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Brown University

Brown Campus News
Importance
1
Federal, state officials break ground on Dynamo project
by Brown Daily Herald

Dec 15, 2014
“Private sector leaders gathered with federal, state and municipal officials in a ceremony Monday to kick off renovations to the Jewelry District’s South Street Power Station, popularly known as the Dynamo House.
The revamp — expected to be complete by the fall of 2016 — will result in a nursing education center shared by Rhode Island College and the University of Rhode Island, as well as graduate housing and administrative offices for the University.
Officials joked that this would be “the last groundbreaking at this particular site,” said Dick Galvin ’79, president and founder of Commonwealth Ventures Properties, poking fun at failed past projects that attempted to renovate the former power station, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. Prior to the actual groundbreaking, officials ranging from Galvin to Gov. Lincoln Chafee ’17 P’14 P’17 voiced their excitement about the project to a crowd of more than 200.
“On a day such as this, I can see why Travel and Leisure (Magazine) named Providence ‘Favorite City in America,’” Chafee said.
The current project serves as a capstone for Chafee, whose self-proclaimed mantra during his tenure has been: “Invest in education, infrastructure and workforce development.” Chafee also created the I-195 Redevelopment District Commission in 2011. The resulting relocation of I-195 cleared up land that will be used for the South Street Landing.
The new nursing education center will be “a thriving center of the meds and eds,” Chafee said, noting that education and health care are two of the biggest labor sectors in the state.
Galvin pointed to federal historic tax credits as helping to finance the revamp and thanked the state’s federal delegation for its support. As a Brown alum, he said he is particularly excited about the University’s involvement in the project.
Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., said he believes the project will meet the economic demands of a larger labor force in the health care industry.
“With the Affordable Care Act, there are … thousands of Rhode Islanders who will have access to care,” Reed said. “We need the nurses and the health professionals to care for them.”
The Rhode Island College nursing school “has been on a roll lately,” said President of Rhode Island College Nancy Carriuolo, noting that 91.5 percent of RIC students who took the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses last year passed and RIC’s average was eight points above the national average.
The University will occupy half of South Street Landing, Reed said. “They’ll be a lead tenant in the 264 beds of graduate housing, and will continue to drive a lot of economic development.”
The University has invested more than $200 million in the Jewelry District, said President Christina Paxson P’19, who participated in the ceremonial groundbreaking. The project “really solidifies our presence here, and one that I think will continue to grow,” she said.
Once completed, the building will house 400 more administrative employees, she added.
Consolidating administrative offices in the Jewelry District will not only free up space for academic priorities on College Hill, but also allow for more collaboration and consolidation within administrative offices, said Russell Carey ’91 MA’06, executive vice president for planning.
The offices of the Vice President for Research, which are currently located in three different places on College Hill, will move to the new building, Carey said. The Division of Advancement, which has some employees at 110 Elm Street in the Jewelry District and some on College Hill, will also be consolidated in the new building, he added.
Further decisions about the use of the new offices and the repurposing of current office space on College Hill will be decided over the next two years, before the lease begins in 2016, Carey said.
Many officials highlighted the collaborative nature of the project. Galvin said the ceremony was “groundbreaking” on several levels, noting that it highlighted the partnership between state and city leadership, the collaboration between the government and a public utility to solve problems and the sharing of a facility by three educational institutions.
The project “really needed more than one anchor tenant to make it practical and feasible,” Carey said. “We probably won’t fully realize how valuable that is for years.”
Governor-elect Gina Raimondo commented on the uniting factor for all stakeholders in the project. “The one thing that binds you is a deep and enduring commitment to this state,” she said in her speech.
“Here in Providence and here in Rhode Island, we have all of the ingredients to be nothing less than a world-class place to live, to work and to play,” said Mayor-elect Jorge Elorza. “But in order to do that, we have to think big, we have to be creative and, most importantly, we have to be collaborative.””

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Importance
1
Chernow ’79 selected as next finance VP
by Brown Daily Herald

Dec 12, 2014
“Barbara Chernow ’79 will succeed Beppie Huidekoper as the next executive vice president for finance and administration effective March 1, President Christina Paxson P’19 announced in a community-wide email Friday. The appointment concludes a search that began in August, when Huidekoper announced her intention to retire after more than 12 years in the position.
Chernow currently serves as Stony Brook University’s senior vice president for administration. Though her new title is different, the job description is the same, Chernow told The Herald.
Chernow said she has worked closely with students, faculty members and staff members during her time at Stony Brook to improve dining services, implement energy-saving programs and change parking and transportation systems. “I’m very, very proud of the work I’ve done with my staff,” she said.
At Brown, Chernow will be charged with “leading and directing essentially all of the non-academic operations of the University” and overseeing a “range of strategic planning issues to advance the University’s mission and goals, including the development of short- and long-term financial and capital plans,” Paxson wrote.
The impending capital campaign — set to go public in October 2015 — will focus on financing the priorities Paxson outlined in her strategic plan .
Chernow will also work in collaboration with Provost Vicki Colvin and the University Resources Committee to develop annual budget recommendations, Paxson wrote.
The University currently faces a structural operating budget deficit of about $10 million. To address this concern, Paxson and Colvin formed a Deficit Working Group in October and charged its 23 members with finding $7 million in cost savings.
Chernow said she is “looking forward to learning more about the issue” and plans to “listen carefully,” though she will not determine her specific goals and strategies until she arrives on campus.
“I really want to work with the team at Brown to find out what the needs are and what the priorities are,” Chernow said. “My goal is really to help the president with her plan.”
Huidekoper managed the University’s finances and operations during the execution of former President Ruth Simmmons’ Plan for Academic Enrichment.
Despite dropping by about $740 million when the 2008 financial crisis hit, the University’s endowment grew overall during Huidekoper’s tenure.
The endowment’s market value reached a record high of $3.2 billion during the last reported fiscal year, but it remains the lowest in the Ivy League.
“I think that Beppie had an incredible impact at Brown, and because of her insight, good work and planning, Brown is in a good place,” Chernow said.
Chernow said her undergraduate experience at Brown impacted her greatly and she is “excited to be back with an active and engaged campus community.””

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Importance
1
20 percent of early decision applicants offered admission
by Brown Daily Herald

Dec 11, 2014
“Updated Dec. 11 at 8:45 p.m.
The University accepted 20 percent of early decision applicants to the class of 2019, admitting 617 students to the largest early decision class since the program was instated for the class of 2006, wrote Dean of Admission Jim Miller ’73 in an email to The Herald.
The 20 percent early admission rate is higher than in recent years — 18.9 percent of early applicants were admitted to the class of 2018 and a record-low 18.5 percent of early applicants were admitted to the class of 2017 .
Out of the 3,016 total early decision applicants this year, 1,968 were deferred to regular decision and 408 were denied admission.
The early decision applicants to the class of 2019 comprised the “strongest ED pool we have ever had,” Miller wrote.
The Program in Liberal Medical Education accepted 18 students, the same number as in the last early decision cycle, Miller wrote.
Recruited athletes account for 26 percent of the early decision class, marking a small dip from the last admission cycle, when athletes accounted for 28 percent of the class, Miller wrote.
Racial minorities account for 31 percent of the admitted class — a slight rise from the last admission cycle, when 30 percent of early admits identified as racial minority students.
Forty-six percent of admitted students applied for financial aid.
Approximately 58 percent of early admits are female, while approximately 42 percent are male.
Admitted students hail from 43 states and 31 nations. New York, California, Massachusetts, New Jersey and Rhode Island are the most represented states in that order, Miller wrote. China, Canada, the United Kingdom, Singapore, France and India are the best-represented foreign countries.
The mid-Atlantic region accounts for 24 percent of the admitted class, New England accounts for 21 percent, the Mountain and Pacific states account for 19 percent, the South accounts for 12 percent and the Midwest accounts for 9 percent. The remaining 15 percent of students are international.
“It feels amazing to get into Brown. … It feels like such a relief to find out,” said Katie Hammaker ’19 of Ephrata, Pennsylvania, who received a “likely” letter earlier this year as a recruit to the field hockey team.
“I decided to apply ED after visiting the school,” she added. “When I visited, everyone was so nice and willing to share what they liked about Brown.”
Mark Hocevar ’19 of Perry, Ohio, said he felt a “connection (he) didn’t feel at any other school” during his three visits to Brown. “It’s the whole package you’re looking for in a college.”
An admit to the Program in Liberal Medical Education, Hocevar said he plans to concentrate in cognitive neuroscience before attending Alpert Medical School. He said he is also interested in participating in robotics research and taking Hispanic studies courses.
- With additional reporting by Eben Blake”

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Importance
1
Midyear graduation honors ‘point-fivers’
by Brown Daily Herald

Dec 09, 2014
“Just over 150 students graduated in the Midyear Completion Celebration Saturday afternoon, marking the 25th year that the University has honored students set to graduate at the end of the fall semester.
Enthusiastic students, parents and alums packed Salomon 101 to cheer on the graduates. A smaller but equally animated contingent watched a simulcast of the proceedings in Salomon 001.
The midyear graduates, whom many refer to as “point-fivers,” took part in a visibly lighthearted procession. Many dressed in creative semi-formal attire: Notable accessories included Hawaiian shirts and an intricate pirate-style bicorne.
Performances by the Van Wickle Winds preceded the ceremony and Mariami Bekauri GS opened the ceremony with a rendition of the national anthem.
Following an invocation by University Chaplain Janet Cooper Nelson, several faculty members made speeches praising the class of 2014.5. Speakers noted that the University stands apart from its peer institutions in holding a ceremony to honor midyear graduates.
“You as point-fivers have opened the curriculum as far as it can possibly open,” said Margaret Klawunn, vice president for campus life and student services. “You are perhaps the most Brunonian of all Brunonians.”
Paxson echoed Klawunn’s celebration of unconventional paths to graduation. In her remarks, Paxson lauded the “individuality” and “independence” of the December graduates and reminded them that they would have more power to effect social change going forward than they “ever had as students.”
Paxson also urged the class to stand against “injustice in all forms,” to “use education to do good in the world” and to hold on to the “sense of social responsibility that distinguishes Brown students and Brown alumni.”
Todd Harris ’14.5 and Maggie Tennis ’14.5, a Herald opinions editor, delivered speeches reflecting on their time at and away from Brown.
Tennis said she became a midyear graduate after deciding not to take a medical leave in the fall of her senior year and to complete an honors thesis. Delaying her graduation to complete her thesis afforded her the freedom to do the kind of work she “came to Brown to do,” she said.
“At Brown, a different approach to education is not odd; it’s expected,” she said. “By pushing us to direct our own educations, Brown positions us to be the leaders of our lives.”
Harris, who took a leave to work on President Obama’s 2012 re-election campaign following the death of a parent, said the option to do work he believed in was an essential opportunity to heal. “Although everything around us can often feel out of our control, one important choice that we do have the ability to make is the choice to continue growing.”
Provost Vicki Colvin’s remarks about her experience as a “double point-fiver” at Stanford University drew much laughter from the audience. While driving to take the Chemistry GRE during her senior year, her car “made a loud exploding sound and filled with smoke and flames,” preventing her from taking the exam and threatening her future plans. This experience of uncertainty affirmed her instinctive awareness of her true passions, she said.
She encouraged the graduates to recognize and trust their instincts. “Pay attention to each and every day of the remarkable life I know you’re going to have,” she said. “The true joy in life is unfolding it and not knowing the future.”
A previous version of this article misstated that Maggie Tennis ’14.5 decided to take a medical leave in the fall of her senior year. In fact, she decided not to take a medical leave. The article also previously stated that a student was wearing a pirate-style tricorne. In fact, it was a bicorne. The Herald regrets the errors.”

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Importance
1
Raimondo taps Roberts ’78 for cabinet position
by Brown Daily Herald

Dec 09, 2014
“Rhode Island Lt. Gov. Elizabeth Roberts ’78 was nominated as Secretary of the Executive Office of Health and Human Services, Governor-elect Gina Raimondo announced at a Dec. 7 press conference. The appointment is pending confirmation from the General Assembly in January.
“The lieutenant governor’s years of experience working on various health and human services issues … makes her the best choice to lead this office,” Raimondo said, Go Local Prov reported Dec. 7.
Roberts is slated to replace current Executive Office of Health and Human Services Secretary Steven Costantino, who has held the position since 2011. Constantino previously served for 16 years as a Democratic state representative from Providence before losing a 2010 mayoral bid. “I haven’t decided whether or not there’s a place for him someplace else in state government,” Raimondo said of Costantino, the Providence Journal reported Dec. 7.
Before beginning her eight-year stint as the Ocean State’s first female lieutenant governor in 2007, Roberts served as a state senator for 10 years.
As an undergraduate at Brown, Roberts concentrated in human biology and volunteered at Women and Children’s Hospital , which furthered her interest in health care. After graduation, Roberts earned an MBA in health care management from Boston University.
Roberts initially got involved in Ocean State politics by volunteering for campaigns in the early 1990s. She successfully claimed a senate seat in 1996, becoming the first Rhode Island woman to do so in 12 years.
During her nearly two-decade career in public service, Roberts has aided a number of bodies tasked with evaluating the state’s health care system, serving as chair of the State of Rhode Island Healthcare Reform Commission, co-chair of the Permanent Joint Committee on Healthcare Oversight and chairwoman of the Senate Health and Human Services Committee. She also introduced the Rhode Island Healthy Reform Act of 2008, an eight-part reform package aiming to improve citizens’ access to affordable health care, according to Roberts’ website.
Additionally, she helped establish the Office of Health Insurance Commissioner, which works to oversee insurance companies and health care costs, according to her website.
At a meeting with reporters Sunday, Raimondo called Roberts “one of the smartest people I know as it relates to health care,” the Providence Journal reported.
In her new role, Roberts plans on working to foster inter-agency collaboration, which could help improve health care delivery systems, according to a Dec. 7 press release from the Office of the Lieutenant Governor.
“(I) look forward to rolling up my sleeves to make sure Rhode Islanders of all ages have access to the quality services they deserve,” Roberts said in the press release.”

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Importance
1
Midyear graduation honors ‘point-fivers’
by Brown Daily Herald

Dec 07, 2014
“Just over 150 students graduated in the Midyear Completion Celebration Saturday afternoon, marking the 25th year that the University has honored students set to graduate at the end of the fall semester.
Enthusiastic students, parents and alums packed Salomon 101 to cheer on the graduates. A smaller but equally animated contingent watched a simulcast of the proceedings in Salomon 001.
The midyear graduates, whom many refer to as “point-fivers,” took part in a visibly lighthearted procession. Many dressed in creative semi-formal attire: Notable accessories included Hawaiian shirts and an intricate pirate-style tricorne.
Performances by the Van Wickle Winds preceded the ceremony and Mariami Bekauri GS opened the ceremony with a rendition of the national anthem.
Following an invocation by University Chaplain Janet Cooper Nelson, several faculty members made speeches praising the class of 2014.5. Speakers noted that the University stands apart from its peer institutions in holding a ceremony to honor midyear graduates.
“You as point-fivers have opened the curriculum as far as it can possibly open,” said Margaret Klawunn, vice president for campus life and student services. “You are perhaps the most Brunonian of all Brunonians.”
Paxson echoed Klawunn’s celebration of unconventional paths to graduation. In her remarks, Paxson lauded the “individuality” and “independence” of the December graduates and reminded them that they would have more power to effect social change going forward than they “ever had as students.”
Paxson also urged the class to stand against “injustice in all forms,” to “use education to do good in the world” and to hold on to the “sense of social responsibility that distinguishes Brown students and Brown alumni.”
Todd Harris ’14.5 and Maggie Tennis ’14.5, a Herald opinions editor, delivered speeches reflecting on their time at and away from Brown.
Tennis said she became a midyear graduate after taking a medical leave in the fall of her senior year and deciding to complete an honors thesis. Delaying her graduation to complete her thesis afforded her the freedom to do the kind of work she “came to Brown to do,” she said.
“At Brown, a different approach to education is not odd; it’s expected,” she said. “By pushing us to direct our own educations, Brown positions us to be the leaders of our lives.”
Harris, who took a leave to work on President Obama’s 2012 re-election campaign following the death of a parent, said the option to do work he believed in was an essential opportunity to heal. “Although everything around us can often feel out of our control, one important choice that we do have the ability to make is the choice to continue growing.”
Provost Vicki Colvin’s remarks about her experience as a “double point-fiver” at Stanford University drew much laughter from the audience. While driving to take the Chemistry GRE during her senior year, her car “made a loud exploding sound and filled with smoke and flames,” preventing her from taking the exam and threatening her future plans. This experience of uncertainty affirmed her instinctive awareness of her true passions, she said.
She encouraged the graduates to recognize and trust their instincts. “Pay attention to each and every day of the remarkable life I know you’re going to have,” she said. “The true joy in life is unfolding it and not knowing the future.””

respond
 
Importance
1
Meiklejohns expand to assist during disciplinary process
by Brown Daily Herald

Dec 05, 2014
“The Meiklejohn Peer Advising program will expand next semester to include the Code Advising Meiklejohn Program, an initiative aimed at helping advisees navigate the disciplinary process.
The subprogram will “deal directly with issues related to the Student Code of Conduct and the Academic Code,” said Abi Kulshreshtha ’15, a member of the Meiklejohn Leadership Committee. CAMP will act as a “peer resource to students undergoing disciplinary procedures” and will offer “general advice on the process,” he added.
Applications for the new program are due Dec. 5, and Meiklejohns who participate will complete a Jan. 20 training in code violation expectations and procedures run by the dean of the College office.
The program will attempt to “fill the void that students have felt” exists in the advising system, said Joey Sacks ’15, another member of the Meiklejohn Leadership Committee. It will ideally act as a way for “students to seek shelter away from University Hall,” he added.
Meiklejohns in the program will only be permitted to help advisees understand the language and meaning of the codes — they will not be allowed to recommend courses of action, Sacks added.
CAMP is currently working with administrators in the dean of the College office and reaching out to the Office of Student Life, Kulshreshtha said.
The program hopes to build off the work of the Student Conduct Information Service, a student group with a similar mission that recently disbanded, he said.
But there are certain limitations facing the program due to issues of confidentiality, which can prevent students from sharing case specifics, he added.
CAMP marks the second recent expansion to the Meiklejohn program. The Department Meiklejohn program, which offers pre-concentration advising to sophomores, was introduced this semester to go “past the first-year experience,” Sacks said.
Both programs seek to “tackle specific advising needs that the Brown community is calling for,” Kulshreshtha said.
Students offered mixed reactions to the Code Advising Meiklejohn Program.
Eliza Lanzillo ’16 said that by sophomore year, students “have fallen into social groups” and “found their own mechanisms of support,” making the program less necessary. But she added that “the program is missing a mental health component,” noting that she wished Meiklejohns in the program would provide advice on mental health in addition to disciplinary proceedings.
But Connor Flexman ’16 said some students have “large holes in their knowledge of” the Student Code of Conduct and the Academic Code, and the program could help educate them.
Clare Peabody ’18 echoed this, noting that many professors and advisors assume students are familiar with these codes, when in reality this is often not the case. She added that increasing student awareness of the codes is “not a focus of the advising process.””

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Importance
1
Fuller ’15.5 announces return for 2015 football season
by Brown Daily Herald

Dec 05, 2014
“In separate social media posts, wide receiver Brian Strachan ’15.5 and football team quarterback and co-captain Marcus Fuller ’15.5 announced that they will be returning to the team for the 2015 season.
While most players are only offered four years of eligibility, Strachan and Fuller were both granted medical hardship waivers for suffering significant injuries in their freshman and junior seasons, respectively. Since both have already completed seven semesters, they will take the 2015 spring semester off before returning to school in the fall.
Fuller grew by leaps and bounds this season — his first as a starter. After throwing for 202 yards, no touchdowns and two interceptions in the season opener, he threw for at least one touchdown in each of the year’s final nine games and was only intercepted five more times. His seven picks were the second fewest among Ivy quarterbacks with at least 250 attempts.
On the year, he threw for 2,618 yards, the third-most in the Ivy League.
He completed a somewhat low 54.7 percent of his attempts but was still third in the conference in yards per attempt at 7.2.
His experience will be invaluable on a team that has seen its share of growing pains: This season, the Bears offense struggled to find cohesiveness with 11 new starters. But seven starters are projected to return for the unit in 2015, and Bruno will benefit from continuity under center, especially now that backup quarterback Seth Rosenbauer ’16 has transitioned to running back and been replaced on the depth chart by Kyle Moreno ’17, who completed just 3-for-9 pass attempts in limited time this season.
“Experience is the one thing you can’t teach,” Fuller said. “I matured a lot over the season.”
Fuller explained that he knew his decision was made after the team’s loss to Yale, in which the offense exploded for six touchdowns but fell 45-42.
“We went toe-to-toe with what was at the time the best offense in the country,” he said. “That was proof of how far we’ve come and what we’re capable of as a unit.”
Strachan had an excellent season as well, ending the year with Second Team All-Ivy honors. His 56 catches, 668 yards and seven touchdowns led the Bears and placed him sixth, seventh and second in the conference respectively. Strachan’s chemistry with Fuller was evident, and the connection between the two will be instrumental in the success of next year’s attack.
“As the season went on, the offense got a lot better,” Strachan said.
Previously plagued by injuries, including two ankle surgeries, Strachan said this offseason will be the first in which he is at full strength and can prepare without limits. Finally unshackled from rehab exercises, Strachan said he plans to “give it all I have.”
With one more shot at a championship, both Bears plan to make it count.
“I came here to win an Ivy title,” Strachan said. “We have unfinished business.””

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Importance
1
Editors’ note: Good night, and good luck
by Brown Daily Herald

Dec 05, 2014
“Today’s paper marks our 121st and final issue as The Herald’s 124th Editorial Board. For the six of us, this issue signifies the end of three and a half years spent working on the paper alongside a dedicated editorial and business staff, to whom we owe an endless debt of gratitude. But we are not alone in contributing to the paper — as members of the Brown community, everyone on campus has added to The Herald, whether as sources in our stories, readers of the paper or commenters on our website. And we thank you for this participation, for without it there would be no paper.
At The Herald this year, we have strived to inspire and project critical discussions by pushing forward discourse on issues including the strategic plan, sexual assault policy, campus racism, financial aid and academic integrity amid major administrative turnover. We have had the tough but important responsibility of covering this community’s tragedies over the past year, including the deaths of Dana Dourdeville ’15, Mark St. Louis ’15, Stephen Rodrigues, Sara Overstreet ’16 and several faculty and staff members, as well as a murder.
Alongside these somber topics, we have enjoyed the pleasure of covering exciting campus events, joining the community in celebration of Brown’s 250th anniversary and cheering on the triumphs of the women’s rugby and men’s water polo teams from the newsroom. We have had a chance to explore the rich culture of Providence’s Cape Verdean community and highlight the accomplishments of student theater and film. And in a critical midterm election year, we had the unique pleasure of covering local politics, with all of its colorful candidates and unexpected twists.
In an increasingly fractionalized landscape of news sources, we are grateful that you have continued to turn to The Herald for information about Brown and the people within and around it. Striving to produce objective, rigorous journalism can sometimes feel like a quixotic quest in a world dominated by sound bites and partisan commentary. But we have kept pursuing it, persistent in the belief that reporting done right is among the best tools at a community’s disposal for holding the powerful accountable and uniting people through storytelling. Truth can be a moving target, but it is worth taking aim nonetheless.
These are lofty goals, and we have sometimes fallen short of them: Such is the inherent nature of a daily newspaper and the fallible people who create it. But we hope that we have informed, enlightened or entertained you on a consistent basis.
We are humbled every day by the continued attention of our readers, and we hope that you continue to engage with The Herald next semester as the 125th Editorial Board takes the reins for what will be a critical year for this paper. While we are proud of what we have accomplished, The Herald still has work to do. The new board has exciting plans to increase the paper’s digital presence through more innovative and interactive features, as well as new video and social media initiatives.
Thank you for being such engaged and active readers over the past year. As we retire and join the ranks of Herald consumers, we can’t wait to see where the paper goes next.
The Herald will resume print publication Jan. 20. Check thebdh.org for updates in the interim.
Editors’ notes are written by The Herald’s 124th Editorial Board: Eli Okun ’15, Mathias Heller ’15, Sona Mkrttchian ’15, Madeline Berg ’15, Katherine Cusumano ’15 and Kate Nussenbaum ’15.”

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Importance
1
Union, RPI pose next ECAC test for men’s hockey
by Brown Daily Herald

Dec 05, 2014
“After a weekend in which the men’s hockey team was able to notch its second win of the season against Connecticut, Bruno will look to finally take the next step and do what Head Coach Brendan Whittet ’94 has been striving for all season: get conference points.
The Bears’ (2-7, 0-6 ECAC) opponents this weekend are Union (7-6-1, 1-4-1) and Rensselaer (6-9-1, 4-2), two teams that are used to conference success. RPI has hovered around the top of the ECAC all year — its only conference losses were to No. 15 Quinnipiac and No. 9 Harvard — but Union has struggled in ECAC play from the start. One explanation for the Dutchmen’s slow start is their opening conference strength of schedule: losses to RPI (twice) and Quinnipiac — both top teams — hurt Union, but it was able to tie Harvard and beat lowly Princeton to gain some ECAC momentum.
Up first for the Bears this weekend are the defending national champions, who come into Providence after a non-conference weekend similar to Brown’s — the Dutchmen beat Notre Dame but got demolished by a struggling Western Michigan team, while Bruno beat UConn but fell badly to Holy Cross. Led by impressive freshman Spencer Foo — who leads the team in goals, with seven — Union features a balanced front line, with 13 players who have registered four or more points this season. Accompanying Foo are a pair of sophomores, Mike Vecchione and Jeff Taylor, who are one-two in the ECAC assists column. Vecchione is second in the nation in points behind Boston University superstar Jack Eichel, who figures to be a top pick in next year’s NHL draft.
“They are so good because they have that experience of winning. They have returning players that have held trophies,” Whittet said. “They always play hard and are aggressive, and they are well coached. I know they have struggled a little bit, but when I watch them on film, I see that they have a lot of the traits of prior teams.”
One of the biggest problems for the Dutchmen has been between the pipes, where — similarly to the Bears — two goalies have contributed to the second-worst save percentage in the ECAC. (Brown has the worst.) Collin Stevens has started all 11 games he has played in, but has been pulled in three of those games in favor of sophomore Alex Sakellaropolous. Stevens has been the goaltender of choice for the last two years, but Sakellaropolous has had his share of impressive starts in that time, including a 31-save effort against the Crimson this year.
If the Bears have any chance at topping Union, they must stop its potent power play: The Dutchmen have a 20.9 percent conversion rate, the 15th-highest in the nation — for reference, Bruno’s overall conversion rate is 7.7 percent — and Union’s conversion rate is a whopping 26.4 percent in the ECAC. Brown averages a little over 10 penalty minutes per game, which means Union should score one or two power-play goals in that time, but if Brown can stop the Dutchmen, it might just be the tide shift it needs.
“I think getting (Matt Lorito ’15) back from injury will help our power play because he’s an elite offensive player,” Whittet said. “We just need to cycle pucks in front of the net and not overcomplicate things. As for the penalty kill, I thought it showed a lot of improvement last weekend, and hopefully that will continue.”
Unfortunately for the Bears, the squad will be without Dane Cooper ’18 and Zack Pryzbek ’17 this weekend, as Cooper suffered a concussion against Colgate and Pryzbek was injured in the same game as Lorito but has not experienced a similarly speedy recovery.
After the Dutchmen, the Bears welcome the Engineers, who come into Providence after a two-loss weekend against Michigan. For all RPI’s conference success this year, its statistics are not as gaudy as Union’s: Rensselaer has only scored 1.56 goals per game this year, third-worst in the ECAC. Riley Bourbonnais and Lou Nanne lead the Engineers with four goals apiece, with Drew Melanson and Mark Miller heading the assist tally.
In goal, Jason Kasdorf has started 12 games this year, going 6-6, while Scott Diebold has filled in and performed poorly, losing three of his only four starts. What the Engineers do well is find ways to attack the net, as they lead the ECAC in shots per game. And with Brown last in the league in save percentage, that could prove to be a recipe for disaster Saturday.
“Rensselaer has had great goaltending this season and is always a fundamentally sound defensive team,” Whittet said. “They have good special teams, and we know it’s going to be a tough matchup.”
Both matchups for Brown will likely prove difficult, as the Bears lost all four games against RPI and Union last year. And if Bruno’s conference record this season is any indication, playing two consistent games this weekend would be the first time that has happened all season. But playing consistent hockey was one of the team’s goals this year, Whittet said, and if the Bears can do that, they have a good chance to achieve their main goal: getting conference points.”

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• What you make of it?
• How Ivy League Admissions works
• On the Student/Faculty Ratio

• FAFSA: Who is a Parent?
• FAFSA: Parent Contribution
• FAFSA: Dream out of reach

• College Financial Planning
• Survive College and Graduate
• Sniffing Out Commuter Schools
• Preparing for College: A HS Roadmap
• Talking to Your Parents about College.
• Is a top college worth it?
• Why is college hard?
• Why Kids Aren't Happy in Traditional Schools
• Essential College Tips
• Cost of College Increasing Faster Than Inflation
• For parents filling out the FAFSA and PROFILE (from a veteran paper slinger)
• How to choose the right college?
• Create The Right Career Habits Now
• Senior Year (Tips and experience)
• Informational Overload! What Should I Look For in a College or University?
• Personality Type and College Choice
• A Free Application is a Good Application
• College Academic Survival Guide
• Getting Involved: The Key to College Happiness
• Choose a Path, Not a Major
• The Scoop on State Schools
• The Purpose of a Higher Education
• The Importance of Choosing the Right College Major (2012)
• How to choose a college major
• How to guarantee your acceptance to many colleges
• Nailing the College Application Process
• What to do for a Successful Interview
• I Don't Know Where to Start (General College Advice)
• Attitude and Dress Code for an Interview (General College Advice)
• Starting College (General College Advice)
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