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Importance
1
Now at a bus stop near you: Gilbert Stuart, Andy Warhol
by The GW Hatchet

Aug 26, 2014
“Media Credit: Erica Christian | Photo Editor
A bus shelter, on Pennsylvania Avenue between 9th and 10th streets, NW, displays Gilbert Stuart's portrait of George Washington as a part of the "Art Everywhere" campaign, which focuses on the public display of iconic works of art across the country.
Students taking a walk to the National Mall may have a run-in with Gilbert Stuart’s famous portrait of George Washington, which gazes at the city from a bus stop on Pennsylvania Avenue between 9th and 10th streets NW.
The painting joins 57 other iconic American works on public display this month in metropolitan areas across the country, including the District, as part of the “Art Everywhere” campaign. A joint effort between the Outdoor Advertising Association of America and five major art museums, the campaign places art reproductions on thousands of bus stops, billboards and other public spaces.
Many displays are just a short walk from campus . Both Grant Wood’s 1930 work “American Gothic” and Andy Warhol’s iconic 1964 “Campbell’s Soup Can” are printed on bus shelters at 18th and K streets and Pennsylvania Avenue and 14th Street, respectively.
The art drive, which Art Everywhere calls the “largest outdoor art show ever conceived,” aims to bring works from museum walls into the daily lives of ordinary Americans. Nicole Hayes, a spokeswoman for the Outdoor Advertising Association of America, said the campaign targets people who may never have a chance to see the works in a museum.
“Museums are now above them as they drive to work, or in the insides of the bus that they commute in, or in the Metro, you know, as they get out and go about their day,” Hayes said.
The campaign will complete its first month-long exhibition Sunday. And with just a handful of days left to see the art, the campaign is exploding on social media with thousands of Instagram posts , tweets and Facebook posts from art enthusiasts across the U.S. as they track down each public display.
“It’s a bit of a treasure hunt, if you will. We have people that are posting, ‘I found one here,’ ‘Oh, I found one at the intersection of 18th and K’ or ‘I found one at the Fort Totten Metro,’” Hayes said.
Caranine Smith, the director of GW’s Gallery 102, said modern technology may be what allows movements like Art Everywhere to build up a following.
“It is technology that is driving interactions with art, whether it's through individuals accessing art and information online, artists creatively utilizing new technologies and connecting and sharing ideas or the organization or launching and promotion of large-scale campaigns such as Art Everywhere,” she said.
The National Gallery of Art, one of the five museums the Outdoor Advertising Association of America tapped to provide works for Art Everywhere, is home to more pieces displayed in the campaign than any other: 14 of the total 58 works came from the museum located on the Mall.
Deborah Ziska, a spokeswoman for the National Gallery, said choosing which works to nominate for the project was easy. The museum, after all, is known for its renowned collection of 18th- and 19th-century American art, she said.
The harder part was considering more technical elements, like choosing pieces that would reproduce well, and making sure all major genres of art were featured.
“We had to think of all the factors and what would resonate beyond the marble walls. So sometimes there are important works that just don’t reproduce very well,” Ziska said.
Charles Brock, the museum’s associate curator of American paintings, said he thinks the museum’s two most influential American works are Winslow Homer’s “Breezing Up,” (1876) which depicts three boys on a boating trip, and Thomas Moran’s western landscape, “Green River Cliffs, Wyoming” (1881).
Both were included in the campaign’s final 58, and students, residents and visitors can find them across D.C.
“In a way they’re both about horizons, they’re both about a sense of America’s destiny in some way. It’s interesting to think about those types of images being transposed to all these very different places all over the country,” Brock said.
After the success of the movement’s first exhibition, Ziska hopes the National Gallery will participate again next year, calling the campaign an interactive and stimulating way to educate Americans about their own history while cultivating an interest in the arts.
“In one way, these paintings tell a lot of different perspectives and stories of the American experience, so people can learn about or understand our common heritage in different ways,” Ziska said.
Artwork on display near campus:
“My Egypt” by Charles Demuth (1927)
18th and I streets
Provided by the Whitney Museum of American Art
“American Gothic” by Grant Wood (1930)
K Street between 18th and 19th streets
Provided by the Art Institute of Chicago
“Allies Day” by Childe Hassam (1917)
Pennsylvania Avenue and 22nd Street
Provided by the National Gallery of Art
“Campbell’s Soup Can” by Andy Warhol (1964)
Pennsylvania Avenue and 14th Street
Provided by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art
“Phil” by Chuck Close (1969)
New York Avenue and 12th Street
Provided by the Whitney Museum of American Art
“George Washington” by Gilbert Stuart (1821)
Pennsylvania Avenue and 10th Street
Provided by the National Gallery of Art”

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Importance
1
For men's soccer, a chance at redemption
by The GW Hatchet

Aug 25, 2014
“Media Credit: Zach Montellaro | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Freshman defender Christian Lawal could challenge returning players for a starting role.
The story of the 2014 men’s soccer season really began last November, when a single loss kept the Colonials out of the postseason.
Now, after a 1-1-1 record in exhibition play, both seasoned returners and dynamic new talent are bent on reaching their potential.
“The group is better, better than it was last year,” head coach Craig Jones said. “We are stronger mentally. The guys are returning and have played a lot of minutes. We’re trying to get our newcomers integrated straight away so they don’t have to stand by. We have a chance here.”
The Colonials finished last season 5-10-2, with eight of their losses coming in two separate four-game losing streaks. The second losing streak ended the season and erased GW's playoff potential for the second year in a row.
“Everyone has a really bad taste in their mouth from the end of last season, from being in a great position and not making the A-10 tournament,” senior defender Matthew Scott said.
At times, the group appeared like a different team from one game to the next. The Colonials who played both defending A-10 champion Saint Louis and then-No. 19 Dayton to double-overtime ties were unrecognizable from the squad that whimpered through a loss to UMass, who finished 4-14-1, and needed double overtime to put away Rhode Island, who finished 0-8 in conference play last year.
Often, it really wasn’t the same players on the field from game to game. Senior Andri Alexandersson said after then-sophomores Ross Higgins and Jonny Forrest suffered injuries, the team struggled to develop a consistent lineup and settle into a rhythm, which the Colonials hope to do now that both players are healthy.
The team will look to Forrest for offense this season after the loss of senior forward Tyler Ranalli, who led the team with six goals last year. Forrest, who Alexandersson called a “big aspect of the team,” scored three goals last season for a Colonials team that averaged 1.12 goals per game.
But Jones said he isn’t looking for one go-to player to find the back of the net.
“We really need goals to come from other places besides a so-called forward or so-called goal scorer,” Jones said. “We have got to get it from our midfield players and even our defenders.”
Alexandersson said junior Philip McQuitty and sophomores Jopus Grevelink and Angel Valencia could be those players in the upcoming season, adding that he thinks they will do a “great job filling Tyler’s shoes.” That trio combined for just one goal last season, with the score coming from Valencia against Massachusetts in late October.
Valencia scored again Tuesday in the Colonials’ 2-0 win against Catholic University in exhibition play. Alexandersson scored the other GW goal.
The most explicit positional battle, like last year, is competition for the starting goaltending spot.
Last season, Jean-Pierre van der Merwe entered the season as the starting goalie, but Luke Farrell took van der Merwe’s spot for A-10 play after van der Merwe allowed 10 goals during one of the Colonials’ four-game losing streaks.
Farrell seemed like the answer to the team’s problems at first, giving up a single goal in his first three games, including contests against Dayton and Saint Louis. But he crumbled later in a crucial three-game losing stretch, allowing 2.33 goals per game.
Jones went back to van der Merwe for the pivotal final game of the year with the postseason on the line. While the South Africa native played well, he didn’t get any goal support in a 1-0 loss to La Salle. GW's opponents averaged 1.35 goals per game last season.
This year, juniors Jack Lopez and van der Merwe and senior Farrell will vie for the starting position. Van der Merwe started in the goal for the team’s exhibition opener, a 2-0 loss at Lehigh, and for Saturday’s exhibition match against James Madison.
The net isn’t the only place to find inter-squad competition, with a slew of rising sophomores and juniors as well as six talented freshmen competing for a spot on the lineup card.
“From what I’ve seen so far this season, there is a lot of competition for positions, and that’s good to see,” Alexandersson said. “Our overall depth and competitiveness within the team is going to make a big difference this season.”
Jones has yet to finalize his starters with less than a week until the Colonials’ season opener. Van der Merwe, Scott, Alexandersson, sophomore and A-10 Preseason All-Conference Second Team selection Tobi Adewole, junior transfer Oliver De Thier, senior Farhan Khan, sophomore Garrett Heine and junior Phillip McQuitty started against both Catholic and James Madison.
All that depth means Jones will look for every player to contribute, which will allow the team to move away from the go-to-scorer model.
“If I have got five guys who score six goals next season, we’ll probably have a good chance of [winning a conference championship],” Jones said. “If we have one guy who scores 15, we won’t.”
Pivotal games this season include GW’s home opener against unfamiliar foe Harvard University, conference home games Oct. 17 and 19 against La Salle and Saint Joseph’s, respectively, and the team’s season finale Nov. 9 against A-10 newcomer Davidson. The season officially begins Friday at 5 p.m. at American in the Colonials’ first game of the Kuykenstrong D.C. College Cup.”

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Importance
1
Staff Editorial: Corcoran merger promises bright future for GW's reputation
by The GW Hatchet

Aug 25, 2014
“Media Credit: Cartoon by Sophie McTear | Design Editor
If you thought you were attending a school that prioritizes political science and international affairs, think again.
In recent years, GW has looked to expand its reputation beyond one rooted in location and politics. While a banner that reads “In the White House or at GW, four years can change the course of history" is still emblazoned on Gelman Library's exterior, just across the street, a $275 million Science and Engineering Hall has risen out of the ground.
And now we've acquired an arts school.
In February, GW announced a merger with the Corcoran College of Art + Design. The parties inked a deal three months later, and this week, administrators dotted the i’s and crossed the t’s on the plans. We still must wait to see how a once-autonomous college will function as a part of the whole. But we’re starting to look forward to the day when the Corcoran is fully integrated with GW.
By all accounts, GW saved the Corcoran. The financially failing arts school had been operating on a deficit almost every year for the past 13 years, and it had little hope for survival unless a more stable institution intervened.
The agreement with GW was met with some resistance from Corcoran students, professors and alumni. Many are still concerned about what their place will be within GW and how the merger will change what it means to be a Corcoran graduate. But when you imagine GW with a Corcoran School of Art + Design five or ten years down the road, the picture isn’t so bad.
We will now be home to a prestigious art school, a state-of-the-art engineering and science research facility and the only public health school building in downtown D.C. – in addition to our already nationally recognized flagship programs.
But where does that leave Corcoran students? Officials have said the arts school will function much like the School of Media and Public Affairs, which is known for its exclusivity, distinguished faculty and classes that are restricted to students in the school’s majors. If the Corcoran functions in a similar way – with a separate application and courses restricted to majors – it can maintain its reputation and some autonomy.
Johns Hopkins University, where University President Steven Knapp once served as provost, can act as a model. The Peabody Institute became part of Johns Hopkins in 1986 and maintained its independence as a separate college.
Because of its affiliation with Johns Hopkins, “Peabody students are exposed to a liberal arts curriculum that is more expansive than those of other leading conservatories; likewise, Hopkins students have access to a world-class musical education and experience that they could not access at another university of such stature,” the Peabody website reads .
Corcoran and GW students will benefit from a comparable relationship, though the Corcoran will not be a separate arts conservatory like the Peabody. Corcoran students will now have access to everything our campus has to offer, from libraries and athletic facilities to academic and career services. For students at a school that was in the red for more than a decade, we hope it's a relief to know their options have vastly expanded.
In turn, we will have exposure to a richer artistic community. It seemed uncharacteristic for GW, not known for its arts education, to build the $33 million GW Museum , and we know students mocked the move. With the acquisition of the Corcoran, future arts initiatives will make a little more sense: GW is obviously trying to boost its arts reputation, as administrators have confirmed.
It’s a win-win situation. Though the Corcoran would be able to function on its own in an ideal world, the merger allows the institution to survive and evolve. It envelops the school into the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, which will be able to support it for years to come. And GW benefits because it can provide students with a more well-rounded education.
Some colleges pick two or three areas of expertise and devote their resources to them entirely. Eventually, one could argue, their reputations become centered around them. But there’s a reason we have general education requirements: You take several classes outside of your major so you can emerge from college with a breadth of knowledge.
By building a science and technology hub and taking over an arts school, GW is acting on that same principle. The University, which often gets pigeonholed by its geographic location, has decided it wants to diversify instead of just excelling at two or three things.
The editorial board is composed of Hatchet staff members and operates separately from the newsroom. This week’s piece was written by opinions editor Robin Jones Kerr and contributing opinions editor Sarah Blugis, based on discussions with managing director Justin Peligri, sports editor Sean Hurd, culture editor Emily Holland, copy editor Rachel Smilan-Goldstein and design editor Sophie McTear.”

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Importance
1
Catch up on summer news
by The GW Hatchet

Aug 21, 2014
“Media Credit: Sam Hardgrove | Hatchet Staff Photographer
The District's new streetcar system is in the final stages of construction and operators for the new line have already begun training.
From First Lady Michelle Obama’s surprise visit to the Smith Center to GW’s merger with the Corcoran, here are some of the biggest stories you might have missed over the summer.
GW launches $1 billion fundraising campaign
The University kicked off its $1 billion fundraising campaign in June, announcing that it had already pulled in $525 million during the first three years of a “quiet phase.” Momentum is building for the campaign that will help the University expand its financial aid pool and hire dozens of new professors: GW raised $191.3 million last year while growing its donor pool by 15 percent.
High-profile visitors appear on campus
Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo by Zach Montellaro | Hatchet Staff Photographer
First Lady Michelle Obama watched a Kastles tennis match at the Smith Center earlier in the summer.
Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton spoke in front of a sold-out Lisner Auditorium audience about her memoir "Hard Choices" in July. She discussed the Middle East, described some of her visits to more than 100 countries and hinted at a possible presidential bid.
In mid-July, First Lady Michelle Obama watched a Washington Kastles tennis match at the Smith Center.
Former Secretary of State and GW alumnus Colin Powell came to Lisner to talk about leadership and government the following month. He reflected on his early childhood in the Bronx and his time serving in the former President George W. Bush's administration.
GW’s debt pile grows
The University confirmed in July that its debt will reach $1.7 billion, an all-time high. GW will used new debt to lock in lower interest rates and cover campus construction projects.
Though two credit rating agencies that grade colleges’ financial health kept their top-tier marks for GW, experts have cautioned against taking on more debt.
Columbian College to absorb the Corcoran
GW’s merger with the Corcoran College of Art + Design moved forward this week after a D.C. Superior Court judge ruled that the Corcoran could make changes to its founding charter. Corcoran students will maintain their fall semester schedules but may eventually need to take general education requirements, like math and science courses, to graduate. GW will spend about $25 million on the initial phase of renovations to the Corcoran's building on 17th Street, though University President Steven Knapp said in July the costs could reach $80 million.
D.C.’s transportation infrastructure grows
The first phase of Metro’s long-awaited Silver Line opened to the public July 26. The new line passes through Foggy Bottom, stretching from Reston, Va. to Largo Town Center. It allows GW to cut down shuttle services to the Virginia Science and Technology Campus by about 10 miles.
Meanwhile, the District’s new streetcar system, which will stretch about 2.5 miles from Union Station to Benning Road in Southeast D.C. is in the final stages of construction, and operator training began this month. The D.C. Department of Transportation hopes to build a 37-mile system of streetcars across the city by 2030.
GW students clinch title as most politically active again
The University held onto its crown as the “most politically active” college in the country for the second year in a row. In the Princeton Review’s annual list, which it published in early August, neighboring schools Georgetown and American universities both fell six spots in the same category to No. 9 and No. 10, respectively. GW also earned recognition for dorm quality, city life and study abroad programs.
University appoints two new deans
GW filled two vacant deanships this summer, tapping Blake D. Morant to lead the GW Law School and former Pepperdine University business school dean Linda Livingstone to steer the School of Business.
Marvin Center to house student health offices
Media Credit: Erica Christian | Photo Editor
GW-branded items have been moved to a store on Pennsylvania Avenue.
The bookstore is preparing for a major shuffle as GW makes space in the Marvin Center for a new student health hub that will be home to the University Counseling Center, Student Health Service and the Center for Alcohol and other Drug Education. GW-branded merchandise will move to a store on Pennsylvania Avenue, while textbooks will remain in the Marvin Center.
Fraternities receive sanctions for conduct violations
Social fraternities Kappa Alpha and Pi Kappa Phi landed on the University's list of student organizations facing sanctions this summer for reports of hazing and underage drinking. They joined a the list that already includes 15 other Greek-letter organizations.”

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Importance
1
Sifting through GW's hundreds of student groups: picks from food to art to service
by The GW Hatchet

Aug 21, 2014
“Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo by Sam Hardgrove | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Tired of J Street? There are several clubs that get you out of the dining hall and into the D.C. food scene.
Finding time to navigate GW’s list of more than 400 student groups can seem overwhelming, and sorting through all the fliers you grabbed at the student organization fair can be even more daunting. Take a look at this guide to some of the University’s most intriguing groups, both old and new, with an option for every interest.
Food
GW Dining Out Club
Whether you’re a freshman looking for an introduction to the District’s restaurant scene or an upperclassman trying to better utilize your kitchen, the GW Dining Out Club offers opportunities for testing culinary adventures beyond Foggy Bottom. Group activities include taste-testing at trendy restaurants across the city and attending food festivals like Truckeroo, while individual members also host cooking lessons.
GW Whiners and Diners
If you’re always the first of your friends to post a review of last night’s dinner on Yelp or have an inexplicable instinct for discovering unknown restaurants, this group is for you. Established last fall, the club reviews both well-known and off-the-beaten-path eateries in the form of blog posts, Twitter updates and photo diaries.
Arts
Quill and Key
Formed in spring 2013, Quill and Key provides a social environment for tepid writers to share their work. To achieve its goal of “socializing” the creative writing process, the organization hosts writing sessions, assigns “writing buddies” to critique each other’s drafts and participates in events like National Novel Writing Month. The club also has a Tumblr page, where members post gifs, short prose and encouraging quotes about writing.
Visiting Artists and Scholars Committee
This group welcomes undergraduate fine arts and art history majors as well as master's students to help organize on-campus lectures by artists and scholars from across the country. Last year’s lectures delved into topics like indigenous languages, Roman wall painting and Afghan art, with speakers ranging from local professors to sculptors and art scholars. While admission to the student organization is restricted by major, all the lectures that the group plans are free and open to the public.
Community Service
Food Recovery Network
The Food Recovery Network’s GW chapter joins the effort to minimize food waste at colleges nationwide by recovering surplus food from J Street. Every Friday, members make a “recovery run” to the campus dining hall, where they collect extra food to donate to local homeless shelters. Since its first run in April 2013, the chapter has recovered almost 600 pounds of food, and aims to eventually eliminate all food waste from the University.
Serve Your City GWU
As a member of Serve Your City GWU, you’ll tutor at-risk students in subjects such as reading, technology and nutrition, aiming to empower and inspire D.C. youth through education. The group also organizes sports programs, pool parties and even scholarship opportunities for local low-income students. With a wide range of subjects, Serve Your City gives students the opportunity to focus on their own interests while helping the community.
Performance and Dance
GW Spoken Word Collective
Founded in the spring, the GW Spoken Word Collective is comprised of poets who are interested in creating a supportive environment for fellow performers. As the first spoken-word-focused organization at GW, the group hosts campus-wide workshops, open-mic nights and poetry showcases. The group's leaders have scheduled their first general interest meeting for Sept. 3. Look out also for a spoken-word workshop Sept. 16, co-hosted by Split This Rock, the nonprofit organization that sponsors the D.C. youth slam team.
XOLA: Afro-Caribbean Dance Team
This dance team, established last fall, raises cultural awareness of African and Caribbean dance styles through performance art. Not only does the group perform, but it also teaches audience members about the techniques and costumes that make up the show. Whether you’re an experienced dancer or just a beginner, check out XOLA for a new perspective on dance.”

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Importance
1
Handover of University's $1.4 billion investment portfolio pushed to this fall
by The GW Hatchet

Jul 04, 2014
“Updated: July 3, 2014 at 1:28 p.m.
The University will take at least another four months to find an outside company to manage its $1.4 billion endowment, prolonging the breakup of GW’s investment office.
The delay comes after University spokeswoman Candace Smith had said GW would cut seven positions and transition a firm in time for the start of the new fiscal year, which starts Tuesday. Smith said the University will begin asking companies to pitch themselves to officials within the next “several weeks,” and make a decision by late October.
“The bottom line is it is going to take as long as it takes, and we don't anticipate the timing will have an impact,” Smith said. “We are doing our due diligence, and the office is being managed until a firm is selected.”
Universities often take their time choosing an outsourcing firm to ensure they protect their financial reputations, said Ken Redd, the director of research and policy analysis at the National Association of College and University Business Officers.
“The penalty of being wrong is the financial penalty of break-up fees and then the emotional cost of doing another request for proposal and having to devote more staff time,” Redd said.
GW’s move, announced in March, makes the University one of the richest schools to take apart its investment office and the only among its 14 peer institutions . The University has also recently hired outside firms to handle services like internal auditing, food service, mail service and facilities upkeep.
Investments grew by 9 percent overall last year, falling behind many competitor schools. The bulk of returns came from GW’s large real estate portfolio , which the investment office does not control.
Executive Vice President and Treasurer Lou Katz said Donald Lindsey, the University's chief investment officer who has 26 years of experience managing endowments, will continue to work in the investment office until GW chooses a firm.
“We value his leadership, and his knowledge of the investment industry will help to ensure a smooth transition," Katz said.
Lindsey said the University has long considered outsourcing, which means it will join a wave of schools that have decided to hand its nest egg to an outside company.
Four years ago, just 1 percent of colleges and universities with endowments of at least $1 billion had outsourced their portfolio management. That figure is now more than 10 percent, according to data from the National Association of College and University Business Officials.
“I am committed to ensuring that we identify a firm that will be the best fit for the University’s long-term future," Lindsey said.
Alice Handy, founder of the firm Investure, said she wouldn't be surprised if GW's search extended beyond October.
“You’re picking an office and a chief investment officer, and those things take a long time to get right,” said Handy, also the former chief investment officer at the University of Virginia.
She said Investure, which manages endowment portfolios at Trinity University, the University of Tulsa and Middlebury, Barnard, Dickinson and Smith colleges, has not been approached by GW.
Though outsourcing sometimes takes up to a year to complete, the wait can pay off, Handy said. Schools that outsource often see benefits like less staff turnover and more stability – important features for a group overseeing an institution’s financial foundation.
GW’s investment office faced scrutiny over the last year after its former director of operations and risk claimed she was fired for blowing the whistle on flawed financial reporting that she had seen in the office.
The office also had a 33 percent turnover rate in the last year, which put strains on the office to hire and train new investment managers.
“With an endowment the size of GW’s, there’s the thought that if you have a good CIO, they may leave for a bigger opportunity,” Handy said. “Now you’ll have a stable group that can manage it.”
Keith Baum, the managing director of the foundations and endowments group at the Minneapolis-based outsourcing firm Abbot Downing, said the launch of GW’s $1 billion fundraising campaign could have slowed the search for a firm.
“A $1 billion campaign and making sure it’s on the right track and choosing an investment manager are two very large tasks. Those two things together are a lot of work," he said.
Before creating its investment office 11 years ago, GW outsourced to management firm CommonFund, which did not return repeated requests for comment. Financial services firm TIAA-CREF declined to comment about whether it had been contacted by the University, though it is a service provider for GW's defined contribution retirement plan.
This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that TIAA-CREF managed part of GW's endowment. The firm is actually a service provider for the University's defined contribution retirement plan. We regret this error.”

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Importance
1
Handover of University's $1.4 billion investment portfolio pushed to this fall
by The GW Hatchet

Jul 01, 2014
“The University will take at least another four months to find an outside company to manage its $1.4 billion endowment, prolonging the breakup of GW’s investment office.
The delay comes after University spokeswoman Candace Smith had said GW would cut seven positions and transition a firm in time for the start of the new fiscal year, which starts Tuesday. Smith said the University will begin asking companies to pitch themselves to officials within the next “several weeks,” and make a decision by late October.
“The bottom line is it is going to take as long as it takes, and we don't anticipate the timing will have an impact,” Smith said. “We are doing our due diligence, and the office is being managed until a firm is selected.”
Universities often take their time choosing an outsourcing firm to ensure they protect their financial reputations, said Ken Redd, the director of research and policy analysis at the National Association of College and University Business Officers.
“The penalty of being wrong is the financial penalty of break-up fees and then the emotional cost of doing another request for proposal and having to devote more staff time,” Redd said.
GW’s move, announced in March, makes the University one of the richest schools to take apart its investment office and the only among its 14 peer institutions . The University has also recently hired outside firms to handle services like internal auditing, food service, mail service and facilities upkeep.
Investments grew by 9 percent overall last year, falling behind many competitor schools. The bulk of returns came from GW’s large real estate portfolio , which the investment office does not control.
Alice Handy, founder of the firm Investure, said she wouldn't be surprised if GW's search extended beyond October.
“You’re picking an office and a chief investment officer, and those things take a long time to get right,” said Handy, also the former chief investment officer at the University of Virginia.
She said Investure, which manages endowment portfolios at Trinity University, the University of Tulsa and Middlebury, Barnard, Dickinson and Smith colleges, has not been approached by GW.
Though outsourcing sometimes takes up to a year to complete, the wait can pay off, Handy said. Schools that outsource often see benefits like less staff turnover and more stability – important features for a group overseeing an institution’s financial foundation.
GW’s investment office faced scrutiny over the last year after its former director of operations and risk claimed she was fired for blowing the whistle on flawed financial reporting that she had seen in the office.
The office also had a 33 percent turnover rate in the last year, which put strains on the office to hire and train new investment managers.
“With an endowment the size of GW’s, there’s the thought that if you have a good CIO, they may leave for a bigger opportunity,” Handy said. “Now you’ll have a stable group that can manage it.”
Keith Baum, the managing director of the foundations and endowments group at the Minneapolis-based outsourcing firm Abbot Downing, said the launch of GW’s $1 billion fundraising campaign could have slowed the search for a firm.
“A $1 billion campaign and making sure it’s on the right track and choosing an investment manager are two very large tasks. Those two things together are a lot of work," he said.
Before creating its investment office 11 years ago, GW outsourced to management firm CommonFund, which did not return repeated requests for comment. Financial services firm TIAA-CREF declined to comment about whether it had been contacted by the University, though it now manages a part of GW's endowment.”

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Importance
1
Davidson College will look to rebuild in A-10
by The GW Hatchet

Jun 11, 2014
“Davidson College is on its way out of the Southern Conference and will officially join the Atlantic 10 as the conference’s 14th school on July 1. Here’s what to expect from the private liberal arts college in North Carolina.
Mascot: Will E. Wildcat
Number of Division I sports: 21
School colors: Red and Black
Notable former students: Both President Woodrow Wilson and NBA player Stephen Curry attended Davidson, though neither graduated.
The construction of a $15 million athletic center will soon begin, with plans for two practice courts for men's and women's basketball, and volleyball. Additionally, the space will include coaches' offices, locker rooms, team rooms and film rooms for men's and women's basketball.
The men’s basketball team, under the leadership of head coach Lefty Driesell, was ranked No. 1 at the start of the 1964-65 season, marking the golden age of the program’s history. The team made the Elite Eight in the 2008 NCAA tournament, riding on the shooting of now-Golden State Warriors star point guard Stephen Curry, before losing to the eventual champion Kansas.
Davidson went 20-13 last season and lost in the first round of the National Invitational Tournament.”

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Importance
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What you need to know about D.C. politics
by The GW Hatchet

Jun 10, 2014
“Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo by Desiree Halpern | Senior Staff Photographer
D.C. Council member Muriel Bowser won the April Democratic primary with 44 percent of the vote. She'll face off against Council member David Catania, an independent, in November.
The benefit of starting your GW career during a midterm election year? Not only will you have a chance to campaign for candidates with some of the most politically active College Democrats and College Republicans chapters in the nation, but you will also witness a D.C. mayoral race.
District politics have been marred by scandals, from crack use to tax evasion to campaign finance fraud, and it is sometimes easy to forget that these characters also run the city.
Intrigued? Here are the top six people and bodies you need to know before starting classes in Foggy Bottom.
1. D.C. Council
The D.C. Council is the city’s legislative body, made up of eight representatives from each ward plus five at-large members. Because D.C. is a federal district rather than a state, every piece of legislation the Council passes and the mayor signs has to go to Congress for approval. In the past year, Council members have voted to decriminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana, though that move has come under scrutiny in Congress and has yet to go into effect. The Council also passed a bill to raise the minimum wage at large retailers from $8.25 to $12.50 an hour, a measure the mayor later vetoed.
2. Vincent Gray
D.C.’s lame duck mayor is an alumnus who has held office since January 2011. Gray, 71, lost his re-election bid to Muriel Bowser in the Democratic primary in April amid allegations that he accepted illegal contributions to his 2010 campaign. Businessman Jeffrey Thompson pleaded guilty in March to illegally funneling more than $660,000 into Gray’s campaign, but the mayor denies any knowledge of the shadow campaign. As a student, Gray was a member of the Jewish fraternity Tau Epsilon Phi and was involved in the GW Newman Center.
3. Muriel Bowser
Muriel Bowser, 41, represents Ward 4 on the Council and is the Democratic nominee for mayor. She defeated incumbent Gray and seven other candidates in April, and is preparing for the general election in November. Her campaign is focusing on homelessness, education and income inequality.
4. David Catania
David Catania, 46, is an independent candidate for mayor. He is openly gay, a former Republican and now serves as an at-large Council member. He chairs the Council’s education committee and has made education reform the center of his campaign. He faces the challenge of convincing D.C. voters that he should be the top executive in a city that has only ever elected Democrats to the office. Aside from minor, third-party candidates, Catania is Bowser’s only other contender. The Republican Party has yet to name a candidate.
5. Jack Evans
Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo by Desiree Halpern
Jack Evans has represented Ward 2 for more than two decades on the D.C. Council.
GW falls right in the center of Ward 2, which long-serving D.C. Council member Jack Evans represents. Evans, 60, ran in the Democratic mayoral primary in April. In his second mayoral bid he won 5 percent of the vote , competing against seven other candidates. The finance and revenue committee chair focused on infrastructure and economic development in his bid. Evans is one of the most active supporters of a proposal to build a new soccer stadium for D.C. United. He also works as a lawyer for the Patton Boggs law firm in Georgetown, allowing him to earn more money than most other Council members.
6. Eleanor Holmes Norton
Eleanor Holmes Norton is the District's non-voting representative in Congress. A 76-year-old native Washingtonian, she has served in her post for more than 23 years. She sits on the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform and the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure. During her tenure, she has advocated for giving D.C. a vote in Congress, and has also fought to make the District the 51st state. Norton is up for re-election this November.”

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1
Teens take the stage in D.C. slam poetry scene
by The GW Hatchet

May 22, 2014
“Media Credit: Tatiana Cirisano | Hatchet Staff Photographer
2Deep, a slam poet, often mentors teens when she isn't performing or hosting open mic and slam poetry events around the District. Tatiana Cirisano | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Updated: May 22, 2014 at 11:21 a.m.
After her long career in slam poetry – kickstarting the Busboys and Poets team in 2008 and hosting weekly open mic nights – “2Deep” is now finding inspiration from a younger crowd.
2Deep, who requested that she only be identified by her stage name to keep her slam poetry interests separate from her day job, said verses written by younger poets have started to inspire her more than those of adults.
“I love the people that are my peers, but there’s something about the truth in the youth," she said. "They don’t sugar coat it in anything, they don’t do well with metaphors, they’re like, ‘Here’s the bluntness of it all.'"
It’s a scene that's spread across social media: Poems like Neil Hilborn’s “ OCD ” and Mark Grist’s “ Girls Who Read ” have more than 7.5 and 3.2 million views, respectively, on YouTube after a year of making rounds on Upworthy and Facebook.
But slam poetry, and youth slam poetry in particular, was not always popular. When Youth Speaks Inc., a national organization that aims to give young people a voice in social issues, hosted the first youth slam competition in 1997, only 43 poets competed. Now, 500 students from 50 cities participate in the Brave New Voices national competition every year.
2Deep said since she left the D.C. slam team in 2009, she has most enjoyed the opportunity to mentor budding poets.
For instance, 2Deep said she is often taken aback by the lines of 17-year-old Eve Smith writes, pointing to a poem stylized as a letter to Rihanna that reads, “Sticks and stones may break my bones, but a backhand makes me submissive.”
“I was like ‘Why didn’t I think of that?'” 2Deep said.
The D.C. Youth Slam Team, supported by national nonprofit Split This Rock, is open to anyone enrolled in a D.C. middle school or high school.
Youth programs coordinator and coach Jonathan Tucker said he focuses more on skill and the sense of activism behind the poems than on the number of competitions his team wins, but the D.C. group is known for its prowess, earning second place at the Brave New Voices youth slam festival last year.
With slam teams at 20 high schools in the area, Tucker hopes poetry will help students become more involved in local issues, tackling somewhat taboo topics like discrimination, poverty and politics through spoken word.
“Just like every high school has a basketball team that competes, I want every high school to have a poetry team that competes,” Tucker said.
The goal, he said, is to empower young people through performance.
Tucker said stereotypes of angry, yelling poets can mischaracterize the spoken-word genre and hold back some students from getting involved.
“The popular depictions are not always accurate,” he said. “Just go out and experience it in the city. There’s tons of slam events every week for you to see.”
Many open mics or larger slam competitions have circulated online, with the Huffington Post picking up D.C. Youth Slam Team feminist poem .
2Deep said she sees a similar trend of openness and activism on colleges campuses across the city.
“I notice that the college students, just like the younger kids, haven’t been tainted by the world yet,” 2Deep said. “So they are the key to a lot of the answers that a lot of the adult problems complain about, but never fix. And I notice that the college kids always have the answer.”
Many schools already have slam or spoken-word teams, like American University’s Mightier Than Swords, University of Maryland’s Terpoets and GW’s Spoken Word Collective, which formed this spring.
Robyn Di Giacinto, a rising sophomore and the president of the Spoken Word Collective , said she hopes the organization will grow on campus and give students not only a platform to voice their opinions but also learn the skills necessary to become spoken word poets.
The group, though still in its early stages, will host workshops and open mic nights in the fall to spur more student interest, Di Giacinto said.
"I think college students have a lot to say. It’s a time in our lives when we’re exploring things a lot and spoken word poetry is a great channel in which you can explore a lot of these burgeoning ideas," she said.
This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that Jonathan Tucker said stereotypes, like the idea that the stage is only open to black poets, sometimes prevents slam poetry groups from gaining popularity. He meant stereotypes of angry, yelling poets. We regret this error.”

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