StudentsReview :: George Washington University
-or-
Search for Schools by Region
 

or within distance of city

Similar Schools
Boston University -- Boston, MA
Boston College -- Chestnut Hill, MA
New York University -- New York, NY


  Who's got the Best?

Perceptual Rankings:
You Make 'Em.
We Post 'Em.
You Vote 'Em Up.
You Vote 'Em Down.
Aww yeah.


George Washington University

GWU Campus News
Importance
1
Sean Hurd: Watanabe's dependability off the bench is big benefit for Lonergan
by The GW Hatchet

Dec 11, 2014
“For a men’s basketball team that has lacked consistent performance, freshman Yuta Watanabe has been a source of certainty through his first eight contests.
Twenty seconds into the team’s game against Charlotte in the BB&T Classic on Sunday, senior forward John Kopriva was whistled for a foul. Another 20 seconds later, in the same 49ers opening possession, Kopriva was tagged again, sending him to the bench in disbelief.
Not even a minute had passed in the matchup, fans were still filing into their seats, and head coach Mike Lonergan found himself at a huge disadvantage. He was forced to sit Kopriva for the next 13 minutes of the first half, potentially compromising an already shallow Colonials frontcourt.
In addition to an immediate depth setback, the GW frontcourt had a 6-foot-11, 270-pound problem on its hands in the form of Charlotte center Mike Thorne Jr., who was averaging nearly a double-double at 14.1 points and 9.6 rebounds entering Sunday’s game. GW also had to contend with forward Willie Clayton, who Lonergan pegged as a “monster rebounder” and was coming off a season-high 17-point performance against Davidson on Wednesday.
“[John] getting two fouls in the first 30 seconds was really scary against that front line,” Lonergan said after the game.
Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo
Sean Hurd
Enter Watanabe.
The freshman, who played 15 minutes of the opening half, significantly contributed to limiting the Charlotte frontcourt, using his lanky 6-foot-8 frame to hold the 49ers in the paint and trap them on the baseline. By the end of the half, Thorne and Clayton combined for just six points and seven boards – a stat that, without Watanabe’s support, could have been much worse.
Like he’s done for much of this early season, Watanabe provided high-energy hustle plays for GW. And while he isn’t particularly vocal on the floor, his emotional reactions on big plays fire up his teammates.
With GW down 10-12 and 12:29 to play in the first half, Watanabe rejected Charlotte guard Torin Dorn at the rim, erasing what seemed like an easy fast break dunk. Then as 49er guard Terrence Williams secured a rebound and attempted the put-back lay-in, Watanabe was there to block a second shot. Charlotte would eventually turn the ball over in the same possession.
“He doesn’t have a lot of power, but when he chased the guy down and blocked his shot – I mean, I love watching him play,” Lonergan said.
Averaging 20.6 minutes per game, Watanabe has commanded the sixth man spot on the roster and has helped ease depth worries for GW. He’s consistently demonstrated the ability to get to the rim (although he still needs some work finishing at the rim), get out on the break and score inside – and, consequently, has emerged as a deep threat for a team in need of 3-point shooting.
On Sunday, Lonergan called Watanabe the best shooter on the team. The freshman is indeed leading the team in a handful of statistical categories, including being tied for first in 3-point field goals made, and he has the highest 3-point percentage on the team among players who have taken at least 14 attempts.
Watanabe’s composure for a freshman is rare, and if it weren’t for his skinny stature, it’d be easy to forget he’s still just in his first year at the collegiate level. He is serving as a benefit to Lonergan on the floor as a Colonial who can contribute off the bench and play consistently without getting visibly flustered when in a pinch.
On Sunday, Lonergan referenced GW’s earlier matchup against Virginia, where Watanabe finished second on the team in scoring with 10 points (3-9 shooting) and a team-high five rebounds. Watanabe played a season-high 28 minutes in the 59-42 loss to the Cavaliers.
“In the Virginia game, in the second half, I think he was probably the only guy who kept his composure,” Lonergan said. “Yuta just plays like he is older and more mature.”
Yuta’s size has made him a “tweener” in terms of how Lonergan has used him in the early season, but Lonergan has repeatedly said that Watanabe will need to get stronger: The fourth-year GW head coach wants to use him primarily as a power forward.
“He’s definitely going to be a fan favorite for us, and his best days are ahead of him,” Lonergan said.
Sean Hurd, a junior majoring in exercise science, is The Hatchet’s sports columnist.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Robin Jones Kerr: Don't define post-grad success by the city you live in or the job you snag
by The GW Hatchet

Dec 10, 2014
“About 18 months ago, my older brother graduated from Ohio State University. He still lives in Columbus today in a small rowhouse with his girlfriend and their cat, Dorian Gray.
Tony is a night manager at a local movie theater, making just $11.50 an hour and, because they’re understaffed, working upwards of 40 to 50 hours a week.
And yet, at home over Thanksgiving break, he was asking my dad all about how to invest in the stock market and start saving for retirement, and chatted about where he’d like to take his girlfriend on an overseas trip.
Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo
Robin Jones Kerr
Turns out, my brother, the English major we were all so worried about when he neglected to go to graduate school, and who will turn 23 in April without ever having held a salaried job, has an abundance of disposable income.
Hearing about his life over break got me thinking: It often feels like GW’s culture dictates that neglecting to secure a hotshot, full-time, salaried entry-level job straight out of college in a flashy place like D.C. or Manhattan is a failure.
After all, that’s why we fill our summers with ( often unpaid ) internships – to make us the best, shiniest, sparkliest candidate come application season. I’ve just begun my job hunt for summer 2015 and am feeling this pressure already.
But in just the short period of time following his graduation, my brother has been able to find not just the ability to make ends meet, but happiness, living what’s essentially a working-class life. As we close out 2014 and seniors begin to think about post-graduation options, we shouldn’t forget that success can be defined in ways other than finding work at a place with name recognition. In fact, we should strongly consider thinking outside the box – about jobs that will pay us well enough to just get by.
Now, of course, the linchpin of all this is a subject with which D.C. residents are all too familiar: rent prices. For a one-bedroom with an updated kitchen one block away from Columbus’ hippest area, Tony and his girlfriend pay in total, between them, $700 a month in rent.
I don’t know about you, but upon hearing that, my jaw dropped and my heart hurt. The average D.C. resident spends more than double that – close to $1,500 – each month on housing, and places on Foggy Bottom can be even worse . (According to my brother, for what I pay for my one-bedroom-plus-den on L Street, I could swing a three-bedroom pad right on OSU’s campus.)
Obviously, there's a huge difference between our two cities, and that’s the main reason why Tony is able to live the way he is. But GW students should think about expanding the scope of their job hunts outside of D.C., and outside of some of the country’s other most expensive cities, like San Francisco, Seattle and Minneapolis.
These metropolises are of course great cities to live in , especially for young professionals, but let’s not discount the high quality of life you might be able to find in groovy places like Tucson, Ariz., Memphis, Tenn., or Louisville, Ky., which all landed on CBS MoneyWatch's 2013 list of the top-10 cheapest U.S. cities to rent an apartment.
Winding up somewhere lesser-known doesn’t represent a failure on your part, and it doesn’t mean you’re lazy for not reaching for the highest tree branch right away.
My brother also seems, plain and simple, content. Though his job is a ton of work, he’s learning about how to run a movie theater, as well as invaluable management skills. He doesn’t have any concrete plans for his immediate future, either, besides continuing to subsist the way he has been – but he doesn’t seem to care.
He’s even casting about for exciting ways to spend his 20s, a time he sees as offering him the first real taste of independence since college and the last chance to have adventures before being locked down by having kids in his 30s: He's talking international vacations and big purchases for his home.
These may not be the kind of long-term plans GW students are used to hearing, but they’re working for people like my brother and they could work for us, too. We shouldn’t buckle to the pressure to succeed so early on that we forget to live our lives as young adults.
Robin Jones Kerr, a senior majoring in journalism, is The Hatchet’s opinions editor.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Homecoming: Junkanoo Jam brings Jonquel Jones back to the Bahamas
by The GW Hatchet

Dec 04, 2014
“Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo by Dan Rich | Hatchet Photographer
Junior Jonquel Jones drives through defenders in a game earlier this season against Virginia Union.
Jonquel Jones has the pride of an island on her shoulders.
On Nov. 28 in Freeport, Bahamas, about 1,000 people rose to their feet in the St. George’s High School gym to welcome Jones back to her hometown.
Over Thanksgiving break, the women’s basketball team traveled over 958 miles to compete in the Junkanoo Jam, marking the first time that Freeport-native Jones has displayed her talent for her mother and grandmother in her GW uniform.
Fueled by the confidence and energy that usually comes with a home-court advantage – this time stemming from the support of an entire community – the Colonials won the Freeport Division title after knocking off N.C. State and Purdue, and Jones was named most valuable player.
“That was definitely a wonderful feeling to be back home, seeing everyone the moment I stepped out of customs and was able to come out to the main area. A lot of my family and friends and people that have watched me grow up were there to greet me, so it was a great moment,” Jones said.
During the tournament, Jones had two goals: to expose her teammates and coaches to her Bahamian culture, and to show off her collegiate skill to Freeport.
Even as she walked off the airplane to see gifts, flowers and a hoard of loved ones, Jones’ focus remained on her teammates and coaches. She said she wanted to show that the Bahamas is full of "people that love to welcome our visitors."
“She wanted it not to be about her because that’s her personality,” head coach Jonathan Tsipis said. “I think even when we were going through customs, they had all her people there and all the flowers, the TV stations, but she wanted to wait for every one of her teammates to clear customs, so they could all go out together. That’s her unselfish nature, how she is both on and off the floor.”
U.S.-imported sports like soccer and basketball are the most popular spectator sports in the Bahamian Commonwealth, so Jones quickly rose to fame as a child when she excelled at both. Before pursuing a collegiate career in basketball in the States, Jones played soccer and ran track for Bahamian youth national teams. One of her former soccer coaches, Mary Knowles, cancelled her local league’s Saturday matches to cheer on her former player.
On Thanksgiving eve, Knowles hosted a feast complete with traditional Bahamian cuisine – like conch fritters, cracked conch and fried whole fish – in the garden around her house. Teammate Hannah Schaible described “dancing around with [Jones'] mom and niece and having a great time, interacting and connecting with her family,” and watching Jones’ great aunt churn out conch fritters.
With the traditional music of rhythmic drums and cowbells playing in the background, the night was a chance for the team to relax with a home-cooked meal, Schaible said, and learning more about their upperclassmen leader gave the Colonials even more motivation in the tournament.
“We wanted to win because that's the goal of sports, but we also wanted to win because there was this whole island behind JJ and behind our team,” Schaible said. “It wasn’t just GW winning, it was the whole Freeport community supporting us winning.”
Jones had the opportunity to address her hometown crowd, with the prime minister in attendance, at the tournament. Even with the prime minister and other prominent government officials there, Jones stole the show.
“I felt bad for the prime minister because he was still second fiddle to Jonquel," Tsipis said with a smile.
Jones was especially excited to show her teammates the beaches in the Bahamas. During the team's off-season trip to Europe, where they tested the waters on the beaches of England and France, Jones teased her teammates that they wouldn’t know a real beach until they visited the Bahamas. During some downtime last week, she got the chance to show the group the sand she used to play on as a child.
But what Jones said she will treasure most was the opportunity to play the game she loves in front of family and friends. Though her father was able to see the team play last year, her mother was never able to get time off of work.
“It was great to have them see me play, especially my grandparents,” Jones said. “My grandparents haven’t seen me play since I was playing at home in the Bahamas, so for them to be able to see me grow into the person I am now.”
For the time being, the taste of victory comes with hints of Jones’ great aunt’s conch fritters and the salty Freeport air.
After their success in the Bahamas, the Colonials return to action in the Smith Center on Saturday to host Fresno State at 2 p.m.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Robin Jones Kerr: Don't define post-grad success by the city you live in or the job you snag
by The GW Hatchet

Dec 04, 2014
“About 18 months ago, my older brother graduated from Ohio State University. He still lives in Columbus today in a small rowhouse with his girlfriend and their cat, Dorian Gray.
Tony is a night manager at a local movie theater, making just $11.50 an hour and, because they’re understaffed, working upwards of 40 to 50 hours a week.
And yet, at home over Thanksgiving break, he was asking my dad all about how to invest in the stock market and start saving for retirement, and chatted about where he’d like to take his girlfriend on an overseas trip.
Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo
Robin Jones Kerr
Turns out, my brother, the English major we were all so worried about when he neglected to go to graduate school, and who will turn 23 in April without ever having held a salaried job, has an abundance of disposable income.
Hearing about his life over break got me thinking: It often feels like GW’s culture dictates that neglecting to secure a hotshot, full-time, salaried entry-level job straight out of college in a flashy place like D.C. or Manhattan is a failure.
After all, that’s why we fill our summers with ( often unpaid ) internships – to make us the best, shiniest, sparkliest candidate come application season. I’ve just begun my job hunt for summer 2015 and am feeling this pressure already.
But in just the short period of time following his graduation, my brother has been able to find not just the ability to make ends meet, but happiness, living what’s essentially a working-class life. As we close out 2014 and seniors begin to think about post-graduation options, we shouldn’t forget that success can be defined in ways other than finding work at a place with name recognition. In fact, we should strongly consider thinking outside the box – about jobs that will pay us well enough to just get by.
Now, of course, the linchpin of all this is a subject with which D.C. residents are all too familiar: rent prices. For a one-bedroom with an updated kitchen one block away from Columbus’ hippest area, Tony and his girlfriend pay in total, between them, $700 a month in rent.
I don’t know about you, but upon hearing that, my jaw dropped and my heart hurt. The average D.C. resident spends more than double that – close to $1,500 – each month on housing, and places on Foggy Bottom can be even worse . (According to my brother, for what I pay for my one-bedroom-plus-den on L Street, I could swing a three-bedroom pad right on OSU’s campus.)
Obviously, there's a huge difference between our two cities, and that’s the main reason why Tony is able to live the way he is. But GW students should think about expanding the scope of their job hunts outside of D.C., and outside of some of the country’s other most expensive cities, like San Francisco, Seattle and Minneapolis.
These metropolises are of course great cities to live in , especially for young professionals, but let’s not discount the high quality of life you might be able to find in groovy places like Tucson, Ariz., Memphis, Tenn., or Louisville, Ky., which all landed on CBS MoneyWatch's 2013 list of the top-10 cheapest U.S. cities to rent an apartment.
Winding up somewhere lesser-known doesn’t represent a failure on your part, and it doesn’t mean you’re lazy for not reaching for the highest tree branch right away.
My brother also seems, plain and simple, content. Though his job is a ton of work, he’s learning about how to run a movie theater, as well as invaluable management skills. He doesn’t have any concrete plans for his immediate future, either, besides continuing to subsist the way he has been – but he doesn’t seem to care.
He’s even casting about for exciting ways to spend his 20s, a time he sees as offering him the first real taste of independence since college and the last chance to have adventures before being locked down by having kids in his 30s: He's talking international vacations and big purchases for his home.
These may not be the kind of long-term plans GW students are used to hearing, but they’re working for people like my brother and they could work for us, too. We shouldn’t buckle to the pressure to succeed so early on that we forget to live our lives as young adults.
Robin Jones Kerr, a senior majoring in journalism, is The Hatchet’s opinions editor.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Deans chart University-wide international strategy
by The GW Hatchet

Dec 04, 2014
“Media Credit: Judy Lim | Hatchet Photographer
A classroom at Korea University, located in Seoul, South Korea. GW administrators hope to expand partnerships in countries like South Korea.
Deans looking to increase their international partnerships will be asked to collaborate more on where their schools plan to grow ties – with a focus on boosting GW's strongest existing connections.
The decision marks the first time deans are coming together to plot an overarching, University-wide strategy for international growth. The dean's council prioritized the issue this fall during its regular meetings.
School leaders need to compare their strongest programs and discuss each of their own priorities to plan how schools can increase recruiting, create new programs or launch new partnerships around the world, Provost Steven Lerman said.
“Different schools have different opportunities internationally and different priorities, and in some cases they have different strengths in different regions," he said. "And so each school will have to work under the umbrella of the strategic plan strategy on international to figure out what works best."
As officials look to strengthen partnerships, Lerman said there is some need to narrow down the number of them and see how schools can partner with the same institutions. GW has dozens of partnerships across its schools, and has partnered with hundreds of institutions for study abroad programs.
“I’d like to see more of that: identifying of very high-quality partners and where it makes sense to have multiple schools try to build partnerships with those partner institutions, rather than have every school create its own partnership where there’s not necessarily any overlap,” he said.
That will help GW meet one of its financing goals for the strategic plan, which was approved in 2013. The decade-long blueprint outlines cutting study payments to providers and reducing other administrative costs as a way to save $900,000 a year.
GW has created strong programs in countries like China, where the School of Business has several joint degree programs. GW also has established relationships across Europe, where many students study abroad.
But Lerman said he hopes the University can expand on partnerships like the GW Law School’s in India and the School of Engineering and Applied Science's in South Korea.
Jean Johnson, dean of the School of Nursing, said schools like nursing, medicine and public health should look to launch strategic partnerships internationally that support global health. At this time, those schools have independent partnerships in places like Haiti, African nations and South Korea.
Across GW, there are bound to be many types of relationships, she said, adding that the University should also look to partner with countries to help bring more students to Foggy Bottom.
“We want to be able to continue that work and research, partner with academic institutions in developing countries, but also work with countries where students can afford to come to the U.S., or the government helps the students come to the U.S.,” she said.
More universities are looking to create comprehensive strategies for programming abroad, said Noah Sobe, an associate professor at the Loyola University of Chicago School of Education, who specializes in the internationalization of higher education. He added that it can be easier for an institution to create a new program from an existing one.
“One of the things that you see a lot of universities doing is leveraging their overseas program, whether its an office or an initial relationship with an institution, using that and expanding from there,” he said.
In some schools, like the Milken Institute School of Public Health, many faculty members have colleagues who they work with around the world. Dean Lynn Goldman said creating more formal partnerships with foreign institutions was one area the school could look to strengthen.
“It’s fair to say that a lot of it has been based on one-on-one relationships,” she said.
James Tielsch, the chair of the global health department, said most of a school’s international partnerships begin with those relationships.
“A lot of it starts with a personal connection or collaboration,” he said. “They develop a relationship. They will collaborate on research, educational programs and things like that. Sometimes it can grow into something bigger.”
For the past few years, administrators focused their international programming on China, where they had hoped to open a branch campus. After scaling back those aspirations last winter, administrators have stressed their interest in expanding partnerships in countries like India and South Korea.
Administrators are also looking to finally launch the undergraduate global degree program that was first floated about three years ago. The Columbian College of Arts and Sciences has spent several years planning the program.
To allow students to have more flexibility in where they go abroad as part of that program, GW will need to strengthen study abroad partnerships across the globe.
And by creating a more comprehensive strategy for international programming, officials could avoid a confrontation with faculty, who objected to being left out of conversations about launching a branch campus in China last year.
Eddie West, the director of international initiatives at the National Association for College Admission Counseling, said having an entire institution behind an international project can make give it more impact.
Faculty and staff working internationally typically need to know about the university’s activities outside of their own office or department, and some institutions have created senior leadership positions for growing international strategy, he said.
“GW’s experience shows schools really have to go into such ventures thoughtfully and in a coordinated manner,” he said. “If you don’t have institution-wide support for these kinds of things, the likelihood of this succeeding long term is pretty low.””

respond
 
Importance
1
GW's signature cost-cutting program holds back on unveiling new ideas
by The GW Hatchet

Dec 04, 2014
“Media Credit: Anna McGarrigle | Senior Designer
GW will not unveil a new round of cost-saving ideas through the Innovation Task Force this month, marking the first semester that the program has not vetted programs to boost the University's bottom line since its launch five years ago.
Instead, administrators plan to focus on implementing the ideas that they haven’t yet brought to fruition, Provost Steven Lerman said in an interview this week. With more than 70 ideas already in the pipeline, GW will be able to reach its goal of identifying $60 million in new revenue or savings by next year, he said.
Still, just $27 million was ready to put back into the GW's budget this year.
“We had accumulated a lot of ideas and there was a danger of having so many ideas that you can’t follow through on all of them,” Lerman said. “It was a good time to do some consolidation and to really move some of the ideas that were in process faster to implementation.”
Dave Lawlor, who led the program since its inception , stepped down in October to take a position at the University of California, Davis. Lerman said Lawlor had suggested not to introduce another round of ideas before he left.
Since the program's launch, the University has held an event each semester to present the newest phase of ideas, and Lerman said that Lawlor’s departure made it an “even better decision” not to hold a round this fall.
With each new phase, it had become more challenging for officials to introduce more sweeping plans. The first round created the most cost savings in the program’s history, and each subsequent round has saved less money for the University.
Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo
The Innovation Task Force presented new cost-saving ideas each semester, as former chair Dave Lawlor (above) did last spring. But no presentation will be held this fall. Instead, the ITF will focus on rolling out more ideas which have already been announced.
GW has introduced contests for students, faculty and staff to earn scholarships and other prizes for pitching the best cost-saving ideas. Last spring, two students earned $50,000 scholarships for their ideas, which were included in the most recent phase.
Some ITF initiatives, like launching new programs for student veterans, have taken a few years to get off the ground, while others, like giving up apartments at Columbia Plaza, were realized within a semester.
Meghan Chapple, the director of the Office of Sustainability, was named the ITF’s new co-chair in October. Before leading the task force, she had championed one of its ideas: launching a certificate program for students looking to work in the sustainability field.
“New ideas are continually accepted through the established programs, and new initiatives will be announced next semester,” she said in a statement.
University President Steven Knapp launched the project to allow GW to hire new faculty and offer financial aid from a new source of funding, rather than dipping into the endowment annually.
But the University scaled back its expectations for the ITF last year. Officials had overestimated how much money would be pulled in through the initiative, and they decided not to count $25 million as new funds for GW.
Members of the Faculty Senate were last briefed on the task force’s progress in spring 2013, and many members said they hadn’t recently received any updates.
“My understanding is they have been successful, but I’m not really sure what specific ideas have been successful or what ideas are in the pipeline,” said Charles Garris, the chair of the senate’s executive committee.
Colleen Murphy contributed reporting.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Snapshot
by The GW Hatchet

Dec 04, 2014
“Media Credit: Aly Kruse | Hatchet Staff Photographer
A mural drawn by Corcoran students to protest recent events in Ferguson, Mo. is power washed off a wall in front of Gelman Library. Protests continued both on campus and around D.C. in the week following the grand jury decision not to indict police officer Darren Wilson.”

respond
 
Importance
1
MPD: Multiple-suspect student rape case is 'disturbing'
by The GW Hatchet

Dec 04, 2014
“Media Credit: Sophie McTear | Design Editor
The Metropolitan Police Department’s assistant chief says he can't remember the last time one victim has reported being sexually assaulted by multiple attackers in D.C.
But nearly two weeks ago, a 21-year-old GW student said she was attacked by three men in an alleyway just off campus. MPD Assistant Chief Peter Newsham said police have few leads, and don't know if the alleged attackers are also GW students.
The female student did not know the suspects, who were described as white men in their 20s.
“It’s very disturbing for us to know that something like that has happened to a student,” Newsham said. “Although sex is involved in the crime, it’s really a crime of violence. It’s a violent behavior by the criminals. And to me it’s very disturbing that you would have more than one person involved in this.”
Media Credit: Aly Kruse | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Last year, there were no sexual abuses reported to the Metropolitan Police Department on New Hampshire Avenue between 24th and I streets, but so far this year, there have been three reported, according to D.C. crime data.
The student reported that the incident occurred at about 12:30 a.m. when she was walking through an alleyway at 2413 I St. A suspect pinned her against the brick wall while another suspect penetrated her vagina with his fingers “against her will,” according to a police report.
She was brought to a hospital for “apparent minor injuries” after the incident, according to the report.
MPD classified the Nov. 22 attack as first-degree sexual abuse, the highest level for a sexual assault crime. Sexual assault advocates say under the FBI’s broader definition, the incident is considered a rape because it involved non-consensual penetration with a body part.
Newsham said the rape allegedly occurred in a “very safe part of the city,” and the department’s top priority is finding the suspects. Last year, there were no sex abuses reported to MPD on New Hampshire Avenue between 24th and I streets, but so far this year, there have been three reported, according to D.C. crime data.
Newsham has spent more than 20 years at MPD. After its sexual assault unit was criticized in 2013 for mishandling sexual assault cases and incorrectly filing reports, Newsham helped improve the way MPD responds to sexual assault, sitting in on hours-long hearings with survivors and city leaders.
A few days after the assault, GW sent an alert by email asking students with any information to call MPD. A flyer attached in the email included further descriptions of the suspects and also listed the cell phone numbers of the two detectives in charge of the case, who did not return requests for comment.
The first suspect, who allegedly pinned the student against the wall, reportedly had light brown hair "that's puffy up top and closer on the sides," was wearing a dark T-shirt with “Fitch” written across the front and was 6-foot-3. The second suspect was described as wearing a dark V-neck T-shirt and a black Nike Fuel band on his right wrist, and was shorter than the first suspect.
MPD has no other details about the third suspect, though he was described as a white man in his 20s like the other suspects. Newsham said the third suspect would be charged based on what information is found during the investigation. The police report only said the third suspect "approached" the student with the other two.
Those convicted of first-degree sexual abuse can be imprisoned for life if they are found guilty of working with accomplices, according to D.C. law.
It’s common for MPD to send out information about suspects to communities, Newsham said, and if an incident happens near a college campus, the department sends the bulletin out to the school to relay to students.
“The information from the community is the most important information we get in closing our cases,” he said.
Rory Muhammad, GW's new sexual assault prevention leader, did not return request for comment about how the University is responding to the reported crime.
University spokeswoman Maralee Csellar said she could not comment on whether the student is using GW resources due to privacy concerns, but said the University has reached out to her.
Media Credit: Samuel Klein | Senior Photo Editor
Three attackers are involved in a reported student rape, which allegedly took place in an alley on I Street near campus, according to a police report.
“We offered support and services as we do with anybody that we learn about or approaches us in that aspect, but to what level she is utilizing our resources, that's private information,” Csellar said. “We offered all the support and services that the University does when we learn of these types of things.”
The incident involving strangers is at least the second to be reported in the I Street area this semester. In October, a man allegedly attempted to sexually abuse two female students outside the Foggy Bottom Metro station.
Kim Lonsway, the research director of End Violence Against Women International, said universities across the country should increase outreach programs and give students multiple ways to report sexual assaults.
Lonsway added that oftentimes, after sexual assaults are reported on campus and the university is alerted to the incident, the community can be in shock, especially when the assault involves multiple suspects.
“As a society, we don’t want to believe that sexual assault happens as much as it does in general, but I think aspects like that are more unbelievable for people,” she said.
Campus security expert S. Daniel Carter said when a person is sexually assaulted by a stranger, he or she is more likely to report the crime to the police. When assaults occur at a social event like a party, “there are a lot of social barriers and stigmas attached to reporting,” he said.
Multiple-suspect sexual assaults are more common on college campuses, but they usually occur when the survivor has some familiarity with the suspects, said Bridgette Harwood, co-executive director of legal services at the Network for Victim Recovery of D.C.
“You're describing a random-stranger attack by three people,” she said. “This is an awful, awful thing, but it's so uncommon in the world of what sexual violence looks like.”
Colleen Murphy contributed reporting.”

respond
 
Importance
1
Foundation launches to remember junior, teach low-income students basketball skills
by The GW Hatchet

Dec 04, 2014
“Media Credit: Courtesy of William Gwathmey's family
In honor of William Gwathmey, a student who died earlier this year, members of his family and fraternity Alpha Epsilon Pi have started a foundation to teach basketball to low-income students.
William Gwathmey’s friends described him as a competitive athlete who beat them almost every time in basketball games. But his friends also said he was a “true sportsman” who never rubbed in his wins and always finished games with a high five.
To remember the junior, who died earlier this semester, Gwathmey’s family and four members of his fraternity, Alpha Epsilon Pi, started a foundation to teach basketball skills to low-income students in D.C. More than 160 people have already signed up to play in a charity basketball tournament organized by the foundation this weekend.
In two weeks, the William Gaines Gwathmey Foundation's GoFundMe campaign has raised more than $1,600 toward a $6,000 goal, which will be used to buy basketball equipment for elementary and middle schools.
“If Willie knew we were doing this, he would smile and say it’s only right that we’re doing it through basketball,” junior Louis Ruggiero said. “It’s time we remember him with a smile, not a frown.”
Volunteers will aim to teach children basic skills as well as the importance of sportsmanship, friendship, family and schoolwork during biweekly visits.
“Those were the things that were most important to Will,” said Ruggiero, who met Gwathmey during freshmen orientation. “We wanted to do it for Will, we wanted to it for us and we wanted to do it for the kids.”
In September, Gwathmey was pronounced dead at GW Hospital after he was found unconscious in an off-campus apartment. The D.C. Office of the Chief Medical Examiner has not yet released a cause of death.
Founders have also reached out to Gwathmey’s high school, Collegiate School in New York City, for support. Gwathmey was very involved with his high school's basketball team and spent time during breaks from college helping the coaches and younger players, Ruggiero said.
The foundation will also look to connect with local nonprofits like the United Way of the National Capital Area or the Boys and Girls Club of Greater Washington. In the future, children in the program could come to events on campus to show donors how their money has helped, junior Cory Silverstein said.
“I wanted to remember him for all of the positive aspects of his life that he imparted on us every day,” Silverstein said. "I felt like this was a way for us to get closer to him.””

respond
 
Importance
1
Cartoon: Buckling down between the holidays
by The GW Hatchet

Dec 04, 2014
“Media Credit: Cartoon by Juliana Kogan”
respond
 
News Topics








(showing 10) Show All

StudentsReview Advice!

• What is a good school?
• Statistical Significance
• How to choose a Major
• How to choose your Career
• What you make of it?
• How Ivy League Admissions works
• On the Student/Faculty Ratio

• FAFSA: Who is a Parent?
• FAFSA: Parent Contribution
• FAFSA: Dream out of reach

• College Financial Planning
• Survive College and Graduate
• Sniffing Out Commuter Schools
• Preparing for College: A HS Roadmap
• Talking to Your Parents about College.
• Is a top college worth it?
• Why is college hard?
• Why Kids Aren't Happy in Traditional Schools
• Essential College Tips
• Cost of College Increasing Faster Than Inflation
• For parents filling out the FAFSA and PROFILE (from a veteran paper slinger)
• How to choose the right college?
• Create The Right Career Habits Now
• Senior Year (Tips and experience)
• Informational Overload! What Should I Look For in a College or University?
• Personality Type and College Choice
• A Free Application is a Good Application
• College Academic Survival Guide
• Getting Involved: The Key to College Happiness
• Choose a Path, Not a Major
• The Scoop on State Schools
• The Purpose of a Higher Education
• The Importance of Choosing the Right College Major (2012)
• How to choose a college major
• How to guarantee your acceptance to many colleges
• Nailing the College Application Process
• What to do for a Successful Interview
• I Don't Know Where to Start (General College Advice)
• Attitude and Dress Code for an Interview (General College Advice)
• Starting College (General College Advice)
Earn $$
Write an Article for us!
About Us | Advertise! | Press
Send Comments/Suggestions to: sradmin@studentsreview.com.

Copyright © 2000-2014. StudentsReview, All Rights Reserved.
 

 

Disclaimer: StudentsReview makes no claims, promises, or guarantees about the accuracy, completeness, or adequacy of the contents of this site, and expressly disclaims liability for errors and omissions in the contents of this site. Furthermore, StudentsReview is not affiliated with any University or Institution.

All Universities in District of Columbia (DC), College Search, College Rankings