-themed newspaper on the screen, with headlines announcing “Mule deaths of late,” and featured a list of Ben Franklin’s “inventions.” Did you know he invented math? I certainly didn’t!
The presentation was split into multiple sections, mainly based on different topics that The Onion concentrates on heavily, including “Politics,” “Obama’s White House” (yes, President Barack Obama gets his own section), “Sports,” “Gay Rights,” “Reader Response,” “Economy,” “Opinion,” “Entertainment,” “Education,” “Local,” “Photo Journalism” and “The Onion Taken Seriously.”
Interestingly enough, the “Politics” section mainly focused on vice president Joe Biden. The headlines about Biden ranged from “Joe Biden shows up to inauguration with pony tail” – featuring a picture of a smiling Biden sporting a long, grey ponytail – to “Shirtless Biden washing Trans Am in the Whitehouse driveway.” You could just imagine the picture featured with that headline. Eek! Garden and Nackers later presented a “Reader’s Response” section where Biden responded that he did not own a Trans Am, but in fact owned a ’67 Corvette. Joe, this is a satirical paper, calm down.
Other headlines ranged from “Man with rare purple and yellow skin is tired of being mistaken as a Vikings fan” to “Obama’s home teleprompter malfunctions during dinner.” Following this headline, they played a news clip displaying a picture of Obama and his family sitting at the dinner table, looking at a teleprompter saying “Mmmm” and “This is delicious.” Garden and Nackers presented headline after headline, leaving every person in the auditorium laughing hysterically. There were jokes to please everybody.
An issue that The Onion sometimes faces is that people don’t seem to understand that it is satirical. Many people read the paper’s outrageous headlines, and take them seriously! Garden explained that a woman once called The Onion angrily after reading the 1998 headline “Clinton Denies Lewinsky Allegations ‘We did not have sex, we made love’”.
“She was like ‘You don’t know what happened! Nobody knows what happened!’ and I was like ‘Well, this is a satirical paper,’” Garden said. The woman continued on arguing that there was nothing that said that The Onion was satirical.
Garden responded, “Well, that story is right next to another story that says “’86 Chicago Bears Return to Studio to re-record the Super Bowl Shuffle.” Garden – 1, ignorant woman – 0.
While it may seem easy to write ridiculous headlines like “Lady Gaga kidnaps Commissioner Gordon,” it actually takes a lot of work.
“Deadlines are a pretty good inspiration,” Nackers said when asked what inspires him to come up with ideas.
The Onion writers also need to make sure to always have pen and paper with them, because sometimes ideas come to Garden and Nackers at the most inconvenient times.
“I’ve actually had some [instances] where I’ve forgotten and then remembered, and then [my idea] became a full story, and I’m like ‘Oh God, I came that close to just losing it forever,’” Nackers said.
It would be an understatement to say that Garden and Nackers put on an incredibly funny presentation. It was unforgettable, leaving everybody in the audience wanting to run back home to hungrily scan The Onion’s website. Garden’s high-spirited charisma and Nackers’ chill demeanor gave the audience the chance to see the faces behind the witty articles of The Onion.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Students brave rain for Spring Jam - CAB experiences high student attendance despite bad weather
by The Triangle

May 20, 2011
“Despite the rain, students came in droves to this year’s Spring Jam May 14, making it the most attended Spring Jam in Drexel history.
The concert, held outside in parking lot F between the Main Building and 30th Street, included headlining performances from Major Lazer and B.o.B. as well as sets from the winners of various Drexel talent competitions such as Drexel Idol and Battle of the Bands. Drexel’s Campus Activities Board organized and ran the event, which capped off a weeklong series of competitions and events to celebrate the nearing end of spring term.
According to backstage director Amanda Moorhead, sporadic showers caused some technical problems for the CAB Traditions Board.
“The rain threw us off and we had a few issues with equipment getting wet,” Moorhead said. “But after some garbage bags and a tarp were found, everything went a lot more smoothly.”
Tara Giancaspro | The New Triangle
Issues with B.o.B’s sound board, coupled with student comedian winner Steve Wettenstein’s absence, caused CAB additional logistical problems, Moorhead said. The rapper’s soundcheck took much longer than expected.
“This meant there was a lot of scrambling to make up time, but the acts were all really great about shortening their sets so that we could get back on schedule,” Moorhead said.
Moorhead said she was grateful to Night Kids, a four-person house DJ disc jockey group from New York that CAB hired to fill the void between other performances, for making the show seem flawless.
CAB was impressed by the total number of attendants: a record 3,500 students and guests.
“I think if we get a sunny day next year, we can easily top those numbers,” Moorhead continued.
The event ran from noon to 8 p.m. with performances by the winners of the aforementioned competitions, while students enjoyed carnival games and rides available throughout the day.
Several student performers represented Drexel at the event, including disc jockey Adrian Hardy, a junior majoring in marketing and international business. Hardy said he became a disc jockey in the fall of 2007, and has since gained residency at various clubs in the Philadelphia area.
“Basically what that means is it’s my home turf; I play there on a regular basis. Not a lot of DJs have that,” Hardy explained.
Hardy also talked about the origins of how he began in music and spoke about his artistic style.
“I’m not technically skilled at all. I started in the fall of 2007 – over three years ago – and just started playing a lot of venues, lots of clubs, anything that I could. Now I play big events with big names,” Hardy said.
“My style has evolved a lot over the past three years. It started as just straight house music and transformed to include Motown and top 40 as well,” he said.
Another popular performance came from W.C. Lindsay, winner of CAB’s Battle of the Bands competition. William Lindsay, a freshman music industry major and the band’s creator, formed the band when the members of his old band in Columbus, Ohio went to different colleges.
“This is my solo music,” Lindsay said. “We met at school and just started jammin’.”
Lindsay is a frequent performer at several Philadelphia area venues, including Drexel’s Late Night Series, World Café Live and Lickety Split.
According to Lindsay, many people in the audience at Spring Jam were his friends, who have seen him perform before. Even his family came to the event.
“My parents love [my music],” Lindsay said. “My dad drove all the way out here from Ohio.”
In addition, the finalists of CAB’s Drexel Idol competition, Sarika Madari and Gabriella Micalizzi, each performed one song.
Madari, a freshman biology major, won the competition and was crowned this year’s Drexel Idol. The contest had several rounds, each further narrowing the competition. In the final round, members of the audience texted in their votes to determine the winner.
Rain began earlier in the day during a set by the Treblemakers, Drexel’s all-female a cappella group, and continued throughout a performance by electronic artist Kuf Knotz. Treblemaker member Joyce Si Lu spoke about her group’s set, which took place during the storm.
“The rain started coming down really hard when we started singing, which was unfortunate, but it didn’t impact our performance. The only complaint that we had was that we couldn’t soundcheck and get enough mics,” Si Lu said.
Ankur Nagpal, traditions director of CAB, explained additional ways the rain affected the event, noting that early showers soaked the carnival, yet didn’t damper people’s spirits.
“It didn’t stop people from enjoying the food and all the fun games,” Nagpal said.
Carnival events included a mechanical bull, pugil stick fighting and a Velcro wall, as well as inflatable basketball and an inflatable obstacle course. Additionally, students enjoyed a wax hand-dipping station and tried to ring the bell in the high striker game.
Headlining duo Major Lazer, best known in the mainstream circuit for its creation of the beat behind Beyonce’s new single “Run the World (Girls),” began the night performing hits such as “Pon de Floor” and “Barbara Streisand” from Duck Sauce. Major Lazer’s lead DJ, Thomas Wesley Pentz, better known as Diplo, was joined onstage by collaborator Chris, who hyped up the crowd.
Tara Giancaspro
According to Diplo, the name Major Lazer is “kind of just a mix of two generic reggae names … we had a bunch of reggae names in a hat, and we were trying to make something out of it.”
“Lazer was always something that you used in reggae records, [and there was always] Major this or Major that, so we just put them together. We had a bunch of funny words that we were gonna make up and those were the first two that we picked. And we just kept it,” he continued.
Discussing Beyoncé’s new single “Run the World (Girls),” in which the techno loop from his song “Pon de Floor” is featured, Diplo said The Dream wrote the song about a year ago for Beyoncé’s upcoming album, sampling his track.
“I think she didn’t realize [“Pon de Floor”] was quite big in the underground still. And I play [her song] and it goes over really well in my crowd. Some people don’t like the song, but I don’t really care. I didn’t make it,” he said.
Offering advice to students who would like to pursue a career in the entertainment field, Diplo said, “I think the best advice for somebody just coming up is to do everything. Play a million shows. Play s—-y ones, play good ones; play as many as you can so you know what’s good and what’s not. Go all out.”
“We have some young artists that we work with that don’t wanna do this show or that show but they need to do every show,” Diplo said. “They need to build their repertoire and just gain experience. And they’ll really understand if they wanna do it forever too, because the touring life’s not easy.”
Diplo discussed his artistic history, which began in Philadelphia during his time at Temple University. He spoke of his musical project Hollertronix, and how his style has evolved over the course of his career.
“I had a party here called Hollertronix, where we were just mixing records. Back then it was considered crazy to mix a rap record and like a dance record,” Diplo said. “But that’s what we did back then. In upscale clubs they’d play house music and then they had hip-hop clubs. They didn’t really mix. Then we started bringing in different things like world music,” he continued.
Currently, Cartoon Network has picked up a “Major Lazer” short series, to premiere on Adult Swim.
“The idea was pretty raw, but then building up our videos and our artwork and our shows and the different remixes and the way we perform, I think it built a sort of attitude or style about the whole project so that it became what it is,” Diplo said.
Like Diplo, Spring Jam headliner B.o.B. is famous for mixing styles and genres in his music. Even during his set, he performed a variety of songs — some acoustic, some grounded in rock, and several with heavy rap leanings.
B.o.B. performed many popular songs from his first album, including “Airplanes,” “Magic” and “Nothin’ On You.” Later in the set he free-styled and performed additional tracks from his album.
B.o.B is currently in the process of releasing a second album, of which he said, “It’s kind of like esoteric knowledge with a modern-day spin to it.”
He added, “The next album I feel like is definitely gonna be an album you can play all the way through … I’m just really curious to see how people are gonna receive it, you know, because I always like to go beyond the boundaries with my music.”
Of his creative process, B.o.B said, “I just allow the music to come out, and I pretty much get an idea of what people like based on the responses I get from the music or the mixtape songs or the singles. From there we pretty much just go for it and put it in the show, and just see how [people respond].”
In addition, B.o.B mentioned the difficulty artists have in trying to become recognized.
Tara Giancaspro | The New Triangle
“It’s really hard for an artist to break past that threshold of being an underground artist or being an open mic artist to being somebody who is developing followers and fans,” he said.
He stressed the importance of having patience and resolve as an artist, as well as developing a connection with one’s fans.
Julie Paradiso, a junior music industry major, will assume the position of Traditions Committee Director for CAB next year and will organize Spring Jam 2012. Paradiso hopes to improve and build on the festival atmosphere achieved from having this year’s Spring Jam outside.
“Right now, the Traditions Committee of CAB is currently in the process of turnover to a new director and committee. Once the new committee is decided we will begin the planning process for all of next year’s traditions events,” Paradiso said.
“CAB is really looking forward to getting feedback from students to make improvements to next year’s Spring Jam and any suggestions from the student body are welcome,” she added.
Funding for Drexel’s annual Spring Jam concert comes from the student activity fee that each undergraduate student is charged.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Crew prepares for historic Dad Vail - Crew to perform well at Dad Vail
by The Triangle

May 14, 2011
“Ajon Brodie The Drexel men’s crew team is looking for a repeat performance from last week to this week at the Dad Vail. Drexel University crew will head into the 73rd annual Dad Vail Regatta this weekend, May 13-14, on the Schuylkill River with strong momentum.
Five men’s boats will be in the water this weekend, along with six women’s boats, making Drexel a headliner of one of the most prestigious races in North America.
The men’s squad enters the event coming on the heels of a historic victory. For the first time in 31 years, the men took home the Bergen Cup by defeating Temple University. The women entered the Dad Vail after the varsity eight boat finished second at the Kelly Cup, and the team was awarded the first ever Chairman’s Trophy for the varsity eight’s performance at the Henley Regatta last June.
Drexel understands the importance of this race and they have been preparing accordingly.
“We have been spending the last week rehearsing the different parts of the race to improve our execution of the rowing stroke,” head coach Paul Savell said. “We are putting together a solid race by staying mentally focused and getting plenty of rest in the days leading up to race day.”
The Dragons will welcome over 100 other colleges and universities from the United States and Canada to Philadelphia for what is sure to be an exhilarating few days on the river. All of the participants will be fighting for first place finishes, and the Dragons will have many teams to overcome for a successful weekend.
The men’s varsity four boat will get things started for Drexel Friday morning. They will take on the Florida Institute of Technology, Pennsylvania State University, University of Massachusetts Lowell, University of Pittsburgh and Vassar College. The top two teams will advance to the races Saturday. The women’s varsity four will follow Friday morning and the women in the Sandra Lee Sheller boat will be matched up against Stony Brook University, Robert Morris University, Old Dominion University, Loyola Marymount University and the University of Buffalo, with the top three times moving on to the semi-finals.
Following the varsity fours, the pairs will make a splash Friday morning with the men’s pair consisting of Liam O’Neill and Peter Schmidt, followed by the women’s pair of Elise Panacek at stroke and Kathy Cheng in bow.
At 10:35 a.m., the Bergen Cup winning men’s varsity eight boat will face Lehigh University, Ohio State University, Jacksonville University, University of Vermont and University of Rhode Island, with the top two times advancing. The much-heralded women’s varsity eight boat will race at 11:05 a.m. and they will be up against Michigan State University, the University of Connecticut, the University of Dayton, Drake University and Virginia Commonwealth University. The top two times from that heat will advance to the semi-finals.
The afternoon races will feature novice boats, and in the early evening the second women’s varsity eight boat will take the water.
“The key to success will be staying focused and maintaining confidence,” Savell said. “The most important piece is not allowing nerves and excitement get to us.”
The excitement factor will be important to keep in check, as the Dad Vail Regatta is one of the most exciting races in the world.
“For many schools in the nation, the Dad Vail Regatta is the premier event for the year where teams look to have their greatest speed,” Savell said. “It is a very exciting event and we are so proud to be a part of its development over the years.”
The Dad Vail Regatta will be the talk of the rowing world this weekend, and Drexel University is certain to be a focal point.
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Jeremy Lee goes through ins and outs of the gaming industry
by The Triangle

May 14, 2011
“Senior producer at Microsoft Game Studios, Jeremy Lee shared his knowledge and experiences at Drexel May 3.
Last week in Randell Hall Drexel’s game design program hosted Jeremy Lee, a senior producer at Microsoft Game Studios. The theme of this seminar was game production, and Lee was well suited as a speaker due to his vast history with both game production and development. His multifaceted outlook on game production offered various insights that were extremely helpful to the students in attendance.
Lee, who has worked with many popular game studios like LucasArts, EA, Square Enix, 2K Games and more, began by explaining the relationship between the publisher and the developer. He often referred to this relationship being a lot like human relationships, stating that when you are looking for a publisher, you don’t want to commit too early and sometimes publishers can “see other people” (assign multiple developers to one game and then choose the better one to continue production with) when they are trying to make a game out of a license they own.
The developer acts as the creative side of the relationship; either they are given an idea and told to run with it or they can sell an idea to a producer for funding. Once a developer decides on a game to work on, he or she goes through a multistep process, beginning with the concept and ending with the beta. Then the game is released to manufacturing.
Publishers, on the other hand, act as the business side of the relationship. They put up the money to keep the developer’s doors open. They also fund all of the marketing and packaging of the finished goods. Since the publishers provide most, if not all, of the money throughout this process, they are entitled to be a part of the development process, although this is not true in all cases. For example, when Lee was at Microsoft Game Studios when Lionhead Studios was making Fable II, he was told that they didn’t need to check in on progress as much, because Lionhead did such a good job with the original Fable.
Lee also outlined the process of game development, which is one that has always intrigued me. It all begins with the concept of a game; this is the stage when most ideas fail. This is a critical time for a game, because if the idea does not get funded, it will never see further development. If the project is picked up, then they develop and construct a prototype to create a style for the game. During this phase, the developer normally has a mini-contract with the publisher so that if the publisher is unhappy they can just halt production after this phase.
From here, Lee went on to explain that the developer begins the production plan, which outlines what needs to be done in the next year (or multiple years, if you are Blizzard or Valve). While production occurs on the developer side, the publisher begins marketing the game by using a demo to stir up some interest.
Production is broken up into these phases: Alpha, Beta and the manufacturer release. During any of these phases a publisher can demand to see progress and if sufficient progress isn’t met, then the publisher can stop funding the project. A project can still be picked up by another publisher and then finished – the most popular example of this was Duke Nukem Forever. After the game is completed, it is finally released to the public and reviewed. Now, it may seem that this will not affect production, but the publisher often uses the Metacritic score as a basis if he wants to work with the same developer again.
Though the seminar was mostly fact-based, Lee managed to keep the students entertained with various anecdotes about the industry, an open forum for questions and the appearance of Business Cat. Lee stressed that during college, students should try to get more exposure to the way the industry works. He suggested that students enter game production competitions or take classes that go through all the steps of the development process, which Drexel does offer.
Lee also stated that every development process teaches new things, and the more times you experience this, the bigger the leg up you will have on the competition when going for an interview. He also stressed that the three skills most companies look for are passion, critical thinking and teamwork.
Lee was very open to answering questions about the logistics of the process of making a game, and many times he followed up with personal examples of how he has gone through a situation similar to that in question. He also offered advice on how to become a registered developer and gave interviewing tips for graduating seniors interested in getting a job in the market. Altogether, this lecture gave specific insight for up and coming game developers and designers to take into their future jobs.
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
What’s Happening in Philly
by The Triangle

May 14, 2011
“Dad Vail Regatta
“The Dad Vail Regatta” was named after famous rowing coach Harry Emerson ”Dad” Vail, a long-time coach at the University of Wisconsin. Vail’s strong beliefs and passion for the sport ushered in the modern day Dad Vail Regatta and inspires the hundreds of colleges and universities that come to compete.” This two-day race, which involves around 3,500 athletes from more than 100 colleges and universities in the United States and Canada are set to compete in the Dad Vail Regatta. This is the largest collegiate regatta in the nation, which Philadelphia has been celebrating for 73 years. The event is held on the Schuylkill River in Fairmount Park, which is one of the most famous and scenic rowing routes in the world. Crowds can reach up to more than 10,000 spectators.
Schuylkill River at 100 Bridge Street
Friday, May 13 through 14
www.dadvail.org
“What Good is an Old Map in the Age of Mapquest?”
Join Dr. Daniel Traister, Curator for Research Services at Penn’s Rare Book and Manuscript Library, and map collector Jack Sosiak to explore what 16th and 17th century maps of European cities offer that Mapquest cannot. The evening will include a thirty-minute lecture, followed by reception and viewing of current exhibition, “Renaissance City Views from Above and Afar.” Between 1572 and 1617, Georg Braun, editor, and Franz Hogenberg, engraver, produced the “Civitates Orbis Terrarum,” a multi-volume collection of views of cities of the world published to complement the first modern atlas, Abraham Ortelius’ “Theatrum Orbis Terrarum,” a map collection first published in 1570. Collector Jack Sosiak’s large group of Braun and Hogenberg’s city views is exhibited, together with related city views from Penn’s own collections. This exhibition is presented in conjunction with a gathering of contributors to the Oxford Handbook on Cities in History.
Van-Pelt Dietrich Library Center at 3420 Walnut Street
Friday, May 13 at 4:30 p.m.
http://www.upenn.edu/arts/
Scavenger Hunt in Center City Philly: The Game Launch Promo
Join Stray Boots for a scavenger hunt around Center City! Receive challenges by text message right on your own cell phone. Explore the city’s coolest spots to complete them and learn fun facts about Philly as you go. From City Hall to the Academy of Fine Arts, you’ll see some of the Philly’s most iconic landmarks. But you’ll also discover some of the City’s cool, hidden spots. Ride an old-time trolley car, spot gargoyles and old engravings, unscramble hidden messages, and much more. From Reading Terminal Market to crazy murals, you’ll spend the day surrounded by Philly’s best sights, sounds and smells. This event is Stray Boots’ inaugural kickoff for Philly: The Game-The Scavenger Hunt Tour, an experience that can be enjoyed anytime, any day of the week from your own cell phone. After great success with The Game in NYC, Boston and Vegas, Stray Boots is now bringing this unique experience to Philadelphia and invites you to celebrate! This promo hunt will be followed by a happy hour.
North Side of City Hall at N Broad St & Kennedy Blvd
Saturday, May 14 from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
http://phillythegamepromo.eventbrite.com/
Art Star Craft Bazaar
The Art Star Craft Bazaar is an outdoor retail art/craft show that is hosted by Philadelphia’s Art Star Gallery & Boutique. Over 100 local and national artists have been chosen to set up shop and sell their wares along the beautiful waterfront at Penn’s Landing. Shoppers can expect high quality handmade goods that reflect the unique and often quirky aesthetic of Art Star, set against the backdrop of the sparkling Delaware River. Art Star has hand selected a diverse collection of artists that create anything and everything, including housewares, paper goods, dolls, prints, ceramics, clothing, accessories, paintings/drawings, sculpture and many other one-of-a-kind curiosities. All items have been handmade from a variety of mediums that include fabric, clay, glass, wood, paper and much more.
Penn’s Landing at Columbus Boulevard between Walnut Street and Chestnut Street
Saturday, May 14 through May 15 from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
http://www.artstarcraftbazaar.com/
Taste of the Belle Fridays
The largest vessel of its kind on the east coast, the Philadelphia Belle provides unique water views of Philadelphia’s spectacular skyline and historic landmarks. Taste of the Belle Fridays is a fun, Philly-inspired happy hour cruise.The cruise includes an unlimited array of hors d’oeuvres inspired by Stephen Starr Events, a selection of local beers and wines and the sultry sounds of Philadelphia International Records’ “The Sound of Philadelphia.” Guests will also enjoy one of the best views in Philadelphia from the relaxed atmosphere of the Belle’s open-air, rooftop deck from which Philadelphia’s spectacular skyline and historic landmarks are framed.
Pier 3 at Penn’s Landing
Every Friday through August 26 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
Cost $39.95 per person
http://www.philadelphiabelle.com/
 
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Crime & Policy Violation Report - May 6, 2011
by The Triangle

May 11, 2011
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety between March 15, 2011 and May 1, 2011 . All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
 
Assault 1
May 1, 1:55 a.m.                                                  3300 Block of Market St.
On May 1 at 1:55 a.m., Drexel Police arrested Marvin Curry, 34, after he assaulted a Drexel University Police Officer who was dispersing a disorderly crowd.
Burglary 1
April 27,  3:30 p.m.                                        100 Block of North 34th St.
On April 27, between 3:30 p.m. and 5:30 p.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) entered her room through an unlocked door and took a laptop computer.
 
Robbery 1
April 28, 8:05 p.m.                                        3500 Block of Hamilton St.
On April 28 at 8:05 p.m., a Drexel student reported that an unknown black male, 5’11”, light complexion, athletic build, armed with a handgun, attempted to enter the complainant’s car. No injuries were reported and nothing was taken.
Theft 2
March 15, 3 p.m.                                                 2900 Block of Queen Ln.
Between March 15 at 3 p.m. and April 8 at 8 a.m., a Drexel staff member reported that unknown person(s) took a laptop computer that was left in an unsecured room.
April 21, 2:25 p.m.                                         3400 Block of Hamilton St.
On April 21 at 2:25 p.m., Philadelphia Police arrested Donta Covert, 25, after he fled a store without paying for merchandise valued at $40.
Vandalism 1
April 30, 11:30 p.m.                                      400 Block of North 33rd St.
Between April 30 at 11:30 p.m. and May 1 at 7:30 a.m., a Drexel student reported that his motorcycle was damaged in an unknown manner.
Alcohol and Drug Policy Violations 5
During the period covered by this report, there were four (4) reported policy violations for alcohol and one (1) reported policy violation for drugs, which resulted in an arrest. The reports were sent to the Office of Student Conduct for review.
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Student org funding: A life lesson in bureaucracy
by The Triangle

May 06, 2011
“Student Activity Fund allocations for the 2011-12 fiscal year were released this week , and murmurs of discontent have spread throughout the student body. Between most organizations receiving a smaller budget than last year and some clubs receiving little to no funding due to asinine reasons, it’s no wonder club leaders are in a foul mood.
Next week we will dig deeper into the process of SAFAC allocations, but for now we would like to discuss some of the administrative issues students have raised with us.
For years student leaders have known that Joseph Gonzalez, assistant director for Campus Engagement and SAFAC adviser, has held a job too large for one man to handle given the number of times we’ve heard students say he is too busy to answer their emails and calls. We were relieved to hear that Casey Sharkey was hired to help carry the burden of administering accounts for the 200+ recognized student organizations. We have high hopes that her addition will alleviate the first and foremost solvable problem that we have observed.
The SAFAC office is one of the places on campus we affectionately refer to as a “black hole” — oftentimes paperwork and communications go in, and they either take an inordinate amount of time to come back out or disappear altogether. You’d think it would be common courtesy to let students know if there is trouble with a bill they are trying to pay, or to provide a simple confirmation that something has in fact been processed, but often there is naught but dead silence. Clear and open communication is a critical skill in business and in life, and we hope that Drexel staff at every level are aware they should be serving as a good example of professionalism for students.
In addition to better interactions with Drexel staff, students need modern tools to manage their finances. These days students are used to monitoring their personal bank accounts online, so when WebFinance access was provided back in 2009, student treasurers across the University were ecstatic. Of course, access was only provided to SAFAC accounts (all student organizations also have non-SAFAC accounts to store money from fundraisers, donations, etc.), and it was promised that access to non-SAFAC accounts would be provided in the near future. Not only was this promise never fulfilled, but WebFinance access for SAFAC accounts also ceased to function in fall 2010. Providing direct access to this system would take a significant burden off the SAFAC office staff in that they would no longer have to set up meetings for the sole purpose of showing a student organization its current account balances. It would also help students be aware of when charges are processed so they know if their requests are being processed and their bills paid in a timely fashion. Pushing through this functionality for all student organization accounts should be the top priority for SAFAC right now.
Handling fiscal matters is one of the most valuable learning experiences students can gain while operating an organization at Drexel. We greatly appreciate that the University affords us this opportunity and provides a safety net in the form of policies, as well as advisers who monitor our activities and shield us from some of the bureaucracy. But when these mechanisms prevent students from carrying out their missions, something must change.
Disclosure: Editorial Board members are also current and past members of a number of SAFAC-funded student organizations. The Triangle is self-funded and does not seek or receive SAFAC money, but does maintain a non-SAFAC account through Drexel.”

respond
 
Importance
1
The Henley Regatta: the gift that keeps on giving - Crew receives highest honor
by The Triangle

May 06, 2011
“Ajon Brodie The women’s varsity eight won the Henley Regatta in Enland last year, and were honored when President John Fry was awarded the Aberdeen Dad Vail Regatta Chairman’s Trophy. Just under one year ago, the Drexel University women’s varsity eight boat became the fourth American school to win the coveted Sport Council Cup at the Henley Women’s Regatta in England.
On May 3, the women were still receiving accolades for that victory.
Recently inaugurated President John Fry was awarded with the first ever Aberdeen Dad Vail Regatta Chairman’s Trophy in the Great Court of the Main Building. The President was all smiles receiving the award that recognized the team’s truly remarkable achievement. Gary Marshall of Aberdeen Asset Management, who sponsored the Dad Vail Regatta, presented the award.
“The 2010 Henley woman’s story reads like a fairytale,” Drexel athletic director Dr. Eric Zillmer said.
He has a point — the women went to England last June as underdogs, only to come out victorious in one of the most challenging and prestigious races in the world. Finishing the race at Henley in a stunning four minutes and 50 seconds to edge out Grand Valley State University, the women joined the elite rowing company of Yale University, Brown University and Radcliffe College as the only American schools to win the Sport Council Cup. So, it is no surprise the victory is still being recognized, and will forever be recognized as one of Drexel Athletics’ finest moments.
“It is very humbling to have all these organizations embrace us,” Zillmer said. “People want to embrace this team, Drexel crew, and the University in general.”
The members of the women’s varsity eight stood in front of a boat stretching halfway across the Great Court while the silver trophy shimmered in the lights. The trophy, a small silver cup, reflected the promise of Drexel crew and the direction in which it is heading.
“Drexel crew is growing and expanding much faster than in previous years,” senior member of the varsity eight boat Casondra Clawson said. “This award is about one race, but our program really is growing.”
Their success in the event has shown what one race can do for a program.
“It puts us in elite racing company,” Zillmer said. “It puts us into another orbit, an orbit we’d like to be in and compete in.”
Of course, the growth of the Drexel crew program cannot be entirely attributed to one race. The man responsible for the emergence of the team is head coach Paul Savell.
“Everyone’s goal is to get to Henley,” Savell, still beaming with pride for his team, said. “So, to win it is just amazing.”
The trophy presentation was a nice break for the athletes who have been rigorously training for the Dad Vail Regatta coming up on the Schuylkill May 13-14.
“We’ve been eating, breathing and sleeping rowing,” Clawson said.
The Dad Vail is one of the premiere rowing events in North America — if not in the world. Held on the Schuylkill River, the Dragons look to put on a show for their home crowd.
“We feel we have some good momentum going into the next two weeks,” Savell said. “The goal at Dad Vail is to have three great races.”
Some momentum for Dad Vail comes from the success the teams had at the Bergen Cup, where the men’s varsity eight took down Temple University to win the Bergen Cup for the first time in 31 years; the women, who finished second behind St. Joseph’s University, won the Kelly Cup.”

respond
 
Importance
1
CoAS hosts Sir Salman Rushdie - Rushdie explains value of literature
by The Triangle

May 05, 2011
“Sir Salman Rushdie, award winning and internationally recognized author, spoke at the inaugural College of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Lecture Series May 4.
Rushdie’s appearance filled the Main Auditorium with students and faculty eager to hear the world-renowned author speak about the role of public and private life in modern literature.
Tara Giancaspro | The New Triangle Author Salman Rushdie presents during the College of Arts and Sciences’ inaugural Distinguished Lecture Series May 4. Donna Murasko, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, mentioned President John Fry’s goal for Drexel to be recognized as a comprehensive research university as an incentive to host Rushdie at the inaugural event.
“When you think of Drexel, you often think of engineering. But great universities must have a strong, vibrant and visible college of arts and science. We have worked over the last 10 years to bring our message to the national and international community, and today there is no one better to begin a tradition of a lecture series to a globally prestigious college than Sir Rushdie,” Murasko said.
Lauren Boyle, who graduated from Drexel in 2010 with a degree in English, praised the college for getting Rushdie to come to campus. Now pursuing a master’s degree at La Salle University, Boyle returned to campus for the opportunity to see the famous author.
“He is one of the few writers alive today whose books – like “Midnight’s Children” and “The Satanic Verses” – will be still be read 100 years from now,” Boyle said.
Rushdie took the stage and quickly lightened the atmosphere by noting that writing a good book and giving a good speech are different things.“It is courageous of you all to come and watch a writer speak,” Rushdie said.
Jennifer Yusin, associate professor of English and literature, knew that the audience would not be disappointed. She has been credited by Murasko for coordinating the event and bringing Rushdie to Drexel.
“I wanted to create an opportunity for students to think about our world and its complexities. Sir Salman Rushdie has been influential in shaping how we think and question our modern lives. When I asked him to deliver our inaugural lecture, he was excited and accepted the invitation,” Yusin said.
Rushdie opened his lecture noting that it was Charles Dickens who started the tradition of writers giving speaking tours, though Dickens’ second tour of the United States was so strenuous it contributed to his death.
“The moral is that some writers are very good at speaking but it kills them. So here I am, risking my life — and not for the first time,” Rushdie said.
The remark alluded to his 1988 novel, “The Satanic Verses,” which caused a global controversy for its depiction of the prophet Muhammad. The novel enraged the religious head of Iran, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, enough to issue a fatwa, or execution proclamation, against Rushdie in 1989. The incident made Rushdie one of the most intensely controversial and well-known fiction writers in modern literature.
Rushdie told the audience that, except for the very serious threat against himself and his family, the protests over the book had some comical aspects.
“I saw a BBC interview in which a man was swearing me up and down, saying that every word I wrote was complete filth. But when asked about the actual text, he did not only admit he didn’t read “The Satanic Verses,” but was not much of a book reader in the first place,” Rushdie said.
Rushdie characterized the novel during its peak in the 19th century as a means of bringing news to the people. He again talked about Dickens because the social commentary in his writing swayed public opinion and brought reforms to protect the poor in England. He argued that the amount of information available on the Internet today has made this function of literature outdated, but the digital realm often lacks hard facts.
“What you have is a billion opinions and suspect facts. That is good for people who have power and not good for those who want to keep an eye on power,” Rushdie said.
Rushdie briefly discussed the daily deluge of news and non-news in modern society. He commented on the silliness of the so-called “birther” debate and even took a jab at Donald Trump. He drew the largest laugh of the night by poking fun at the attention Paris Hilton got from the press a few years ago.
“It’s thankfully over now, but I am still amazed how a second-rate hotel in Paris was transformed into a third rate person,” Rushdie said.
In other words, he implied that the amount of information available today often prevents us from finding out anything meaningful. At their best, novels can again fill the void and tell us about our world.
Rushdie also talked about the pressures and dangers of writers clashing with politics and government — as proven true by his own own controversial career.
“I think one of the reasons historically why writers and politicians come into conflict is because they both try to offer a vision of a world and propose that it is true and to prescribe to it,” Rushdie said.
He used an example from his 1981 novel, “Midnight’s Children,” in which his character stumbles into a scene of mass murder paralleling alleged crimes by the Pakistani army — an event the government flatly denied ever happened.
“So there I was trying to write a part of my novel where my character sees this event. Just the act of me saying ’this was so’ became a political act. But this is how it must be; the writer can give a different voice to the story,” he said.
Rushdie emphasized that the role of the novel today is as crucial as ever because it explores the world on a human scale.
“We are the storytelling animal. We are the only animal who tells stories to understand who we are. The novel offers a different, human perspective of the world so that the story isn’t hijacked by a single group – whether that is government or religion or anything else,” Rushdie said.
Rushdie also urged the audience to read outside their own country and culture. “Literature really allows you to enter into a culture like nothing else. I learned a lot about the American perspective through literature before I ever traveled to the States,” Rushdie said. “That kind of understanding is lost, especially in an age when politics and opinion are so divided. We are asked to define ourselves more and more narrowly, and that naturally leads to conflict with others. The more broadly you define yourself, the more you can identify with others. Novels discuss this; novels allow us to understand the emotions and perspective of others – often you will find there is a lot of common ground between cultures.”
Rushdie continued, “The novel maintains a human scale to our story. A good novel is propelled by character and at the end of the day the study of character is the most truthful way to figure out what’s going on. This is the function of a novel.”
He used a surprising yet effective example to prove his point: the Peanuts Comic Strip.
“Charles Schulz never wrote a comic in which Lucy let Charlie Brown kick the football because if he did, Charlie would not be Charlie and Lucy would not be Lucy; the characters were who they were and that is their destiny,” Rushdie said.
Alex Muret, a freshman in environmental studies, was surprised to hear Rushdie speak on such an accessible level.
“I’m happy to finally see Rushdie. I was really surprised at his speaking ability. He made a lot of sense and the funny, lighter moments made him very relatable,” Muret said.
Borana Hajdinaj, a junior dual majoring in criminal justice and sociology, also found Rushdie’s sense of humor surprising and refreshing.
“He is someone who asks a lot of himself, holds himself accountable for his own actions and is critical of the world around him, but at the end of the day he is still able to laugh about it,” Hajdinaj said.
While his speech was received with praise by faculty and students in attendance, Rushdie’s appearance did not come without a price. Though both Murasko and Yusin declined to specify how much it cost to host Rushdie, Murasko did admit that Rushdie is the most expensive speaker the college has hosted. Yusin credits the student-run Good Idea Fund for lending their financial support toward the lecture.
“Having worked on other lectures with high profile speakers at other universities, I can say that Rushdie’s fees are more than fair and a most valuable investment,” Yusin said.
Rushdie ended his speech by reaffirming the power of the artist, saying, “Great art — whether it is literature, painting or music — bit by bit increases our understanding of the world: what we know, comprehend, feel and are able to be.
“In order to push the boundaries, you can’t sit in the middle of a room. You must go to the boundary and push. There is risk: the artist may fall of the edge and fail. But pushing the limits a little further is that we do. Good artists know this. That is the goal … that is the job.””

respond
 
Importance
1
CoE advances to nationals - Students construct concrete canoe, steel bridge
by The Triangle

May 05, 2011
“Drexel University hosted the Mid-Atlantic region’s American Society of Civil Engineers’ Student Conference, which included the regional concrete canoe and steel bridge competitions, April 15-17.
The University placed second in the steel bridge competition, advancing to the national round, and placed third in the concrete canoe competition. The events took place at Cooper River State Park.
Drexel was the runner up to Lafayette at the 2011 regional bridge building event, which featured 12 colleges in total, the top three of which advanced to nationals. Pennsylvania State University finished third at the competition, in which the competing bridges were 22 feet long and contained a six-foot cantilever.
Marie LaPosta Students work on creating a concrete bridge during the annual Mid-Atlantic American Society of Civil Engineers’ Student Conference April 17.
The team also competed in nationals in 2010, when they finished in 10th place, according to Alexander Stadel, a graduate student in civil engineering and the captain of this year’s team.
The colleges competed in six categories, with Drexel finishing first in lightness, display, stiffness and efficiency, with a second place in construction speed and third in economy. The competition began with a time trial during which the teams assembled their bridges. This construction activity was meant to simulate the construction of a full-size bridge, with students simulating trucks and barges that would be used in actual bridge construction.
The bridges then went through other tests for stiffness, sway and other measures. Drexel’s bridge was able to hold the maximum 2,500 pounds.
Drexel’s bridge had approximately one-fourth of an inch of sag in its back span and approximately one-eighth of an inch in its cantilever, making it the competition’s stiffest bridge. It also had a total sway of less than half an inch, the least sway of any bridge in the competition. Stadel said his team was “really nervous” about the bridge’s sway due to issues with this measure earlier in the building process.
Bridges that sagged more than one inch or swayed more than half an inch were disqualified.
“We were able to build a structure that exceeded the requirements,” Erik Colombo, a senior majoring in civil engineering and one of the project foremen, said.
Colombo added that Drexel’s overall competition score was among the top ten of all schools that participated in a regional competition.
“We’re shooting for top ten this year,” Stadel said.
The Drexel steel bridge team includes 32 students, 25 of whom participated in a special topics class related to the project that was held during the fall and winter terms. According to Colombo, students in the course decided on a bridge design in the fall and built the bridge in the winter. The building process has continued into spring term as well.
The team’s building strategy “has been a refinement of many years,” Colombo said.
Stadel said the most rewarding part of the process for him has been the strong student involvement and the effectiveness of the final product.
“We built everything by ourselves, so we had a lot of ownership,” Stadel said, adding that some universities in the competition built bridges that were not made purely by students.
Michael Whelan, a senior majoring in civil and architectural engineering and another foreman for the project, said some students on the team helped other students learn about the building process “to instill a sense of uniformity in fabrication.” Carl Oberg, a senior majoring in civil and architectural engineering, also served as a foreman for the project.
Tara Giancaspro | The New Triangle A team of Drexel students led by civil and architectural engineering student Alexander Stadel works on its steel bridge at the Mid-Atlantic region’s American Society of Civil Engineers’ Student Conference April 17. Drexel placed second.
Stadel added that the Drexel team is respected in the competition. He described how some students went up to him during the competition and said their goal was to beat Drexel.
Colombo said the steel bridge team “has been instrumental to [his] understanding of leadership.”
Whelan said it has been rewarding “being able to work with other students, helping them develop their skills.” He said he hopes students participating in the project will be able to learn enough to build similar structures in the future.
The steel bridge team will participate in the national competition May 19-20 at Texas A&M University.
The concrete canoe competition featured canoe races between the five participating schools, as well as other elements including a design paper, oral presentation and aesthetics and durability judging. Each of these four elements was worth 25 percent of the total score, according to a College of Engineering press release. Drexel’s team placed first in the races, according to Aga Sidarta, a senior majoring in civil and architectural engineering and project manager for the concrete canoe team.
The concrete canoe team is fully student-run, according to Sidarta, who said the team organized the entire project, including planning the boat, mixing the concrete, pouring the concrete into a female mold and male mold and curing the canoe. The canoe building process began when the competition rules were released Sept. 1 and went until the competition in April.
The Drexel team named their canoe TiTANIC, with the ‘Ti’ at the start of the name representing the titanium dioxide in the team’s concrete mix. Titanium dioxide allows the concrete to be self-cleaning, according to Sidarta, who said the titanium dioxide cleans the pollution that comes from mixing the concrete and creating the boat.
This was the first year Drexel’s team used titanium dioxide in their canoe. Sidarta said the team decided to use it after reading about it in research papers and industry journals.
Drexel’s canoe also used self-consolidated concrete – a feature Drexel’s canoes often use in the competition, according to Sidarta, who said this type of concrete flows better and allows Drexel to cast the concrete faster.
Sidarta said he was pleased with the results of the event. “We really proved that Drexel has some fierce competition to offer,” he said.
Sidarta added that he has valued the contacts he was able to make through the canoe project. He also said he appreciates the project’s close connection with his major.
“Concrete is as hands-on as you can get with civil engineering,” Sidarta said.
Additionally, the process also helped his resourcefulness by forcing him to help build a project from scratch, while also helping him with skills like teamwork and researching, Sidarta said.
The University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown finished first in the competition, and the Naval Academy placed second, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer.
There is some overlap between the concrete canoe and steel bridge teams, according to Colombo. Both competitions are connected to the American Society of Civil Engineers, which organizes the concrete canoe competition. The ASCE is also the umbrella organization for the Architectural Engineering Institute, which organizes the steel bridge competition. The Drexel student chapters of the ASCE and AEI are primarily separate organizations.
 
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Magazine’s retelling lacks facts
by The Triangle

Apr 30, 2011
“Shoshana Weiss
“Entertainment Weekly” is a magazine filled with the types of articles young adults our age can appreciate: articles regarding the next best films, TV series, music and books. When I open EW, I expect to read about Angelina Jolie’s next big role, or the upcoming episode of “Glee.” I do not expect to come across a bigoted view of politics. In fact, I find it offensive that this magazine, having no expertise or credibility in the area of politics, would print biased controversial event coverage.
When the April 15 issue arrived in my mailbox I was, as you may have already guessed, offended. Throughout the pages that were studded with celebrities and posh film directors, I came across an article about Henning Mankell – a famous Swedish novelist best known for his series of mystery novels starring his fictitious character, Inspector Kurt Wallander. The spread focused on informing readers about his famous book series and biography – all seemingly appropriate for EW. However, the entertainment glossy took a step into the surreal once it started elaborating about his recent “social justice” trip regarding the infamous Flotilla incident in the Middle East. This tragedy starred Israel and self-proclaimed “social activists” including Mankell himself.
In what can only be described as a non-sequitur, the author of the article summarized the events as if he were reporting on his own personal movie script. Breathlessly, he states:
[Mankell] lived through an attack by the Israeli military. He was on a ship headed for Gaza, part of a flotilla that was trying to deliver humanitarian aid to Palestinians who had been cut off by an Israeli blockade. They never made it. Israeli commandos stormed the ships, gunning down nine activists and roughing up many more. (The Israeli government maintains that the killings were in self defense.) ‘I would never, ever imagine that the Israelis would be so stupid as to attack ships in international waters, to kill people completely unnecessarily,’ he said. ‘The brutality they showed to some people was terrifying.’
This re-telling of the event was extremely out of place in such a magazine. Not only is it intensely biased, it is simply false. The confrontation did take place. People were killed. The context, however, is wildly off the mark. EW has created a character of its own: the evil and ruthless Israeli commando. Looking at the event through the eyes of EW, there was no rendition of both sides of the story aside from the one parenthetical statement, thrown in as a sop to objectivity.
And so, because the editors chose to ignorantly place a transparent anti-Israel political agenda right in the middle of a report on an author, I will try to illuminate the facts of the event. First, it is important to note that Israel has set an international blockade on Gaza since 2007 (when the organization Hamas took power) to restrict Hamas from obtaining weaponry that they procure specifically for, and use specifically against, Israeli citizens. Gaza terrorists have launched attacks against Israel for the sole purpose of killing or maiming civilians in their never-ending quest to kill Jews and destroy Israel. Over 10,000 rockets have been launched at Israel from the Gaza Strip. What is even more astonishing is that EW would print such an article when just recently, those same Gaza terrorists fired over 50 rockets into Israel. The rocket was aimed at a school bus that had just dropped off 30 students; nevertheless, it left one boy critically injured.
Secondly, the wording implies that the ship was sent to provide humanitarian aid to Gaza, because Gaza is a poverty-stricken area desperately in need due to the Israeli blockade. This is absolutely not the case. Israel, every week, allows any humanitarian aid from any country into Gaza. Even further, Israel sends 15,000 tons of its own humanitarian aid into Gaza every single week even though it has placed a blockade on Gaza and Gaza continues to try to hurt innocent Israeli civilians. What other country would aid the people chanting its demise? Chanting America’s demise? Another fact EW refuses to acknowledge is that the fleet was funded by the Foundation for Human Rights and Freedoms and Humanitarian Relief, a militant Islamist group with previous ties to al-Qaeda, Hamas and other terrorist organizations throughout the Middle East. The group was outlawed in Turkey and officially named a terrorist group by the United States in 2008. Germany has also outlawed the IHH.
And so, the drama goes like this: IHH activists decided to send humanitarian aid to Gaza, disregarding the blockade Israel had imposed. Israel, even before the fleet left the port, warned that the ships would not be able to dock at Gaza due to the blockade (although Israel was willing to allow ships to dock in Israel, agreeing to transport the humanitarian aid once they had been inspected). The activists refused to accept Israel’s offer and began their journey on which they chanted “Go back to Auschwitz” and “Remember 9/11.” Every single fact set forth herein was and is available on the Internet with audio and video.
The Israeli Navy asked the ships, from a distance, to turn around or comply with the Navy’s right to inspect the ships for weapons. Upon a final refusal, the Israeli Navy, as well as the Egyptian Navy, offered to deliver the aid to Gaza. If the sole purpose of this mission was to deliver humanitarian aid, why would they not accept this offer? Were they not carrying humanitarian aid? To no surprise, the “peaceful activists” refused these offers in addition to an offer made by the Israeli army to use a third party such as the U.N. or another NGO to deliver the packages. All ships refused, leaving Israel with no choice but to board the ships by force. Of the six boats, five peacefully complied and were led safely to Israel’s nearby port of Ashdod for security checks. The last boat, Mavi Marmara, was the only boat to violently resist the boarding and the only boat to incur causalities. It is unclear if Mankell was even on this boat. Varying accounts claim he was on different boats. Some say he was aboard the MS Sofia while others say it was in fact the Mavi Marmara. For our sake, it is easier to assume he was on the Mavi Marmara.
So what exactly took place on the Mavi Marmara? Israeli commandos originally boarded the boat with non-lethal tear gas and paintball guns — proof they had no intention of killing or even hurting anyone. Upon boarding, the soldiers were attacked and dragged to the ground before being flogged with pipes, clubs, bats, chains, crow bars, glass bottles, knives, fire hoses, live ammunition, stun grenades and fire bombs — all seen on video tape. One soldier was even thrown 30 feet from the upper deck of the ship to a deck below. An attempt to lynch two soldiers was also carried out. In an interview with the captain of the Mavi Marmara, the “social activists” began planning the attack two hours before the boarding by cutting chains and steel off the ship to use as weaponry. Unfortunately, in an act of self-defense, the Israeli soldiers killed nine IHH militants. Only later was it uncovered that before they departed from port, these militants expressed a desire to become martyrs, also seen in a video clip.
Once the scuffle was over and the ship was in the hands of the Israelis, a thorough search was conducted. Unsurprisingly, weapons were found on the ships. The injured “social activists” were all taken to Israeli hospitals and treated right away. Israel also delivered all of the aid from the flotilla to Gaza as originally offered — much of which was expired medicine.
EW did not mention all of this — most likely out of ignorance. However, Henning Mankell refused to mention any of this out of pure deceit. Instead, Mankell did what he does best: he created a fascinating drama in which sympathy is evoked for the “underdog” against his “oppressor.” What he forgot is that Inspector Kurt Wallander is not the only one seeking truth and justice. Mankell is now considering refusing to allow his books to be printed in Hebrew, the expected reaction of an open-minded “activist.” Had readers known about these facts all along, his books may have been refused in English as well.
Shoshana Weiss is a sophomore majoring in finance. She can be reached at op-ed@thetriangle.org.”

respond
 
Importance
1
BBC favorite ‘Doctor Who’ returns
by The Triangle

Apr 30, 2011
“BBC MCT Campus Alex Kingston, Arthur Darvill, Matt Smith (as the Doctor) and Karen Gillam in the new season of the BBC's "Doctor Who," which started April 23. “Doctor Who” is a television program about a human-looking alien that travels through time and space in a blue police box. It sounds crazy and bizarre, and, to a certain extent, the show is. However, it is also one of the most beloved television shows in the United Kingdom and has been since its start in the 1960s. Now it is finally catching fire in the United States as the series six premiere broke BBC America records with 1.3 million viewers.
So what is it about a time traveling alien that makes the show so popular across the pond? As Craig Ferguson described in a song on his program, “It’s all about the triumph of intellect and romance over brute force and cynicism.” The show centers around a character called the Doctor, the last of the Time Lord race, who fights evil without truly fighting. He often gives the “bad guys” a chance to stop their evil-doings before he ends their schemes with his mind instead of his fists. It sounds sappy – and it would be – if it were not so well written. There are plots that keep the audience on the edge of their seats and, above all, characters people fall in love with. The Doctor rarely travels alone and the dynamic between the Doctor and his female companions is often the focus of the program. While the show is categorized as science fiction, it is not a cold, unfeeling science fiction; in fact, it is full of drama and comedy as well. Most of the time, sci-fi takes the back burner to plotlines about relationships.
These relationships and the complexity of the Doctor’s character is what have kept people watching since the 1960s. Many different actors have played the Doctor, but unlike James Bond, it is part of the story rather than just actor availability. When the Doctor is about to die, he regenerates as a way of cheating death, but ends up with a whole new body. He is the same person, but he looks different. Regeneration is one of the aspects of the show that keeps something with so many seasons interesting. Different actors, and writers, portray the Doctor in new ways, highlighting various quirks of his personality. At this point in the show, he is over 900 years old with many facets of his character still left to explore.
Currently, the series is on its 11th Doctor, played by Matt Smith, who made his debut last year with season five. While there are over 30 seasons of the program, it disappeared for a while in the 90s, so the numbering of the seasons restarted with the return of the series in 2005. Steven Moffat, who wrote some single episodes in past seasons, took over as the head writer for the fifth season, creating what some people call a “scarier” era of “Doctor Who.” Moffat has a way of amplifying our smaller fears, such as being afraid of the dark, through his monsters and aliens. He creates intricate plots that cause the audience to both love him for his ingenuity but hate him for toying with their emotions. Moffat considers himself the biggest “Doctor Who” fan in the world, having watched and loved the show as a child. He definitely knows what fans want from the show, but he also knows how to drive them insane. This season will be split in two with a huge cliffhanger before a summer break that will leave fans speculating for months.
Anyone who is the least bit intrigued should get his or her hands on some episodes immediately. The show cannot be described well enough in words; it needs to be watched for anyone to understand why it is so loved. Do not let the factor of over 40 years of episodes be daunting. Starting with the 21st century episodes is enough to understand the current season. A quick Internet search will easily get you up to speed on which episodes are must-sees before you jump into season six.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Second in Delirium series is sour, sweet, and complex
by The Triangle

Apr 30, 2011
“ 
Ajon.Brodie | The New Triangle Last week I tried Delirium Tremens, so this week I decided to try another beer from the same brand: Delirium Nocturnum. Delirium is brewed by the Huyghe Brewery in the town of Melle in East Flanders, Belgium. The modern brewery was founded in 1906 by Leon Huyghe, but brewing on this site dates back to at least 1654, and since 1906 the brewery has expanded several times. In the 1990s the brewery acquired several other small breweries in the area, and now produces over 40 different beers under almost a dozen different brand names. Delirium, however, is the only brand from this brewery that I have seen for sale in the United States, and consists of Tremens, Nocturnum, Noel (now named Christmas) and Red.
 
Delirium Nocturnum is a Belgian Strong Dark ale. This style is malt focused and fairly sweet, especially compared to most stouts, and has very low hop character. Fruity aromas and tastes are common, serving to accentuate the malt in this rich, complex beer. This beer should be served in a tulip or snifter, although large wine glasses will work just as well, and warmer than American beer is usually served, around 50 degrees Fahrenheit. This beer will pair well with strong tasting foods, which can make pairings for vegetarians somewhat difficult. I think falafel will pair well, or actually a stir-fry, as long as it’s not too wild. Meats that pair well include red meats, dark poultry and just about anything grilled. Sharp and blue cheeses should also pair well, but I’d stick to sharper, less buttery cheeses.
Delirium Nocturnum poured a dark, clear mahogany red-brown. One finger of dark tan head formed with a very fine texture, but dissipated quickly. The lacing, however, was very good, lasting until I finished the beer. This is actually the best looking beer I have seen in quite a long time and easily in the top 10 I’ve ever had. The aroma was quite complex, including both plum and lemon that contrasted with dark coffee and molasses notes; the molasses actually reminded me of Cruzan Black Strap rum. No hop aroma was evident, which is also normal with this style.
The carbonation was quite high and sharp, generating a sparkly sensation. The body was moderately heavy and long lasting; while not as bad as say, Dogfish Head’s World Wide Stout, the effect was slightly cloying. Overall the mouth feel was quite smooth, with a nice, creamy texture. The taste initially had some sweetness, but that faded to the back fairly quickly to be replaced by plum and lemon. There was a significant molasses-like base to this taste profile, which I’ve never encountered in a beer before. While I like it, I also like naval style rum (which has molasses added to it). When first tasted, there was a hint of burnt malt toward the finish, but thankfully this disappeared as it warmed up, as it’s out of place in this style. I also noticed a very slight sourness to this beer, which I thought to be rather odd, but was quite pleasant.
Overall, I really enjoyed this beer, and I highly recommend giving it a try. It’s sweet enough to be approachable by most people, and complex enough to interest microbrew fans. Personally, I’d try and pick up a bottle, as when I had this beer on tap it was actually fairly flat, which somewhat surprisingly killed this beer.
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
What’s Happening in Philly
by The Triangle

Apr 30, 2011
““Rites, Rhythm … Riot!”
Center City Opera Theater in collaboration with Kun-Yang Lin/Dancers and Orchestra 2001 presents “Rites, Rhythm … Riot!” This triple feature includes the world premiere of Paul Moravec and Terry Teachout’s opera “Danse Russe” and Philadelphia premieres of Igor Stravinsky’s “Renard and Ragtime.” Artistic collaborators include Kun-Yang Lin/Dancers and Orchestra 2001. “Danse Russe” is a one-act, vaudeville-style opera which tells the story of the creation of Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring through the eyes of its creators: Sergei Diaghilev, Vaslar Nijinsky, Pierre Monteux and, of course, Stravinsky. “Renard,” a burlesque fable inspired by the tales of AlexanderAfanasiev, is typically categorized in a genre known as ballet hybrid. In production, dancers on-stage visibly play the characters of Renard while off-stage singers provide narrative texture and also function as members of the accompanying chamber orchestra. “Ragtime” heralds Stravinsky’s interest in jazz, most clearly by virtue of its title. The musical scores for both “Renard and Ragtime” make prominent use of a rare Eastern European dulcimer known as the cimbalom. Philadelphia’s award-winning Orchestra 2001 will serve as chamber ensemble for all three features: “Danse Russe, Renard and Ragtime.”
Perelman Theater at the Kimmel Center at 260 South Broad Street
Thursday, April 28 through April 29
Tickets $10 – $125
www.operatheater.org
“Journeys South”
Produced by the City of Philadelphia Mural Arts Program, “Journeys South” examines the evolving immigrant histories of South Philadelphia through four unique interactive public art projects. Decorative vendor awnings, footprint journeys with movement videos, poetic broadsides and a life-size zoetrope, tell varying stories of immigration of the residents of this diverse neighborhood. The seven artists creating each part of “Journeys South,” five of whom were born and raised and/or currently reside in South Philadelphia, worked with community members, historians and folklorists to gain a deeper understanding of the culture and history of this legendary neighborhood. These four projects are spread throughout different neighborhoods of South Philadelphia, using a wide variety of artistic media to explore the intersections of diverse cultures and the continuity of life experience in South Philadelphia. “Journeys South” can be found at locations along South 9th St. and East Passyunk Ave. between Christian and West Moore Street.
Pronto at 920 South 9th Street
Every Saturday, April 30 through June 11 at 10 a.m.
www.muralarts.org
Philadelphia’s Biggest Dance Party
World Dance Day was established in 1982 by the International Dance Council to bring attention to the art of dance every year. Hitting the floor with local dancers, choreographers and teachers gather to celebrate all forms of dance. From 5-8 p.m., performances and dance classes will be offered for all ages and skill levels. The event is held outdoors at the Piazza at Schmidts and is free for anyone who harbors a secret desire to be in “Black Swan,” or to just pick up a new move or two. Indonesian traditional dance, modern and Polish folk dancers will be among many to show off their skills as part of the World Dance Day performances. Lace up your dancing shoes for classes in tango, hula, hip-hop, belly dance and much more!
The Piazza at Schmidts at N. 2nd Street & Germantown Avenue
April 29, 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.
www.atthepiazza.com
The Headhouse Square Farmers’ Market
At this location, Philadelphia’s largest and most popular open-air farmers’ market, you’ll find all manner of herbs, pastured meat, chicken, eggs and dairy, baked goods and lots of produce. Because the growing season is still young, one should expect to find products like asparagus, green garlic and lots of young, tender greens. The market is open between the hours of 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. You’ll find market favorites like Culton Organics, Wild Flour Bakery and Philly Fair Trade Roasters, formerly known as Joe Coffee, as well as new vendors like Root Mass Farm and Penns Woods Winery. The good stuff goes fast, so get there early for best selection.
Headhouse Square Farmers’ Market at 2nd and Lombard Street
Sundays, May 1 through December 18, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.
More info: www.thefoodtrust.org
The Penn Relays
Before they compete at the World Championships in Daegu, South Korea, the best relay teams in the world will converge on Philadelphia to test their mettle at the 12th edition of USA vs. the World at the 117th Penn Relays. With more than 180 athletes flying in from around the globe, 16 countries will be on-hand to compete for six titles at the premier elite relay event in the world. Team USA will face stiff competition with teams from Brazil, Canada, Jamaica, Kenya, Morocco and the United Kingdom. First hosted on April 21, 1895, the Penn Relays is the longest uninterrupted collegiate track meet in the country. Averaging one race every five minutes during more than 33 hours of competition, this year’s events will welcome more than 22,000 entries, including high school and collegiate runners. Now in its 117th year, more athletes have run at the Penn Relays than at any single meet in the world. The meet has drawn more spectators than any in the world except the Olympics and World Championships. And the Penn Relay Carnival remains the same whirlwind of activity that has always excited fans young and old.
Franklin Field at 235 S 33rd Street
Friday, April 29 through 30
www.thepennrelays.com
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Japan co-ops cut short by disaster - Students return to campus five months ahead of schedule
by The Triangle

Apr 22, 2011
“Drexel students Trevor Adams and Tze-Fung “Francis” Suen were studying abroad at Tohoku University in northeastern Japan when a 9.0 magnitude earthquake and subsequent tsunami struck the region March 11.
The students had been studying in the area since the beginning of fall term. Though they were in Tokyo the day of the earthquake and were therefore unharmed, they were required to return to Drexel’s Philadelphia campus immediately — five months earlier than planned, and without completing the co-op that their study-abroad program entitled them to take.
Adams and Suen left Japan March 20, using their round-trip tickets that were supposed to be used to return to the United States when their study abroad program ended this September.
A couple days after the March 11 earthquake, they returned to their living arrangements in Sendai, which was one of the hardest-hit areas. Before the earthquake occurred they were planning to return to Sendai March 12.
When a 7.2 magnitude earthquake hit Sendai March 9, Drexel’s study abroad office contacted the students to ensure their safety. After the March 11 earthquake, which was more severe, the office contacted Adams the next day. The students remained in contact with the study abroad office via email and Skype until they left Japan.
“We were leaving the country when we were talking to Daniella Ascarelli, the director of the study abroad office. She had mentioned that we’ll stay here [in Philadelphia] for, let’s say, three weeks, see what the situation is then, and then if Tohoku [University] decides to reopen, we could go back. That’s what we were told while we were in Japan,” Adams, a senior computer science major in his third year at Drexel, said.
When the students met with the study abroad office March 28, one week after returning from Japan, they were surprised to be told that they couldn’t return.
“You can’t tell us while we’re in Japan that we could go back and then say nope, no can do [once we’re back in America],” Adams said.
Though he was able to find a co-op in the United States, Adams has had problems concerning his academic transcript and financial aid resulting from his abrupt removal from the study abroad program.
“I’m very mad at Drexel right now,” he said.
Adams took 24 credits during the fall program in Tohoku; however, due to issues with his grades, he has been met with confusion from the study abroad office and the co-op office. Neither department has been able to give him a definitive answer on how to resolve the conflict.
“Now my transcript comes back and I might have problems with financial aid. I don’t even know about my problems with financial aid because no one can tell me anything,” Adams explained.
Suen, a Drexel iSchool student, was one of the four students awarded the Gilman Study Abroad Scholarship for the 2010-11 academic year. As previously reported in the Triangle in July, he used his scholarship to partake in Drexel’s Global Engineering Education Exchange program at Tohoku University.
He was unable to respond at the time of print.
When asked about the status of Suen’s study abroad scholarship now that Suen is unable to study abroad in Japan, an assistant director at the financial aid office stated that he could not release the private information.
Because the University had released information that Adams was on co-op, he was unable to use SCDCOnline, the online system that most Drexel students use to search and apply for co-ops.
“So they put my resume in for a few of the jobs, but in the end I just found a job through a professor I worked for before,” Adams explained.
After an April 7 meeting with his professor of computer science, William Regli, Adams started working at Drexel’s Applied Communication and Information Networking program April 12. Regli serves as the executive director of ACIN. Though his co-op at ACIN is only scheduled for a three-month period, Adams said that Regli helped secure a second co-op for him for the other three months.
His co-op at ACIN is paid, unlike the research program he was supposed to do in Japan for his co-op.
According to Adams, Drexel didn’t initially ask the students about their living arrangements in Philadelphia once they returned to campus. Fortunately, both lived at home and were not inconvenienced by the unexpected return.
Adams and Suen aren’t the only students scrambling to organize their academic lives after the tsunami. Other universities, including all 10 campuses of the University of California, suspended all study abroad programs for students studying in Japan.
“Drexel’s decision was pretty simple. I mean, we felt that the situation was too unstable and I think Japan has been too unstable. If you’ve been reading the papers, you know there’s been more radiation, and it continues to be too unstable for our students to be there,” Ascarelli said.
“Any time there’s an incident, we obviously try to reach out to our students to make sure that they’re safe,” she added.
The University’s study abroad program in Cairo this year ended in late December, so all Drexel students had returned to Philadelphia before the Egyptian revolts began.
Similarly, Drexel study abroad students who had been in London during the subway bombings that occurred in July 2005 were contacted immediately afterward by the office, but did not have to return to the United States.
“We’re very optimistic. We’re hoping that, come this fall, Japan will be safe. There was a travel warning when we brought our students back, and now there’s just a travel alert,” Ascarelli said.
Adams said he had no plans to return to Japan since he is now on co-op.
On April 20, the Japanese government encouraged people to leave communities about 12 to 18 miles from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, as well as five towns farther away that received extra fallout because of wind and rain patterns.
Ascarelli says that Tohoku, the university all Drexel students in Japan attend, is about 36 kilometers, or 20 miles, away from the nuclear site.
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Fry announces long-term goals - UMBC President Hrabowski congratulates Fry
by The Triangle

Apr 22, 2011
“President John Anderson Fry was officially inaugurated April 15 in an investiture ceremony at the Drexel Recreation Center. The event featured a number of speakers and major announcements from Fry during his inaugural address.
“Today I stand before you, comfortable in my own shoes and excited to offer my vision for Drexel becoming a top-flight, global university,” Fry said. He joined Drexel as president Aug. 1, 2010, and has since been examining the University “from stem to stern.”
The Vision
Fry framed the first part of his presidency as building on the University’s history and strengths, forging “a deeper and better version of today’s Drexel.”
He described the University’s ideals as sturdy and rooted in Anthony J. Drexel’s vision and experiential education, but continued, “While our moral foundation is firm, our physical foundation and academic infrastructure are not yet sound and secure. Who among us could walk around campus and take full stock of all of our spaces, resources and supports for faculty and students, and then say this is a campus befitting a world-class university?”
On improving campus, Fry said, “I have a message for all of our faculty, students and professional staff, regardless of your school or program: I cannot deliver the moon, but I will do all I can to equip you with the resources that you require to flourish and excel.”
Fry also addressed disparity between academic programs. “Despite many centers of excellence, some of our schools are not as mature, or in some cases, not as well supported, as they need to be … I pledge to build on our strengths, and particularly to invest my time and energies toward making every enterprise bearing the Drexel name a valuable asset in our drive to becoming a powerful global university.”
“That goes for the College of Arts and Sciences as well as the College of Engineering,” he said, continuing to list each of Drexel’s major academic divisions.
With goals for a solid institutional foundation established, he moved into three major objectives that support the second half of his vision — “play[ing] an even larger and more beneficial role on the local, regional and national stage, while also becoming a powerful force for shaping the future in this complex, complicated and often confounding world.”
Improving Our Neighborhood and Region
“The road to global leadership begins with our first objective. We will become one of academe’s most powerful engines for neighborhood improvement and regional economic growth.”
Fry is known for his work with the neighborhoods surrounding Franklin and Marshall College and the University of Pennsylvania, and first outlined his plan to engage with Powelton Village and Mantua during his convocation address Oct. 5, 2010. During the inauguration, he announced that the University has received a $15 million donation from Philip B. Lindy, who has also since 2009 funded the Lindy Scholars Program — a program through which Drexel students provide academic support to middle school students and their families in West Philadelphia. Drexel’s Center for Civic Engagement will be renamed in Lindy’s honor, and the donation will go toward community outreach and education programs.
As far as regional economic growth, Fry pointed to the importance of translating research into industry.
“Harnessing and capitalizing on the collective research might of Drexel and our sister universities is not a new idea,” Fry said, discussing the University City Science Center, which was founded in 1963 to serve as an incubator for science and technology developments coming out of universities, hospitals and other institutions in the Philadelphia region.
“We haven’t found the spark to make our regional network as powerful as our counterparts in the Research Triangle Park in North Carolina, in Cambridge, Mass. and in the Silicon Valley … Let’s end a half-century of unfulfilled potential and make our region a national leader in innovation in the new economy.”
Tackling Societal Challenges
From there, Fry moved on to his second objective: “We must mobilize our entrepreneurial and creative energies to confront major threats to human health, economic prosperity and the environment.”
“A great university will be remembered not just for the quality of our graduates and the intellectual goods we turn out, but also for the good they did in service to humankind,” Fry said.
While saying that Drexel is large enough to tackle many societal challenges, the first on his agenda is autism, a developmental disorder which according to Fry affects 1 in 110 newborn children and around 4 million adults in the U.S. The first session of the academic symposia April 14 was dedicated to autism research, and Fry has a personal connection to the disorder, which affects his nephew.
“We need a comprehensive public health institute,” Fry said, “with one clear objective: to discover and implement approaches for preventing the morbidity and disability associated with autism. Let’s not waiting around for this to happen—let’s dream it, and let’s do it.”
He announced the formation of such an institute, spearheaded by School of Public Health Dean Marla Gold and Craig Newschaffer, professor and chair of the School’s Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and leading autism researcher.
Building A Global Network
“Maximizing Drexel’s global reputation and impact,” is the third major objective Fry described, emphasizing the need for students to develop an interdisciplinary repertoire of communication skills and cultural awareness to solve global problems. He said Drexel has not “fully forged the kind of strong partnerships with universities overseas that would nourish our inventive spirit and bring the best minds in the world closer to Drexel.”
Fry will be traveling to China next month to develop exchange and research partnerships with the Chinese Academy of Science as well as universities in Shanghai and Beijing.
Next year, he will travel to Israel to cultivate Drexel’s existing relationship with Hebrew University. The partnership focuses on biomedical research, including drug development and health care work that may lead to patents and commercial solutions.
Fry and Drexel: Soul Mates?
“Do I have outsize ambitions for Drexel University? You bet I do,” Fry said. “No ambition is too tough to wrestle with or too big to realize as long as we work together and, as important, dream together.”
University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann introduced the featured speaker, Freeman A. Hrabowski III, president of the University of Maryland Baltimore County. He spoke on the impact that Drexel has and its role as a model for experiential education, and described Fry and the University as “determined to prepare people to be citizens who care about other people.”
“I would submit that your challenges is to produce students and research that will focus on the sticky issues of the day,” Hrabowski said. “Drexel has the fundamental brainpower to make a difference.”
Hrabowski employed a line which has become popular in describing Fry’s ambitious leadership style, quoting a March 5, 2008 New York Times article in which Franklin and Marshall College Professor Louise L. Stevenson said: “There are two speeds in Lancaster. There is Lancaster speed, and there is Fry speed. And Fry speed is fast.”
When asked later to approximate “Fry speed,” the president responded, “Well if the speed limit is 65 [miles per hour], then Fry speed is probably about 90.”
Fry also described the inauguration as basically the same as any other day, but also “like the day I got married,” echoing the sentimental sense of compatibility exhibited throughout the ceremony. During his address he quoted T.S. Eliot, “The end of all of our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time,” and described Drexel as “creative, diverse, entrepreneurial, inpatient, unpretentious and a little fearless — in short, my kind of university.”
Hrabowski ended his speech by congratulating Fry and the University “having the good judgment to choose one another,” and many Drexel representatives spoke on the positive interactions they’d had with Fry thus far.
Chairman of the Board Richard Greenawalt, who also led the presidential search committee, said, “I believe that in John Fry we found the perfect candidate — not only for the presidency of a modern university, but for Drexel.”
Barbara Hornum, associate professor of anthropology and chair of the Faculty Senate spoke on behalf of the professoriate. “As many of us have begun to work with [Fry], a number of adjectives come readily to mind: caring, compassionate, concerned, collaborative, communicative, community-oriented. These and many other qualities indicate that we have the leadership qualities that should enable Drexel University to be an innovator in developing a model for the urban university of the future.”
Undergraduate Student Government Association President Lucas Hippel gave Fry with a clock as a welcoming present on behalf of the undergraduate student body, “with the reminder that the time is now for Philadelphia, for Drexel, and for you.” He described Fry as “genuine” and “not only a leader, but a motivator with a strong sense of community.”
Lawrence Fried, student government president at the Drexel College of Medicine, presented Fry with a lab coat, and president of the Graduate Student Association Jonathan Soffer welcomed Fry with a donation made on his behalf to the University City District.
A Poetic Ceremony
In addition to visions for the future, the ceremony was filled with tradition, history and poetry.
Provost Mark Greenberg riffed on a line from Shakespeare. “Today marks a new beginning for Drexel, but don’t view it as a break with what came before — rather, we are sewing a tight seam between where we’ve been and where we’re going, creating the next prologue to a future that one day will be remembered as a glorious part of our past.”
Greenberg guided the investiture ceremony as Greenawalt and former interim president C.R. “Chuck” Pennoni dressed Fry in the presidential academic regalia, including a hood, medallion and cap.
Pennoni had three pieces of advice for Fry: “Trust the students … trust Drexel’s mission … trust your instincts … your vision will most certainly take Drexel University to new heights.”
Pennoni recalled the inauguration of Fry’s predecessor, the late Constantine Papadakis: “Like you, he was bursting with ideas for the challenges and opportunities offered by this great urban university … You will of course be your own kind of leader, just as your predecessors were their own kind of leader.”
Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter made an appearance reading Walt Whitman’s “I Dreamed a Dream” at Fry’s request. “When Philadelphia prospers,” Nutter said, “so does Drexel — our futures are inextricably tied together.”
Fry’s oldest daughter Mia, a sophomore English major at Williams College, contributed a reading of “Long Island Sound” by Emma Lazarus.
The invocation was delivered by Rev. David Peck of St. James Episcopal Church in Lancaster, Pa., and the benediction by Rabbi Isabel de Koninck, Director of Drexel Hillel and Director for Intercampus and Israel Initiatives at Hillel of Greater Philadelphia. The University Chorus, backed by the Brass and Percussion Ensembles, performed a text by Theodore Roosevelt set to music composed by Professor Steven Powell.
Webcasts of the investiture ceremony, academic symposia and inaugural concert can be found on the inauguration website.
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Crime & Policy Violation Report - April 22, 2011
by The Triangle

Apr 23, 2011
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety between April 8, 2011 and April 16, 2011 . All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
Burglary 3
April 12, 9:30 a.m. 3100 Block of J.F.K. Blvd.
On April 12 between 9:30 a.m. and 12:00 p.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) entered her room with no signs of force and took a laptop computer.
April 12, 9:45 a.m. 3100 Block of J.F.K. Blvd.
On April 12, between 9:45 a.m. and 11:50 a.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) entered her room with no signs of force and took her laptop computer.
April 14, 2:50 p.m. 100 Block of North 34th St.
On April 14, between 2:50 p.m. and 3:45 p.m., two Drexel students reported that unknown person(s) took two laptop computers from their room that was left unlocked.
Theft 8
April 8, noon 3300 Block of Market St.
On April 8, between noon and 1:00 p.m., a Drexel employee reported that unknown person(s) took jewelry that was left in an unsecured locker.
April 11, 5:00 p.m. 3500 Block of Market St.
Between April 11 at 5:00 p.m. and April 12 at 11:00 a.m., a non-Drexel affiliate reported that unknown person(s) took cash from her desk drawer with no signs of force.
April 14, 8:45 a.m. 3500 Block of Pearl St.
On April 14, between 8:45 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) broke the window to his car and took a GPS and credit cards that were left in view.
April 14, 8:30 p.m. 3300 Block of Cherry St.
Between April 14 at 8:30 p.m. and April 15 at 11:00 a.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) entered his vehicle with no signs of force and took speakers and tools that were left in view.
April 15, 8:00 p.m. 2900 Block of Queen Lane
Between April 15 at 8:00 p.m. and April 16 at 3:08 a.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) broke the window to his car and took a GPS and personal items that were left in view.
April 16, 6:30 a.m. 400 Block of North 42nd St.
On April 16, between 6:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) took her iPod that was left in an unsecured locker.
April 16, 7:30 a.m. 400 Block of North 42nd St.
On April 16 between 7:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) took cash that was left in an unsecured locker.
April 16, 9:30 a.m. 3100 Block of Chestnut St.
On April 16 between 9:30 a.m. and 11:30 a.m., a Drexel student reported that unknown person(s) took his bike that was left unsecured in a classroom.
Alcohol and Drug Policy Violations 9
During the period covered by this report, there were nine (9) reported Policy Violation for alcohol. The reports were sent to the Office of Student Conduct for review.”

respond
 
Importance
1
What’s Happening in Philly?
by The Triangle

Apr 15, 2011
““For the Sake of Future Days” by Erik Ruin
“For the Sake of Future Days” is a densely layered floor-to-ceiling installation incorporating shadow projections, built structure, and various hand-painted, printed and cut elements. The central theme is that of a world in the midst of extreme tumult and transformation. The installation functions like speculative fiction, showing a world just shy of the terminal end-point of today’s trends toward environmental devastation, economic collapse, income disparity and social fragmentation and alienation. At the same time, it weaves in more hopeful possibilities; people banding together in the face of adversity, the reclamation of public space and resources, the simple acts of generosity and ingenuity that point towards a brighter future.
40th Street Artist-in-Residence Gallery
at 4007 Chestnut Street
Thursday April 14 through Friday April 29
www.40streetair.blogspot.com
 
 
“Spies, Traitors & Saboteurs: Fear and
Freedom in America”
The National Constitution Center is hosting the “Spies, Traitors & Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America,” created by the International Spy Museum. From the burning of the White House in 1814 to the tragic events of September 11, 2001, Americans have contended with enemies both from within and from without since our country’s founding days. This exhibition dramatically illustrates the challenge of securing our nation without compromising our civil liberties.
National Constitution Center, 525 Arch Street
Thursday, April 14 through Monday, May 30
Admission $15
www.constitutioncenter.org
Trade Winds From Japan
Sponsored by the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts, Trade Winds From Japan features the world and U.S. premieres of music by contemporary Japanese composers and traces the influence of the music of Debussy through their work. It’s well-known that Debussy found inspiration in the woodcuts of Hokusai and other Asian arts; what may be less well known is the continuing influence that Debussy’s music had on the music of successive generations of Japanese composers. Dai Fujikura will travel from the UK to introduce his music at this concert, and will attend a post-concert reception as well. Additionally, as a pre-concert “Aperitif,” young musicians will perform works by French and Japanese composers during the half-hour prior to the concert.
International House Philadelphia at 3701 Chestnut Street
Friday, April 15 at 8 p.m.
Tickets are $5 to $25
www.networkfornewmusic.org
 
The Philadelphia Science Festival – Carnival on
Ben Franklin Parkway
The Philadelphia Science Festival is a two-week, community-wide celebration of science that will take place annually in April, featuring lectures, debates, hands-on activities, special exhibitions and a variety of other informal science education experiences for Philadelphians of all ages.  The carnival features more than 80 exhibitors offering non-stop family-friendly experiments, interactive activities, games and a packed line-up of live entertainment. Enjoy liquid nitrogen ice cream, make gak, meet live zoo animals, check out the inner-workings of robots, take a tour of a helicopter, extract DNA from a strawberry, test a “crime scene” for forensic evidence and so much more!
Ben Franklin Parkway
Saturday, April 16 from 10 a.m to 5 p.m
www.philasciencefestival.org
 
Fairmount Water Works Shad Weekend
Fairmount Water Works Interpretive Center is hosting free educational programs that highlight the American Shad and other fish that call the Schuylkill River home. Events include a fishing clinic for all ages followed by a cooking demonstration on Saturday, April 16. Learn how to cook American Shad from either the Colonial or the Native American perspective as Heart to Hearth Cookery demonstrates 17th through 19th century cooking methods, practices and recipes. On Sunday, watch a screening of everyone’s favorite fishy tale, “Finding Nemo.”
Fairmount Water Works Interpretive Center
at 640 Water Works Drive
Saturday, April 16 through Sunday, April 17
www.fairmountwaterworks.com
 
Flying Trapeze Lessons
The Philadelphia School of Circus Arts offers two hour flying trapeze lessons to all who are interested, in honor of the Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts. Learn everything you ever wanted to know about performing on a trapeze, including take-off from the platform, the swing, the transfer to the catcher, and the drop to the net. The event is weather permitting and reservations are also necessary.
University of the Arts lot at 313 S. Broad St.
Wednesday, April 20 9 a.m. until 7 p.m.
Cost: $55 for two hours
www.pifa.org
 
 
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Journalists discuss influence of social media in revolution
by The Triangle

Apr 15, 2011
“The National Constitution Center hosted a panel of journalists and activists April 12 to discuss the effects of social media in the political uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa.
Ajon Brodie - The Triangle A panel of journalists and political activists gathered at the National Constitution Center April 12 to discuss “The Rise of Digital Democracy,” how social media sites have influenced recent uprisings in North Africa and the Middle East. The “The Rise of Digital Democracy” event featured Jennifer Preston, a staff writer and the first social media editor at The New York Times, as the moderator for the other speakers, all of whom had experience in social media, activism and the Middle East.
 
Tony Burman, Al Jazeera’s head of strategy for the Americas, spoke during the presentation, as did Charles Sennott, the executive editor and co-founder of GlobalPost, an online international news agency. The two activists on the panel were Susannah Vila of Movements.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to supporting young activists around the world, and Nadine Wahab, an administrator for the influential “We Are All Khaled” Facebook page.
For the majority of the event, which was hosted in part with the Kal and Lucille Rudman Media Production Center at Temple University and the Kal and Lucille Rudman Institute for Entertainment Industry Studies at Drexel University, the speakers discussed their opinions about the role that social media played during these events.
“These [social media organizations] are tools, but at the end of the day you need people to use the tools,” Burman said, adding that Al Jazeera could not have covered the Arab uprisings without material contributed by thousands of citizens, as the network famously promoted tweets, camera phone videos and Facebook statuses created by people living in the affected countries.
Vila’s organization, Movements.org, aims to help activists from movements all over the world to share strategies, like how to avoid tear gas or how to organize as many people as possible without getting arrested. She introduced a video clip of a Movements.org trainer in Libya teaching the people how to use video to share their stories and current events.
Additionally, panelists spoke of their personal ties and roles in the promotion of citizen journalism and activism in the Middle East and North Africa, as two of the four speakers were in Egypt during or after the revolts, and another, Burman, lived in the Middle East for a number of years.
Sennott, who was filming in Tahrir Square during the bulk of the protests for a documentary collaboration with the PBS documentary program Frontline, shared audio taken from a reading of what he described as the “birth certificate of a new Egypt,” a type of manifesto that the Muslim Brotherhood, an outlaw political activist group in the Middle East, wrote the night former Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak stepped down from power.
Wahab smiled proudly and nodded her head in agreement during the length of the clip. In the true spirit of the event, she participated at the panel via Skype, as she is currently based in Cairo working as the deputy campaign manager for Egyptian candidate Mohamed ElBaradei’s presidential bid. During the revolts, she was based in the U.S. but was instrumental in running a Facebook page that she estimates received thousands of comments and hits every day by citizen journalists and protestors even when the Internet was temporarily shut down in Egypt.
Among the audience members was Hazem Reda, a Drexel freshman political science major who moved from Egypt to the United States in January 2008. Reda is a member of the “We Are All Khaled” group that was discussed in length, and is also a member of the group that associates themselves with the April 6 Movement, which earned its name from a day of protest in 2008 and since continued to be a popular activist group for Egyptian youth.
Reda estimates that he has about 500 Facebook friends from Egypt, half of whom regularly used Facebook to raise awareness about their opinions on the events occurring in Egypt during the January revolt and the days following it.
“Everyone was just posting stuff about if the revolution did succeed and how the revolution should succeed and what’s going to happen after the revolution,” he said.
Though Reda does not have a Twitter account, he followed certain feeds on Google through the “Realtime” search feature, as well as status updates on Facebook. However, he doesn’t rely solely on social media for information.
“Of course I read newspapers for the understanding of what’s actually going on and, I guess, get a better perspective on the events,” he said before adding that he watches Al Jazeera “all the time.”
He said that many of his friends and family back in Egypt would message him on Facebook to ask his opinion on events from the perspective of someone living in the U.S. Many also wrote to give him ideas about what he could be doing to show his support thousands of miles away from his home country.
Reda attended two protests in Philadelphia, saying it was the least he could do since he wasn’t actually in Egypt. Back home, his mother and cousins rallied in Tahrir Square, driving to the University of Cairo and walking the four blocks from there to the protest destination.
Reda’s house was targeted by the police in February because it is located in one of the nicer neighborhoods of Cairo where mostly foreigners and liberal-minded people live, as it is close to Americanized and Europeanized schools in the area.
“When the police disappeared, the secret police were attacking people just to make chaos, and one of the houses that were attacked was my house,” he said. “To cause chaos in this area would be a strike to the revolution.”
In addition to describing Middle Eastern revolutions, the speakers of the event also touched upon the American Revolution and its aftermath in the U.S. more than 200 years ago.
“I can’t think of a more appropriate place to discuss the role of digital democracy,” Preston said, referencing the fact that the Constitution was written mere blocks away from where the speakers and audience were seated.
The panelists ended the event by discussing the possible roles that social media and youth activists could play here in the U.S. during the 2012 presidential election, especially given the online grassroots movement that helped propel President Barack Obama to the White House in 2008.
“Young people in America haven’t used these tools very much,” Sutton said. The other speakers agreed, attributing the fact that America’s youth hasn’t had cause to speak out like young people in other countries as a possible reason for a lack of youth activism.
The experts predicted that new uses of social media will become more prominent in the politics of America in the coming years.
 ”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel kicks off inauguration events
by The Triangle

Apr 15, 2011
“April 14 marked the beginning of a two-day celebration and academic symposia in honor of Drexel President John A. Fry’s inauguration. Fry has served as University president since August 2010; the inauguration April 15 serves as a ceremonial checkpoint now that he has had time to settle into the role.
Ajon Brodie - The Triangle Students lined up at various booths outside of Race Hall April 14 during a two-day celebration of Fry’s Inaguration. The festivities included free food, music and various academic symposia. Two academic symposia held in the morning of April 14 addressed a few major 21st century research areas. The first, titled “Autism: The Public Health Response,” focused on autism research through the lens of public health and how autism is detected and addressed in society.
 
 
The discussion featured panelists from the Drexel community, like Igor Burstyn, an associate professor in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, and Felicia Hurewitz, assistant professor in the Department of Psychology. Brian K. Lee, an assistant professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Michael Yudell, an assistant professor in the Department of Community Health and Prevention, also contributed.
Additionally, Andy Shih, the vice president of scientific affairs for Autism Speaks, an organization dedicated to promoting autism research and awareness, spoke out on autism as well.
According to the inauguration website, topics covered at the event were about diagnosing, treating and researching autism.
The second symposium was more broad, discussing “Urban Challenges and Urban Solutions” via a number of Drexel community outreach programs. Mariana Chilton, an associate professor of public health at the Drexel University School of Public Health, spoke about the high levels of child poverty in Philadelphia; the City’s first congressional district has the second highest rate of hunger in the nation.
“This is not just a moral issue, it’s a major public health crisis,” Chilton said.
She is involved in a number of local organizations, one being the Philadelphia GROW organization and Witnesses to Hunger, dedicated to aiding those in need.
Patricia Gerrity of Drexel’s 11th Street Health Services Clinic spoke about the importance of a community health center and the general services it is able to provide to patients. She also discussed the clinic’s urban farm that supplies the culinary classes with organically grown food.
One of the two students on the panel, Cody Ray, a student of electrical engineering and the president of the Drexel Smart House, discussed urban farming as well.
“It’s not a new idea. But what we’re trying to do is take it into your kitchen,” Ray said.
Other Drexel Smart House research he spoke about other included lightweight green roofing and natural light simulation. He emphasized the importance of not just developing solutions, but proving their effectiveness and bringing them to market.
According to the inauguration website, Drexel Smart House will receive funds raised in conjunction with the inauguration.
Clinton Burkhart, a biological sciences major who is active in the Lindy Scholars Program, discussed the quality of education available to Philadelphia children. He described the tutoring and mentoring efforts of the program, which include twice weekly tutoring sessions at local schools, summer programs and workshops to encourage parents to become more engaged in their children’s education. He said many of the students have a stereotype of college as being for “rich smart people,” but the program helps them “see that college isn’t beyond their grasp.”
Jeffery Jacobson, chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Medicine in the College of Medicine, spoke about the local HIV epidemic, which is most prevalent in West and North Philadelphia.
John Rich, chair of the Department of Health Management and Policy in the School of Public Health, discussed the importance of treating violence and trauma within the community even though crime rates in the city decreased in 2010.
A “Spotlight on Drexel” event was held in the Daskalakis Athletic Center from noon to 2 p.m. to showcase the plethora of other research areas and community programs at Drexel. The gym was transformed by Ada M. Tremonte, associate director of the undergraduate interior design program, with wayfinding and graphic design by Amy Rees, adjunct faculty in graphic design. Exhibits ranged from a 65-million-year-old crocodile skeleton to live music performances and clinical simulation dummies to dancing robots.
The keynote speaker at the 2:30 p.m. address was Judith Rodin, who was president of the University of Pennsylvania during Fry’s time there as the executive vice president.
Fry thanked Rodin for giving him his “big professional break” and mentoring him through his career in higher education administration.
In turn, Rodin praised Fry’s “mastery of the art of the deal” as well as “his biding commitment to partnership as a critical part of leadership.”
As president of the Rockefeller Foundation, which works with cities and academia to improve the quality of its environment in the 21st century, Rodin spoke on the ability of urban universities like Drexel to play a major role in society as urban living becomes increasingly popular.
During the keynote session, which included a question-and-answer dialogue between Rodin, Fry and attendees, Fry admitted to being continually impressed by Drexel’s ability to respond to social needs and the diversity of activity within the Drexel community. He looked to the richness of research presented during the inaugural events available as an example.
Students who had classes and couldn’t attend any of the daytime events Thursday started their evening with the “FRYday” student festival that occurred from 4:30 to 7 p.m. on the 3300 block of Race Street.
Multiple tents scattered within the residential quad featured sandwiches, desserts and drinks provided by Chestnut Street Caterers. The event overlapped a concert and cocktail reception held in the Main Building.
The official inauguration ceremony for Fry is Friday, April 15 from 3:30 to 5 p.m. at the Drexel Recreation Center. The honored speaker of the event is Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
A closing reception for the inauguration will take place from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the Drexel Recreation Center.

Alissa Falcone contributed reporting.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Fry offers vision for University at inauguration - Lindy donates $15 million for civic engagement; Center for autism research, expanded global partnerships in the works
by The Triangle

Apr 19, 2011
“President John Anderson Fry was officially inaugurated April 15 in an investiture ceremony at the Drexel Recreation Center. The event featured a number of speakers and major announcements from Fry during his inaugural address.
“Today I stand before you, comfortable in my own shoes and excited to offer my vision for Drexel becoming a top-flight, global university,” Fry said. He joined Drexel as president Aug. 1, 2010, and has since been examining the University “from stem to stern.”
[Show as slideshow]
 
The Vision
Fry framed the first part of his presidency as building on the University’s history and strengths, forging “a deeper and better version of today’s Drexel.”
He described the University’s ideals as sturdy and rooted in Anthony J. Drexel’s vision and experiential education, but continued, “While our moral foundation is firm, our physical foundation and academic infrastructure are not yet sound and secure. Who among us could walk around campus and take full stock of all of our spaces, resources and supports for faculty and students, and then say this is a campus befitting a world-class university?”
On improving campus, Fry said, “I have a message for all of our faculty, students and professional staff, regardless of your school or program: I cannot deliver the moon, but I will do all I can to equip you with the resources that you require to flourish and excel.”
Fry also addressed disparity between academic programs. “Despite many centers of excellence, some of our schools are not as mature, or in some cases, not as well supported, as they need to be … I pledge to build on our strengths, and particularly to invest my time and energies toward making every enterprise bearing the Drexel name a valuable asset in our drive to becoming a powerful global university.”
“That goes for the College of Arts and Sciences as well as the College of Engineering,” he said, continuing to list each of Drexel’s major academic divisions.
With goals for a solid institutional foundation established, he moved into three major objectives that support the second half of his vision — “play[ing] an even larger and more beneficial role on the local, regional and national stage, while also becoming a powerful force for shaping the future in this complex, complicated and often confounding world.”
Improving Our Neighborhood and Region
“The road to global leadership begins with our first objective. We will become one of academe’s most powerful engines for neighborhood improvement and regional economic growth.”
Fry is known for his work with the neighborhoods surrounding Franklin and Marshall College and the University of Pennsylvania, and first outlined his plan to engage with Powelton Village and Mantua during his convocation address Oct. 5, 2010. During the inauguration, he announced that the University has received a $15 million donation from Philip B. Lindy, who has also since 2009 funded the Lindy Scholars Program — a program through which Drexel students provide academic support to middle school students and their families in West Philadelphia. Drexel’s Center for Civic Engagement will be renamed in Lindy’s honor, and the donation will go toward community outreach and education programs.
As far as regional economic growth, Fry pointed to the importance of translating research into industry.
“Harnessing and capitalizing on the collective research might of Drexel and our sister universities is not a new idea,” Fry said, discussing the University City Science Center, which was founded in 1963 to serve as an incubator for science and technology developments coming out of universities, hospitals and other institutions in the Philadelphia region.
“We haven’t found the spark to make our regional network as powerful as our counterparts in the Research Triangle Park in North Carolina, in Cambridge, Mass. and in the Silicon Valley … Let’s end a half-century of unfulfilled potential and make our region a national leader in innovation in the new economy.”
Tackling Societal Challenges
From there, Fry moved on to his second objective: “We must mobilize our entrepreneurial and creative energies to confront major threats to human health, economic prosperity and the environment.”
“A great university will be remembered not just for the quality of our graduates and the intellectual goods we turn out, but also for the good they did in service to humankind,” Fry said.
While saying that Drexel is large enough to tackle many societal challenges, the first on his agenda is autism, a developmental disorder which according to Fry affects 1 in 110 newborn children and around 4 million adults in the U.S. The first session of the academic symposia April 14 was dedicated to autism research, and Fry has a personal connection to the disorder, which affects his nephew.
“We need a comprehensive public health institute,” Fry said, “with one clear objective: to discover and implement approaches for preventing the morbidity and disability associated with autism. Let’s not waiting around for this to happen—let’s dream it, and let’s do it.”
He announced the formation of such an institute, spearheaded by School of Public Health Dean Marla Gold and Craig Newschaffer, professor and chair of the School’s Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and leading autism researcher.
Building A Global Network
“Maximizing Drexel’s global reputation and impact,” is the third major objective Fry described, emphasizing the need for students to develop an interdisciplinary repertoire of communication skills and cultural awareness to solve global problems. He said Drexel has not “fully forged the kind of strong partnerships with universities overseas that would nourish our inventive spirit and bring the best minds in the world closer to Drexel.”
Fry will be traveling to China next month to develop exchange and research partnerships with the Chinese Academy of Science as well as universities in Shanghai and Beijing.
Next year, he will travel to Israel to cultivate Drexel’s existing relationship with Hebrew University. The partnership focuses on biomedical research, including drug development and health care work that may lead to patents and commercial solutions.
Fry and Drexel: Soul Mates?
“Do I have outsize ambitions for Drexel University? You bet I do,” Fry said. “No ambition is too tough to wrestle with or too big to realize as long as we work together and, as important, dream together.”
University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann introduced the featured speaker, Freeman A. Hrabowski III, president of the University of Maryland Baltimore County. He spoke on the impact that Drexel has and its role as a model for experiential education, and described Fry and the University as “determined to prepare people to be citizens who care about other people.”
“I would submit that your challenges is to produce students and research that will focus on the sticky issues of the day,” Hrabowski said. “Drexel has the fundamental brainpower to make a difference.”
Hrabowski employed a line which has become popular in describing Fry’s ambitious leadership style, quoting a March 5, 2008 New York Times article in which Franklin and Marshall College Professor Louise L. Stevenson said: “There are two speeds in Lancaster. There is Lancaster speed, and there is Fry speed. And Fry speed is fast.”
When asked later to approximate “Fry speed,” the president responded, “Well if the speed limit is 65 [miles per hour], then Fry speed is probably about 90.”
Fry also described the inauguration as basically the same as any other day, but also “like the day I got married,” echoing the sentimental sense of compatibility exhibited throughout the ceremony. During his address he quoted T.S. Eliot, “The end of all of our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time,” and described Drexel as “creative, diverse, entrepreneurial, inpatient, unpretentious and a little fearless — in short, my kind of university.”
Hrabowski ended his speech by congratulating Fry and the University “having the good judgment to choose one another,” and many Drexel representatives spoke on the positive interactions they’d had with Fry thus far.
Chairman of the Board Richard Greenawalt, who also led the presidential search committee, said, “I believe that in John Fry we found the perfect candidate — not only for the presidency of a modern university, but for Drexel.”
Barbara Hornum, associate professor of anthropology and chair of the Faculty Senate spoke on behalf of the professoriate. “As many of us have begun to work with [Fry], a number of adjectives come readily to mind: caring, compassionate, concerned, collaborative, communicative, community-oriented. These and many other qualities indicate that we have the leadership qualities that should enable Drexel University to be an innovator in developing a model for the urban university of the future.”
Undergraduate Student Government Association President Lucas Hippel gave Fry with a clock as a welcoming present on behalf of the undergraduate student body, “with the reminder that the time is now for Philadelphia, for Drexel, and for you.” He described Fry as “genuine” and “not only a leader, but a motivator with a strong sense of community.”
Lawrence Fried, student government president at the Drexel College of Medicine, presented Fry with a lab coat, and president of the Graduate Student Association Jonathan Soffer welcomed Fry with a donation made on his behalf to the University City District.
A Poetic Ceremony
In addition to visions for the future, the ceremony was filled with tradition, history and poetry.
Provost Mark Greenberg riffed on a line from Shakespeare . “Today marks a new beginning for Drexel, but don’t view it as a break with what came before — rather, we are sewing a tight seam between where we’ve been and where we’re going, creating the next prologue to a future that one day will be remembered as a glorious part of our past.”
Greenberg guided the investiture ceremony as Greenawalt and former interim president C.R. “Chuck” Pennoni dressed Fry in the presidential academic regalia, including a hood, medallion and cap.
Pennoni had three pieces of advice for Fry: “Trust the students … trust Drexel’s mission … trust your instincts … your vision will most certainly take Drexel University to new heights.”
Pennoni recalled the inauguration of Fry’s predecessor, the late Constantine Papadakis: “Like you, he was bursting with ideas for the challenges and opportunities offered by this great urban university … You will of course be your own kind of leader, just as your predecessors were their own kind of leader.”
Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter made an appearance reading Walt Whitman’s “I Dreamed a Dream” at Fry’s request. “When Philadelphia prospers,” Nutter said, “so does Drexel — our futures are inextricably tied together.”
Fry’s oldest daughter Mia, a sophomore English major at Williams College, contributed a reading of “Long Island Sound” by Emma Lazarus.
The invocation was delivered by Rev. David Peck of St. James Episcopal Church in Lancaster, Pa., and the benediction by Rabbi Isabel de Koninck, Director of Drexel Hillel and Director for Intercampus and Israel Initiatives at Hillel of Greater Philadelphia. The University Chorus, backed by the Brass and Percussion Ensembles, performed a text by Theodore Roosevelt set to music composed by Professor Steven Powell.
Webcasts of the investiture ceremony, academic symposia and inaugural concert can be found on the inauguration website .”

respond
 
Importance
1
Nic Cage still ridiculous in 3D
by The Triangle

Mar 10, 2011
“The best word that can be used to describe the new Nicolas Cage flick, "Drive Angry 3D," (yes, 3D is actually a part of the title) is ridiculous.
The film, directed by Patrick Lussier, centers around a hard-boiled criminal of sorts who escapes from a very strict prison: Hell.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Segway exhibit rolls to Armory
by The Triangle

Mar 10, 2011
“Collaborating with the DeTour Segway Tours of Philadelphia, Drexel held an event for students, faculty and staff March 8 to test participants' mental and physical skills as they tried to maneuver the high tech pieces of machinery around the Drexel Armory on 33rd and Cuthbert streets.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Should inmates perform labor?
by The Triangle

Mar 03, 2011
“An article entitled "Enlisting Prison Labor to Close Budget Gaps" was recently printed in The New York Times. The idea of prison labor raises an interesting question worth debating in light of the current economic climate. In addition to due punishment, the generally accepted philosophy behind incarcerating non-violent criminals in a correctional facility is to facilitate rehabilitation, thus giving those who have been rehabilitated the ability to re-enter society and function as law-abiding citizens.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Sugary showdown with UPenn
by The Triangle

Mar 03, 2011
“Cream and Sugar Sweets, a coffee and sweet shop located at 4004 Spruce Street, hosted its first semi-annual cupcake decorating competition for students at Drexel and the University of Pennsylvania Feb. 26.
Six teams came out and paid a $25 entry fee to show off their cupcake decorating skills.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Cage's devout drama falls flat
by The Triangle

Jan 20, 2011
“The latest Nicolas Cage disaster, "Season of the Witch," directed by Dominic Sena, follows the adventures of two knights living in England in the 14th century.
The two friends, played by Cage and Ron Perlman, are skillful warriors (as revealed in a corny battle montage) who viciously carry out God's will in battle.”

respond
 
Importance
1
'Love and Other Drugs' is another predictable story
by The Triangle

Dec 02, 2010
“Set in the 1990s, the indie flick "Love and Other Drugs," starring Anne Hathaway and Jake Gyllenhaal, is largely a social commentary piece. In part, the film holds the pharmaceutical industry accountable for what is known as the dark era of prescription drugs, while also attempting to pay tribute to the decade's evolving relationship norms.”
respond
 
Importance
1
What's Happening in Philly
by The Triangle

Nov 18, 2010
“The Coward
Spider Man is postponed. Who cares? Go next door and see "The Coward," a period comedy set in 18th century England. A young gentleman named Lucidus initiates a pistol duel then finds that he can't go through with it. He hires a common criminal to fight in his place, only to have the scoundrel make a bloody mess of things.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Feds deem Four Loko unsafe drink
by The Triangle

Nov 18, 2010
“The makers of seven alcoholic energy drinks have been given 15 days to show that their beverages are safe for consumers or remove them from the marketplace.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued warning letters yesterday to four beverage manufacturers including the maker of Four Loko saying that the drinks are being marketed in violation of federal law.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Crew preparing for a weekend on the Schuylkill
by The Triangle

Nov 11, 2010
“Drexel Crew is back on the Schuylkill River this weekend to compete in both the Frostbite and Bill Braxton Regattas to finish up the fall season. The Dragons have consistently finished at the top of the pack these past few weeks, and they plan on ending the season victoriously once again.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Program to help autistic students
by The Triangle

Nov 04, 2010
“This fall, the Drexel Autism Support Program will be helping Drexel students with autism improve their University experience through a peer mentoring program.
The program will strive to enhance self-advocacy skills, interpersonal relations and other strategies critical to college success for students on the autistic spectrum.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Crew takes Head of Schuylkill
by The Triangle

Nov 04, 2010
“As the fall season for the men's and women's crew teams comes to an end, they have some excellent motivation to prepare for the spring season.
The Dragons won the Head to the Schuylkill Regatta Oct. 30 with the most overall points among the many teams that participated.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson transition into the 21st century
by The Triangle

Oct 21, 2010
“London is a real, bustling city with a real Baker Street and plenty of crime. It has just as much character as it did in its Victorian era. Writers Steven Moffat and Mark Gatiss recognized that a modern London still has much to offer as a setting and felt compelled to bring Sherlock Holmes to the 21st century before someone else did.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Stout pours opaque black
by The Triangle

Oct 14, 2010
“This week's beer comes from, in my opinion, the strongest and most abusive style out there: the Russian Imperial Stout. This style combines a very robust and forward roasted malt presence with high bitterness and alcohol content. A word of caution, however - this style will tend to blow your palate for an hour or two, so don't try sipping this while eating some delicately balanced dish with exotic spices, because you aren't going to taste the food.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Vigil held for gay suicide victims
by The Triangle

Oct 14, 2010
“During what is normally a time of pride and festivities for the LGBT community at Philadelphia's annual Outfest, the Equality Forum held a vigil Oct. 10 to remember the recent gay youth suicides following harassment due to their sexual orientation.
A group of approximately 200 people gathered in a conference room at the William Way Community Center that held an arrangement of speakers, each of which had personal connections to the matter at hand.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Public safety has awareness event
by The Triangle

Sep 30, 2010
“Drexel Department of Public Safety held an information expo at 33rd and Arch Streets Sept. 29. to raise awareness about the many services available to students on and off campus.
The first annual expo marks the first academic year that Drexel Police will provide 24-hour police protection.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel pulls fraternity recognition
by The Triangle

Aug 19, 2010
“After two years back on campus, the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fraternity has been stripped of their recognition by Drexel University, according to the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life.
Drexel's Office of Fraternity and Sorority Life cited violations in fire and life safety, as well as alcohol and hazing violations, that led to the organization's closing.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Sierra helps clean up Schuylkill
by The Triangle

Aug 05, 2010
“The Drexel Sierra Student Coalition and United By Blue, an environmentally focused apparel company, partnered for a Schuylkill River cleanup event at Bartram's Gardens July 24.
The volunteers, including approximately 10 Drexel students, picked up 196 pounds of trash from the riverbank during the four hour cleanup session, according to Euric Krause, president of the Drexel Sierra
Student Coalition.”

respond
 
Importance
1
New HIV research revealed
by The Triangle

Jul 22, 2010
“SAN JOSE, Calif. - In what could be one of the most significant breakthroughs in the battle against AIDS, researchers announced Monday that a drug produced by Gilead Sciences has provided women with an unprecedented shield against HIV, essentially blocking the disease from infecting them.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Court rules against UC student group
by The Triangle

Jul 08, 2010
“LOS ANGELES - A University of California law school's refusal to give official student group status to a Christian Legal Society chapter because it excludes gays was a reasonable application of anti-discrimination policies, the U.S. Supreme Court said Monday in a 5-4 ruling.”
respond
 
Importance
1
What's Happening in Philly
by The Triangle

Jul 08, 2010
“Danger After Dark Film Festival
A long running sidebar to the Philadelphia Film Festival and CineFest, the festival features some of the darkest, coolest, gut-wrenching films of the year, including 3D stripper zombies, anarchist pornographers and an unreleased grindhouse film about organized crime.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel police arrest suspect
by The Triangle

Jul 08, 2010
“Drexel Police Officer James Campbell arrested Curt Benton, the suspect in a nearby bank robbery June 29.
According to Director of Police Operations Ed Spangler, Philadelphia and DU police responded to a robbery that was reported at Sovereign Bank on 3131 Chestnut Street around 12:30 p.”

respond
 
Importance
1
DU wins recording competition
by The Triangle

Jun 03, 2010
“Drexel University's Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts and Design has always successfully advanced its students through their prospective artistic fields propelled by superior knowledge, skills and techniques, taught both in and out of the typical classroom environment.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Robberies occur around U. campus
by The Triangle

May 13, 2010
“A public safety advisory was sent via e-mail to the Drexel community Monday night to make them aware of a string of robberies within the Drexel Police patrol area, according to Domenic Ceccanecchio, senior associate vice president for public safety at Drexel.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Angel's Share utilizes barrel aging
by The Triangle

May 06, 2010
“I hate hot temperatures; well, unless I am at the beach, but in Philly we are nowhere near the actual shore, and I'm sweating. The breeze every few days is nice, but it is not nearly consistent enough. I do have a solution to the heat, though, and that's alcohol.”
respond
 
Importance
1
DU sending 10 boats to Dad Vail
by The Triangle

May 06, 2010
“The Drexel men's and women's crew teams will be competing in the 72nd Dad Vail Regatta, the nation's largest collegiate regatta, May 7-8 on the Schuylkill River.
The men's team will send six boats to the Dad Vail, while the women's team will have four boats competing.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Awareness breeds safety
by The Triangle

May 06, 2010
“In the wake of the failed car bomb at Times Square in New York City, national security has once again come to the front of the public's mind. Every time a threat to national security is exposed to the country, it calls into question the safety level of all institutions.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Memorial concert held for Papadakis
by The Triangle

Apr 15, 2010
“April 5 marked one year since the death of Drexel's former president Constantine "Taki" Papadakis, and to honor his memory, Drexel is hosting formal tributes, including an April 9 concert organized by the Greek Studies program.
In addition to the upcoming events, Drexel commemorates his many contributions to the University through efforts to continue his initiatives and goals for improving Drexel.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Biddle talks of mystery novel
by The Triangle

Apr 08, 2010
“On Wednesday April 7, local author Cordelia Frances Biddle offered a reading from her newest novel, "Without Fear." She is the great-great-granddaughter of Drexel's founder, Anthony Drexel, and is also a teacher. The new novel is about Martha Beale, described on the cover as a "staunchly independent heiress" who attempts to solve a murder in 19th century Philadelphia.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Cancer patient faces court for avoiding chemo
by The Triangle

May 28, 2009
“Daniel Hauser, a 13-year-old boy, and his mother, have recently become the focus of bioethics when the pair fled Minnesota to avoid chemotherapy. The mother and child returned voluntarily to Sleepy Eye, Minn., after local courts approved arrest warrants for the mother for not showing up at a court case regarding Daniel's chemotherapy regiment.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Sep 24, 2009
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
September 12, 2009
THEFT FROM VEHICLE
10:30 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Report: 'Drunkorexia' rising on college campuses
by The Triangle

Sep 24, 2009
“An eating disorder dubbed drunkorexia - the limiting of one's food intake to offset the calories of binge drinking - has reportedly been rising on college campuses, according to Colorado Daily. The non-medical name, drunkorexia is a newly coined term that combines the two afflictions of the disorders anorexia and alcoholism.”
respond
 
Importance
7
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Aug 27, 2009
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
August 5, 2009
THEFT FROM BUILDING
12 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Dirty Bastard delivers balanced and delicious ale
by The Triangle

Apr 30, 2009
“Beer - delicious, wonderful, refreshing. The Czechs gave us the Pilsner. The Germans gave us the Bock. The Brits gave us the IPA. The Scotts? They gifted unto us the Scottish and Scotch ale styles. These range from the low alcohol 60 Schilling to the rich Wee Heavy.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Swine flu causes global concerns
by The Triangle

Apr 30, 2009
“Over 100 cases in the United States of the swine flu have been reported, and the influenza virus has killed one toddler in the country near the Mexico border in Texas.
Despite reports of the virus outbreak, Marla Gold, dean of Drexel's School of Public Health, said there is nothing different about the clinical presentation of swine flu as compared to regular flu at this time.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Somali pirates attack U.S. ships
by The Triangle

Apr 16, 2009
“Capt. Richard Phillips of the Maersk Alabama was rescued April 11 after U.S. snipers fired on and killed three Somali pirates who were holding him at gunpoint, according to Fox News.
It is additionally reported that Somali pirates have also attempted to take a vessel carrying famine aid packages for African countries April 14.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Apr 09, 2009
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
April 3, 2009
LIQUOR LAW VIOLATION
2:30 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Police use networking sites
by The Triangle

Apr 09, 2009
“Social networking sites such as Facebook allow students to write messages, post pictures, and in some cases, allow campus police forces to search information included on students' profiles to help prevent or solve crimes.
The Drexel University Police Department has not used this practice of searching student profiles, although Ed Spangler, Drexel University director of Police Operations, said the University would use these sites as a tool if doing so could help them solve a case.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Bearing arms is constitutional
by The Triangle

Apr 02, 2009
“Our constitution ensures us the right to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. For our liberties we have the Bill of Rights and a government created to ensure our independence, and for our happiness we have our skills and dedication to follow our dreams, but what of our very lives?
As much as we would like to believe that our police officers and armed forces can protect us at all times, this just isn't true.”

respond
 
Importance
1
DU Police assume responsibilities
by The Triangle

Apr 02, 2009
“New members of the Drexel Police Department have been sowrn in and are now patrolling the campus.
Domenic Ceccanecchio, senior associate vice president of Public Safety, said the eight new police officers and two supervisors were sworn in during a ceremony Mar.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Death penalty expensive, unjust
by The Triangle

Mar 12, 2009
“Last week, my colleague Julia Hall and I moderated a symposium at Drexel's law school to address the question of Pennsylvania's death penalty. It pulled together a distinguished panel from all sides of the question, including Bruce Castor, the former Montgomery County district attorney who has successfully prosecuted several capital cases; Professor Jules Epstein of Widener, who represents a number of death row defendants; Stewart Greenleaf, the long-serving chair of the Pennsylvania State Senate Judiciary Committee; Ellen Greenlee, the chief defender of the Philadelphia Defenders Association, which has never had a client sentenced to death; Judge Renee Cardwell Hughes, who tries exclusively capital cases for the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas and has pronounced three capital sentences from her bench; Lisette McCormick, author of the 2003 report on capital punishment in the Commonwealth commissioned by the State Supreme Court; and Ed Martone, who successfully led the campaign to abolish the death penalty in our neighbor state of New Jersey.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Mar 12, 2009
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
March 4, 2009
THEFT-MOTOR VEHICLES
9:28 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Panel debates death penalty
by The Triangle

Mar 12, 2009
“Drexel's Earle Mack School of Law held a symposium to answer why does Pennsylvania still have the death penalty March 6.
A panel discussed various aspects of the death penalty in the state, ranging from a Pennsylvania Supreme Court study on the demographics and statistics of the sentence to political aspects and implications.”

respond
 
Importance
1
'Lovers' demonstrate purely realistic emotions
by The Triangle

Feb 26, 2009
“"Two Lovers" reveals itself as an understated melodrama set in Brooklyn. Directed by James Gray, the film consists of familiar surroundings from his earlier works as material to explore a new territory: the caprices of the human heart. Not that his previous crime dramas lacked heart, but "Two Lo vers" is heart-centric.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Feb 26, 2009
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
February 17, 2009
THEFT-FROM BUILDINGS
11:10 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Feb 19, 2009
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
February 9, 2009
VANDALISM
6:26 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Feb 05, 2009
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
January 29, 2009
FRAUD
12:01 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Schools offer 'clean' living
by The Triangle

Feb 05, 2009
“Some colleges in the area, including the University of Pennsylvania, have implemented "healthy living" houses, areas for students looking for a drug- and alcohol-free place to live.
According to The Philadelphia Inquirer, colleges such as Rutgers University and Muhlenberg College have already implemented these houses on their campuses.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Jan 29, 2009
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
January 22, 2009
LAW VIOLATION-LIQUOR
12:31 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Student alleges sexual assault on campus
by The Triangle

Jan 29, 2009
“Three Drexel students were accused of sexually assaulting a Temple student Jan. 24, according to a Public Affairs Unit of the Philadelphia Police Department.
A report from Drexel Public Safety said DPS responded to the alert around 5 a.m. in Calhoun Hall.”

respond
 
Importance
1
AXP hosts candlelight vigil
by The Triangle

Jan 29, 2009
“Two students were killed in a one-car wreck, leaving four others injured on a trip through Lycoming County in north-central Pennsylvania Jan. 25 at 3:30 a.m.
According to a statement released by the University, Ian Alexander, a senior majoring in psychology, and John Williamson Jr.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Panelists discuss civil rights, film
by The Triangle

Jan 22, 2009
“Remember that book "To Kill a Mockingbird" by Harper Lee your English teacher made you read in the 8th grade, about Boo Radley and his neighbors Scout and Jem; presents left in the knot of a tree; a controversial court room case? Drexel Trustee Donna O'Donnell recognized a chance to resurrect this memory in relating it to the coming of a new era in the United States, with President Obama's inauguration.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Jan 22, 2009
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
January 13, 2009
THEFT-MOTOR VEHICLE
8:20 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Obama staff picks inspire little hope
by The Triangle

Jan 15, 2009
“Okay, I'm not ready to pull the plug on Barack Obama yet. He was willing to run for president after all, and really, who wanted that job? Two failed wars, a depression well underway, a party ready to pounce on its supposed savior and a world sitting deathwatch on the American empire.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Jan 15, 2009
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
January 5, 2009
VANDALISM
4:31 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Jan 08, 2009
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
December 1, 2008
THEFT FROM BUILDINGS
2:12 p.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Students lead in crime prevention
by The Triangle

Dec 04, 2008
“The University City District has been asked to assist the Local Initiative's Social Corporation to come up with a large crime prevention plan for the area.
Assistant Professor Robert Stokes met with the UCD over the summer and asked them if they had any issues with which Drexel Students could help.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Students procrastinate with new social media
by The Triangle

Dec 04, 2008
“College students are well known for their impressive skills in the area of procrastination. Those students attending school in the 21st century have at their fingertips the procrastinator of yesteryears' dream - the Internet. It has never been easier for a student to distract him or herself from completing required work.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Players present 'Blood Brothers'
by The Triangle

Nov 20, 2008
“"Shoes upon the table and a spider's been killed" speaks a foreboding voice as two women decide the fate of two unborn boys. Blood Bothers steps onto the Drexel stage Nov. 20-23 at Mandell Theater to explore the relationship between superstition and reality.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Crew moving into historic boathouse
by The Triangle

Nov 20, 2008
“The crew team made major headlines Nov. 19 with its announcement that Drexel University has entered into a 50-year lease, including two 20-year renewable options, with the historic Bachelors Barge Club located on the Schuylkill River Boathouse Row.
Beginning in July 2009, the Drexel crew program will be rowing out of the oldest rowing club in the nation.”

respond
 
Importance
1
DPS announces new safety campaign
by The Triangle

Nov 20, 2008
“The Department of Public Safety has announced a "Protect your Values" campaign to make students more aware of unattended thefts on campus, according to Ed Spangler, director of Police Operations.
Spangler said 80 percent of total crimes in the Drexel Patrol Zone are thefts and 70 percent of non-retail thefts are attributed to unattended or improperly secured items.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Students work together in Global Entrepreneurship Week
by The Triangle

Nov 20, 2008
“Global Entrepreneurship Week, a week when students are challenged to generate new ideas and develop skills in generating new innovations, will be held through Nov. 23 by the Drexel LeBow College of Business and Laurence A. Baiada Center for Entrepreneurship in Technology.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Sports and art collide in Painted Bride exhibition
by The Triangle

Nov 13, 2008
“"Ever since I was born, I've been fighting for my life," reads the back wall of the first-floor gallery at the Painted Bride Art Center. The great boxer Sonny Liston's words survive beyond his mysterious death at the height of his career, and also sum up the professions of those who toil in his stead.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Nov 06, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
October 28, 2008
VANDALISM
2:03 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Alerts go 'multi-mobile'
by The Triangle

Oct 30, 2008
“The University's Department of Public Safety has implemented an improved DrexelAlert system that will allow students to receive alerts within minutes to mobile phones, Drexel landlines and wireless PDAs.
"[The alert system] has more capabilities that include voicemails, e-mails, faxes and text messages.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Suspect arrested by Penn police
by The Triangle

Oct 23, 2008
“The University of Pennsylvania police arrested Jerry Porter, a suspect in the recent burglaries that occurred between Sept. 14 and Oct. 7 in local Drexel fraternity and sorority residences, as well as at Penn, according to Jim Katsaounis, executive director and senior vice president of Student Life and Administrative Services.”
respond
 
Importance
1
DU hires director of police operations
by The Triangle

Oct 23, 2008
“Former Philadelphia Police Commander Ed Spangler was hired as the director of police operations for Drexel's police force on Oct. 14.
Spangler served as a Police Lieutenant in the 39th Police District and Narcotics Strike Force and worked as the commanding officer of the Philadelphia Police Department's Crime Scene Unit in gaining national recognition through the accreditation process.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Religious fear mongering is un-American
by The Triangle

Oct 23, 2008
“Dusty American history books, which nowadays go largely untouched, hold uncomfortable events such as: The Trail of Tears, anti-Irish Sentiment, anti-Semitism, Jim Crowe laws, xenophobia and the McCarthy Trials - to name a few.
We have a history of hatred and a habit of discrimination.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Student assaulted in cab
by The Triangle

Oct 23, 2008
“A female Drexel University student reported Oct. 12 that she was held captive and sexually assaulted in South Philadelphia by a taxicab driver, according to an incident report from Drexel's Department of Public Safety.
Lt. Stephen Biello, of the Philadelphia Police Special Victims Unit said it is believed the assault occurred in an Olde City Taxi.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drunk driving simulation on campus
by The Triangle

Oct 16, 2008
“The office of Alcohol, Other Drug and Health Education brought the P.E.E.R.S. Aware III simulator to campus Oct. 15 to raise awareness of students' drinking behavior and how it impacts them while driving, according to John Watson, director of Alcohol, Other Drug and Health Education and assistant director of counseling.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Oct 16, 2008
“October 6, 2008
THEFT-BICYCLE
1:43 a.m. 3400 Block of Powelton Ave.
DPS and Penn Public Safety collaborated to apprehend a known bike thief stealing a bike from Towers Hall on 34th and Powelton Ave. The male and the bike were taken into custody.”

respond
 
Importance
1
'Terror' makes history horrifying
by The Triangle

Oct 09, 2008
“In May 1929, supreme Chicago gang lord Al Capone was arrested for possession of a concealed weapon. It was only three months prior to his arrest that Capone was widely credited with ordering the notorious "St. Valentine's Day Massacre," but conventional law had no place in gangland those days.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Silverman dishes on new season
by The Triangle

Oct 09, 2008
“Have you ever thought about suing an entire country because of a sexual crime that happened to an ancestor of yours hundreds of years ago? Or how about having hallucinations of Osama Bin Laden and then running them over with your car? Many comedians are known to get their laughs from purposefully crossing the line.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Oct 09, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
BURGLARY
9:18 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Students start drink delivery business
by The Triangle

Oct 09, 2008
“Two Drexel students have started their own business, Drexeldrinks.com, a web site that allows students to mix and match up to 20 non-alcoholic drinks per case that will be delivered to their doors.
"About a year ago, I met people from University of Penn and they started their own business, Askel Gungor, a junior majoring in finance and co-founder of Drexeldrinks.”

respond
 
Importance
1
DPS stresses safety, 'Common Sense 101'
by The Triangle

Oct 09, 2008
“The Commuter, Graduate, and Transfer Student Programs and Services, along with Drexel Public Safety, held a town hall meeting Oct. 8 to inform commuter students about the recent changes to Public Safety and how it affects their Drexel experience.
Fred Carbonara, director of Public Safety, and John Cohen, assistant director of Public Safety, gave students some basic information about the new Drexel police force that will soon take effect and provided advice as to how students should make their time at Drexel as safe as possible.”

respond
 
Importance
1
One less class, on more vote for America
by The Triangle

Oct 02, 2008
“This past week, fliers were posted around campus claiming that police would be at the polls Nov. 4 reviewing voters' records for outstanding violations and arresting offenders on the spot.
This information was deemed "blatantly false" by the administration, and although these fliers have been removed from campus, it is still imperative that we step up to the plate and show everyone that students are truly ready to speak their minds and will not be intimidated by such shameful tactics.”

respond
 
Importance
1
'Nick and Norah' saved by eclectic indie soundtrack
by The Triangle

Oct 02, 2008
“Every few years, a set of fresh actors rise from the depths of child star fame, attempting new roles, yet are still recognized and associated with their first breakout performance rather than a current project.
In the early '90s, Macaulay Culkin was type-casted as an annoying brat in the "Home Alone" series; Haley Joel Osment as the kid who saw dead people in "The Sixth Sense"; and now, Michael Cera, as the nerdy-but-cool-in-an-odd-way character in "Arrested Development," "Superbad," "Juno" and his latest endeavor, "Nick and Norah's Infinite Playlist.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Philly's fallen heroes: the true injustice surrounding MOVE
by The Triangle

Sep 25, 2008
“In his Aug. 22 commentary entitled "MOVE Still Looking for Philadelphia Justice" Robert Zaller misrepresents two events in Philadelphia's criminal history.
Zaller's first distortion was that the 1978 MOVE confrontation was a swift, hot-headed storming of the radical group's home by the police.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Young, but not stupid
by The Triangle

Sep 25, 2008
“This past week, fliers were posted around campus claiming that police would be at the polls Nov. 4 reviewing voters' records for outstanding violations and arresting offenders on the spot.
This information was deemed "blatantly false" by the administration, and although these fliers have been removed from campus, it is still imperative that we step up to the plate and show everyone that students are truly ready to speak their minds and will not be intimidated by such shameful tactics.”

respond
 
Importance
1
MOVE still looking for Philadelphia justice
by The Triangle

Aug 21, 2008
“The subject of MOVE is the third rail of Philadelphia politics. MOVE was, at its inception, nonviolent; its members got their livings in the wage-earning economy; it was drug-free. In the larger context of the 1960s and 1970s, it was one of many communal movements around the country that rejected a society regarded as poisoned by racism, imperialism and corporate-engendered consumerism.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Aug 07, 2008
“Drexel Crime Report”
respond
 
Importance
1
Crime Report
by The Triangle

Jul 24, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.”
respond
 
Importance
1
DPS interviewing for head of campus police force
by The Triangle

Jul 24, 2008
“The Drexel University Department of Public Safety is in the process of interviewing candidates for the newly created position of director of Police Operations. The candidate chosen for this post will serve as the head of the campus police force that Drexel is currently developing.”
respond
 
Importance
1
DPS links three robberies to same suspect
by The Triangle

Jul 24, 2008
“Drexel University Public Safety officials have linked three strong-arm robberies to the same suspect, prompting a campus alert that was issued July 19.
The robberies were committed in the late evening and early morning in the area bound by 34th to 36th streets and Powelton Avenue to Spring Garden Street, according to a University-wide e-mail.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Web site donates over 35 billion grains of rice
by The Triangle

Jun 05, 2008
“FreeRice.com, a web site launched as a way for the public to donate rice to underprivileged people around the world while improving vocabulary skills, has now reached approximately 35.5 billion grains of rice donated.
FreeRice donated over 537,163,380 grains of rice when it was launched in October 2007; in comparison, in May 2008, 4,657,641,260 grains of rice were donated, according to the organization's web site.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Jun 05, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Stratton robbery suspect arrested
by The Triangle

Jun 05, 2008
“The suspect wanted for robbing a Drexel University professor in Stratton Hall was arrested June 4 at approximately 3:30 p.m. in North Philadelphia while driving a stolen car and carrying a handgun, according to Drexel Public Safety officials.
"We [detectives] knew the vehicle he was in," a Sergeant in the Philadelphia Police Department's Major Crimes Unit said.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Kirsch faces new charges in Calif.
by The Triangle

May 29, 2008
“Jocelyn Kirsch appeared in federal court May 29 in Philadelphia to face a new allegation of credit-card theft in California, according to the Daily News.
She allegedly stole the credit card of an unidentified victim to whom she was not close.
Judge Lynne Sitarski placed Kirsch, 22, on 24-hour house arrest in her Marin County, Calif.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Brews Clues: Quirky agave fruit packs smooth, light, crisp flavor
by The Triangle

May 29, 2008
“I've seen many fruit beers - apple, cherry, raspberry - and the list goes on and on. There is one unconventional fruit, though, that I never thought about for brewing, but looking back, it makes perfect sense. I am talking about the agave.
Long known in Mexico for its tequila producing abilities, agave nectar is sweet and tasty, both being great qualities when it comes to brewing beer (the sugary sweetness converts to sweet alcohol, and of course its pleasant taste flavors the beer).”

respond
 
Importance
1
University building evacuated after bomb threat
by The Triangle

May 29, 2008
“Drexel Public Safety and the Philadelphia Police Department responded to a bomb threat at Stratton Hall May 23.
The bomb threat was reported to PPD's radio center at approximately 3 p.m. by an anonymous caller who said, "[He] heard there was a bomb in Stratton Hall on Chestnut Street," according to Domenic Ceccanecchio, senior associate vice president for the Department of Public Safety at Drexel.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

May 29, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Stratton assault reported
by The Triangle

May 29, 2008
“A female Drexel University employee reported being assaulted in Stratton Hall at approximately 6:15 p.m. May 29 and a suspect is being sought, according to University public safety officials.
The suspect fled with the victim's cell phone and had a black handgun, but no serious injuries were reported, according to James Katsaounis, executive director of communications and marketing for the Division of Student Life and Administrative Services.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Car slams into 32nd Street homes, no injuries reported
by The Triangle

May 29, 2008
“A female crashed her friend's car into the side of two houses on 32nd Street between Summer and Winter streets May 24 at 2:30 a.m., according to Domenic Ceccanecchio, senior associate vice president for Public Safety.
Drexel University women's lacrosse players rent one of the two houses which the car crashed into; the other house is rented by non-Drexel students.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

May 15, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

May 08, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Student struck by car near Main Building
by The Triangle

May 08, 2008
“A Drexel student was struck by a car May 5 shortly before 10 p.m. while riding a bicycle at 32nd and Chestnut streets, according to Domenic Ceccanecchio, senior associate vice president for public safety.
"It was reported that while he was riding a friend's bike in the street, west on Chestnut [Street], he was struck by a white four-door 2002 Hyundai Sonata driven with its headlights off," Ceccanecchio wrote in an e-mail.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

May 01, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.”
respond
 
Importance
1
DPS officer fired after alleged assault
by The Triangle

May 01, 2008
“A Drexel University public safety officer was fired after allegedly assaulting a supervisor April 13, according to Domenic Ceccanecchio, senior associate vice president for public safety.
The supervisor was punched in the head repeatedly by his subordinate while questioning why the officer had left his post and instructing him on how to use a radio, the supervisor said in a statement given to University officials.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Apr 24, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Apr 17, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Brews Clues: Nugget Nectar
by The Triangle

Apr 10, 2008
“Somewhere along the timeline of craft brewing, adding "Imperial" to the beginning of your beer name meant it was more or less twice as strong, twice as alcoholic, twice as bitter, twice as sweet, etc. I don't know how or why this trend started, but I'm not complaining.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Emergency notification upgrade
by The Triangle

Apr 10, 2008
“Drexel Public Safety, along with Student Life and Administrative Services, will implement a new text messaging-based emergency notification system in June 2008 for the communications component of the Power of Ten initiative.”
respond
 
Importance
1
PSP gamers get a taste of "God of War" series
by The Triangle

Mar 13, 2008
“The "God of War" series has followed Kratos, a relentless killing machine of a man who has successfully brought down his rage upon many a giant monster. In the past, all of this fun-filled monster killing has taken place on the Playstation 2 console, but with the release of "God of War: Chains of Olympus," the gore-filled hack n' slash will go handheld on the PSP and you will finally be able to conveniently bring death to mythological creatures on the go.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Mar 13, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
March 6, 2008
LIQUOR LAW VIOLATION
11:44 p.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Power of Ten funds recreation, safety
by The Triangle

Mar 13, 2008
“The division of Student Life and Administrative Services announced its third component of the Power of Ten initiative, recreation, last week, and its fourth component will be safety.
The recreation component of the initiative revealed that students will be able to view Buckley Green and Buckley Recreational Field via web cams beginning in the first two weeks of April.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Mar 05, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
February 28, 2008
DRUG POLICY VIOLATION
12:41 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel to create campus police force
by The Triangle

Mar 06, 2008
“Drexel University will begin developing a sworn campus police department over the next four years with plans to have a 29-officer force by 2012, Domenic Ceccanecchio, senior associate vice president for Public Safety, announced March 5 at a student luncheon.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Studies prove exercise to be stress-reliever
by The Triangle

Mar 06, 2008
“The benefits of exercise for students with too much stress are numerous.
A study done by the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association listed the top two benefits of exercise as improving emotional well-being as well as reducing stress.
John Watson, Director of Alcohol, Other Drug and Health Education and Director of Counseling encouraged students to exercise to release their frustration and get some activity.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Feb 28, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
February 20, 2008
LARCENY-THEFT
5:00 p.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Feb 21, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
February 12, 2008
LARCENY-THEFT
1:34 p.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Brews Clues
by The Triangle

Feb 21, 2008
“Wheat beers are known for being crisp, refreshing and easy to drink. They are also generally light in color and body and also low in alcohol. The weizenbock breaks these stereotypes. It's dark. It's strong. Usually this combination means an overpowering taste, however, Victory's Moonglow Weizenbock remains as refreshing as all its wheat beer brethren.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel Crime Report
by The Triangle

Feb 14, 2008
“The following are crimes that occurred on or near campus and were reported to The Triangle by the Drexel University Department of Public Safety. All information included in this report is taken from law enforcement or DPS incident reports.
February 6, 2008
DRUG POLICY VIOLATION
12:28 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Mid-majors not getting enough credit
by The Triangle

Feb 14, 2008
“In recent years, there has been a quasi-takeover of college basketball by "Mid-Majors." Gonzaga formed into a mini-powerhouse out of the West Coast Conference and has become a regular in the Top 25 (although not this year). The Missouri Valley Conference in particular developed into a land of giant killers, sending several teams to the Sweet 16 in recent years.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Gunman opens fire in lecture hall at Northern Illinois University
by The Triangle

Feb 14, 2008
“CHICAGO - A gunman opened fire with a shotgun and a handgun the afternoon of Feb. 14 in a lecture hall at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, killing people before shooting himself to death, authorities said.
As of 9:30 p.m. Feb. 14, NIU Police Chief Donald Grady said five victims had died.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Secret Service visits campus
by The Triangle

Jan 31, 2008
“Three secret service agents spoke to Drexel students Jan. 31 at the Criminal Justice Program and the College of Information and Technology's secret service career forum.
The special agents Brien Graveline, Michael Sullivan and Kelly Fincher, provided students with an informational session on what the secret service is all about and informed them of the hiring process.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Basic preventative measures can make sure student identities are safe
by The Triangle

Jan 31, 2008
“Identity theft crimes are classified in two categories, "simple," and "complex," being as simple as opening someone's mailbox, to using special software to steal personal information, Murugan Anandarajan, a Drexel Management Information Systems professor, said.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Prevent identity theft
by The Triangle

Jan 31, 2008
“According to Robert D'Ovidio, an assistant professor of culture and communication at Drexel, there are a variety of measures students can take to protect themselves against identity theft crimes.
The first step in the case of such a crime is to notify local security at Drexel, according to D'Ovidio.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Identity theft crimes constantly varying in nature
by The Triangle

Jan 31, 2008
“In November 2007, the Federal Trade Commission released a survey showing that 8.3 million Americans were victims of identity theft in 2005.
Though not as common on college campuses, identity theft is clearly a serious crime. There are a variety of levels of technology and practices involved in stealing an identity, and methods of catching criminals of this nature are also varied in technology.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Coffee found to have unexpected benefits
by The Triangle

Jan 24, 2008
“The occasional stop at Starbucks or quick pick-up at The Daily Grind drive-thru may do more than settle that irresistible craving for a peppermint latte, which happens to be the greatest part of the winter, next to the "Home Alone" soundtrack.
Coffee products often receive a bad rep as caffeine is an addictive drug with side effects from excess consumption that include increased blood pressure and nervousness.”

respond
 
Importance
1
America needs to rethink ineffective marijuana prohibition
by The Triangle

Jan 24, 2008
“In the 21st century I find it difficult to grasp why we as Americans have not learned from our mistakes and become better. Decriminalizing marijuana in Pennsylvania and the entire nation subsequently could possibly alleviate some of the drug problems we face here in Philadelphia and the nation at large.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Suspect identified in sexual assault
by The Triangle

Jan 24, 2008
“Investigators know the identity of a suspect who allegedly raped a female Drexel student in her University-owned apartment Jan. 18, according University officials and Philadelphia Police.
The victim reported the crime after she admitted herself to an area hospital, according to a Jan.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Freshman arrested
by The Triangle

Jan 24, 2008
“Drexel University freshman Gang Qiu was arrested Jan. 19 for allegedly using a state computer system to access the personal information of Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter, former Mayor John Street and actor Will Smith, according to police.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Teen shot north of Drexel Patrol Zone
by The Triangle

Jan 17, 2008
“A 17-year-old boy was shot in the neck at 1:30 p.m. Jan. 15. at 36th and Wallace Streets, according to police.
Wallace street, which is four blocks north of Spring Garden Street, is outside Drexel's Public Safety Patrol Zone, and the shooting did not involve any University affiliates, according to Domenic Ceccanecchio, senior associate vice president for Public Safety.”

respond
 
Importance
1
New crosswalk, traffic light at 34th and Lancaster
by The Triangle

Jan 17, 2008
“The University's Student Government Association, along with the Department of Public Safety, announced the addition of a traffic light and crosswalk at 34th Street and Lancaster Avenue early this week.
The three-year project began in winter term of 2005 when USGA recognized the heavy pedestrian traffic flow at 34th Street and Lancaster Avenue, as well as at 33rd and Lancaster Avenue.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Evil gets a dose of some ridiculous and then more
by The Triangle

Jan 17, 2008
“A man gets murdered with a carrot. Yes, that is right. In the opening sequence Clive Owen uses a carrot like a dagger, and shoves it into a bad guy's eye socket. That is a microcosm of Shoot 'Em Up; an action-packed, full-throttle film that is all unrealistic fighting sequences and minimal story.”
respond
 
Importance
1
A.K.A.S. massacre their way into the Fillmore
by The Triangle

Jan 10, 2008
“Here come the A.K.A.S.. Just kidding, they've been here for a while.
After the recent drama on their previous tour with Hawthorne Heights, due to the untimely death of HH guitarist Casey Calvert, the A.K.A.S. were left tourless. After a brief period of mourning, the Philly natives have set plans to return to the road.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Nutter sworn in, promises reform
by The Triangle

Jan 10, 2008
“Former Councilman Michael Nutter took the oath of office Jan. 7, and his first plans of action are to deal with education and crime, he said.
"This is our city and we are taking it back. Every day, every block, every neighborhood, everywhere in Philadelphia," Nutter said.”

respond
 
Importance
1
8 Shot dead in Nebraska
by The Triangle

Dec 06, 2007
“(U-WIRE) LINCOLN, Neb. - A Christmas shopping scene turned into a bloody nightmare Wednesday at an Omaha, Neb. mall.
Robert A. Hawkins, 19, of Bellevue, opened fire in Westroads Mall in west-central Omaha on Wednesday afternoon, killing eight people, then himself.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Public Safety increases walking escort services
by The Triangle

Dec 06, 2007
“Drexel Public Safety and the Undergraduate Student Government Association have announced a new walking escort program to begin Dec. 6 in which public safety officers will actively seek students in need of escorts at the Hagerty Library.
The program will require security officers in the library to ask students if they need an escort every hour.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Where is the respect?
by The Triangle

Nov 29, 2007
“Where is the respect? Where is it? Where is the respect for others, the respect for other people's property, and the respect for ourselves? Where has it gone?
The crime in Philadelphia currently stands in direct correlation to the lack of respect we have for one another.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Public Safety assists in hunt for murderer
by The Triangle

Nov 29, 2007
“Drexel University Public Safety has been asked to assist Rowan University investigators in the search for a suspect who allegedly robbed and beat 19-year-old Rowan sophomore Donald Farrell to death during Rowan's homecoming weekend Oct. 27.
Police are reaching out to surrounding schools for information about the suspect's identity.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Robbery suspects caught; investigation goes on
by The Triangle

Nov 15, 2007
“Police arrested a teenager Nov. 9 and a homeless man Nov. 14 in two unrelated crime patterns targeting Drexel students since early November.
The 17-year-old suspect was arrested in his home at 600 N. 35 St. when Philadelphia Police detectives served a search warrant in connection with seven gunpoint robberies of Drexel students.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Google releases cell software
by The Triangle

Nov 15, 2007
“(U-WIRE) - Google released a new software package for wireless phones called Android on Monday, killing recent speculation for actual wireless phone hardware Google was thought to have in the works.
The first phones are expected to make it to market in the later half of 2008.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Politician visits U.
by The Triangle

Nov 08, 2007
“Representative David G. Argall, who has won 11 straight elections since 1985 in Berks and Schuykill countries, spoke at Drexel Nov. 7.
For the past two elections, he was also elected Republican Party Whip, making him the second highest-ranking Republican in the state House of Representatives.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Philly Briefs
by The Triangle

Nov 01, 2007
“Police officer killed
Philadelphia police officer Charles Cassidy was shot, and died after he interrupted a robbery at a Dunkin Donuts on North Broad Street shortly after 10 a.m. Nov. 1, according to police.
The killer stole Cassidy's gun before fleeing the scene.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Homelessness misunderstood by students
by The Triangle

Oct 25, 2007
“In recent weeks I've seen ignorance about homelessness surfacing among students of this University. It seems that many Drexel students believe the homeless to be drug addicts or lazy opportunists looking for some easy money. Although this probably defines some people on the streets, it does not accurately characterize the majority of the homeless.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Public education continuously declines
by The Triangle

Oct 25, 2007
“In the interview I gave a representative from Haverford University last year (during that awful three month period of trial and error that is called college interviews), I lied and told him I learned logic, reason, rhetoric, penmanship, creativity, culture, skill in writing, persuasion, vocabulary, mathematics, and cold hard facts from my stint in high school.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Financial aid: Your anti-drug?
by The Triangle

Oct 25, 2007
“HONOLULU - Students who are on financial aid and are caught smoking marijuana could see their federal assistance go up in smoke.
The Higher Education Act was established in 1965 to provide educational resources for college students through financial aid programs.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Campus on alert after series of robberies
by The Triangle

Oct 25, 2007
“Eight robberies, four involving guns, have occurred near or around Drexel's campus since Oct. 5, prompting public safety officials to increase patrol and seek assistance from the Philadelphia Police Department's Special Investigations Unit, according to Drexel's Department of Public Safety.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Study: Excessive drinking could cause breast cancer
by The Triangle

Oct 18, 2007
“(U-WIRE) University Park, Pa. - Before heading out to the bars this weekend, women may want to think twice about how much they drink because they could be risking more than a hangover.
A new study led by researchers Arthur Klatsky and Yan Li of the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program in Oakland, California found that heavy consumption of any type of alcohol increases a woman's risk of developing breast cancer.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Colleges start working to combat binge drinking
by The Triangle

Oct 18, 2007
“WASHINGTON - More than 200 universities require incoming freshmen to take AlcoholEdu, an online course that informs students about drinking's impact on the mind and body, before enrolling in school.
To many college students, binge drinking and everything that goes with it - beer pong, keg stands and $1 shots - are a rite of passage, as integral a part of the college experience as midterms and all-nighters.”

respond
 
Importance
1
College cleaning services find their way to Philly
by The Triangle

Oct 18, 2007
“PHILADELPHIA - Past the Bud Light can on the lawn, four empty Coors kegs in the entryway, and, in the hall, the box for a Little Whizzer statuette that "pours" liquor, there was a den of filth.
Eight fraternity brothers from the University of Pennsylvania share this West Philadelphia house, a pig sty tolerable only to undiscerning students and collegiate revelers trawling for free alcohol.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel hires Public Safety chief
by The Triangle

Oct 18, 2007
“Domenic Ceccanecchio, a former University of Pennsylvania security official, was hired as the new senior associate vice president of public safety and will begin working in his role Oct. 29, according to an Oct. 16 statement from the University.
James Tucker, senior vice president of Student Life, called Ceccanecchio an "innovative leader in public safety" in the statement, and stressed his experience working in University City and the surrounding communities.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Campus crime drops, officials cite new plans
by The Triangle

Oct 18, 2007
“Total criminal offenses reported under the federal Jeanne Clery Act dropped 4.8 percent across all three of Drexel University's campuses from 2005 to 2006, according to The Triangle's analysis of Drexel's crime statistics released Oct. 11.
The University City Main Campus had the greatest declines with a 21.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel MBA alumna uses microlending for good
by The Triangle

Oct 11, 2007
“With an undergraduate degree from Temple University, an MBA from Drexel University and course experience from Stanford University, Rupa Modi has the skills, prowess and knowledge to tackle just about any domain, but she has her eyes on just one prize - the success of founding organization Kiva.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Robbers pose as cabbies, prey on students
by The Triangle

Oct 04, 2007
“Drexel University's Department of Public Safety issued a campus wide alert Oct. 4 after a pattern of robberies and abductions emerged across Philadelphia.
The victim hails a taxi with two males in the front, and after the victim enters the cab, the front seat passenger displays a handgun and demands cash, cell phones and forces the victim to withdraw money from an ATM.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Knife-wielding suspect arrested
by The Triangle

Sep 27, 2007
“Two Drexel students were robbed and another threatened with a knife in a series of crimes occurring between Aug. 25 and Aug. 30.
The first incident occurred when students reported a black male, possibly armed with a knife, in the area of 35th and Lancaster Avenue shortly before 4 a.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Letter to the editor: Inaccurate Editorial About Drexel Public Safety
by The Triangle

Sep 27, 2007
“Dear Editor,
Your editorial, "Dysfunctional Drexel Public Safety," (Sept. 20, 2007), implies that Drexel's campus is unsafe and our crime statistics are not accurate and do not encompass off-campus areas. This is false!
The administration at Drexel University takes campus safety very seriously.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Brews Clues: Allagash White
by The Triangle

Sep 27, 2007
“In all the party beer hubbub, I forgot to mention the death of a great hop head. The beer community will sorely miss Michael Jackson, the man responsible for making beer style guides, on which I base my reviews. He also popularized beer geekdom with his TV show on Discovery Channel, The Beer Hunter.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Author speaks on prison reform
by The Triangle

Sep 27, 2007
“Prison reform advocate and Quaker Linda Magnani visited with Criminal Justice students Sept. 26 to discuss her latest book, Beyond Prisons.
In the book published in 2006 by Fortress Press, Magnani discusses the topic of what she sees as our flawed penal system, what went wrong with the original system, and 12 ways it can be changed.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Brew's Clues: The Party Beer Edition
by The Triangle

Sep 19, 2007
“The American Style Pilsner is a true bastardization of a classic foreign style, and there is no one to blame for it except for the Sixty-fifth Congress of the United States of America who passed a joke of a constitutional amendment. The 18th Amendment is the only amendment to take away rights, in this case the right to alcohol.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Lack of plot, character creativity and quality backfire on 'Shoot 'Em Up'
by The Triangle

Sep 19, 2007
“In the tradition of many of the action films before it, Shoot 'Em Up tries to reinvent new ways of killing the bad guy and intriguing the audience. Unfortunately, it failed to do so in ways that could be considered entertaining.”
respond
 
Importance
1
756 reasons Bonds' numbers will boggle your mind
by The Triangle

Aug 09, 2007
“While Barry Bonds admired his 756th home run fall amidst the throngs of ravenous fans as they battled for the ball in the right center field bleachers, a piece of history, (and might I add, a big payday), he must've felt a sigh of relief.
Regardless of whether or not Bonds is found guilty of taking steroids and other performance enhancing drugs, for that one moment as he trotted around the bases for the 756th time, he was king of the baseball world.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Brew's Clues: Drexel's #1 Beer Review
by The Triangle

Aug 09, 2007
“The American Double IPA (DIPA is truly a uniquely American style beer. It is a beer that represents the "bigger is better" mantra more than any other. Like America herself, it is based off an English style, the IPA, but it goes one better. There are more hops and much more alcohol.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Newark murders shatter students' hope for future
by The Triangle

Aug 09, 2007
“Sunday night, three young lives ended in a brutal execution-style murder. The victims were lined up in the Mount Vernon School playground and shot in the head. The dead were Delaware State University students home for summer vacation. As students living in Philadelphia, we are often numb to violence but the DSU students died in another troubled city - Newark N.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Public Safety issues University-wide Alert
by The Triangle

Jul 26, 2007
“Drexel Public Safety issued a University-wide alert June 17 after two students were assaulted at off-campus locations in the vicinity of Hamilton and Spring Garden Sts., west of 34 St.
The assaults, which are attributed to juveniles allegedly ranging from ages nine to 16, are linked to a number of incidents around Drexel and the University of Pennsylvania's campus.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Bandido's sentence will fail to reduce piracy
by The Triangle

Jun 28, 2007
“So, Bandido got sentenced to 51 months in a U.S. federal prison, over three years of which will be waived because of time he served in Australia. His crime? Pirating software back in the 90s.
Hew Raymond Griffiths (known better to the Internet by his tag "Bandido") was one of the leaders of the warez group "DrinkOrDie" which is most famous for releasing Windows 95 a whopping two weeks before its official release date (Vista was released months before its release date).”

respond
 
Importance
1
Head of Public Safety accepts post at USP
by The Triangle

Jun 28, 2007
“Bernard Gollotti, senior associate vice president of the Department of Public Safety at the University, is resigning from his position effective the first week of July.
Gollotti left Drexel to accept a position as the head of the Department of Public Safety at the University of the Sciences of Philadelphia, according to James Katsaounis, executive director of communications for Student Life and Administrative Services.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Crime Report
by The Triangle

Jun 28, 2007
“Please click thumbnail for crime report.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Drexel crew teams participate in Dad Vail Regatta
by The Triangle

May 17, 2007
“Drexel's men's and women's crew teams joined rowers from around the country and gathered on the Schuylkill River in Philadelphia for the 69th Annual Dad Vail Regatta, the largest collegiate rowing competition in the country, May 11 and 12.
The women's varsity four had the most successful outing of all Drexel boats.”

respond
 
Importance
1
'Rape Kits': option for victimized
by The Triangle

May 17, 2007
“Editors note: This article is part two of a four part series on sexual violence.
Asking for help can be frightening, especially if you are a victim of sexual violence. In fact, most of people do not even know what their options are.
One of the tools most widely used to help victims of sex crimes is a 'rape kit', also known as a sexual assault evidence kit or sexual assault forensic evidence kit.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Why not a death penalty moratorium in Pennsylvania?
by The Triangle

May 10, 2007
“New Jersey is poised to become the latest state to impose a moratorium on the death penalty, following the recommendation of a special panel commissioned by the State Legislature. The panel's report points out what other studies have long-since concluded: capital punishment is expensive to taxpayers and ineffective as a deterrent to crime.”
respond
 
Importance
1
Philadelphia: Another day, another murder
by The Triangle

May 10, 2007
“A lot of students think that the upcoming Mayoral election doesn't have anything to do with them, but it does.
The City of Philadelphia is slowly dying. A murder rate of one dead and five shootings per day has turned neighborhoods into war zones and forced many residents into a constant state of fear.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Va. Tech: Media right to broadcast killer's videos
by The Triangle

May 03, 2007
“The morning of Thursday, April 12 saw Cho Seung-Hui, the Virginia Tech murderer, on the cover of the always-tasteful Daily News. Here was the man who killed 32 people facing me with a look of hate in his eyes pointing the barrel of the gun. Still shaken by the tragedy that Monday, I became flush with rage, disgust and disappointment at my media peers.”
respond
 
Importance
1
City workforce ranks low in education, skills
by The Triangle

Apr 26, 2007
“Philadelphia's workforce is not as educated as in comparable cities, and this is beginning to affect job seekers. According to the Philadelphia Workforce Investment Board, the city's workforce is ranked near the bottom of the 100 largest American cities in education and skill level.”
respond
 
Importance
1
To conquer the barbarism within us
by The Triangle

Apr 19, 2007
“I saw a remarkable sight the other day: eighteen death row exonerees, clutching a banner and battling the wind in front on Independence Mall, celebrating their reprieve from hell. One after another, they recounted the days and nights there:
"Seventee”

respond
 
Importance
1
New Orleans: Helping those who help themselves
by The Triangle

Apr 19, 2007
“There are numerous topics I tire of hearing on a constant basis. Global warming and the death of polar bears would be one. The "Bush lied, people died" meme would be another. But since I'm a U.S. boy and an architectural engineer, what really irks me are”
respond
 
Importance
1
New system enhances safety communication
by The Triangle

Apr 19, 2007
“DragonForce, a new handheld communication tool for Drexel Public Safety was unveiled April 18. This technology makes it easier for DPS officers to track each other using GPS enabled PDAs.
Senior Associate Vice President for Public Safety Ben Gollotti a”

respond
 
Importance
1
Tragedy prompts increased security
by The Triangle

Apr 19, 2007
“Only hours after the tragedy began at Virginia Tech, Drexel public safety officials were working to implement a plan to protect the University community.
Senior Vice President for Public Safety Ben Gollotti explained that preparing for a crisis has been”

respond
 
Importance
1
Police shooting leaves suspect dead
by The Triangle

Apr 19, 2007
“A male carjacker was killed in a struggle with a University of Pennsylvania police officer April 16 after he carjacked a van from a UPenn parking garage. Prior to the incident, the carjacker led police on a brief chase before crashing into a parked car at”
respond
 
Importance
1
Students cope with Virginia Tech campus massacre
by The Triangle

Apr 19, 2007
“Thirty-three people were killed in the deadliest shooting spree in U.S. history on the Virginia Polytechnic Institute campus April 16 in Blacksburg, Va.
The violence began at 7:15 am when police received a report that two students had been shot in the”

respond
 
Importance
1
The Protomen revive Mega Man mythos
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Those growing up around the Super Nintendo era are sure to tell you they have spent many hours smashing away at buttons to send digitized heroes into the jaws of what seemed like imminent death. These heroes included Mario, Link and even Earthworm Jim. Of”
respond
 
Importance
1
The mother state meets The Triangle's Editorial Board
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Let's talk about the desire for people to be coddled.
People like to be told that guns cause crime, not criminals and lack of proper parenting. They like to be told they can't have trans-fat foods, and they like to be told that bars will be smoke free.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Three students arrested in U. Crossings
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Three members of the Drexel's men's tennis team were arrested after allegedly burglarizing several University Crossings apartments early Monday morning.
Carlo Pangilinan, a sophomore, Ben Trabin, a junior, and Jarrod Popvice, a freshman, were all arres”

respond
 
Importance
1
The Protomen revive Mega Man mythos
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Those growing up around the Super Nintendo era are sure to tell you they have spent many hours smashing away at buttons to send digitized heroes into the jaws of what seemed like imminent death. These heroes included Mario, Link and even Earthworm Jim. Of”
respond
 
Importance
1
The mother state meets The Triangle's Editorial Board
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Let's talk about the desire for people to be coddled.
People like to be told that guns cause crime, not criminals and lack of proper parenting. They like to be told they can't have trans-fat foods, and they like to be told that bars will be smoke free.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Three students arrested in U. Crossings
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Three members of the Drexel's men's tennis team were arrested after allegedly burglarizing several University Crossings apartments early Monday morning.
Carlo Pangilinan, a sophomore, Ben Trabin, a junior, and Jarrod Popvice, a freshman, were all arres”

respond
 
Importance
1
The Protomen revive Mega Man mythos
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Those growing up around the Super Nintendo era are sure to tell you they have spent many hours smashing away at buttons to send digitized heroes into the jaws of what seemed like imminent death. These heroes included Mario, Link and even Earthworm Jim. Of”
respond
 
Importance
1
The mother state meets The Triangle's Editorial Board
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Let's talk about the desire for people to be coddled.
People like to be told that guns cause crime, not criminals and lack of proper parenting. They like to be told they can't have trans-fat foods, and they like to be told that bars will be smoke free.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Three students arrested in U. Crossings
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Three members of the Drexel's men's tennis team were arrested after allegedly burglarizing several University Crossings apartments early Monday morning.
Carlo Pangilinan, a sophomore, Ben Trabin, a junior, and Jarrod Popvice, a freshman, were all arres”

respond
 
Importance
1
The Protomen revive Mega Man mythos
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Those growing up around the Super Nintendo era are sure to tell you they have spent many hours smashing away at buttons to send digitized heroes into the jaws of what seemed like imminent death. These heroes included Mario, Link and even Earthworm Jim. Of”
respond
 
Importance
1
The mother state meets The Triangle's Editorial Board
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Let's talk about the desire for people to be coddled.
People like to be told that guns cause crime, not criminals and lack of proper parenting. They like to be told they can't have trans-fat foods, and they like to be told that bars will be smoke free.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Three students arrested in U. Crossings
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Three members of the Drexel's men's tennis team were arrested after allegedly burglarizing several University Crossings apartments early Monday morning.
Carlo Pangilinan, a sophomore, Ben Trabin, a junior, and Jarrod Popvice, a freshman, were all arres”

respond
 
Importance
1
The Protomen revive Mega Man mythos
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Those growing up around the Super Nintendo era are sure to tell you they have spent many hours smashing away at buttons to send digitized heroes into the jaws of what seemed like imminent death. These heroes included Mario, Link and even Earthworm Jim. Of”
respond
 
Importance
1
The mother state meets The Triangle's Editorial Board
by The Triangle

Apr 12, 2007
“Let's talk about the desire for people to be coddled.
People like to be told that guns cause crime, not criminals and lack of proper parenting. They like to be told they can't have trans-fat foods, and they like to be told that bars will be smoke free.”