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George Washington University

GWU Campus News
Importance
1
Handover of University's $1.4 billion investment portfolio pushed to this fall
by The GW Hatchet

Jul 04, 2014
“Updated: July 3, 2014 at 1:28 p.m.
The University will take at least another four months to find an outside company to manage its $1.4 billion endowment, prolonging the breakup of GW’s investment office.
The delay comes after University spokeswoman Candace Smith had said GW would cut seven positions and transition a firm in time for the start of the new fiscal year, which starts Tuesday. Smith said the University will begin asking companies to pitch themselves to officials within the next “several weeks,” and make a decision by late October.
“The bottom line is it is going to take as long as it takes, and we don't anticipate the timing will have an impact,” Smith said. “We are doing our due diligence, and the office is being managed until a firm is selected.”
Universities often take their time choosing an outsourcing firm to ensure they protect their financial reputations, said Ken Redd, the director of research and policy analysis at the National Association of College and University Business Officers.
“The penalty of being wrong is the financial penalty of break-up fees and then the emotional cost of doing another request for proposal and having to devote more staff time,” Redd said.
GW’s move, announced in March, makes the University one of the richest schools to take apart its investment office and the only among its 14 peer institutions . The University has also recently hired outside firms to handle services like internal auditing, food service, mail service and facilities upkeep.
Investments grew by 9 percent overall last year, falling behind many competitor schools. The bulk of returns came from GW’s large real estate portfolio , which the investment office does not control.
Executive Vice President and Treasurer Lou Katz said Donald Lindsey, the University's chief investment officer who has 26 years of experience managing endowments, will continue to work in the investment office until GW chooses a firm.
“We value his leadership, and his knowledge of the investment industry will help to ensure a smooth transition," Katz said.
Lindsey said the University has long considered outsourcing, which means it will join a wave of schools that have decided to hand its nest egg to an outside company.
Four years ago, just 1 percent of colleges and universities with endowments of at least $1 billion had outsourced their portfolio management. That figure is now more than 10 percent, according to data from the National Association of College and University Business Officials.
“I am committed to ensuring that we identify a firm that will be the best fit for the University’s long-term future," Lindsey said.
Alice Handy, founder of the firm Investure, said she wouldn't be surprised if GW's search extended beyond October.
“You’re picking an office and a chief investment officer, and those things take a long time to get right,” said Handy, also the former chief investment officer at the University of Virginia.
She said Investure, which manages endowment portfolios at Trinity University, the University of Tulsa and Middlebury, Barnard, Dickinson and Smith colleges, has not been approached by GW.
Though outsourcing sometimes takes up to a year to complete, the wait can pay off, Handy said. Schools that outsource often see benefits like less staff turnover and more stability – important features for a group overseeing an institution’s financial foundation.
GW’s investment office faced scrutiny over the last year after its former director of operations and risk claimed she was fired for blowing the whistle on flawed financial reporting that she had seen in the office.
The office also had a 33 percent turnover rate in the last year, which put strains on the office to hire and train new investment managers.
“With an endowment the size of GW’s, there’s the thought that if you have a good CIO, they may leave for a bigger opportunity,” Handy said. “Now you’ll have a stable group that can manage it.”
Keith Baum, the managing director of the foundations and endowments group at the Minneapolis-based outsourcing firm Abbot Downing, said the launch of GW’s $1 billion fundraising campaign could have slowed the search for a firm.
“A $1 billion campaign and making sure it’s on the right track and choosing an investment manager are two very large tasks. Those two things together are a lot of work," he said.
Before creating its investment office 11 years ago, GW outsourced to management firm CommonFund, which did not return repeated requests for comment. Financial services firm TIAA-CREF declined to comment about whether it had been contacted by the University, though it is a service provider for GW's defined contribution retirement plan.
This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that TIAA-CREF managed part of GW's endowment. The firm is actually a service provider for the University's defined contribution retirement plan. We regret this error.”

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Importance
1
Handover of University's $1.4 billion investment portfolio pushed to this fall
by The GW Hatchet

Jul 01, 2014
“The University will take at least another four months to find an outside company to manage its $1.4 billion endowment, prolonging the breakup of GW’s investment office.
The delay comes after University spokeswoman Candace Smith had said GW would cut seven positions and transition a firm in time for the start of the new fiscal year, which starts Tuesday. Smith said the University will begin asking companies to pitch themselves to officials within the next “several weeks,” and make a decision by late October.
“The bottom line is it is going to take as long as it takes, and we don't anticipate the timing will have an impact,” Smith said. “We are doing our due diligence, and the office is being managed until a firm is selected.”
Universities often take their time choosing an outsourcing firm to ensure they protect their financial reputations, said Ken Redd, the director of research and policy analysis at the National Association of College and University Business Officers.
“The penalty of being wrong is the financial penalty of break-up fees and then the emotional cost of doing another request for proposal and having to devote more staff time,” Redd said.
GW’s move, announced in March, makes the University one of the richest schools to take apart its investment office and the only among its 14 peer institutions . The University has also recently hired outside firms to handle services like internal auditing, food service, mail service and facilities upkeep.
Investments grew by 9 percent overall last year, falling behind many competitor schools. The bulk of returns came from GW’s large real estate portfolio , which the investment office does not control.
Alice Handy, founder of the firm Investure, said she wouldn't be surprised if GW's search extended beyond October.
“You’re picking an office and a chief investment officer, and those things take a long time to get right,” said Handy, also the former chief investment officer at the University of Virginia.
She said Investure, which manages endowment portfolios at Trinity University, the University of Tulsa and Middlebury, Barnard, Dickinson and Smith colleges, has not been approached by GW.
Though outsourcing sometimes takes up to a year to complete, the wait can pay off, Handy said. Schools that outsource often see benefits like less staff turnover and more stability – important features for a group overseeing an institution’s financial foundation.
GW’s investment office faced scrutiny over the last year after its former director of operations and risk claimed she was fired for blowing the whistle on flawed financial reporting that she had seen in the office.
The office also had a 33 percent turnover rate in the last year, which put strains on the office to hire and train new investment managers.
“With an endowment the size of GW’s, there’s the thought that if you have a good CIO, they may leave for a bigger opportunity,” Handy said. “Now you’ll have a stable group that can manage it.”
Keith Baum, the managing director of the foundations and endowments group at the Minneapolis-based outsourcing firm Abbot Downing, said the launch of GW’s $1 billion fundraising campaign could have slowed the search for a firm.
“A $1 billion campaign and making sure it’s on the right track and choosing an investment manager are two very large tasks. Those two things together are a lot of work," he said.
Before creating its investment office 11 years ago, GW outsourced to management firm CommonFund, which did not return repeated requests for comment. Financial services firm TIAA-CREF declined to comment about whether it had been contacted by the University, though it now manages a part of GW's endowment.”

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Importance
1
University lays out goals for academics, student support in $1 billion fundraising blitz
by The GW Hatchet

Jun 23, 2014
“Media Credit: File photo by Desiree Halpern | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Vice President for Development and Alumni Relations Mike Morsberger will steer GW's fundraising team through its first ever $1 billion campaign.
Updated: June 21, 2014 at 12:12 a.m.
The University announced Friday that it's already reached the halfway point in its $1 billion fundraising goal.
After spending three years quietly courting donors as part of the campaign’s momentum-building phase, officials announced they will aim to raise the remaining funds by June 2018.
GW is looking to raise at least $400 million to swell its financial aid pool and fund student programs. It will earmark $500 million for hiring faculty and improving academics, as well as at least $100 million to cover construction projects across campus.
Those targets, laid out Friday as part of the official launch, will propel GW into its 200th year, University President Steven Knapp said. The funding pools will not only cover approved projects, like the creation of joint bachelor’s and master’s degree programs, but will also give donors the chance to pitch fresh ideas as long as they fall in line with GW’s broad goals.
The campaign will try to institutionalize a culture of alumni giving, Knapp said, which comes as GW’s finances depend more on strong annual fundraising to keep the University competitive with peer schools.
“One of the hopes is that when we finish the campaign, we’ll be at a higher level of annual giving than we’ve been at,” Knapp said. “That’s how institutions build their resources and endowments and become the strongest universities.”
Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo
Knapp said the historic fundraising campaign coincides with the University's decade-long strategic plan.
GW fundraising chief Mike Morsberger pitched potential launch dates to the Board of Trustees three times this year, and at each session trustees debated whether the University had pulled in enough to publicly commit to a $1 billion goal.
Georgetown University took about five years to announce its ongoing $1.5 billion campaign. Vanderbilt University also spent four years planning and courting donors before launching its $2 billion effort.
GW’s strongest push came this spring when billionaire philanthropists Michael Milken and Sumner Redstone donated a combined $80 million to the public health school, energizing the community for the official launch.
The University will have to struggle to overcome a lackluster fundraising history, but Knapp said GW fundraisers will get a boost from hundreds of volunteers, including parents, alumni and trustees.
As part of the public launch , those volunteers spent hours Friday learning the best ways to convey their enthusiasm for GW to potential donors, as well as skills to quickly hone in on a prospect’s interests.
Media Credit: Hatchet File Design
“It’s really a matter of listening to the donor to find out what that person is interested in and then understanding how you can connect that with GW’s goals,” Knapp said. “There are actually techniques. It’s everything from making eye contact to listening to them. Don’t try to tell jokes if you’re not funny.”
Those workshops allowed them to practice meeting potential donors and easing into a conversation about giving, he said. The best way to do that, Board of Trustees chair Nelson Carbonell said, is by steering the conversation to why they volunteer.
“We want our volunteers to tell their own stories,” Carbonell said. “They’re learning how to tell their story about why they volunteer their time.”
Conversations with donors are most successful when their passions are able to shape programs at GW, Morsberger said. They have to match with the University's interests, but if a donor funds a specific topic of research, for example, that focus will last down the line.
Redstone’s gift to the public health school, totaling $30 million, highlights how a donor’s interests can impact a school’s trajectory: His seed money is meant to help focus the school on obesity and prevention research.
“When a donor’s needs meet our institution’s aspirations, that’s when the magic happens. We’re trying to find that intersection,” Morsberger said.
This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that GW was looking to raise $500 million to support financial aid and student programs. The University is actually trying to raise $400 million for those purposes. We regret this error.”

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Importance
1
By breaking drug and alcohol rules, students at Colonial Inauguration risk admission
by The GW Hatchet

Jun 15, 2014
“Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo
Be forewarned – in the past, the University has suspended or even rescinded new students’ admission for drug or alcohol violations during Colonial Inauguration.
At Colonial Inauguration, students watch a series of skits warning them of the dangers of substance use. And if they actually engage in those activities during their first stay on campus, they'll be sent to GW’s disciplinary office just like any other student.
The University has suspended and even rescinded new students’ admission because of alcohol- or drug-related violations during the orientation weekend. In at least 2009 and 2007 , four incoming freshmen were caught drinking the summer before their first semester. At least one of them regained admission – on permanent disciplinary probation – after she fought to get it back.
Gabriel Slifka, director of the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities, said consequences for students at CI vary by case, “depending on the severity of the incident.” SRR considers whether students’ behavior at CI reflects how they’ll act when they return for the academic year. Slifka declined to say exactly how many times the University had revoked admission for behavior at CI, though he said it was “rare.”
“When a student makes a decision to illegally consume alcohol or use illegal drugs ... it calls into question the types of choices the student will make around substance use when they come to campus in the fall,” Slifka said in an email.
David Anderson, director of the George Mason University’s Center for Advancement of Public Health, said an overnight orientation puts more pressure on students to use alcohol and drugs. But he said those nights likely are not the first times first-year students are exposed to a party environment.
“The vast majority of high school students have already been drinking,” Anderson said. “They may not think they’re going to get caught. They may think it’s no big deal.”
Anderson added that students overlook the possible consequences of substance use during orientation because they are trying to make an impression with their peers.
“They’re trying to establish friendships. They’re trying to be viewed as a social animal rather than as a nerd,” Anderson said. “The surprising part is if they don’t think they’re risking their college career.”
During CI sessions in the last four years, the University Police Department recorded 49 drug or liquor law violations in the crime log. Thirty-three of those violations were referred to the disciplinary office.
In 2010, UPD logged 12 alcohol violations, and nine were reported to GW’s disciplinary arm. The number doubled the following year, but just 10 were referred. In 2012 and 2013, less than a dozen students were caught drinking.
University spokeswoman Maralee Csellar said UPD patrols campus the same way during CI as it does during the academic year.
At American University, Vice President for Campus Life Gail Hanson said officials also consider incoming freshman “our students,” and they are charged if they violate the code of conduct, although drunkenness itself is not a violation.”

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Importance
1
The best of the crime log
by The GW Hatchet

Jun 12, 2014
“The Hatchet's weekly crime log keeps tabs on incidents across campus from drug and alcohol violations to thefts and assaults.
Here are some of last year’s most memorable cases – some funny, some more serious.
Disorderly Conduct
City Hall
10/21/13 – Time unknown
Case closed
A staff member reported to the University Police Department that there were feces in the lobby area.
- No suspects or witnesses
Simple Assault
1900 block of F Street
11/1/13 – 2:44 a.m.
Case closed
UPD responded to a report of two students in front of Thurston Hall making fun of people’s Halloween costumes and attempting to provoke them. The two students told officers they were actually complimenting them. One also reported that an unknown subject had hit him in the nose earlier that evening.
- Referred for disciplinary action
Lewd, Obscene Acts
Marvin Center
1/27/14 – 5:27 p.m.
Case closed
A staff member reported a complaint to UPD of two juveniles engaging in sexual intercourse. Officers identified the subjects, who admitted to having consensual relations. The Metropolitan Police Department responded and interviewed the juveniles before releasing them.
-Referred to MPD
Assault on a Police Officer/Assault/Drug Law Violation/Threats/Disorderly Conduct
South Hall
2/6/14 – 9 p.m.
Case closed
UPD responded to a domestic violence complaint between a student resident and her boyfriend who was visiting. Both had been drinking. During the investigation, the boyfriend spit on a UPD officer and attempted to spit on an MPD officer. The student also threatened the officers, and about 8 grams of marijuana and paraphernalia were found in her room.
- Subjects arrested
Disorderly Conduct
601 21st St.
2/13/14 – 9:20 p.m.
Case closed
Pedestrians reported that they were hit by snowballs thrown from the rooftop of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity townhouse. More than five Metropolitan Police Department vehicles responded and issued the residents a warning.
- Referred for disciplinary action
Robbery/Simple Assault
Off Campus
3/18/14 – 12:20 p.m.
Case closed
A student reported that while she was on a Metro train in Virginia, a woman grabbed her phone out of her hand and ran. The student chased the suspect and when she caught up with her, the woman attempted to choke the student. The student boarded the next train with the woman, and Metro transit police arrived at the next stop and arrested the woman.
- Off campus incident
Drug Law Violation/Liquor Law Violation
JBKO Hall
4/3/14 – 1 a.m.
Case closed
UPD noticed a suspicious odor and notified staff. An administrative search yielded marijuana, drug paraphernalia with cocaine residue, non-prescribed Adderall tablets, alcohol and four fraudulent driver’s licenses. Two students, one male and one female, were arrested for possession.
- Closed by arrest
Burglary II/Destruction
International House
4/16/14 – Unknown time
Case closed
Two students reported that someone had entered their room, which had been left unlocked, and vandalized it using the contents of their refrigerator.
- No suspects or witnesses
Compiled by Zaid Shoorbajee.”

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Importance
1
Columbian College to absorb Corcoran school
by The GW Hatchet

Jun 12, 2014
“Media Credit: File photo by Hatchet staff photographer Zach Montellaro
Top administrators from GW met with Corcoran students Tuesday.
Corcoran College of Art + Design students who will now become part of the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences could have to complete GW’s general curriculum requirements to graduate, a top academic administrator said Wednesday.
Fall semester class schedules will remain untouched for current Corcoran students, but new students in the University’s Corcoran School of the Arts and Design might have to take the same courses, such as University Writing, mathematics and laboratory sciences, as other Columbian College students.
Though administrators are stilling hashing out details, the G-PAC courses “would replace or perhaps include the general curriculum courses that the Corcoran currently requires,” Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs and Planning Forrest Maltzman said Wednesday.
Alan Wade, a GW theater and dance professor who is one of the school’s interim directors, said some professors have proposed that the University offer dean’s seminars to guide Corcoran students through the minimum of nine required courses.
As the Columbian College envelops the Corcoran school, administrators are considering whether to ask the art students to pay full GW tuition – an about $17,000 increase from what they pay now. Corcoran students will already see “moderate” increases to their tuition in the coming years.
That’s what top officials told Corcoran students at a meeting Tuesday after student leaders demanded more details about how their academic careers would change. The meeting, held at the Corcoran’s 17th Street auditorium, was the first between administrators and students in two months.
“We have worked out many more things since April and having these regular channels of communication is important,” Maltzman said. “​We received a number of ideas on ways to increase the involvement of Corcoran​ students and even families.”
Maltzman, Dean of Students Peter Konwerski and Center for Student Engagement director Tim Miller all attended the meeting with about 50 Corcoran students.
GW has tapped Stephanie Travis, who is the director of GW’s interior architecture and design program, and Wade as interim directors of the Corcoran school. Maltzman said after a nationwide search, the University will choose a permanent director.
Ben Vinson, dean of the Columbian College, said the University is looking for a "visionary" to lead the school.
"We are also looking for someone who can clearly articulate and effectively translate their vision, communicating it in ways that will help encourage philanthropy," Vinson said. "We hope that this dynamic individual will help engineer this school into a preeminent unit of its type."
The Corcoran Gallery of Art and its college have faced financial uncertainty and the strain of mismanagement for years, with fundraising for the gallery dropping by half in the last seven years. GW has committed to $25 million in initial renovations to the 115-year-old Beaux-Arts building, which University President Steven Knapp has said the University will have to cover at least partially through fundraising.
Wade said Corcoran students will receive GWorld cards and GW email addresses as the University starts to build a school within the Columbian College that will have a “similar structure” to the School of Media and Public Affairs.
The more than one-hour-long meeting Tuesday was a chance for Corcoran students to meet administrators, learn about available services at GW and ask questions, Konwerski said.
“We made it clear that we are open to student input and meetings like this are important to demonstrate transparency and keep lines of communication open,” Konwerski said.
Although Corcoran students will not attend Colonial Inauguration sessions this summer, they will have orientation programs in the fall, Konwerski said.
Student Association president Nick Gumas also attended the meeting. He said in an email that the SA will create several positions for Corcoran students to “help make the transition process as easy as possible,” though he did not provide details about what those positions would look like and declined phone interviews.
Miller said in an email that the spots on the SA will give Corcoran students a “voice on campus.”
“I expect that many of the aspects of our student life experience will be a value add to their already incredible academic experience with the Corcoran,” he said.
As GW continues to weigh decisions about how to structure classes and which Corcoran professors to hire, Corcoran students said they still have big questions about their futures.
Katie Nelson, a second-year graduate student who attended the meeting, said she thought the answers from administrators lacked the detail Corcoran students wanted.
“They’ve thought about things, but they haven’t gotten as far as students hope,” she said. “You could definitely sense some frustration from the students.”
More than 175 people have signed a petition that Corcoran students penned last week demanding more transparency and regular meetings with administrators during the merger .
Caroline Lacey, a third-year graduate student on the Corcoran Student Council, said the petition was meant to remind GW that it had promised to keep the spirit of the tight-knit Corcoran community intact.
“It’s hard to believe that with such huge amounts of money at hand, nobody knows what they imagined. Somebody has an idea of why this merger happened, so what is the vision?” Lacey said.
Mary Ellen McIntire contributed reporting”

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Importance
1
Davidson College will look to rebuild in A-10
by The GW Hatchet

Jun 11, 2014
“Davidson College is on its way out of the Southern Conference and will officially join the Atlantic 10 as the conference’s 14th school on July 1. Here’s what to expect from the private liberal arts college in North Carolina.
Mascot: Will E. Wildcat
Number of Division I sports: 21
School colors: Red and Black
Notable former students: Both President Woodrow Wilson and NBA player Stephen Curry attended Davidson, though neither graduated.
The construction of a $15 million athletic center will soon begin, with plans for two practice courts for men's and women's basketball, and volleyball. Additionally, the space will include coaches' offices, locker rooms, team rooms and film rooms for men's and women's basketball.
The men’s basketball team, under the leadership of head coach Lefty Driesell, was ranked No. 1 at the start of the 1964-65 season, marking the golden age of the program’s history. The team made the Elite Eight in the 2008 NCAA tournament, riding on the shooting of now-Golden State Warriors star point guard Stephen Curry, before losing to the eventual champion Kansas.
Davidson went 20-13 last season and lost in the first round of the National Invitational Tournament.”

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Importance
1
Five cheap ways to fight off the Freshman 15
by The GW Hatchet

Jun 10, 2014
“Media Credit: Zach Montellaro | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Capital Bikeshare, D.C.'s bike rental program, makes it easy to pedal across the District.
1. Ditch studios for community yoga groups
D.C.’s yoga studios can be a pricey way to stay in shape – with each class costing upwards of $15. Thankfully, a number of groups offer free sessions. Kali Yoga Studio in Columbia Heights holds open classes every Friday and Sunday.
2. Join a running club
Sign up with programs like DC Capital Striders , Pacers and I Run You Run , which all host runs at least once a week. Not only will you get to meet other runners in the area, but the competitive environment will push you to pick up your pace.
3. Take advantage of the Lerner Health and Wellness Center
“Included in tuition” isn’t exactly the same as free, but since you’re already paying, you might as well check out the workout equipment and programs at the fitness hub known as HelWell. Besides the dozens of cardio machines, yoga mats and a fully-stocked weight room, the gym also offers free fitness classes during the first week of every semester and finals.
4. Skip the Uber
We know – it’s tempting to avoid the walk to Georgetown and roll up in an Uber car instead. But you’ll be happy when you save some money and walk off those Baked & Wired cupcakes.
5. Bring your bike from home
You don’t have to ride it to every class, but a bike ride is cheaper than a cab and can be faster than the Metro. Try taking a ride around the monuments at dusk. Or, if you're unable to drag your bike to D.C. from home, rent a Capital Bikeshare. You'll see them everywhere, so might as well try it out.”

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Importance
1
University taps Wake Forest dean to lead law school
by The GW Hatchet

Jun 10, 2014
“Media Credit: Photo courtesy of GW Media Relations
Blake D. Morant faces a difficult decision: swell the size of the law school’s incoming classes, at the expense of selectivity, or keep first-year classes at about 500 students.
The next dean of the GW Law School will arrive on campus in September, after seven years leading Wake Forest University’s law school, officials announced Monday.
Blake D. Morant will take over GW’s No. 20-ranked school on Sept. 1, bringing expertise in media and administrative law to the school that has spent 18 months without a permanent leader.
A double alumnus from the University of Virginia, Morant is the first black dean to lead the law school, search committee chair Roger Schechter said. He is also the second permanent black dean in GW history after Ben Vinson, who just completed his first year leading the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences.
Morant is the president-elect of the Association of American Law Schools, and will serve as president in 2015. He has also acted as the vice chair of the American Bar Association’s diversity council.
Schechter said Morant stood out from other candidates during several interviews over the course of the year-long search because of his experience as a dean and incoming leader of the most-prominent organization for law schools.
“It’s an extremely visible position, and it means that he will be out there very visible to all kinds of different audiences,” he said.
Schechter pointed to Morant’s tenure at Wake Forest, where he raised the school’s profile and saw its overall ranking by U.S. News & World Report rise to No. 31 this year from No. 40 in 2009. The school now competes with neighboring University of North Carolina Law School.
Morant also launched a year-long program at Wake Forest for professionals seeking law degrees but who do not necessarily want to become lawyers. The program provided an alternative source of revenue for the school, which GW’s deans have also tried to accomplish during a University-wide enrollment slump.
Amid declining applications to law schools nationwide, Morant will face a tough decision: swell the size of incoming classes to bring in more tuition dollars or keep first-year classes at about 500 students and maintain selectivity.
GW Law School’s admissions rate increased by nearly 13 percentage points this year, as the school accepted 80 more students than it had the previous year. The average LSAT score of this year’s first-year class decreased by two points, though the average GPA increased.
“I look forward to working with the constituency of this historic institution during this time of both challenge and extraordinary opportunity,” Morant said in a release. He was not immediately available to comment.
Wake Forest’s law school specializes in health care law and runs several pro-bono law clinics that focus on elder law and child advocacy. GW has made a name for itself among highly-competitive law schools for its strong intellectual property and environmental law programs.
Morant’s current school is significantly smaller, typically bringing in a first-year class of 179 students, while GW’s class included 484 students this year.
Before he became the dean of Wake Forest in 2007, Morant was a professor at several schools including Washington and Lee and American universities. At the start of his career, he spent two summers working in the office of the general counsel at NASA.
In interviews with the 16-person search committee and every member of law school faculty, Morant sought input from professors, Schechter said. That distinguished him from some competitors, who laid out audacious plans when faculty leaders were looking for a steadying force.
Morant beat out nine other candidates, some who were sitting deans, Schechter said. Professors in the school kept the names of the candidates under wraps after the previous dean’s highly-public departure.
“We had a mix of people who had not yet been deans, but Blake was a dean, and that was definitely a plus in his favor. There was a notion that he had a little bit less of the learning curve,” he said.
Ten candidates visited campus in April for the last round of interviews before the school’s search committee narrowed down the list. The law school holds a full faculty vote to hone in on its top candidates, unlike most schools at GW that allow a search committee to decide.
“He brings to this important position a proven record of accomplishments, and his extensive leadership experience will make him an extremely valuable addition to our law school and the entire University,” University President Steven Knapp said in a release.
Morant will be the first dean since a group of strong-willed faculty tried to push out then-dean Paul Schiff Berman in fall 2012. Some professors called to hold a school-wide vote of no confidence that would oust him from his post.
Berman was shuffled to the provost’s office, where he works to build GW’s online education programs from the ground up. Berman only served as dean for 18 months before leaving the law school. Gregory Maggs has led the school since then, serving his second stint as interim dean.
Morant is the second sitting dean GW has brought in to take control of one of its schools in the last month. Linda Livingstone, who will lead the GW School of Business starting in August, spent the last 12 years as dean of the Graziadio School of Business at Pepperdine University.
She is also the incoming chair of the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, GW’s accrediting organization.”

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Importance
1
Your roommate game plan: How to prepare for...
by The GW Hatchet

Jun 10, 2014
“Media Credit: Illustration by Sophie McTear | Design Editor
...Parties and hook-ups
If you like to party, let your roommate know. If you don't, speak up now or forever spend your Friday nights somewhere else. Decide whether you'll be OK with your room serving as the go-to pre-game spot. Also, figure out what you'll do if you or your roommate want alone time with someone. Work out a system to notify each other and set reasonable time limits. This might also be a good time to think about where to go when you're locked out of the room for the afternoon.
...Housekeeping and shopping
Use a calendar to designate chores and keep a running list of who last bought supplies. Be careful not to become the mom of the room – you shouldn't feel like you have to buy every roll of toilet paper the entire year.
...Sharing?
Some people like to share and some don’t. It doesn't always come down to an “only child" versus “one of 10 children” upbringing, but it’s best to discuss what's off limits rather than make assumptions. You don’t want to be frantically searching for your favorite shirt, only to find it in your roommate’s hamper. And if you share food, make sure you keep your other roommates in the loop when you run low. No one likes opening an empty box of cereal in the morning.
...Morning and nighttime routines
Who is going to shower first? By what time do lights need to go out? Some like to make these decisions on a day-to-day basis, but when your roommate hits snooze five times before his 8 a.m. class, it may be time to set some ground rules. And if you need an hour to get ready, make sure you don't make your roommates late in the process.”

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