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Importance
1
Handover of University's $1.4 billion investment portfolio pushed to this fall
by The GW Hatchet

Jul 04, 2014
“Updated: July 3, 2014 at 1:28 p.m.
The University will take at least another four months to find an outside company to manage its $1.4 billion endowment, prolonging the breakup of GW’s investment office.
The delay comes after University spokeswoman Candace Smith had said GW would cut seven positions and transition a firm in time for the start of the new fiscal year, which starts Tuesday. Smith said the University will begin asking companies to pitch themselves to officials within the next “several weeks,” and make a decision by late October.
“The bottom line is it is going to take as long as it takes, and we don't anticipate the timing will have an impact,” Smith said. “We are doing our due diligence, and the office is being managed until a firm is selected.”
Universities often take their time choosing an outsourcing firm to ensure they protect their financial reputations, said Ken Redd, the director of research and policy analysis at the National Association of College and University Business Officers.
“The penalty of being wrong is the financial penalty of break-up fees and then the emotional cost of doing another request for proposal and having to devote more staff time,” Redd said.
GW’s move, announced in March, makes the University one of the richest schools to take apart its investment office and the only among its 14 peer institutions . The University has also recently hired outside firms to handle services like internal auditing, food service, mail service and facilities upkeep.
Investments grew by 9 percent overall last year, falling behind many competitor schools. The bulk of returns came from GW’s large real estate portfolio , which the investment office does not control.
Executive Vice President and Treasurer Lou Katz said Donald Lindsey, the University's chief investment officer who has 26 years of experience managing endowments, will continue to work in the investment office until GW chooses a firm.
“We value his leadership, and his knowledge of the investment industry will help to ensure a smooth transition," Katz said.
Lindsey said the University has long considered outsourcing, which means it will join a wave of schools that have decided to hand its nest egg to an outside company.
Four years ago, just 1 percent of colleges and universities with endowments of at least $1 billion had outsourced their portfolio management. That figure is now more than 10 percent, according to data from the National Association of College and University Business Officials.
“I am committed to ensuring that we identify a firm that will be the best fit for the University’s long-term future," Lindsey said.
Alice Handy, founder of the firm Investure, said she wouldn't be surprised if GW's search extended beyond October.
“You’re picking an office and a chief investment officer, and those things take a long time to get right,” said Handy, also the former chief investment officer at the University of Virginia.
She said Investure, which manages endowment portfolios at Trinity University, the University of Tulsa and Middlebury, Barnard, Dickinson and Smith colleges, has not been approached by GW.
Though outsourcing sometimes takes up to a year to complete, the wait can pay off, Handy said. Schools that outsource often see benefits like less staff turnover and more stability – important features for a group overseeing an institution’s financial foundation.
GW’s investment office faced scrutiny over the last year after its former director of operations and risk claimed she was fired for blowing the whistle on flawed financial reporting that she had seen in the office.
The office also had a 33 percent turnover rate in the last year, which put strains on the office to hire and train new investment managers.
“With an endowment the size of GW’s, there’s the thought that if you have a good CIO, they may leave for a bigger opportunity,” Handy said. “Now you’ll have a stable group that can manage it.”
Keith Baum, the managing director of the foundations and endowments group at the Minneapolis-based outsourcing firm Abbot Downing, said the launch of GW’s $1 billion fundraising campaign could have slowed the search for a firm.
“A $1 billion campaign and making sure it’s on the right track and choosing an investment manager are two very large tasks. Those two things together are a lot of work," he said.
Before creating its investment office 11 years ago, GW outsourced to management firm CommonFund, which did not return repeated requests for comment. Financial services firm TIAA-CREF declined to comment about whether it had been contacted by the University, though it is a service provider for GW's defined contribution retirement plan.
This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that TIAA-CREF managed part of GW's endowment. The firm is actually a service provider for the University's defined contribution retirement plan. We regret this error.”

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Importance
1
Handover of University's $1.4 billion investment portfolio pushed to this fall
by The GW Hatchet

Jul 01, 2014
“The University will take at least another four months to find an outside company to manage its $1.4 billion endowment, prolonging the breakup of GW’s investment office.
The delay comes after University spokeswoman Candace Smith had said GW would cut seven positions and transition a firm in time for the start of the new fiscal year, which starts Tuesday. Smith said the University will begin asking companies to pitch themselves to officials within the next “several weeks,” and make a decision by late October.
“The bottom line is it is going to take as long as it takes, and we don't anticipate the timing will have an impact,” Smith said. “We are doing our due diligence, and the office is being managed until a firm is selected.”
Universities often take their time choosing an outsourcing firm to ensure they protect their financial reputations, said Ken Redd, the director of research and policy analysis at the National Association of College and University Business Officers.
“The penalty of being wrong is the financial penalty of break-up fees and then the emotional cost of doing another request for proposal and having to devote more staff time,” Redd said.
GW’s move, announced in March, makes the University one of the richest schools to take apart its investment office and the only among its 14 peer institutions . The University has also recently hired outside firms to handle services like internal auditing, food service, mail service and facilities upkeep.
Investments grew by 9 percent overall last year, falling behind many competitor schools. The bulk of returns came from GW’s large real estate portfolio , which the investment office does not control.
Alice Handy, founder of the firm Investure, said she wouldn't be surprised if GW's search extended beyond October.
“You’re picking an office and a chief investment officer, and those things take a long time to get right,” said Handy, also the former chief investment officer at the University of Virginia.
She said Investure, which manages endowment portfolios at Trinity University, the University of Tulsa and Middlebury, Barnard, Dickinson and Smith colleges, has not been approached by GW.
Though outsourcing sometimes takes up to a year to complete, the wait can pay off, Handy said. Schools that outsource often see benefits like less staff turnover and more stability – important features for a group overseeing an institution’s financial foundation.
GW’s investment office faced scrutiny over the last year after its former director of operations and risk claimed she was fired for blowing the whistle on flawed financial reporting that she had seen in the office.
The office also had a 33 percent turnover rate in the last year, which put strains on the office to hire and train new investment managers.
“With an endowment the size of GW’s, there’s the thought that if you have a good CIO, they may leave for a bigger opportunity,” Handy said. “Now you’ll have a stable group that can manage it.”
Keith Baum, the managing director of the foundations and endowments group at the Minneapolis-based outsourcing firm Abbot Downing, said the launch of GW’s $1 billion fundraising campaign could have slowed the search for a firm.
“A $1 billion campaign and making sure it’s on the right track and choosing an investment manager are two very large tasks. Those two things together are a lot of work," he said.
Before creating its investment office 11 years ago, GW outsourced to management firm CommonFund, which did not return repeated requests for comment. Financial services firm TIAA-CREF declined to comment about whether it had been contacted by the University, though it now manages a part of GW's endowment.”

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Importance
1
Davidson College will look to rebuild in A-10
by The GW Hatchet

Jun 11, 2014
“Davidson College is on its way out of the Southern Conference and will officially join the Atlantic 10 as the conference’s 14th school on July 1. Here’s what to expect from the private liberal arts college in North Carolina.
Mascot: Will E. Wildcat
Number of Division I sports: 21
School colors: Red and Black
Notable former students: Both President Woodrow Wilson and NBA player Stephen Curry attended Davidson, though neither graduated.
The construction of a $15 million athletic center will soon begin, with plans for two practice courts for men's and women's basketball, and volleyball. Additionally, the space will include coaches' offices, locker rooms, team rooms and film rooms for men's and women's basketball.
The men’s basketball team, under the leadership of head coach Lefty Driesell, was ranked No. 1 at the start of the 1964-65 season, marking the golden age of the program’s history. The team made the Elite Eight in the 2008 NCAA tournament, riding on the shooting of now-Golden State Warriors star point guard Stephen Curry, before losing to the eventual champion Kansas.
Davidson went 20-13 last season and lost in the first round of the National Invitational Tournament.”

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Importance
1
What you need to know about D.C. politics
by The GW Hatchet

Jun 10, 2014
“Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo by Desiree Halpern | Senior Staff Photographer
D.C. Council member Muriel Bowser won the April Democratic primary with 44 percent of the vote. She'll face off against Council member David Catania, an independent, in November.
The benefit of starting your GW career during a midterm election year? Not only will you have a chance to campaign for candidates with some of the most politically active College Democrats and College Republicans chapters in the nation, but you will also witness a D.C. mayoral race.
District politics have been marred by scandals, from crack use to tax evasion to campaign finance fraud, and it is sometimes easy to forget that these characters also run the city.
Intrigued? Here are the top six people and bodies you need to know before starting classes in Foggy Bottom.
1. D.C. Council
The D.C. Council is the city’s legislative body, made up of eight representatives from each ward plus five at-large members. Because D.C. is a federal district rather than a state, every piece of legislation the Council passes and the mayor signs has to go to Congress for approval. In the past year, Council members have voted to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana, though that move has come under scrutiny in Congress and has yet to go into effect. The Council also passed a bill to raise the minimum wage at large retailers from $8.25 to $12.50 an hour, a measure the mayor later vetoed.
2. Vincent Gray
D.C.’s lame duck mayor is an alumnus who has held office since January 2011. Gray, 71, lost his re-election bid to Muriel Bowser in the Democratic primary in April amid allegations that he accepted illegal contributions to his 2010 campaign. Businessman Jeffrey Thompson pleaded guilty in March to illegally funneling more than $660,000 into Gray’s campaign, but the mayor denies any knowledge of the shadow campaign. As a student, Gray was a member of the Jewish fraternity Tau Epsilon Phi and was involved in the GW Newman Center.
3. Muriel Bowser
Muriel Bowser, 41, represents Ward 4 on the Council and is the Democratic nominee for mayor. She defeated incumbent Gray and seven other candidates in April, and is preparing for the general election in November. Her campaign is focusing on homelessness, education and income inequality.
4. David Catania
David Catania, 46, is an independent candidate for mayor. He is openly gay, a former Republican and now serves as an at-large Council member. He chairs the Council’s education committee and has made education reform the center of his campaign. He faces the challenge of convincing D.C. voters that he should be the top executive in a city that has only ever elected Democrats to the office. Aside from minor, third-party candidates, Catania is Bowser’s only other contender. The Republican Party has yet to name a candidate.
5. Jack Evans
Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo by Desiree Halpern
Jack Evans has represented Ward 2 for more than two decades on the D.C. Council.
GW falls right in the center of Ward 2, which long-serving D.C. Council member Jack Evans represents. Evans, 60, ran in the Democratic mayoral primary in April. In his second mayoral bid he won 5 percent of the vote , competing against seven other candidates. The finance and revenue committee chair focused on infrastructure and economic development in his bid. Evans is one of the most active supporters of a proposal to build a new soccer stadium for D.C. United. He also works as a lawyer for the Patton Boggs law firm in Georgetown, allowing him to earn more money than most other Council members.
6. Eleanor Holmes Norton
Eleanor Holmes Norton is the District's non-voting representative in Congress. A 76-year-old native Washingtonian, she has served in her post for more than 23 years. She sits on the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. During her tenure, she has advocated for giving D.C. a vote in Congress, and has also fought to make the District the 51st state. Norton is up for re-election this November.”

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Importance
1
Teens take the stage in D.C. slam poetry scene
by The GW Hatchet

May 22, 2014
“Media Credit: Tatiana Cirisano | Hatchet Staff Photographer
2Deep, a slam poet, often mentors teens when she isn't performing or hosting open mic and slam poetry events around the District. Tatiana Cirisano | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Updated: May 22, 2014 at 11:21 a.m.
After her long career in slam poetry – kickstarting the Busboys and Poets team in 2008 and hosting weekly open mic nights – “2Deep” is now finding inspiration from a younger crowd.
2Deep, who requested that she only be identified by her stage name to keep her slam poetry interests separate from her day job, said verses written by younger poets have started to inspire her more than those of adults.
“I love the people that are my peers, but there’s something about the truth in the youth," she said. "They don’t sugar coat it in anything, they don’t do well with metaphors, they’re like, ‘Here’s the bluntness of it all.'"
It’s a scene that's spread across social media: Poems like Neil Hilborn’s “ OCD ” and Mark Grist’s “ Girls Who Read ” have more than 7.5 and 3.2 million views, respectively, on YouTube after a year of making rounds on Upworthy and Facebook.
But slam poetry, and youth slam poetry in particular, was not always popular. When Youth Speaks Inc., a national organization that aims to give young people a voice in social issues, hosted the first youth slam competition in 1997, only 43 poets competed. Now, 500 students from 50 cities participate in the Brave New Voices national competition every year.
2Deep said since she left the D.C. slam team in 2009, she has most enjoyed the opportunity to mentor budding poets.
For instance, 2Deep said she is often taken aback by the lines of 17-year-old Eve Smith writes, pointing to a poem stylized as a letter to Rihanna that reads, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but a backhand makes me submissive.”
“I was like ‘Why didn’t I think of that?'” 2Deep said.
The D.C. Youth Slam Team, supported by national nonprofit Split This Rock, is open to anyone enrolled in a D.C. middle school or high school.
Youth programs coordinator and coach Jonathan Tucker said he focuses more on skill and the sense of activism behind the poems than on the number of competitions his team wins, but the D.C. group is known for its prowess, earning second place at the Brave New Voices youth slam festival last year.
With slam teams at 20 high schools in the area, Tucker hopes poetry will help students become more involved in local issues, tackling somewhat taboo topics like discrimination, poverty and politics through spoken word.
“Just like every high school has a basketball team that competes, I want every high school to have a poetry team that competes,” Tucker said.
The goal, he said, is to empower young people through performance.
Tucker said stereotypes of angry, yelling poets can mischaracterize the spoken-word genre and hold back some students from getting involved.
“The popular depictions are not always accurate,” he said. “Just go out and experience it in the city. There’s tons of slam events every week for you to see.”
Many open mics or larger slam competitions have circulated online, with the Huffington Post picking up D.C. Youth Slam Team feminist poem .
2Deep said she sees a similar trend of openness and activism on colleges campuses across the city.
“I notice that the college students, just like the younger kids, haven’t been tainted by the world yet,” 2Deep said. “So they are the key to a lot of the answers that a lot of the adult problems complain about, but never fix. And I notice that the college kids always have the answer.”
Many schools already have slam or spoken-word teams, like American University’s Mightier Than Swords, University of Maryland’s Terpoets and GW’s Spoken Word Collective, which formed this spring.
Robyn Di Giacinto, a rising sophomore and the president of the Spoken Word Collective , said she hopes the organization will grow on campus and give students not only a platform to voice their opinions but also learn the skills necessary to become spoken word poets.
The group, though still in its early stages, will host workshops and open mic nights in the fall to spur more student interest, Di Giacinto said.
"I think college students have a lot to say. It’s a time in our lives when we’re exploring things a lot and spoken word poetry is a great channel in which you can explore a lot of these burgeoning ideas," she said.
This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that Jonathan Tucker said stereotypes, like the idea that the stage is only open to black poets, sometimes prevents slam poetry groups from gaining popularity. He meant stereotypes of angry, yelling poets. We regret this error.”

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Importance
1
Bocce league reinvents the game with glow-in-the-dark tournaments, social focus
by The GW Hatchet

May 19, 2014
“Media Credit: Sam Klein | Senior Photo Editor
Players chat between turns at Wednesday's GLO Bocce tournamet, which featured glow-in-the-dark balls as a fresh take on the classic Italian game.
Dozens of competitors tossed small, glowing plastic balls down makeshift courts in the grass at Arlington’s Mosaic Park last Wednesday, drawing spectators to the stream of moving colors.
It was a typical night of GLO Bocce for the members of the D.C. Bocce League, who played across ten courts with glow-in-the-dark balls. The league invites both novices and experts to try their hand at the ancient Italian sport, in which players toss larger balls at a smaller ball, aiming to land as close to the target as possible.
The league was born in 2004, when Rachael Preston, now a member of the group's board of directors, met with three other friends in the hopes of starting a local sports league. Though the four friends were originally kickball players, they thought the relaxed, social atmosphere of bocce would bring members of the community together.
The group has grown over the last decade from 50 original members to more than 2,500 players in D.C., Maryland and Virginia.
“We called it an ‘amoeba’ phenomenon,” Preston said. “Teams that had six players on them suddenly had ten players on them, and then in the subsequent season those would split into two teams and grow in size, and then kind of split again.”
The League organizes a bocce game every night of the week, bouncing from neighborhoods like Dupont and Bethesda to Capitol Hill and Columbia Heights. While it is typically an all-ages sport, the D.C. Bocce League hosts bocce bar crawls at local bars for older crowds.
At U Street’s Vinoteca, La Tagliatella in Arlington and Black Jack of Logan Circle, league members are treated to food and drink specials as they play.
The organization's lighthearted take on the game is perhaps most obvious in team names. With names like “Mission Imbocceball,” “Bocce Horror Picture Show” and “I Came in Like a Bocce Ball,” players have made choosing the most clever title an additional competition.
Heading to the courts each game night means more than just developing a knack for tossing the “pallina.” Above all, the game is a way for players across the D.C. area to unwind and socialize with new friends.
Because bocce requires less movement than other sports, team members are free to chat between throws. On the court, the game itself is a natural conversation-starter, as many members are rookies who need to learn the rules together.
“You can actually talk and hang out while you’re playing, which is probably one of the best benefits of it. So it’s not just about the sport, it’s about interacting with people,” said Tristanne Staudt, a GLO Bocce division manager.
Staudt said she has made many new friends since she joined the League in 2004, including her now-boyfriend of two years. Both were part of winning teams at “Flair Week,” the league’s seasonal tournament and bocce celebration, and were given free tickets to a baseball game as a prize.
To tone down competitiveness, the D.C. Bocce League uses a different kind of award system, giving the top-scoring team at the end of each season the chance to choose a charity to receive a donation from the league.
“You’re not, like, physically fighting over the ball like in soccer. It’s much less head-to-head competition. It can get very competitive, but it’s much more chill than a lot of other sports,” said Dan Holm, member of the team “Boccisimo.”
Preston, who remembers tossing bocce balls with her grandparents as a child, said people of all abilities join the league, including members in wheelchairs and players that have suffered injuries playing other sports.
Although the teams play to win, the league’s ultimate purpose isn’t just to coach members into star bocce athletes. Instead, members of the organization said it hopes to create opportunities to form relationships.
“If you fill a need you have that isn’t currently met, there’s certainly gonna be other people out there that also have that need to connect,” Preston said.”

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Importance
1
Teens take the stage in D.C. slam poetry scene
by The GW Hatchet

May 19, 2014
“Media Credit: Tatiana Cirisano | Hatchet Staff Photographer
2Deep, a slam poet, often mentors teens when she isn't performing or hosting open mic and slam poetry events around the District. Tatiana Cirisano | Hatchet Staff Photographer
After her long career in slam poetry – kickstarting the Busboys and Poets team in 2008 and hosting weekly open mic nights – “2Deep” is now finding inspiration from a younger crowd.
2Deep, who requested that she only be identified by her stage name to keep her slam poetry interests separate from her day job, said verses written by younger poets have started to inspire her more than those of adults.
“I love the people that are my peers, but there’s something about the truth in the youth," she said. "They don’t sugar coat it in anything, they don’t do well with metaphors, they’re like, ‘Here’s the bluntness of it all.'"
It’s a scene that's spread across social media: Poems like Neil Hilborn’s “ OCD ” and Mark Grist’s “ Girls Who Read ” have more than 7.5 and 3.2 million views, respectively, on YouTube after a year of making rounds on Upworthy and Facebook.
But slam poetry, and youth slam poetry in particular, was not always popular. When Youth Speaks Inc., a national organization that aims to give young people a voice in social issues, hosted the first youth slam competition in 1997, only 43 poets competed. Now, 500 students from 50 cities participate in the Brave New Voices national competition every year.
2Deep said since she left the D.C. slam team in 2009, she has most enjoyed the opportunity to mentor budding poets.
For instance, 2Deep said she is often taken aback by the lines of 17-year-old Eve Smith writes, pointing to a poem stylized as a letter to Rihanna that reads, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but a backhand makes me submissive.”
“I was like ‘Why didn’t I think of that?'” 2Deep said.
The D.C. Youth Slam Team, supported by national nonprofit Split This Rock, is open to anyone enrolled in a D.C. middle school or high school.
Youth programs coordinator and coach Jonathan Tucker said he focuses more on skill and the sense of activism behind the poems than on the number of competitions his team wins, but the D.C. group is known for its prowess, earning second place at the Brave New Voices youth slam festival last year.
With slam teams at 20 high schools in the area, Tucker hopes poetry will help students become more involved in local issues, tackling somewhat taboo topics like discrimination, poverty and politics through spoken word.
“Just like every high school has a basketball team that competes, I want every high school to have a poetry team that competes,” Tucker said.
The goal, he said, is to empower young people through performance.
Tucker said stereotypes, like the idea that the stage is only open to black poets, sometimes holds groups back from gaining popularity.
“The popular depictions are not always accurate,” he said. “Just go out and experience it in the city. There’s tons of slam events every week for you to see.”
Many open mics or larger slam competitions have circulated online, with the Huffington Post picking up D.C. Youth Slam Team feminist poem .
2Deep said she sees a similar trend of openness and activism on colleges campuses across the city.
“I notice that the college students, just like the younger kids, haven’t been tainted by the world yet,” 2Deep said. “So they are the key to a lot of the answers that a lot of the adult problems complain about, but never fix. And I notice that the college kids always have the answer.”
Many schools already have slam or spoken-word teams, like American University’s Mightier Than Swords, University of Maryland’s Terpoets and GW’s Spoken Word Collective, which formed this spring.
Robyn Di Giacinto, a rising sophomore and the president of the Spoken Word Collective , said she hopes the organization will grow on campus and give students not only a platform to voice their opinions but also learn the skills necessary to become spoken word poets.
The group, though still in its early stages, will host workshops and open mic nights in the fall to spur more student interest, Di Giacinto said.
"I think college students have a lot to say. It’s a time in our lives when we’re exploring things a lot and spoken word poetry is a great channel in which you can explore a lot of these burgeoning ideas," she said.”

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Importance
1
As a player who fails to fit an NBA mold, Armwood looks to sell strengths
by The GW Hatchet

May 19, 2014
“Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo by Cameron Lancaster
Isaiah Armwood goes for basket during the Colonials' March matchup against the Memphis Tigers in the NCAA Tournament.
Men's basketball players hung up their jerseys in March, but Isaiah Armwood still spends many of his mornings on the floor of the Smith Center.
The lanky 23-year-old is taking the weeks leading up to the NBA draft and Summer League to train, fly across the country to work out for teams and play in highly-scouted showcases to promote himself as a player worthy of a professional contract.
It's a hard sell: Just two percent of NCAA athletes end up playing professionally, and the June 26 draft will call just 60 names from one of the largest and deepest draft classes in recent history. Undersized for his position and considered too old in what is deemed a young man's draft, it's unlikely Armwood will hear his name called, forcing him to search for a different way to make an NBA roster.
Every step in the process is meticulously planned, but the end of Armwood’s journey remains unclear. He could make an impression on a team and land an invitation to training camp in the fall, but if Armwood does not make it to the NBA, he will likely have to decide between playing in the NBA Development League and playing overseas.
Armwood has had his sights set on the NBA for long as he can remember, but the Colonials 24-win season and first tournament appearance in seven years helped thrust the Villanova transfer into the sights of professional scouts.
“This year we started winning, started gaining more attention and a lot of scouts started coming to my games, talking to my coaches and things like that, and it just started to build,” Armwood said. “That’s when it actually became a possibility for me to do it.”
Since the men’s basketball team bowed out of the 2014 season in the first round of the NCAA tournament against Memphis, Armwood, one of the most impactful players in program history, has continued working out with men’s basketball assistant coach Maurice Joseph to polish his overall game and appeal to the needs of professional organizations.
Selling a product
Armwood and his agent, Pedro Power, must determine how to best generate interest from NBA teams with a range of criteria. At 6'7'' and 200 pounds, Armwood is a few inches shorter and 25 pounds lighter than the league’s average power forward. Armwood also lacks the outside-shooting ability of a small forward, which makes him a misfit by league standards.
“If he wants to get to the NBA, he’ll have to show that he can play on the perimeter both on offense and on defense, so he’ll have to work on shooting and ball handling and being able to guard quicker players,” NBAdraftblog.com owner and analyst Ed Isaacson said.
Men's basketball head coach Mike Lonergan said Armwood could improve his guard skills to develop into a small forward. He pointed to Armwood’s defensive stand against projected lottery pick Doug McDermott during a Creighton game on Dec. 1, when Armwood helped hold McDermott to seven points – his lowest total of the year.
“I would sell him as a lockdown defender who can guard a small forward or a power forward, and I would really try to say he’s really improved in college each year and try to sell them on that improvement will continue,” Lonergan said.
Armwood would likely mesh best with an up-tempo offense like the Sacramento Kings, Denver Nuggets or Houston Rockets, where his athleticism would shine and the quick pace would protect him from having to muscle out larger, stronger players, Isaacson said.
Earlier this month, Armwood worked out for the Kings in California. The closed-gym workout sessions typically host about six prospects for a skills-and-drills showcase in front of a team’s coaching staff.
“They want to see if we can do certain things: shoot the ball, shoot the ball from NBA range, handle the ball, see if we’re in shape. That’s a lot of it,” Armwood said. “So far I think I did a real good job because I just kept going. That’s just how I play, so that’s a good thing for me, it fits my mode.”
Most workouts feature a college star and a group of lesser-known players. Armwood would fall into the latter group, so while he may not be the focus, he benefits from the session if he can stand out from the other players.
“I think the workouts are good for him because usually you go in with these guys who are supposed to be high picks, so I just told him to study their games,” Lonergan said. “Watch what they do and just be very prepared and just try to kick their butts and be noticed.”
Armwood's agent represents a strong crop of NBA hopefuls, including Louisville’s Luke Hancock, which could open doors for all his clients. By the end of the draft process, Armwood will likely be able participate in workouts with ten to 12 more teams, Isaacson said.
In April, Armwood competed at the Portsmouth Invitational Tournament as one of 64 college seniors invited to the showcase that hundreds of scouts attend. He dominated the lane agility athletic testing and was able to show off his mid-range jumper, inside scoring, touch off the boards and defensive prowess.
Professional alternatives
If Armwood is not drafted in June, he will continue to train in the hopes of earning an invitation to join an NBA Summer League team. There, if Armwood can impress an NBA organization, he could go to a team’s training camp in the fall.
If Armwood doesn’t receive an invite, he has two more places where he can play – the NBA Development League or abroad.
The D-League is often the fastest route for young players to the NBA as organizations keep tabs on teams closer to home. But playing internationally, most commonly in Europe, would likely yield a higher salary and, depending on the league, could present better competition for Armwood to develop his skill set.
If Armwood signs a professional contract by the end of the summer, he would join a handful of other GW alumni who’ve had professional careers. Tony Taylor, who graduated in 2012, signed to play in Poland last August after a successful year in the D-League. Pops Mensah-Bonsu, who currently plays in Turkey, spent several seasons on multiple NBA rosters including the Dallas Mavericks, San Antonio Spurs and Houston Rockets.
“I think I have a really good shot,” Armwood said. “I think if I get that opportunity to compete I’ll definitely showcase myself and I’ll put myself in a great position.””

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Importance
1
Men's rowing places 10th at Eastern Sprints
by The GW Hatchet

May 19, 2014
“Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo by Nicole Radivilov | Contributing Photo Editor
Men's rowing races on the Potomac River earlier this season. The Colonials raced in the Eastern Sprints against many of the nation's top crews Sunday.
After 12,000 collective meters of racing Sunday, men’s rowing finished right where they started at the Eastern Sprints in Worcester, Mass.
GW tied the University of Pennsylvania for 10th in points for the Rowe Cup which Harvard and Brown tied in winning. Each Colonials boat finished in the same place in which they were seeded in the Eastern Association of Rowing Colleges Championships.
“The conference got really fast,” head coach Mark Davis said. “There were some good upsets today, and in that respect I’m just kind of glad that we were able to hold our seed.”
The Varsity Eight, ranked No. 15 in the nation in the most recent USRowing coaches poll rowed the length of the course in 5:48.966 in their morning heat to finish in fifth. Dartmouth narrowly edged GW for a berth in the petite finals by finishing less than two seconds ahead of the Colonials at 5:47.500.
“[The Varsity Eight] had a good race in their heat but not a great race, and they needed a great race in order to get top four and get into that petite final,” Davis said.
Davis said the crew was somewhat discouraged with the result, but shook off their disappointment to row the most complete race of their season in the third-level finals. The Colonials won, and lead the entire way. The crew has had fast starts all season but has struggled during the sprint at the end of races. GW was able to make a move on second-place crew Syracuse in the final 500 meters, maintaining a 42 stroke-per-minute rate while pouring power into each sweep of the oars to win with a time of 5:41.712.
Yale edged the Second Varsity Eight into fifth by less than one-tenth of a second in a race that Davis called “heartbreaking.” The Colonials led the Bulldogs for much of the race but were passed at the very end, losing out on a lane in the petite finals.
The narrow defeat put a weight on the boat’s third-level finals race, in which they placed second with a time of 5:55.275, about five seconds behind the winning crew from the University of Pennsylvania. The Colonials were able to improve their time relative to UPenn from earlier this year by just under two seconds.
The Freshman Eight was the only boat to earn a spot in their grand finals race after placing third in their heat. Higher boats needed a first or second place finish to make the grand finals, but a smaller fleet of rookie boats meant the Colonials time of 6:03.124 was enough to earn them a spot in the race. They finished fifth with a time of 5:48.998.
The close races were upsetting for GW, which came out on the wrong end of tight battles, but the Colonials proved that they could contend with some of the nations best boats. Brown, Princeton, Yale, Harvard and Wisconsin are among the top-20 squads in the nation, according to the most recent USRowing coaches poll, and all took to the water Sunday.
“The times of the crews in front of us aren’t really that far in front of us,” Davis said. “We just want to get a little bit better. We feel like if we can improve anywhere from 2-4 seconds off what we have that we’ll be right where we want to be.”
The Colonials have less than two weeks to pick up boat speed in preparation for the IRA National Championships in West Windsor, N.J.”

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Importance
1
Baseball keeps chance of second-straight playoff berth alive with series sweep of Rhode Island
by The GW Hatchet

May 13, 2014
“Media Credit: Zach Montellaro | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Freshman Jon Steele knocks the ball out of the Rhode Island catcher's glove to score the winning run in a 7-6 walkoff victory Friday.
It's deja vu all over again for the baseball team, which gave credence to the old baseball adage in a three-game series sweep over Rhode Island this weekend, capped off by a complete game Sunday by sophomore pitcher Bobby LeWarne.
Last season, GW won nine of its final 10 games to make the conference tournament for the first time since 2006. Now the Colonials are on the verge of making a late charge for the playoffs once again with just one series left to play.
LeWarne called the weekend’s sweep “massive.” The Colonials also had help from Fordham, which is contending with GW for a playoff berth. The Rams dropped three games to Saint Louis this weekend to fall within a game of GW for the seventh and last seed in the postseason.
The sweep sets up an exciting final week of play for the Colonials, who will go on the road to play last-place St. Bonaventure. Meanwhile, Fordham will face third-place VCU, which went 2-1 against the Colonials last week.
“Right now we’re pretty much win or go home at this point with the conference tournament,” LeWarne said.
The Colonials toed a fine line for much of the weekend, winning the series opener 7-6 in a 14-inning odyssey, and then earning a second walk-off victory 6-5 on Saturday.
But the tune changed Sunday when LeWarne, who his teammates call “Bobby the Bull,” took the mound against the Rams. The right-hander threw 134 pitches through nine innings, surrendering three runs while striking out seven Rhode Island batters.
"The bull met the ram and horns collided, and the bull won," head coach Gregg Ritchie said.
While the Colonials appeared to have zeroed in on their playoff hopes by the end of the weekend, the beginning of the series saw an unfocused GW team struggle early. Ritchie said it was the worst baseball his team had played nearly all year.
With senior ace Aaron Weisberg on the hill in Friday’s series opener, GW dug a 5-0 hole through the first four innings that appeared to have sunk the Colonials' playoff hopes. But in the seventh inning, a fatigued Rams pitcher began to leave balls hanging over the plate.
The Colonials capitalized, scoring four runs in the seventh, aided by a two-run, stand-up double to right field by freshman John Steele with two outs in the inning. Steele entered the game for a struggling Matthieu Robert, who had been bouncing the ball back to the pitcher.
Media Credit: Zach Montellaro | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Freshman Jordan Sheinkop held the Rams scoreless for 4.1 innings of relief in Friday's 14-inning victory.
GW would only hold the lead for a short time as senior Colin Milon blew one of his only games of the year, taking the two teams into extra innings with the score tied at six. Freshman Jordan Sheinkop kept the Rams to three hits in 4.1 innings of relief, but was matched by the Rhode Island bullpen that held GW to just one hit between the eighth and the 14th inning.
The second for the Colonials in the 14th inning would equate to the winning run.
With Steele waiting on second base, freshman Eli Kashi smacked a single to left field. As Steele rounded third and headed for the plate he was beat by the throw, but contact at the plate caused by a diving Steele led to the Rams catcher dropping the ball and the Colonials winning the game.
"I thought he was out at first and then the umpire said safe," Kashi said. "Then I saw Joey [Bartosic] running at me and that’s how I knew."
While Saturday’s game ended similarly in a walkoff, it didn’t last five hours.
Freshman starter Jacob Williams threw 7.1 solid innings, allowing eight hits and three runs. Williams left the game with the lead, but was later credited with the tying run after the Rams amounted a hit off reliever Luke Olson.
GW regained the lead in the eighth, but the Rams refused to go away easy, taking back control with two runs in the top of the ninth inning and giving themselves a one-run lead.
The Colonials ended on top. A couple of miscues by the Rams combined with two runs on two hits for GW, including a game-winning single by freshman Kevin Mahala that gave the Colonials a 6-5.
To keep playoff hopes healthy, though, GW needed a sweep. Weisberg said the back-to-back walkoffs from the weekend’s previous games gave the team momentum heading into the series finale.
"It should’ve clicked about a few weeks ago, a little more sense of urgency, although it should be like that every week," Weisberg said. "Bats are clicking, pitching is coming together. It’s all working good right now."
But even with the team riding high on two straight victories, Sunday’s matchup was not without its nail-biting moments. Toeing the rubber with a 4-0 lead in the third, LeWarne ran into some bad luck without the ball ever leaving the infield.
A pair of errors and a single put him in a bases loaded, no-out jam. But despite trouble surrounding the Colonials defense, LeWarne settled down without surrendering a single run to the Rams.
Media Credit: Zach Montellaro | Hatchet Staff Photographer
The Colonials' playoff chances stay alive after a sweeping Rhode Island over the weekend.
LeWarne would give up a solo home run in the sixth inning, but his other two earned runs came after a couple poorly executed situational balls and missed cut-off men by the GW defense provided extra opportunities for Rhode Island batters.
Solid on the field for the Colonials, however, was freshman Bobby Campbell, who was sensational at third base. Campbell ranged to both sides and made strong throws across the diamond. Campbell said he was particularly focused with the game holding playoff connotations.
"When I play too quickly, they just want me to slow down and play underneath the baseball," Campbell said. "Especially Owen [Beightol]. Owen’s been a great role model for me this year, especially in the infield."
Beightol finished the day hitless and saw his near-league leading batting average drop a bit during the series. On senior day, he was honored as the team's MVP and recognized for joining the career 100 RBI club and entering the program’s top-10 list in hits with 230.
Heading up to St. Bonaventure for a weekend series to close out the season, the Colonials will need a sweep to near-guarantee themselves a spot in the playoffs for the second straight season – but this year with one of the youngest teams in the country. Ritchie said as the team prepares for its final three games of the season, he expects his players to shed the youth label that has been held over their heads all season.
"Whether it’s a coach that makes a mistake, whether it’s a player that makes a mistake, own up to it, pick yourself up, pull your big-boy pants on, pick up those boot straps and roll, keep moving," Ritchie said. "You’re going to keep growing. It’ll be fun to watch this team as we continue to build."
This post was updated May 12, 2014 at 1:23 p.m. to reflect the following:
Correction appended
The Hatchet misidentified freshman Jordan Sheinkop as "John Sheinkop." We regret this error.”

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