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Clark University

Clark Campus News

Importance
1
Clark’s Mock Trial Team headed to sub-national tournament for third consecutive year
by News Releases – Clark News Hub
Jan 01, 2021
“Clark University’s Mock Trial Team is headed to the American Mock Trial Association Sub-National Tournament for the third year in a row; the team was awarded an automatic bid after their outstanding performance at the 2016 New Haven Regional Tournament at Yale University last month.
Two of Clark’s teams participated in the regional tournament.
Clark University Mock Trial Team A
Team A won the bid by achieving a 6-2 record, beating teams from Wesleyan, UMass-Amherst and the University of New Haven, only having lost to Yale.  McKenna Hunter ’17 won a Best Attorney Award and Ray Carville ’17 won a Best Witness Award.
Team B consisted of students who were competing in collegiate Mock Trial for the first time. This novice team earned a record of 2-6, faced tough teams from Wesleyan, UConn and Tufts, and beat a team from Connecticut College.
“The teams rose to the occasion at one of the most competitive regional tournaments in recent memory,” said Steven C. Kennedy ’88, a practicing attorney who teaches a trial advocacy course in the fall and coaches the Mock Trial teams in the spring. “These students earned their exemplary record through hard work and dedication.”
“Despite having a lot of people participating in Mock Trial for the first time, the team did exceptionally well,” said Co-captain Emily Art ’17.  “It goes to show that with lots of dedication and commitment, many of these first time mockers showed skill and poise that you would expect from a veteran.”
Clark University Mock Trial Team Captains McKenna Hunter ’17 (left) and Emily Art ’17
Co-captain McKenna Hunter ’17 said the late-night practices, re-writes, and time spent bonding allowed the team to “grow competitively” and perform well against top teams.
Teams that will be competing at the upcoming sub-national tournament include Yale, Harvard, Brown, Columbia, Boston University, Boston College, Brandeis, Tufts, Williams, Wesleyan, The College of the Holy Cross, Fordham, Vermont, St. John’s, and Delaware.
The Mock Trial program is part of Clark’s Law & Society Program.
“We are all very proud of our Mock Trial students,” said Political Science Professor Mark Miller, who is director of the program. “They all worked very hard for the competition.”
In Mock Trial, teams of students analyze and study a legal case during the course of the academic year.  The students assume roles of attorneys and witnesses in a trial and engage in trial simulations in competition with teams from other colleges and universities.  At a tournament, students are evaluated by a panel of actual attorneys and judges whose scores determine which teams and individuals gave the best performances.
Clark University Mock Trial Team B poses with Coach Steven C. Kennedy ’88 (front row, far right)
Students who make up Clark’s 2016 Mock Trial team rosters include:
Team A: McKenna Hunter ’17 (captain), Emily Art ’17 (captain), Mike Spanos ’17, Ray Carville ’17, Sarah Maloney ’17, Ari Sutcliffe ’18, Juliet Michaelsen ’19 and Tauren Nelson ’19 (missing from photo)
Team B (all are members of the Class of 2019): Greg Jones (captain), Joanna Hamilton (captain), Derek Michaud, Jeremy Hirson-Sagalyn, Salma Shawa, Yenifer Cabreja and Rachael Chen
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge convention. Change our world.
www.clarku.edu
–Angela M. Bazydlo, associate director of media relations”

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Importance
1
Sen. Warren urges every child be given ‘a fighting chance to succeed’
by News Releases – Clark News Hub
Jan 01, 2021
“U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren addresses the crowd as she gives the Lee Gurel ’48 Lecture at Clark. / Photo: Matthew Healey
It was not a religious revival, but Sen. Elizabeth Warren did request one “amen” from the podium in Clark University ’s Atwood Hall. Recalling the Supreme Court’s historic decision ending school segregation Brown v. The Board of Education, she cited Justice Earl Warren, who observed that a public school education “is a right that must be made available to all on equal terms.”
“Can I get an ‘amen’ on that?” Warren asked the audience, which responded with an ovation.
U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren poses for a photo with Lee Gurel ’48, prior to the Senator giving the 2016 Gurel Lecture. / Photo: Matthew Healey
Warren delivered the sixth annual Lee Gurel ’48 Lecture on March 14, emphasizing the federal government’s vital role in ensuring that when it comes to public education every child should get “a real opportunity and a fighting chance to succeed.”
The lecture, and the subsequent Gurel Symposium on Education, were sponsored by the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise and MassINC.
By way of illustration Warren recalled the “The Problem We All Live With,” the famous painting by Norman Rockwell that depicts Ruby Bridges , a young African-American girl, walking into school past a wall marred with a racial epithet and a smashed tomato. She’s flanked by federal marshals, and the symbolism is clear, Warren said. Her right to an education was being protected — “The federal government was there for her.”
The message carries forward today. “Gateway” cities like Worcester, and other urban school districts, need a federal commitment to promote achievement, she said. The passage of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, Warren noted, was a significant improvement over No Child Left Behind, but one that required significant revisions to ensure federal authority over how the states use the money. She co-sponsored an amendment that gives added assistance to the 1,200 high schools in the U.S. from which fewer than two-thirds of the students graduate. Another amendment stiffens data-collection methodologies so that states are reporting more accurately.
The government also needs to crack down on “predatory” for-profit colleges that “suck down 20 percent of all federal aid and loan dollars” while being responsible for 40 percent of all loan defaults, Warren insisted.
She listed six things the government should, and can, do:
Offer a debt-free college option for all students
Fight back against resource inequality among schools, ensuring that students in urban schools have the same opportunities as students in suburban districts
Ensure children born in this country to undocumented parents receive an education equal to that of other children
Ensure black and Latino students aren’t disproportionally suspended and fed into the “school-to-prison pipeline”
See that black and Latino students aren’t disproportionally placed in special education classes
Guarantee that girls and boys have equal access to sports, science and math.
Warren began and ended her presentation by recounting her own journey in education, from her days playing school with her doll collection to the opportunities public school provided her to build a life and career. She insisted it’s the responsibility of the federal government to provide those same opportunities to today’s students “regardless of state, income or zip code.”
“These aren’t other people’s children,” she said. “These are our children.”
Afterward, in a room below Atwood, Warren fielded questions from the media. She declined to say if she preferred either Bernie Sanders or Hillary Clinton for president, and when asked if she would consider the vice president’s position, she replied that she loves the job she has.
More photo s from Sen. Warren’s visit and the Gurel Symposium on Education are online.
The education symposium led by Katerine Bielaczyc, director of the Hiatt Center for Urban Education and association professor of education at Clark University, brought together four experts to discuss the prospects for students in urban schools to gain a full complement of 21st-century skills that will serve them in the classroom and beyond. Participants were: Nick Donohue, president and CEO of the Nellie Mae Education Foundation ; Ronald Ferguson from the Kennedy School of Government and director of the Achievement Gap Initiative at Harvard University ; Dianne Kelly, superintendent of Revere (Mass.) Public Schools ; and Gene Wilhoit, executive director of the National Center for Innovation in Education .
How schools will respond to the Every Student Succeeds Act has yet to be determined as they navigate the opportunities and challenges, the panelists said. Kelly said she liked the move away from high-stakes standardized testing, but observed that her schools continue to face significant challenges. She said the governor’s proposed budget leaves Gateway cities out in the cold when it comes to education funding, with massive layoffs looming if there isn’t an infusion of aid.
Other panelists questioned whether schools have the capacities to carry through on the promises laid out in the new law, especially if the historic nature of delivering an education remains unchanged. Donohue called for a dramatic shift in student engagement, away from “a 19th century model rooted in 17th-century ideals.” He’s looking for students to exhibit true mastery of a subject before advancing, and hopes for honest community conversations about the future of education, as well as about race and white privilege.
The jury is out on how states will respond to the issue of inadequate resourcing in certain school districts, Wilhoit said. We can’t continue to under-resource the most at-risk students and expect positive results, he said. But are those with more willing to give up something to better serve the neediest students? “Equity is not equal,” he said.
Ferguson talked about areas of concentrated poverty, where the schools are overwhelmed and left unstable by behavior problems. “The greatest inequality is access to an orderly classroom,” he said. “Time on task is one of the strongest predictors of learning.”
He urged more discourse about students’ life experiences, noting that children begin learning language in-utero and that by age 2 some kids can exhibit perceivable learning gaps. By the age of 5, when they’re starting school, they’re already struggling to catch up, he said.
— Jim Keogh, Assistant VP for Marketing and Communications”

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Importance
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Ben Bagdikian ’41 championed the public’s right to know
by News Releases – Clark News Hub
Jan 01, 2021
“Ben Bagdikian ’41, who died March 11 at the age of 96, enjoyed a storied career in journalism. He won the Pulitzer Prize, reported on prisons, poverty and civil rights, and defied the federal government by helping publish the Pentagon Papers, thus securing one of history’s greatest victories for freedom of the press.
Later he became an influential media critic — The New York Times described him as “a celebrated voice of conscience for his profession” — particularly in his seminal book, “The Media Monopoly.” In it he examined the role a handful of corporate media giants play in shaping and controlling the news for a mass audience.
Bagdikian’s journalistic legacy, not to mention his penchant for challenging authority, was rooted at Clark University. While editor of the student newspaper, then called The Clark News , he hit on the idea of changing the name to The Scarlet , in honor of the school color. As recalled by his longtime friend, Albert Southwick ’41, M.A. ’49, who was the newspaper’s managing editor, President Wallace Atwood objected to the change, believing the word “scarlet” would be too closely associated with the “red menace” of Communism.
“Atwood was suspicious, but Ben went ahead and did it anyway,” Southwick says. The first issue of The Scarlet was published on Nov. 3, 1939. (The run-ins with Atwood never dimmed Badgikian’s affection for the place. He was awarded an honorary degree in 1963 and served as a Clark trustee from 1964 to 1976.)
Bagdikian’s family fled the Armenian Genocide in Ottoman Turkey when he was a baby, settling in Massachusetts. According to Southwick, Bagdikian studied science at Clark, thinking he might pursue a career in biology. Shortly after graduation he was visiting a friend at the Springfield (Mass.) Morning Union newspaper when the editor informed him that the paper needed a reporter. He offered the job to Bagdikian, who accepted. The world had lost a biologist but gained a crusader.
After serving as an Air Force navigator in World War II, Bagdikian took a job with The Providence Journal, where he was part of a team that earned a Pulitzer for coverage of a bank robbery. He also traveled throughout the Deep South in the early 1960s for a series detailing the civil rights movement through the eyes of oppressed families. In later years he chronicled the ravages of poverty in the United States and investigated prison conditions by going undercover as a convicted murderer in a Pennsylvania maximum-security penitentiary.
His most celebrated work occurred during his tenure as national editor at The Washington Post . In his obituary , the Post recounts Bagdikian being summoned to Boston for a clandestine meeting with Daniel Ellsburg, the onetime defense analyst who was willing to hand over the so-called Pentagon Papers, a secret history of U.S. involvement in Vietnam ( The New York Times already had published excerpts but had been ordered to cease by a federal judge for national security reasons).
Bagdikian retrieved the documents from Ellsburg and delivered them to Editor Ben Bradlee. He was then among the editors and reporters who reviewed more than 4,000 pages and debated the consequences of publishing their sensitive contents.
“Mr. Bagdikian was one of the strongest voices in favor of publication,” the Post wrote, “arguing that the government could not use the cloak of ‘national security’ to limit what newspapers could print. He uttered a line that neatly summed up the principle involved: ‘The only way to assert the right to publish is to publish.’” The Post printed the documents, a decision that withstood a Supreme Court challenge.
Bagdikian often trained his reporter’s eye on the media, writing several books that were fiercely critical of the trends that he saw eroding best journalistic practices and ethics. He concluded his long career as dean of the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley. The New York Times recalled a lesson he would impart to his students at the outset of each course: “Never forget that your obligation is to the people. It is not, at heart, to those who pay you, or to your editor, or to your sources, or to your friends, or to the advancement of your career. It is to the public.”
His old friend Al Southwick puts it another way. “He always had a feel for the underdog.”
— Jim Keogh, Assistant VP for Marketing and Communications”

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Importance
1
‘Macbeth’ brought sound and fury to Atwood
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Feb 18, 2016
“Witches cursed, ghosts haunted, guilty hands were stained with stubborn blood, and once again, as he has on countless stages for almost 400 years, the murderous Macbeth met the fate he deserved.
It all took place in Shakespeare & Company’s 2016 touring production of “Macbeth” in Atwood Hall, Feb. 3-5. The performance was funded by the Margaret W. and Richard P. Traina Endowed Fund for Shakespeare and the Arts.
The cast consisted of six actors playing multiple roles, each character represented by a slight change in costume. At the end of each performance, the actors answered questions from the audience.
“Macbeth,” or, as it is known in theater circles, “the Scottish Play,” is fraught with superstition, the actors told the audience following the Feb. 4 performance. Legend has it that even saying the name “Macbeth” in a theater will bring bad luck upon a performance. Several of the Shakespeare & Company actors confessed to believing in the curse, though, as one acknowledged, “It is hard to avoid [saying the name] when doing the play.”
The actors described the challenges and fun they had playing multiple roles, noting the “interesting transitions” when quickly switching characters.
They also reflected on mastering Shakespearean dialogue. Kaileela Hobby, who played Lady Macbeth, said she had an easier time learning her lines because of the iambic pentameter — the rhythmic word pattern in which Shakespeare wrote. For Zoe Laiz, who played Lady Macduff, the key was in finding “the intention behind the words.”
One of the classic features of Macbeth is the appearance of the witches. The actors noted the witches’ costumes were a gauzy, sheer fabric draped over their bodies that allowed them freedom of movement and also helped inform the characters.
In addition to the three performances at Clark, the company also gave a free performance to more than 200 Worcester students from Claremont Academy and University Park Campus School.
— Kate Rafey ’08, M.P.A. ’09
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Importance
1
First-year students help shape Worcester’s public health efforts
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jan 27, 2016
“The Boston Globe reported this stark statistic last fall: Halfway through 2015, more than 4.5 times as many people in Massachusetts had died from opioid-related overdoses than from car crashes . By the end of the year, opioid-related deaths numbered over 1,200 , nearly a 400 percent increase since 2000 .
Now, with the help of Marianne Sarkis, Ph.D., and her First-Year Intensive (FYI) course, “Healthy Cities,” 15 Clark University students have learned much more about the opioid crisis – and have proposed steps to help Worcester combat the problem.
Marianne Sarkis, Ph.D., bottom row, far right, designed her “Healthy Cities” First-Year Intensive course so that her first-year students could gain real-world experience. Students researched two major public health issues — opioid abuse and sexual exploitation — and presented proposals before the Worcester Division of Public Health.
Required for all first-year Clark students, FYI courses give students the opportunity to take what they learn in class and apply it to real issues. And that’s just what Sarkis’ students did. Each of six student-run teams proposed solutions to address one of two urban health issues: opioid abuse and sexual exploitation. Community stakeholders – the city’s Division of Public Health and the Worcester Alliance Against Sexual Exploitation (WAASE) – commissioned the projects.
“I designed the class with a focus on quantitative reasoning and analytical skills, and I wanted the students to see that every piece of data tells a story,” said Sarkis, assistant professor of international development and social change . “A survivor of sexual exploitation and a public health outreach worker sat in on the class and advised students on their projects. The students heard the stories behind the data and theories. They saw how what they were doing in class could directly and almost immediately impact the community. It was a very powerful experience.”
After applying their “social justice lens,” the students “wove together a powerful narrative about urban health and health disparities,” she said. They presented their findings and recommendations to the Worcester Division of Public Health on Dec. 7.
To address Worcester’s opioid issues, Eric Keller ’19 and Elisabeth Wichser ’19 “mapped” the city’s heroin abuse so that health experts, city councilors and the public could understand the impact on various neighborhoods and demographic groups.
“I wanted the project to turn out well because it wasn’t just for a grade; it could actually influence policy decisions undertaken by the city of Worcester,” Keller said.
Research by one of his classmates, Keegan Daugherty ’19, already may be influencing city policy, in part because of her internship with Matilde Castiel, M.D., Worcester’s commissioner of health and human services.
Only two months into her first semester at Clark, Daugherty appeared before the newly empowered Board of Health at its first meeting on Oct. 22. She presented research and advocated for a needle-exchange program in Worcester.
Currently, yellow boxes are installed in parts of the city so that drug users can safely deposit used needles and syringes, but there is nowhere for them to obtain clean needles. Research shows that needle-exchange programs can decrease risky behaviors and transmission of HIV and hepatitis C, as well as connect drug users to counseling and treatment, Daugherty told health officials. Needle-exchange programs cost much less money than medical treatment for HIV and hepatitis C while further protecting general population health.
“It was incredible to see a college freshman make this presentation as she did,” Castiel said. “She has a passion for public health, and it shows.”
Using some of Daugherty’s data, city health officials presented before City Council in November. Councilors subsequently gave the board and the Division of Public Health the go-ahead to consider a needle-exchange program as part of Worcester’s anti-opioid efforts.
Daugherty also conducted research on opioid abuse for Sarkis’ class, working with Kayleigh McHugh ’19. At the Dec. 7 presentation, they suggested a “holistic community-based approach” among schools, police, public health officials and hospitals that would include monthly progress meetings, data sharing and open forums for addicts and families. They even came up with a name: Worcester Opioid Addiction Coalition.
“I really enjoyed having the opportunity to work on a project that I believe will have an impact on the community,” Daugherty said. “I feel like the class came up with plans that will directly help with some of the more sizable issues that the city currently faces.”
Besides the student research on opioid abuse – which is proving useful in current citywide discussions – two additional “Healthy Cities” projects are progressing: a community outreach campaign and website redesign for the Worcester Alliance Against Sexual Exploitation and a proposed safe house for female survivors of sexual exploitation that is undergoing a feasibility study.
City and university officials extolled the students’ work.
Karyn E. Clark, director of the Worcester Division of Public Health , asked all six of Sarkis’ student teams to share their findings at an upcoming Board of Health meeting. “This is all very timely, and it is very helpful to the work we are doing,” Clark said.
Jim Gomes, J.D. , director of the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise at Clark, called the students’ efforts “outstanding.”
“These presentations and the work and analysis that went into them were even more impressive given that the students arrived at Clark just three months ago,” he said.
For Nancy Budwig, Ph.D. , associate provost and dean of research, the “Healthy Cities” FYI course is a great example of the kind of education that Clark students receive.
“This is far from the norm in higher education,” she said. “At Clark, student learning and faculty research come together in powerful ways and – as this seminar demonstrates – ways that impact the broader communities of which we are a part.”
– By Meredith Woodward King, associate director of content marketing at Clark University”

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Importance
1
Dual MBA grad’s Leafy Green Machine returns to its roots on Clark campus
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jan 22, 2016
“Brad McNamara, M.B.A./M.S. ’13, center, in front of Clark’s Leafy Green Machine with Heather Vaillette, district manager for Sodexo Campus Services and Michael Newmark, general manager of Clark Dining Services.
Clark University officially has its own farm.
There are no animals, no barn, not even soil. And yet it will supply a steady harvest of crops regardless of the season.
On Jan. 15, the University received delivery of a Freight Farm — a retrofitted shipping container housing a fully functional hydroponic farm known as the Leafy Green Machine. Parked behind the Lasry Center for Bioscience, the Freight Farm will provide Clark’s Dining Services with fresh lettuce — as many as 500 heads a week during peak times — 365 days a year, whether there’s two feet of snow on the ground or the thermometer is hitting three digits.
Inside the climate-controlled Freight Farm, which will be operational in a couple of weeks, are rows of “growing towers” in which seedlings are bathed in LED lighting that mimics sunlight and irrigated with nutrient-rich water. As many as 4,500 plants within the 320-square-foot trailer can be maintained and monitored remotely through a mobile app, deploying modern technology to the ancient art of cultivating food. It’s agronomy for a new age.
Freight Farms co-founder and Clark alum Brad McNamara M.B.A./M.S. ’13 discusses having a Leafy Green Machine installed at Clark, where the idea began.
Technically, this is not the first time a Leafy Green Machine has found a home on campus. CEO and co-founder Brad McNamara, M.B.A./M.S. (ES&P) ’13, incubated and launched Freight Farms while still a graduate student at Clark . With early support and guidance from Director of Sustainability Jenny Isler, he and partner Jon Friedman developed a prototype in the Maywood Street parking lot behind the Recycling Center. Few at the time knew the two men entering and exiting the nondescript trailer were creating a model for automated agriculture that would allow people to grow fresh vegetables and herbs in places where traditional farming is not feasible, like business settings, university campuses and especially urban neighborhoods where access to healthy food can be severely limited.
“I’m super excited to be back on campus,” said McNamara, who returned to Clark for the Jan. 15 installation. “Three blocks away is where Jon and I spent an inordinate amount of time inside a container — building, rebuilding, protoyping, doing it all to make a farm happen. And now the real thing is here, and it’s going to be feeding students at Clark. It’s a dream.”
Brad McNamara displays a typical product of a Leafy Green Machine.
And that dream, like the rows of hearty greens inside those vertical towers, is thriving. According to a recent Associate Press story, Freight Farms has sold 54 Leafy Green Machines throughout the country, including on Google’s campus in Mountain View, Calif. Michael Newmark, general manager of Clark Dining Services, says one of the University’s challenges was securing a container just as the demand for Freight Farms began to take off. He notes that the Freight Farm meets the University’s commitment to sustainability, efficiency and local sourcing, and given McNamara’s connection to Clark, “it was a no-brainer for us.”
Bringing the Freight Farm to Clark was a collaborative effort between the University and its food service vendor, Sodexo. Heather Vaillette, district manager for Sodexo Campus Services, saw the potential for Freight Farms when it was still in the prototype phase.
“I began talking to Brad about Freight Farms on a corporate level when he was a grad student and I’m extremely proud of the work he and his peers have done,” she says. “They have accomplished what others dream of but don’t always see through – creating an idea and turning it into a success and something that promotes a better tomorrow.”
Sodexo is supporting the project both in funding and execution, Vaillette notes. Team members worked for several months to ensure the Freight Farm met safety standards, and met with McNamara and his staff on logistics.
Clark is leasing the Freight Farm for eight months, at which time it will be determined if it is cost-neutral or a savings for the University.
“While there are many benefits to Clark by having a Freight Farm on site, it should also financially benefit the dining program by providing a significant volume of produce at a relatively low cost,” says Clark Business Manager Paul Wykes. “As the cost of food is a key component of the price of meal plans, savings from utilizing the freight farm will also benefit Clark students.”
While Dining Services initially will be employing its Leafy Green Machine to grow only lettuce, about the most widely consumed vegetable at Clark, eventually it will incorporate other plants. Options can include leafy greens like kale, cabbage and Swiss chard; and herbs like mint, basil and oregano.
Down the road, Wykes says, the Freight Farm can be used as a tool for Clark students to learn about such things as sustainable growing and food sourcing.
— Jim Keogh
 
 
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Importance
1
Clark undergrad a kung fu grand champion
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jan 01, 2016
“Among many definitions of the Chinese term kung fu is the rough translation “skill achieved through hard work.” Clark University first-year student Cheyenne R. Lachapelle, of Worcester, is just beginning to prove how far her hard work and passion for this challenging martial art will take her.
In October, Lachapelle ’19 defended her title at the 5th Annual New England Chinese Martial Arts Championship, where she won the 2015 Traditional Northern Women’s Grand Championship.
Lachapelle has been involved with kung fu since age 3 and earned her black sash at age 12. She also participates in tai chi and Chinese Lion dance. She practices at Shaolin Kung Fu Centers in Worcester, where she is known as Sije (“older sister”) Cheyenne and grew up learning from peers and her father, Sifu (“teacher”) Gary Lachapelle.
Like the art of kung fu, Clark University has played a large role in Lachapelle’s life, she says. “I
Cheyenne Lachapelle ’19 recently defended her Grand Champion title in kung fu at the 5th Annual New England Chinese Martial Arts Championship.
grew up behind Clark for about eight years of my life. Even after I moved out of the neighborhood, I was often at Clark for demonstrations for my kung fu school, to listen in on a family friend’s thesis, and was present to take my AP tests in the Jonas Clark building. I’ve always personally loved the vibe of the campus and the convenience of being so close to home.”
The physical demands of kung fu have not only helped Lachapelle stay fit and capable of self-defense, she says, “but it was also a mentally straining art. The multiple lessons on discipline, respect and courtesy as I was growing up in and out of the kung fu classes has built my outgoing social skills. The consistent physical activity has built my memory skills and also kept my time management up to par.”
Lachapelle stresses that “anyone can do martial arts. It’s nothing like, oh, ‘this specific body type’ or ‘only men can do martial arts because they’re more physically capable.’ Not at all the case. … At Clark, there’s so much acceptance for that divergence, and it’s great to see. .. Whatever you want to do – it doesn’t matter who you are – they inspire you to do it, and that’s what I love.”
Cheyenne Lachapelle: “I was often at Clark for demonstrations for my kung fu school, to listen in on a family friend’s thesis, and was present to take my AP tests in the Jonas Clark building. I’ve always personally loved the vibe of the campus and the convenience of being so close to home.”
Lachapelle adds, “Martial arts taught me the proper solutions to solve conflicts through self defense as well as the proper social speech skills to prevent any further conflicts. But, in a more basic sense, it has kept me busy. It kept me focused, diligent and essentially out of any trouble …”
At Clark University, Lachapelle majors in biology and is a recipient of the Traina Scholarship. Her excellence in martial arts and academics also garnered scholarship support from the Helen Gee Chin Scholarship Foundation . Lachapelle’s extra-curricular interests include the student-led Salsa Club, Science-Fiction People of Clark, and the Association of Martial Arts Club.
Lachapelle is a 2015 graduate of South High Community School in Worcester.
 
Read “ Worcester teen set to defend world kung fu title ” (Worcester Telegram & Gazette)
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge Convention. Change Our World.
www.clarku.edu
 ”

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Importance
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Clark University team takes 3rd in high-intensity Fed Challenge economics contest
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Dec 01, 2015
“The Clark University team captured third place in the 2015 Boston Regional College Fed Challenge, an “intensely competitive” contest held at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston (Nov. 6). Pictured, from left, are Jorge Galvez Rodriguez, Rahul Dutt, Associate Professor of Economics David Cuberes, Doga Bilgin, Roei Shimony, and Assistant Professor of Economics Chang Hong.
A team of Clark University seniors captured third place in the 2015 Boston Regional College Fed Challenge , an annual competition held at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston , on Nov. 6.
The Fed Challenge competition asks teams to present monetary policy recommendations regarding interest rates and to answer questions before a panel of judges comprising economists at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
Clark’s participation in the Fed Challenge reflects the Economics Department’s “effective practice” opportunities in correlation with the University’s Liberal Education and Effective Practice (LEEP) higher education model, and also is linked to the course “Money and Banking” taught by Associate Professor of Economics David Cuberes .
The Clark team placed third, behind Bentley University (first place) and Harvard College. Twenty-five teams competed, including undergraduates from Harvard University, Dartmouth University, Tufts University, Boston University, Boston College, Brown University, University of Connecticut and others.
“This is an amazing opportunity for our undergraduate students. It offers them the chance to work on a very serious research project for several months and then share their ideas in front of a very demanding – sometimes even intimidating – audience. It is also a big plus in their resumes. I strongly encourage future students to take part.” ~ Prof. David Cuberes
Clark’s Fed Challenge team members include Clark seniors Doga Bilgin , Rahul Dutt , Roei Shimony and Jorge Galvez Rodriguez , under the mentorship of David Cuberes, Associate Professor of Economics and the assistance of Chang Hong , Assistant Professor of Economics. The department has participated in the challenge every year since 2008, improving in place each year. The completion consists of two rounds. In the morning round, the 25 teams compete in groups of five and only the best team in every group qualifies to the afternoon round. Remarkably, this is the first time the Clark team progressed to the second round, competing against top universities like Boston University.
“I can say that the Fed Challenge was a great experience, that helped me develop my research skills as well as learn more about the economy as a whole, and was great to finally put all of my economic knowledge into a real world experience,” Galvez Rodriguez said. “Being able to be under such pressure really forces you to adapt to the situation and think outside the box. All in all, it was a great experience with the best teammates I could have possibly asked for, and I’m more than glad I participated in it.”
“To apply the theories we learn in class to evaluate economic situations in real-time was a welcome challenge. Competing against other excellent universities and having our work recognized was one of my most rewarding experiences at Clark.” – Doga Bilgin ’16
“The Fed Challenge is an intensely competitive contest,” said Hong. “It requires solid macroeconomic theory foundation, close attention to the latest economic situation in real life, in-depth knowledge about decision-making process of the Federal Reserve, eloquent and professional presentation skills, and quick response ability to fluently and effectively address difficult questions from judges.”
Bentley’s winning team will face other competing districts at the Board of Governors in Washington, D.C., Dec. 2.
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge Convention. Change Our World.
www.clarku.edu”

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Research smokes out facts on tobacco use
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Nov 24, 2015
“The American Cancer Society launched the Great American Smokeout in 1977 as a way to encourage millions of Americans to put down their cigarettes, cigars and pipes for 24 hours in recognition of the dangers of their habit. Held on the third Thursday of each November, the event promotes the singular message: Quit. Now.
Samantha Arsenault ’15 has never needed prompting to spread that same message. She grew up lecturing her father and grandmother, both of them smokers, about the dangers of cigarettes. It’s a topic that so galvanized her she wrote her college essay about tobacco use.
At Clark, she has continued the crusade. Last year for her honors thesis, Arsenault conducted research that looked at demographic and socioeconomic factors of tobacco use among Worcester youth, ages 13-19, using data compiled by the city’s Division of Public Health, where she has worked since last summer. She also included a variable for risk-seeking behaviors, and included a comparison of the city to national data on youth tobacco use.
She found that Worcester parallels national trends, with only minor variations, and that certain high-risk groups should be targeted for tobacco-prevention efforts. Her conclusions:
In the Worcester region, White and Hispanic males display the highest prevalence and intensity of tobacco use. Prevention efforts should be put into place before grade 10, when the probability of trying tobacco products escalates.
Low socioeconomic-status individuals are a high-risk subpopulation for tobacco use. Future research on tobacco use among high school students should consider the percent of students on free or reduced lunch as an indicator of socioeconomic status, as well as data on household size.
Risk-seeking individuals have a significantly higher prevalence and intensity of tobacco use than risk-averse individuals. Therefore, interventions should focus on decreasing overall risk-seeking behavior, possibly through increasing perceptions of self-worth and being aware of other contributing factors like mental health and social capital.
“You can’t just tell young people that smoking is bad because that’s not going to change what they’re doing,” Arsenault says. “It’s important to get at why they are risk-seeking and how we can address that behavior.” This type of intervention, she notes, may do more than decrease tobacco use: It could also be applied to other risky behaviors like drug use or even the non-use of a seatbelt.
Arsenault says her thesis advisor, professor of economics John Brown, “pushes students farther” than they expect to nail down their research. “We’ll come to him totally satisfied with our project and he’ll say, ‘Now learn how to run this other model,’” she says. She also received encouragement and assistance from Ph.D. students in the economics lab, who were happy to answer questions and offer their expertise.
Arsenault, who is pursuing her master’s at Clark in community development and planning, is working at the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise alongside director Jim Gomes and John O’Brien, the Jane and William Mosakowski Distinguished Professor of Higher Education, to help coordinate the Academic Health Department. The partnership between the University and the Worcester Division of Public Health seeks to improve health outcomes among the city’s most vulnerable populations.
“This has allowed me to continue to work closely with the DPH and foster growing partnerships with UMass Memorial and Worcester State,” she says. Arsenault placed two Clark students at the DPH for academic internships last academic year and helped coordinate the summer internship program.
Not surprisingly, Arsenault is planning a career in public health, and is now conducting research that examines the effects of childhood trauma on criminal activity, gang involvement, and violence in Worcester. She also remains vigilant about tobacco and its offshoot, e-cigarettes, which are touted as a healthier alternative, but which, Arsenault notes, are unregulated, loaded with nicotine, and marketed to children — an emerging threat to community wellness.”

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Clark LEEP Fellow, art history professor help Worcester Art Museum prepare for Olmec Star God exhibit
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Nov 06, 2015
“Clark University senior Elisabeth “Zizi” Spak recently completed a project for the Worcester Art Museum (WAM) , “Jeppson Idea Lab: Statuette of an Olmec Figure,” which was funded through Clark’s Liberal Education and Effective Practice (LEEP) initiative .
Spak presented a poster about her LEEP Project at Fall Fest
Spak’s LEEP project was to help prepare an upcoming exhibit, The Jeppson Idea Lab: Olmec Incised Standing Figure , in a section of the museum dedicated to showcasing single objects from the permanent collection. John Garton , associate professor of art history , is curating this exhibit on the stone Olmec figurine from Mesoamerica’s earliest flourishing culture. Professor Garton served as Spak’s faculty adviser.
Spak helped generate ideas and formulate content for the iPad display for the exhibit, which will be on display in the Jeppson Idea Lab at WAM from November 14, 2015 to April 3, 2016. She researched the museum’s Pre-Colombian collection and wrote the copy for the instructional guide to the collection, ensuring it conformed to Massachusetts’ state curriculum frameworks. Her guides will be used by the Worcester Art Museum and posted on their website.
“Elisabeth worked with me to create an itinerary around the gallery—and has done a great job. Her research of both the Pre-Colombian collection and the Massachusetts’ state curricular frameworks has made this project highly useful to the museum, and because she has a keen eye for graphic design, the tools she helped produce are visually exciting,” said Professor Garton.
Professor Garton is interviewed for a video on the Olmec Star God exhibit
“This project required a great deal of research into fields that I ordinarily would not encounter. I had to decipher archeological journals and education frameworks to create a guide that would be straightforward and effective for younger audiences,” said Spak.
By photographing the Pre-Columbian exhibit at the WAM and designing how the guide is arranged, I was able to incorporate art and design into this project,” she said.
Liberal Education and Effective Practice (LEEP) is Clark’s bold effort to advance liberal education, linking a deep and integrated curriculum with opportunities to put knowledge into practice in order to prepare students for remarkable careers and purposeful, accomplished lives.
Now in its fourth year, LEEP projects have helped Clark University students pursue funded and directed problem-based summer projects. The projects—several of which are hosted by Clark alumni—offer real-world application of course material and provide an opportunity to engage with professionals outside of the University. LEEP Projects also enable students to develop marketable skills, and focus on characteristics the University refers to as LEEP Learning Outcomes .
Spak assists a film crew as they record the Olmec sculpture
This year, 122 undergraduates received funding through Clark’s LEEP initiative to pursue projects ranging from international social action initiatives to internships with leading corporations. LEEP Fellows are expected to devote approximately 150 hours to their LEEP Project and participate in workshops on professionalism and project management.  LEEP Fellows complete a written reflection upon completion of their experience and share results with the Clark community in one of the University’s annual undergraduate student research showcases .
Spak majors in cultural studies and communication and studio art at Clark. She is a member of the Class of 2016.
“LEEP Projects provide a tremendous opportunity for our students to connect their academic learning with professional development,” said Vickie Cox-Lanyon, assistant director of the LEEP Center at Clark. “LEEP Fellows are able to explore, in depth, topics about which they are passionate, to integrate their skills and knowledge, and to solve complex problems through creative thinking, collaboration and persistence. Advisors from Clark’s LEEP Center, faculty mentors, Clark alumni and organizational partners work to ensure that each student maximizes his or her opportunity.”
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge convention. Change our world.
www.clarku.edu
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Transgender rights activist Janet Mock advises: ‘Listen to yourself’
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Oct 29, 2015
“Janet Mock
When Janet Mock sat down to write her memoir, she initially thought she’d do it for an audience of one: herself. But during the writing process, Mock came out in Marie Claire magazine as a transgender woman. The disclosure turned her into an “instant activist and advocate,” and not only expanded her audience but prompted her to use her personal story as a springboard for a wider conversation about trans issues.
Fans of Mock’s work as advocate, host of the MSNBC digital program “So POPular!” and author of the bestseller “Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More” packed Jefferson 320 at Clark University for a spirited conversation about her life’s journey. The book is her account of growing up multiracial, poor, and transgender in America. It offers vital insight into the unique challenges and vulnerabilities of a marginalized and misunderstood population, yet tells a coming-of-age story that taps into the universal human experience of making room for oneself in the world.
Mock sat onstage across from Amy Richter , professor of history and director of the Higgins School for Humanities, who posed questions to Mock, including some supplied by Clark students. Mock recalled how she’d set out to write a book that was strictly personal, but in collaboration with her editor she incorporated information that would enlighten and educate a general audience about the trans experience. “It was the book that needed to be written,” she said.
Mock said a common fallacy is that LBGTQ constitutes a unified “community,” when in fact it’s a movement composed of numerous communities “advocating for the rights, protection and safety of sexually diverse” people. Asked about the creation of safe spaces for LBGTQ students on college campuses, Mock insisted it’s also necessary for students to experience “discomfort and risk.”
“I did not grow up in a world where I ever felt safe,” she recalled. “People come in with different experiences and a lack of understanding, and this leads to complicated conversations. … You shouldn’t be afraid of [these] conversations.”
Mock then fielded questions from audience members who queued up at microphones on either side of the room. Asked how she chose which life passages to include in her book, Mock said she selected “moments that were key to my understanding of self,” ones that dealt with the “friction between what people were telling me I was supposed to be and what I felt I was supposed to be.” She said prior to writing her memoir she talked to family members to get their recollections, and that while she didn’t delve into the personal stories of her siblings she did explore her parents’ troubled relationship.
It’s common for the media to want her to represent all LBGTQ groups, Mock said, but she noted she’s part of a “vast movement of communities” who have been doing advocacy work for a long time. Mock recalled that once she moved from her native Hawaii to New York City at the age of 26, she began to “unpack and unlearn the inherent shames and fears” associated with race, class and sexual identity that had made her feel “not worthy of being seen or heard.”
Mock acknowledged her experience is a journey “that never quite ends.”
“The best thing you can do is listen to yourself and shut out the voices that constantly try to rebut the truths you may be afraid to recognize,” she said, drawing applause from the audience.
Mock’s presentation was co-sponsored by the Higgins School of Humanities , the Office of Diversity and Inclusion , the Office of the Provost , and the Women’s and Gender Studies Program . It was part of the African American Intellectual Culture Series offered by the Higgins School.
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In President’s Lecture, civil rights pioneer encourages ‘constitutional conversation’
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Oct 22, 2015
“Robert Parris Moses received a standing ovation before he uttered a word.
The raucous reception greeting Moses as he took the Razzo Hall stage to deliver the Oct. 8 President’s Lecture was a display of deep appreciation for the life and career of the prominent Civil Rights leader, who defied the violent racism of early-1960s Mississippi to register black voters at his own peril.
Soft-spoken and deliberate, Moses told the Clark University audience that the United States has lurched through three distinct “constitutional eras” — each about 75 years in length — that continue to define and redefine the concept of “We the people.” The first era, from 1787 to the end of the Civil War, was marked by the finding that African slaves were the constitutional property of their owners. (That concept was successfully challenged by a slave named James Somerset, but not in the United States. Somerset, while accompanying his owner to England, challenged his slave status in court and was set free by a British judge, Moses recounted.)
Following the Civil War, the second constitutional era established the rights of former slaves as U.S. citizens, but southern states defied the federal mandate, leading to the enactment of Jim Crow laws that reinforced segregation.
“As soon as Africans became citizens the concept of citizenship was demeaned and downgraded, and the concept of states’ rights was elevated,” Moses said. In effect, he said, the descendants of slaves were not fully acknowledged as constitutional people.
A third constitutional era, Moses said, was launched in 1941 in the shadow of the attack on Pearl Harbor when U.S. Attorney General Francis Biddle issued Circular 3591, which criminalized slavery and other forms of forced labor, which still persisted in some places.
Twenty years later, Moses served as a field secretary for the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee ( SNCC ), initiated SNCC’s Mississippi Voter Registration Project, and was appointed committee director in 1962. He helped lead the Council of Federated Organizations into the Mississippi Summer Project ( 1964 Freedom Summer ), which introduced the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party to the National Democratic Convention.
He cited several Civil Rights victories of the 1960s, which involved getting Jim Crow laws out of three distinct areas: public accommodations, the right to vote and the national Democratic power structure. “But we didn’t get Jim Crow out of education,” he said, noting there are 45 pending cases over the issue of education equity.
Moses is founder and president of  Algebra Project, Inc ., a national nonprofit organization that uses mathematics as an organizing tool to ensure quality public school education for every child in America. The Algebra Project has worked with cohorts of high school students who previously performed in the lowest quartile of standardized exams and proposes a “benchmark” for them: to graduate high school on time, in four years, ready to do college math for college credit. He said young people should be recognized as constitutional citizens, and it’s critical that students’ educations give them a “public voice.”
The country is moving backward in several areas as the Supreme Court appears to be trying to institute another era in which state rights supercede those established by the federal government, Moses asserted.
He concluded by urging the United States’ acceptance of undocumented immigrants — “anyone who takes this country as home” — into the “constitutional conversation,” noting that earlier generations of European immigrants arrived on U.S. shores without invitation and established themselves here.
During a question-and-answer session, Moses was asked how he felt when the United States elected Barack Obama as its first black president.
“I felt the country had turned a corner,” he said, though the “shearing” of society on race and class distinctions is still acute. “We don’t have ‘we the people’ politics in this country,” Moses said.
Prior to the lecture, President David Angel announced that alumni, colleagues, friends and family have created a permanent endowment for the Robert J.S. Ross Social Justice Internship, honoring the retired longtime professor of sociology at Clark. The endowment supports stipends for undergraduate social justice internships with an organization or other entity whose principal mission is to promote social, economic or environmental justice.
 
 
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Todd Livdahl’s Bermuda research has bite
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Oct 22, 2015
“Professor Todd Livdahl (left) travels to Bermuda every other year with a team of students to closely investigate several mosquito species and to observe the country’s efforts to control them.
A whole lot of people would cheer any efforts to control the pesky mosquitoes that can turn any picnic into a swat fest. But for some countries, mosquito control is a matter of life and death.
Biology professor Todd Livdahl has found that very scenario in Bermuda. While accompanying Clark biology students at the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Sciences (BIOS), Livdahl’s attention was piqued by the country’s efforts to control specific mosquito species and the diseases they spread.
“I got wind of the introduction of a species to Bermuda,” says Livdahl, who saw both a great research opportunity and a way to improve the public health on the island.
Livdahl now travels to Bermuda every other year with a team of students from his vector ecology class to closely investigate several mosquito species and to observe the country’s efforts to control them.
Students stay in the BIOS housing and use the labs, but work closely with the Ministry of Health and with Vector Control in Bermuda to gauge how mosquito species change the ecology. Of particular interest is an Asian species that was introduced to North America in 1985 and Bermuda in 2000.
“We are tracking the course of the invasion of the Asian species,” says Livdahl. He says the Asian mosquito and another species from Africa had for years continually swapped places as the more dominant species in Bermuda. Right now, the African species has disappeared from the island, but not the Caribbean region, so there’s always a possibility of reintroduction. Each carries its own potential threats to the island.
“The Asian species took over and within a few years, the African species was extinct,” says Livdahl. “We are trying to understand how this rapid displacement occurred.” Using everything from mathematical models to experiments with larvae, Livdahl and his team hope to discover whether egg-laying patterns, breeding, feeding habits, or a combination of these and/or other factors contribute to the changes in mosquito populations.
John Soghigian ’09, a Ph.D. candidate, says his vector control research in Bermuda was a chance to see the real-life implications of research findings.
“[Livdahl’s] course was a great opportunity to get involved in research and get a hands-on feeling for public health issues,” he says. “It’s a bigger deal there — they are very concerned about the diseases from mosquitoes.” The serious public health implications give Bermudians more incentive to make sure mosquito control is done right, Soghigian adds.
Clark students learn how Bermuda’s government keeps close watch on mosquito breeding areas, even fining some homeowners who don’t comply with repeated requests to fix potential breeding-ground problems.
As an island nation, Bermuda has a lot at stake. While the Asian mosquitoes carry diseases like dengue virus, scientists are also closely watching the spread of the painful chikungunya virus, which can nearly cripple humans with joint pain, and West Nile virus , which could impact the island’s rare bird populations, says Livdahl.
Livdahl’s students conduct field surveys and research. “They learn something about the ecology of the species we are working on, and the various factors that influence where mosquitoes choose to lay eggs,” he says. Students accompany the vector control officials as they make inspection rounds, says Livdahl, which is like peeking behind the curtain of island life. “Students get a big kick out of it,” he notes.
Ashleigh Stanton ’14 says that seeing the impact the tiny bug can have on a population has caused her to reconsider her career path. “I was more of a molecular biology student,” she says. “Ecology was out of my norm. Now I am thinking I might want to do more ecology work. For me, that’s huge.”
Because the week in Bermuda is a relatively short time span, students aren’t tasked with fixing any problems, but they come to understand the implications of their findings. “We don’t get involved in eradication,” says Livdahl. “We focus more on understanding the interactions.”
— Julia Quinn-Szcesuil ’90
 
 
 
 
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Clark Graduate School of Management offers new Master of Science in Management
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Oct 10, 2015
“Clark University’s Graduate School of Management (GSOM) is offering a new Master of Science in Management (MSM) program for early- and mid-career professionals ready to expand their leadership skills and gain an understanding of how management principles apply to today’s complex organizational issues.
The MS in Management degree is designed for emerging leaders from nearly any sector – public, private, or non-profit – and any industry. The program will integrate coursework, case studies, and projects around topics in accounting, marketing, information systems, and human resource management.
“The creation of the MSM program was driven by industry and market needs. The curriculum was designed in response to what employers identified as the highest priority skills for individuals in mid-level jobs, such as critical thinking and communication. We’re excited to offer this relevant management degree program to aspiring leaders looking to advance in their career and transform their organizations.” ~  GSOM Dean Catherine Usoff
Full-time students can complete the degree in just one year, with part-time options also available, allowing students to take one or more courses and continue working while enrolled in the program. Evening, day, and accelerated classes are offered, and the Graduate School of Management now offers courses online.
MSM courses will be offered beginning in fall 2016 and applications are currently being accepted. I nformation sessions on all GSOM programs will be held on Tuesday, Oct. 20 and Wednesday, Nov. 18, both at 6 p.m. at Clark’s Southborough/MetroWest campus .
In addition to the new MSM, Clark’s GSOM offers a full-time and part-time MBA , a full-time and part-time Master of Science in Accounting , a Master of Science in Finance , as well as a number of dual-degrees .
Accredited by AACSB International, the Graduate School of Management (GSOM) at Clark University is a small, academically rigorous business school that offers a personalized, collaborative learning experience. We uphold the international Principles for Responsible Management Education, demonstrating our commitment to education, research, and collaboration to foster sustainable social, economic and environmental change. Our students build the capacity to become future leaders who will ensure the long-term viability of our enterprises and our world.
Related links:
Forbes: Clark University is No. 16 on list of most entrepreneurial research universities
Clark University Graduate Admissions
Clark Student Helps Organize Energy Transition Workshop in Luxembourg
Clark Graduate Students Selected as EDF Climate Corps Fellows”

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Clark University alumnus Gary Cohen ’78 awarded MacArthur ‘genius’ fellowship
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Oct 01, 2015
“Gary Cohen, Co-Founder and President of Health Care Without Harm, photographed in Charlestown, Mass. at the Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, one of the first hospitals built embracing Cohen’s advocacy of self-sustaining, environmentally responsible healthcare networks. (Credit: John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)
Clark University alumnus Gary Cohen is the recipient of one of 24 MacArthur Fellowships — commonly known as “genius grants” — from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation . Fellows each receive a no-strings-attached $625,000 grant for their cutting-edge work that is transforming their fields.
Cohen, a 1978 graduate of Clark, is a social entrepreneur and activist spurring environmental responsibility in health care both in the United States and abroad. In 1996, he co-founded Health Care Without Harm (HCWH), initially a grass-roots cooperative, to bring attention to the fact that American hospitals had been major contributors to environmental pollution and had been largely ignoring the damage to local communities and environments caused by extensive use of harmful chemicals in medical devices, toxic cleaning agents, reliance on fossil fuels, and disposal of waste via incineration.
Watch Cohen talk about his life’s work here .
“Clark is where I learned about social activism and met John O’Connor, who was a close friend and the person who introduced me to the environmental health and justice movement,” Cohen says. The two co-authored a book, “Fighting Toxins,” in 1990. O’Connor, a former Clark trustee who was also a member of the class of 1978, passed away in 2001 at the age of 46.
Cohen also cites the influence of Robert Ross, research professor in sociology, and philosophy professors Al Anderson and Walter Wright. While at Clark, Cohen helped run The Scarlet alongside Peter Diamond ’78, with whom he works at Health Care Without Harm.
HCWH’s campaign against the use of mercury, a highly toxic neurotoxin once ubiquitous in thermometers and other medical devices, led to its virtual elimination in the United States and ultimately a global treaty phasing out its use by 2020. HCWH is also credited with playing a leading role in reducing the number of carcinogenic-emitting waste incinerators in the United States from 5,600 in the late 1990s to fewer than 70 in 2006. Since its founding, HCWH has grown to comprise thousands of hospitals and healthcare partners in more than 50 countries.
In proposing practical, economically viable solutions, Cohen has achieved remarkable success in galvanizing a sense of social responsibility among hospitals and health care conglomerates and spearheading voluntary (rather than through legal or judicial mandates) adoption of safer practices.
Currently president of HCWH, he has also founded or co-founded other organizations, including the Healthier Hospitals Initiative , a data-driven platform that guides hospitals in purchasing safer chemicals and healthy food and implementing energy efficient technologies, and Practice Greenhealth , a U.S.-based membership organization for hospital systems to share best practices, information, and tools for environmentally responsible patient safety and care.
Prior to co-founding HCWH, he served as executive director of the National Toxics Campaign Fund (1989–1993) and co-founded the Military Toxics Project (1991–1994).
In an interview with The Washington Post , Cohen said he was stunned to receive the call about the MacArthur award.
“I just thought it was such an honor and validation not only for my work,” he said, “but the work of the organization and the people who built the social movement inside of health care that has now taken root.”
The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation supports creative people and effective institutions committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. In addition to selecting the MacArthur Fellows, the Foundation works to defend human rights, advance global conservation and security, make cities better places, and understand how technology is affecting children and society.”

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Clark contributor to Open Tree of Life awarded two National Science Foundation grants
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Sep 26, 2015
“Whether bees or bacteria, hyenas or humans, all known life forms have a place in the first draft of the Open Tree of Life , published online last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . Molds and mushrooms haven’t been left out either, thanks in part to the work of Clark professor and fungal evolutionary biologist David Hibbett , who has recently received additional funding to further his research on fungi.
Professor David Hibbett
The Tree (think family tree) is an ambitious work-in-progress that draws on the expertise of biologists like Hibbett around the globe to chart the evolutionary relationships between all known living things—a mere 2.3 million named species descended from a single life form that lived approximately 4 billion years ago. A September 21 HuffPost Science article described the Tree as “a massive and open-access digital depository where anyone can download, view and edit the tree—a kind of ‘Wikipedia’ for evolutionary trees.”
The Open Tree of Life pieces together many smaller evolutionary trees, including some for fungi developed by Hibbett and his collaborators on the NSF-supported project: Assembling the Fungal Tree of Life (AFTOL). Hibbett explains that AFTOL is one of thousands of individual studies, each focused on different groups of organisms. “My lab’s role in Open Tree of Life,” Hibbett explains, “was to collect evolutionary trees of fungi for use in constructing the comprehensive, global tree.” In a recent blog post he describes the fungal branch as integrated into the Open Tree of Life.
Hibbet has recently been awarded two grants totaling more than $600,000 from the National Science Foundation that will provide him with new research opportunities to advance the fungal tree of life.
Laetiporus sulphureus only grows on oak trees
The first project, titled “Functional and evolutionary bases of substrate-specificity in wood-decaying basidiomycetes,” will try to understand why certain mushrooms (like the Laetiporus sulphureus mushroom, left) only grow on a single substrate (in this case, oak trees), while others flourish on a variety of tree hosts.
“We’ve known for ages that some fungi are associated with certain host species, but we don’t know why,” explains Hibbett. “We’ll be growing different wood-decaying fungi on different tree species and looking at how gene expression in the fungi varies.”
Sharing the investigation with Hibbett are co-principal investigators Emma Master (University of Toronto) and Betsy Loring, director of exhibits at the EcoTarium in Worcester, Mass. Clark’s portion of the grant is $275,078 over three years.
Lentinus-tigrinus . The top and bottom images show the “typical” form, while the middle image shows an atypical “coralloid” form. The coralloid form is produced when the fungus is grown in darkness, whereas the typical form occurs when the fungus is grown in light.
The second project, “Evolution of fruiting body forms in the mushroom-forming Fungi (Agaricomycetes): a comparative phylogenetic and developmental approach,” is undertaken with colleagues at the University of California-Berkeley, the University of Minnesota and the University of Toronto. Using DNA sequencing, the team will investigate the genetic mechanisms that allow a mushroom species like Lentinus tigrinus (see image, left) to assume very different-looking forms according to the environment it grows in. The Clark portion of this grant, again over three years, is $339,384.
In addition to providing scientific training for participating graduate and undergraduate students, both grants support outreach and education related to fungi. Public programs and interactive exhibits illustrating fungal diversity, as well as the role of fungi in the decay process and the carbon cycle, will be created at the EcoTarium, a science and nature museum serving over 140,000 visitors annually. Clark undergraduates interested in art as well as biology will take classes like studio art professor Valerie Claff’s drawing course: “Exploring the Natural World” that help them develop observational skills and raise their awareness about fungal biodiversity. Students will create educational posters appropriate for high school students that illustrate fungal biology and general evolutionary principles. The posters and associated lesson plans will be made available for free download on a project website and will be distributed through workshops at professional conferences for science educators.
David Hibbett uses comparative analyses of genes and genomes to infer the evolutionary relationships of fungi, concentrating on the mushroom-forming fungi. He is particularly interested in using phylogenetic approaches to understand the evolution of fungal morphology and ecological strategies. His other interests include biological classification, species recognition and phyloinformatics. Follow his blog .
 
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Clark University alumnus receives AACSB Influential Leader Award
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Sep 22, 2015
“Lawrence Landry of Masterpiece Living honored among alumni from AACSB-accredited schools  who are making an impact in the world through their business acumen, leadership, or entrepreneurial success
Lawrence Landry earned his BS/BA in management and an MBA from Clark University.
AACSB International (AACSB), the global accrediting body and membership association for business schools, today (Sept. 22) revealed that Clark University trustee and alumnus Lawrence Landry has been recognized as one of the first 100 AACSB Influential Leaders . Landry’s work exemplifies the innovative mindset and meaningful contributions to society that Clark University graduates display around the world and every day—whether they operate within large corporations, small businesses or the nonprofit sector.
Landry earned his BS/BA in management in 1971 and an MBA in 1975 from Clark University. He was Clark’s Chief Financial Officer in the late 1970s. He is founder and CEO of Masterpiece Living , an organization built on a specific philosophy of aging well and living longer. Masterpiece Living is based on research that initially came out of the MacArthur Foundation Study on Aging. Masterpiece Living provides resources and training to help Certified Centers for Successful Aging (CSA) provide and measure the effects of programming that supports the successful aging of their clientele. Landry’s brother, Dr. Roger Landry, is president of Masterpiece Living and is the author of “Live Long Die Short: A Guide for Authentic Health and Successful Aging.”
“I’m honored to receive the AACSB Influential Leader Award and thankful to Clark University and others for preparing me to challenge convention and to want to make a difference,” said Landry. “It was the Clark experience that guided me to become entrepreneurial and create programs like Masterpiece Living to positively impact society.”
Landry also previously has held several senior financial positions, including CFO at Swarthmore and Chief Investment Officer for Southern Methodist University and at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation for more than ten years. He was co-creator and the first Chairman of The Investment Fund for Foundations (TIFF). TIFF was founded in 1991 by a network of foundations to support the investing activities of non-profits who cannot afford their own internal investment organizations. After leaving the MacArthur Foundation, Landry founded Westport Advisors, an investment company that funds and develops continuing care retirement communities throughout the United States.
Landry joins individuals such as the CEO of one of the world’s largest global relief services, a technology pioneer who is working to cure cancer, the founder of a global e-commerce powerhouse, and an enterprising president attributed with reviving an international toy industry favorite. More than 20 industry sectors, from consumer products to healthcare to nonprofits, across 21 countries, are present in this year’s group.
“Throughout his professional career, Larry has applied his business skills and financial acumen to support non-profit organizations and organizations that are critical to human development and well-being (universities, foundations, and senior living facilities). He also has brought his expertise and the value of his many years of experience at different organizations to the Clark Board of Trustees, where he served as a trustee for 20 years, including as chair and vice chair.” ~ Catherine Usoff, Dean of the Graduate School of Management
For the nomination process, AACSB developed a short list of open-ended questions that provided a framework for expectations for nominees. From April to June 2015, AACSB-accredited schools submitted notable alumni who have made (or are making) an impact in the world. From the nominations, a selection committee reviewed and chose stories that showed a sampling of the positive impact that business school graduates have made on society.
“It is my honor to recognize Lawrence Landry for his contributions as an Influential Leader, and to thank Clark’s Graduate School of Management for its dedication to providing a business education environment based on engagement, innovation, and impact,” said Thomas R. Robinson, president and chief executive officer of AACSB International. “If told, the success stories of all business school graduates would fill unmeasurable volumes. AACSB is honored to celebrate Mr. Landry—and the collective 100 Influential Leaders—as a representation of how business school alumni have positively influenced society, as well as the management education industry’s past, present, and promising future.”
For the full list of recipients, visit www.aacsb.edu/Influential-Leaders .
Founded in 1916, AACSB is an association of more than 1,450 educational institutions, businesses, and other organizations in 89 countries and territories. AACSB’s mission is to advance quality management education worldwide through accreditation, thought leadership, and value-added services. As the premier accreditation body for institutions offering undergraduate, master’s, and doctorate degrees in business and accounting, AACSB offers a wide array of services to the management education industry. AACSB’s global headquarters is located in Tampa, Florida, USA; its Asia Pacific headquarters is located in Singapore; and its Europe, Middle East, and Africa headquarters is located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands.
Founded in 1887 in Worcester , Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge Convention. Change Our World.
Contacts :
Jane Salerno, Media Relations
jsalerno@clarku.edu
Amy Ponzillo
Senior Manager, Public Relations
MediaRelations@aacsb.edu
www.clarku.edu
 
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Hard choices in the nonprofit world
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Sep 15, 2015
“Clark University Professor Rosalie Torres Stone (with microphone) and students Donovan Snyder ’17 and Jiawei Mao ’15 presented Dr. Matilde Castiel, with a check for $10,000 to aid with the work at Hector Reyes House.
For Jessica Horton ’17, the straightforward course title, Community and Health: Nonprofit Grantmaking, hardly hinted at the immersive experience to come. Throughout the fall semester, Horton and her classmates researched, wrote and pitched grant proposals on behalf of several Worcester nonprofit health organizations that address health and social disparities among underserved populations.
But the most demanding, and wrenching, element for the students was deciding which organizations would receive funding, and which would not.
“I didn’t know it would be this intense. We were emotionally invested.”   — Jessica Horton ’17
The course, designed by Rosalie Torres Stone , associate professor of sociology at Clark University , gave undergraduate students the opportunity to understand the social and economic underpinnings of philanthropy in the nonprofit sector. She secured $15,000 in funding — $5,000 each from the Learning By Giving Foundation , the Greater Worcester Community Foundation , and the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise at Clark University . The class was divided into four groups, with each group assigned to work with a local nonprofit health organization in Worcester to develop a grant proposal then defend it to their fellow students, who collectively decided how the funding would be distributed. Ultimately, $10,000 was awarded to LAHA Hector Reyes House , which provides residential substance abuse treatment for Hispanic men, and $5,000 went to Pernet Family Health , which offers health and other services to the surrounding community.
Horton’s group collaborated with Hector Reyes House at a time when the organization was launching a major new initiative in which some of the residents work at Café Reyes , a Cuban restaurant where they prepare and serve mouthwatering sandwiches and other fare in a small but vibrant space on Worcester’s Shrewsbury Street. The men are former addicts, some of them ex-cons, who are making the slow, steady climb toward recovery, with their restaurant employment supplying an opportunity to learn a trade as well as the “soft” skills needed to maintain a healthy, productive lifestyle while transitioning into the workforce.
Horton and fellow students Donovan Snyder ’17 and Jiawei Mao ’15 made site visits to Hector Reyes House and fashioned their proposal with the input of Executive Director Dr. Matilde (Mattie) Castiel.
“We saw the kind of social capital Mattie had in the Latino community and how important she is in their lives,” Horton recalls. “She wants these men to succeed so much that she created an environment where success is possible.”
Horton’s group spent time with the men, hearing their stories of difficult lives marked by drug and alcohol abuse.
“They talked a lot about the remorse they felt for failing their kids and failing their wives and girlfriends,” Horton says. “Many of them have hopes of staying clean and rebuilding the relationship with their families.”
Torres Stone says the course achieved a number of goals. It gave students a rich understanding of the dynamics of a nonprofit, provided an opportunity to conduct community-based health research, and immersed them in the grant-writing and review process. As Horton notes, perhaps the toughest lesson of all was choosing who would benefit from a limited funding pool when all the recipients were deserving.
“The kids found it was much more difficult to make the decision in the end,” says Torres Stone. “They were pretty torn about it — they wanted to fund all four proposals.”
Torres Stone is offering the course again this fall.
Horton was inspired enough to intern this summer at the Learning By Giving Foundation, and is eyeing nonprofit work as a possible career choice. “Nonprofits fill the gap where social service programs end,” she says. “They fill a need where something is faltering.”
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A reality show that’s actually real
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Sep 02, 2015
“Award-winning Clark professor helps city students tell their stories through film
Eric DeMeulenaere guides Worcester high school students in the making of their documentary.
What are the stories in people’s lives that are not being told? And what stories are being misrepresented in the media? Eric DeMeulenaere , assistant professor of urban schooling in the Clark University Education Department , posed these questions to a group of Worcester public high school students this past spring and guided them through the process of making a documentary film to find the answers.
Known as SPIT-IT , the 15-week project is under the auspices of N-CITE Media Collective , run by DeMeulenaere and colleague Angelique Webster. Clark alumna Thu Nguyen ’14 helped launch the program two years ago and continues to stay connected. DeMeulenaere’s storytelling expertise and Webster’s technical filming and editing skills give the students a full view of documentary filmmaking; they tackle real-life, personal issues and explore themes honestly, and often starkly, through their movie.
The project lets the students take the helm, brainstorming ideas, handling production tasks, conducting interviews, and editing the footage into a 30-minute film. The documentary is shown to various audiences, including family and friends who might be hearing these stories for the first time.
Eric DeMeulenaere has received the Lynton Award
for his longtime work to improve urban education.
Finding the right topics isn’t always easy. The inaugural film explored several issues, like body image, and the sophomore effort examined the immigrant experience. This year’s theme is “colorism” — specifically how different skin tones are perceived and judged within communities of color. It’s a subject rarely discussed openly, DeMeulenaere says.
“We help the youth find the stories from their realities that remain hidden from the world,” he says. “They become aware that those stories are what give them the most power.” One student first revealed his undocumented status in last year’s film and is now publicly advocating in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants.
How people perceive skin tone and whether it leads to inclusion or exclusion in a group is something the students experience but rarely give voice to, DeMeulenaere notes. Bringing the topic to the screen helps the students address the ways colorism is practiced and the deep pain it can create.
The film projects attract a variety of students. Some participants want to become professionals in the film industry; others are simply curious. Few anticipate the intense emotions they may experience or the incredible effort the project requires. For the dozen students creating this year’s documentary, it’s a significant commitment (every Friday after school and extra time for interviews, filming, and editing) that requires dedication if the project is to succeed.
DeMeulenaere says the filmmakers are held to a rigorous set of expectations. “We are hardcore,” he insists. “We aren’t playing, and we push them pretty hard.”
Worcester Technical High School junior Sinneh Guzeh is a media assistant in the program after participating last year. “I like that we have control over the topics,” Guzeh says. “I feel like this is important for the community because it deals with youth. When you are focusing on youth, you are focusing on the future.”
Students go through an application and screening process to determine if they can work in the intense collaborative environment the project requires. The bar is always being raised. “We expect them to do better than the last group,” DeMeulenaere says. “We have high standards.”
Guzeh agrees. “At times it’s hard and it can be tedious to get things perfect. The amount of work you put in is a lot, but it’s empowering at the end when you see that work unfold.”
Students learn the technical skills that film producers need, so they each assume responsibility for producing one shoot. DeMeulenaere and the students also explore the ways their personal influences affect how the story develops and is portrayed.
Recent Claremont Academy graduate St. Cyr Dimarche says working on the 2014 documentary opened his eyes. “After making it, I got to understand a lot about the media,” he says. Now headed to Brandeis University to study international relations, Dimarche says even being grouped with people he didn’t know was a great experience. “We shared our stories with so many people,” he says. “The more I talk to people, the more they understand.”
Understanding the tools of media, DeMeulenaere says, includes being able to disrupt the dominant narrative and become a critical consumer of media messages. Students also have to understand the deep responsibility they have in carrying forward their own stories and the stories of others. “After the program, I see the importance of telling your story,” says Guzeh. “You see how it affects other people.”
Criticism and feedback aren’t always easy to accept, but the students learn to appreciate it, DeMeulenaere says. “We live in a culture where we celebrate mediocrity,” he says. “[The students] know when you get positive feedback here, it’s not fake.”
The process of reflecting on the program helps ground the students. “This program will always be a part of me,” says Guzeh. “It helped me grow and see the importance of me as a youth and of the power of youth in the world. It helped me see the importance of voting, of educating yourself.”
Nguyen says the change she saw in the students and in their adult leaders was transforming. “My favorite part about the experience is the human relationships between all of us, and seeing the youth in their power,” she notes. “Nothing can replace that.”
For DeMeulenaere, the students’ growth and energy is invigorating as an educator — and life-changing on a personal level. “This is my soul work,” he says. “They work their butts off, and that’s the culture we are trying to build. We are not trying to take the easy path. We are taking the hard path, and it’s something they are proud of.”
– Julia Quinn Szcesuil ’90
 
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Esteemed alumnus D’Army Bailey has passed away
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jul 14, 2015
“To the Clark Community:
With deep sadness, we share news of the death on Sunday of our friend and esteemed alumnus D’Army Bailey.
Judge, civil rights activist—even actor—D’Army Bailey (’65/L.L.D. ’10/P ’00) was honored with the Distinguished Alumni Award at Reunion 2015, although he was not able to attend.
“Judge D’Army Bailey was a great Memphis and American icon,” Ronald Walter, Clark alumnus (’71) and member of the University Board of Trustees, recalled. “Fearlessly, he faced difficult issues with courage and conviction. In Memphis, he led the way in the preservation and founding of the National Civil Rights Museum, the old Lorraine Motel where Dr. Martin Luther King was assassinated. He was a patron of the fine arts, a man who produced and appreciated learned literature, and one of unreserved action to worthy causes, especially in his crusade against injustices against the poor, powerless and disenfranchised. He was a true Clarkie: Liberal, educated, caring, concerned, responsible and a cynosure of important movements of our time.”
Bailey recounted his personal journey in the book “The Education of a Black Radical.” In a 2010 Clark alumni magazine feature, A Radical Life , Bailey spoke about his life and accomplishments — which included founding the National Civil Rights Museum.
We offer our heartfelt condolences to his family and friends.
Sincerely,
David P. Angel
President”

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Fiske Guide to Colleges includes Clark University in 2016 edition
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jul 02, 2015
“The Fiske Guide to Colleges, revised and updated for 2016, includes Clark University on its list of the “best and most interesting of the more than 2,200 four-year colleges in the United States.”
The Fiske Guide covers a range of topics, including academic quality, student body, social life, financial aid, campus setting, housing, food, and extracurricular activities. About Clark, it states, “Clark’s Program of Liberal Studies promotes the habits, skills, and perspectives essential to lifelong learning. … Clark continues to challenge convention, pioneering new teaching methods, pursuing new fields of knowledge, and finding new ways to connect thinking and doing.”
Also included in Clark’s profile are anonymous quotes from students of various grade levels. “There is a definite onus on the student to enquire, explore, and think critically. The faculty does a wonderful job in gearing students for this task,” says a sophomore.
Learn more about Clark University in the rankings here .
The Fiske Guide is compiled by Edward B. Fiske, who served for 17 years as education editor of the New York Times.  Now a leading independent voice in college admissions, Fiske has published this popular annual guide to provide a selective, subjective, and systematic look at 300+ colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada, and Great Britain.
The Fiske Guide to Colleges is also available as an iPad app from the iTunes store and a Web app from  CollegeCountdown.com .
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge convention. Change our world.
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Clark University student selected for Fulbright Summer Institute, expands research about Hadrian’s Wall
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jun 20, 2015
“Clark University undergraduate Hannah Kogut will spend a month in the U.K. this summer studying history as a Fulbright Summer Institute program participant.
Clark University undergraduate Hannah Kogut, of Ellington, CT, has been selected as a Fulbright Summer Institute program participant and will spend four weeks at  Durham University  in the United Kingdom, studying British history and Hadrian’s Wall.
Kogut soon will enter her junior year at Clark University, where she double-majors in history and screen studies . It was during a “Writing History” course that she became interested in Hadrian’s Wall and chose the social makeup of the Roman forts along the famous wall as a thesis topic. She had watched a film about Hadrian’s Wall  and noticed that “information about the wall at the beginning of the film was just wrong.” The atmosphere and cinematography piqued her interest, however, she added. “I’ve always been fascinated by medieval history, so I took the opportunity to do my own research.”
During her first year at Clark, Kogut learned about the Fulbright Summer Institute program during a campus-wide information session presented by Constance Whitehead Hanks, associate director of Study Abroad and LEEP Center adviser.
Kogut knew that Durham University’s program titled “The Northern Borders of Empire to the Making of the Middle Ages,” described as a medieval history program that includes two weeks of archeological excavation at the wall itself seemed a perfect fit and she says she was thrilled to be accepted to this prestigious program. “I’ve always wanted to travel and this is an incredible opportunity to focus on something that has always intrigued me, and to work with experts in the field at the place where it happened.”
Kogut’s career goals include documentary film production with a historical focus. While in Durham (July 5 to August 1), she will earn university credits for coursework and field research conducted in the near shadow of the ancient wall whose history and stunning visual traits inspired her.
As a Clark student, Kogut is a member of the International Thespian Society, a Presidential Scholar (Clark), and National Honorary Society Member. Her extra-curricular activities include: E-board of Clark University Outing Club, Clark Musical Theater, Clark University Players, E-board of Clark’s Film Production Society, and Vice-President of Clark University Pagan Alliance.
Kogut is a 2013 graduate of Ellington High School.
“Hadrian’s Wall at Greenhead Lough” (Personal photograph by Velella)
“Hannah is a great example of how important it is for first year students to become informed about opportunities in college,” Whitehead Hanks said.  Kogut had applied for the same opportunity during her freshman year and was not selected.  Once a sophomore, she told Whitehead Hanks of her plan to re-apply, saying that her goals and interests had become much more focused than during her first year. Whitehead Hanks: “She skillfully incorporated this into her essay, we practiced her phone interview, and with competence, confidence, and a bit of luck, Hannah earned the opportunity to participate in the Fulbright Institute the second time around. She is an impressive and tenacious young woman.”
Kogut’s success is especially gratifying, Whitehead Hanks said. “For me, this is what my job as study abroad advisor and a LEEP Center adviser is all about — helping students take their education beyond the borders of the campus to do things they never knew they were capable of. The sky’s the limit once they get started.”
Kogut will be eligible to apply for a Fulbright Scholarship or a Fulbright Research Grant later in her career, Whitehead Hanks added.
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge convention. Change our world.
www.clarku.edu”

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Clark U. senior receives $10,000 from Davis Projects for Peace to empower Ghanaian schoolchildren
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jun 18, 2015
“Delight Gavor ’16 received $10,000 award from Davis Projects for Peace to share her “Butterfly Effect Program” with Ghanaian schoolchildren
Last summer, Clark University’s Delight Gavor ’16, of Accra, Ghana, received funding and support from Clark’s LEEP initiative to implement a program she co-designed to help 36 truant youth discover and explore their talents in journalism, musical theatre, recycled art, and other areas, and apply those talents to solve problems in their community. This summer, a $10,000 grant from Davis Projects for Peace is enabling Gavor to share her successful “Butterfly Effect Program,” and incorporate it into a year-long curriculum for 200 eighth grade students in the Anyaa Community School in Ghana.
“Imagine if these youth who find they bear the brunt of underdevelopment do not see education as pivotal to their success, so most do not even show up for school regularly and instead get involved in truant activities. This is a reality for about a thousand students who attend under-resourced government schools in Ghana,” wrote Gavor in her proposal .
Gavor reported that last year her “Butterfly Effect Program” helped 36 students explore their interests and discover what they were good at (apart from academics), and encouraged them to use their interests to become socially responsible and solve community problems they identified themselves.
“This, to me, is my picture of peace,” Gavor wrote in her proposal.
This summer, Gavor is partnering with INTED (Institute of Teacher Education and Development) Africa and the Ghana Education Service to train the instructors who will be teaching the curriculum in the fall. Training will continue through August 14.
If the experience proves successful, Gavor will be allowed to share the curriculum with at least three other schools in the district in 2016, and possibly with the entire school district in the future.
“I have had the privilege of working with Delight on this project since her first year at Clark, so for three years, watching her vision for the Butterfly Effect develop,” said Seana Moran, research assistant professor in Clark’s Frances L. Hiatt School of Psychology .
“Delight has the passion, determination, creativity, and skill to make positive ripple effects in society. She not only aims to instill in others the courage and talents to ‘be the change you want to see in the world,’ she epitomizes that mantra,” said professor Moran. “I am thrilled that Clark and the Davis Foundation are supporting her worthy efforts.”
Gavor is a member of the Class of 2016 at Clark; she majors in psychology with a double minor in management and entrepreneurship. She is a 2012 graduate of the SOS Hermann Gmeneir International College in Tema-Ghana.
Other Clark students who have received funding from Davis Projects for Peace in the recent past include: Sanjiv Fernando ’15 in 2014 for his self-designed conservation project “Mitigating the Human-Leopard Conflict in Southeast Sri Lanka;” Melat Seyoum ’15 in 2013 for “The YWCA Critical Dialogue Program in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia;” Bonginkhosi (Petros) Vilakati ’13 in 2012 for “Recycling for Peace-Swaziland;” the late Amanda Mundt ’13 in 2011 for “Lekol Dete for Restavek and Free Children in Les Cayes;” Anuj Adhikary ’10 and Joseph Kowalski ’10 in 2010 for “The Energy for Education Project;” and Chelsea Ellingsen ’10 in 2009 for her project “Seeds of Change.”
Davis Projects for Peace invites all undergraduates at the 91 American colleges and universities which are partners in the Davis United World College Scholars Program to compete for these grants. A total of 184 students participating in 127 projects received funding this summer.
Beginning in 2007, on the occasion of her 100th birthday, international philanthropist Kathryn W. Davis chose to celebrate by committing $1 million to  Projects for Peace . Now in its seventh year, the Davis Projects for Peace continue to support and encourage today’s motivated youth to create and test their own ideas for building peace.
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge convention. Change our world.
www.clarku.edu
 
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Prof. Taner Akçam receives ‘Heroes of Justice and Truth’ award during Armenian Genocide Centennial commemoration
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
May 28, 2015
“Professor Taner Akçam receives a “Heroes of Justice and Truth” award, May 9 in Washington, D.C.
Clark University scholars long have been involved and outspoken about the Armenian Genocide. This spring in particular, as events of 1915 were commemorated and discussed at centenary events and among news media around the world, Clark voices and scholarship shed light on dark historical truths.
Especially busy as a speaker, media source, and honoree was Taner Akçam, history professor and Robert Aram and Marianne Kaloosdian and Stephen and Marian Mugar Chair of Armenian Genocide Studies at the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies .
From May 7 to 9 in Washington, D.C., thousands gathered for the National Commemoration of the Armenian Genocide Centennial , organized by the Diocese and Prelacy of the Armenian Apostolic Churches of America, “to remember those lost in the Genocide 100 years ago and individuals and organizations who put their lives in harm’s way to save others from the Ottoman Empire’s attacks. The Commemoration events served as an opportunity to thank the institutions and individuals who have helped Armenians to survive and thrive, and to promote unity and awareness as a means of preventing future genocides.”
Akçam was honored with a “Heroes of Justice and Truth” award, at a banquet ceremony marking the close of the events.
The award was just one moment in the Turkish-born scholar’s courageous work uncovering historical fact, advocating for openness and opposing denial of the Armenian Genocide. On April 26, Akçam was among dignitaries speaking at a rally attended by several thousand in New York’s Times Square, organized by the Armenian Genocide Centennial Committee of America (AGCCA).
Clark University history Professor Taner Akçam testifies before the Helsinki Commission hearing dedicated to the centennial of the Armenian Genocide, in Washington, D.C., April 23.
The mass killing of an estimated 1.5 million Armenians during World War I is widely acknowledged as genocide, and just recently was recognized as such by France, Germany and Russia. The Turkish government persists in its long-standingrefusal to call the killings genocide, denying the claims as “Armenian lies.” The United States also does not use the term “genocide” in any official communications. “It is still very troubling that the United States has still not recognized this genocide,” Akçam said.
Akçam delivered a passionate speech at the Times Square event, which he wrote was “a very moving moment for me!” The central message, he later wrote, is that “the nation of Turkey consists of more than simply its denialist regime; there is another Turkey, and the citizens of that Turkey are ready to face their history.”
At the rally he said: “Today does not merely mark the centennial of the annihilation of some 1.5 million Armenians; it also marks a century of denial of this crime. The Turkish government continues to deny not merely any responsibility for the horrors inflicted upon Armenian people, but even the fact that it happened at all. As a Turk, it is from this fact that my sorrow and great shame derive.”
On April 23, Akҁam testified before the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe, also known as the Helsinki Commission. The hearing was dedicated to the centennial of the Armenian Genocide, “A Century of Denial: The Armenian Genocide and the Ongoing Quest for Justice.” He remarked, “Without truth, there can’t be a peace. … Juxtaposing national interest and morality as being mutually exclusive is just plain wrong.”
Video and full text of Akçam’s speech, “The Other Turkey,” are available online.
Akcam also delivered a talk, “ Genocide, Not As An Occurrence But As A Process ,” on May 13 at the Brookings Institute Center on the United States and Europe at a conference titled, “Armenians and the Legacies of World War I. “In my talk I tried to develop a macro perspective on the Armenian Genocide,” Akcam wrote, “What I suggested was actually a ‘new’ continuity thesis. I considered the genocide not only as an event that occurred between 1915 and 1918 but also a process that covered the period of 1878 to 1923.”
Strassler Center scholars deeply engaged
Strassler Center Director and Rose Professor of Holocaust History Debórah Dwork delivers the 7th Annual Schleunes Lecture at Greensboro College.
Akçam and Strassler Center Executive Director Mary Jane Rein authored an op-ed titled, “ Recognizing Armenian genocide an important step for US policy ,” which ran in The Boston Globe on April 24.
Strassler Center Director and Rose Professor of Holocaust History Debórah Dwork , a leading authority on university education in the field, was a featured speaker at “Responsibility 2015,” the international conference marking the centennial of the Armenian Genocide, March 13-15 in New York, organized by the Armenian Revolutionary Federation (ARF) Eastern U.S. Centennial Committee, under the auspices of the AGCCA. Khatchig Mouradian, Clark Ph.D. candidate and coordinator of the Armenian Genocide Program at the Center for the Study of Genocide and Human Rights at Rutgers University , where he is also adjunct professor of history and sociology, was a key coordinator of the “Responsibility 2015” conference.
Strassler Center Executive Director Mary Jane Rein with Steve Migridichian , President of the Friends of the Armenian Chair at Clark University, at a rally outside City Hall in Worcester, April 18.
On the Clark University campus, the Strassler Center hosted the Third International Graduate Students’ Conference on Genocide Studies: TEmerging Scholarship in Holocaust and Genocide Studies 100 Years After the Armenian Genocide, in April. The interdisciplinary conference, held in cooperation with the Danish Institute for International Studies , Department of Holocaust and Genocide Studies, Copenhagen, provided a forum for doctoral students to present research to peers and established scholars. Professor Eric Weitz, Dean of Humanities and Arts and Professor of History at the City College of New York, was the keynote speaker. Joining Dwork, Akçam and other guest scholars was Clark Professor Thomas Kühne, Director of Graduate Studies and Strassler Family Chair in the Study of Holocaust History.
In an interview with the Armenian Mirror-Spectator , Dwork said she believes “preparing teachers and writers is the best way to keep the Armenian Genocide important in people’s lives.”
About the Strassler Center
The Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies trains scholars, educators, and activists to develop a sophisticated understanding of genocides grounded in scholarship. As the only program to offer a Ph.D. in Holocaust History and Genocide Studies, the Center educates doctoral students to assess the multiple factors that fuel genocides and to formulate policies for political prevention and humanitarian intervention. Grounded in history, the program also draws upon psychology, political science, and geography, all academic strengths at Clark University. The Center’s robust undergraduate program sends a clear signal to colleges across the country about the significance of this subject for all students.
Related links:
The Armenian Genocide and the law UMIT KURT  openDemocracy.com (04/24/2015)
U.S. Rock Band System of a Down to Commemorate Armenian Genocide Newsweek (04/02/2015)
Restitution of Armenian property remains unresolved AL-Monitor.com Middle East (04/20/2015)
Clark U.’s Akçam recognized with Hrant Dink Spirit of Freedom and Justice Medal (01/18/2015)
David Strassler, M.B.A. ’11, honorary Trustee and Clark champion, receives ADL honor for lifetime achievement, leadership – Clark News HUB (02/23/2015)
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Steinbrecher fellows reconnect at alumni panel
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
May 21, 2015
“Steve Steinbrecher ’55 thanks Prof. Sharon Krefetz for her work with the Steinbrecher Fellowship Program.
They retraced the footsteps of Jack Kerouac, provided support to victims of human trafficking in Albania, and harvested the eggs from threespine stickleback fish. They learned how to reclaim scorched earth, and prowled the Paris catacombs to investigate the ways we approach death.
And they did it all as undergraduates at Clark University .
On May 2, five alumni members of the Steinbrecher and Anton Fellows Society returned to campus to talk about how their fellowship experiences influenced their life paths.  Watch the panel discussion here .
The panel was moderated by Sharon Krefetz, professor of political science, the director of the Steinbrecher Fellowship Program .
Brady Wagoner ’03
Brady Wagoner ’03, who majored in philosophy and psychology, is a professor of psychology at Aalborg University in Denmark and heads its Center for Cultural Psychology. His fellowship project involved studying cemeteries and other monuments as part of his research on “how we relate to the dead” and how people’s approach to death intersects with the way they address issues in their lives. Wagoner, who earned his doctorate at the University of Cambridge, continues to do research on memory, including “the tools and strategies we use with each other to prompt memory.” His work, he said, is “quite close” to the type of research he did for his fellowship project at Clark.
Etel Capacchione ’04 was so concerned about the scourge of women being trafficked in her native Albania that she made it the focus of her fellowship project. Capacchione worked at a shelter for women who had been abducted and sold into prostitution, conducting interviews with the victims and looking for ways to safely guide them back into society. When she returned to Worcester and publicized her findings she encountered strong criticism from some in the local Albanian community “for airing dirty laundry,” she said. “It just made me speak louder.” Capacchione today works at Crittenton Women’s Union, an organization that helps low-income women and families in Worcester become self-sufficient.
Brady Wagoner ’03, Etel Capacchione ’04, Adam Tomczik ’06, M.A. ’07, Ali Berlent ’13, and Joey Danko ’13, M.A. ’14, share memories of their Steinbrecher Fellowships.
Adam Tomczik ’06, M.A. ’07, devoted his fellowship project to “On the Road” author Jack Kerouac’s vision of America. After immersing himself in the writer’s novels and poetry he retraced Kerouac’s journey from Lowell, Mass., to San Francisco and documented how the country had changed during the intervening decades. Tomczik went on to attend the University of Minnesota Law School and works as a prosecutor in the Adult Violent Crimes Division of the Hennepin County Attorney’s Office in Minneapolis.
Tomczik recalled his fellowship as “a life-changing experience.”
“You can read about how big the country is. It’s another thing to get behind the wheel and drive it, or bike it, or walk it. [The experience] changes the perception of who we are as Americans.”
Ali Berlent ’13
Ali Berlent ’13, a student at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine at Tufts University, did her fellowship project in the Foster-Baker biology lab at Clark, studying the effects of stress on the evolution of the threespine stickleback fish. Berlent explored how maternal stress impacted the egg-laying process, which required her to study stickleback eggs. Berlent said her Steinbrecher Fellowship experience informed her thinking on ethical issues in the sciences, allowed her to hone her research skills, and taught her how much time and effort go into the writing of a large research grant.
For his Steinbrecher Fellowship project, Joey Danko ’13, M.A. ’14, learned how to conduct a controlled burn of a 20-acre parcel of land owned by the EcoTarium in Worcester and created a restoration plan for it using GIS technology. “I wanted to be a catalyst for positive change,” he said. Currently a Ph.D. student in geography at the University of Connecticut, Danko also works with the Worcester Regional Chamber of Commerce to create maps depicting the city’s recent growth and to provide an inventory of assets and available real estate opportunities. “To have someone support me in my research has been really important,” Danko said of his fellowship, which also helped him “push myself forward.”
Steve Steinbrecher ’55 greets Fellowship alumni
Asked by Krefetz what advice they would give current students to make the most of their Clark experience, the alumni offered a wide range of responses.
“Follow your interests. Don’t feel obliged to fit into a discipline,” Wagoner said. “A lot of innovations have come from moving ideas from one place to another.”
Capacchione advised students to follow their intuition and “get to know the community you’re working with, and your own social identity within [that community].” She said she wrestled with the implications of using victims as research subjects, but knew that she was aiming to improve the greater good. “This couldn’t just be for me,” she said.
Tomczik discouraged students from focusing only on obtaining a job and recommended they dedicate themselves to developing skills. “Learn to read and write, and take the critical approach,” he said, noting that his fellowship provided the theme for his history master’s thesis on the social and economic evolution of Chicago’s West Madison Street (one of Kerouac’s locales).
The individualized attention he received from professors at Clark is not something students get at other colleges, Danko said, and Clark students should seize the opportunities to work closely with faculty.
Berlent recalled that when she hit a roadblock in her research, she needed to find creative ways to solve the problem. “Not everything goes as planned,” she said, and learning to be adaptable and nimble when the unexpected occurs is essential.
Stephen Steinbrecher ’55, who, with his wife Phyllis, created an endowed fund to support the fellowships in memory of their late son, David Steinbrecher ’81, talked about how very important the program is to his family (which includes three more Clark graduates: his daughter Marcy Puklin ’80 and her husband Alan Puklin ’81, and their daughter Rachel Puklin ’10). He noted that the students who are awarded the fellowships have opportunities rarely available to undergraduate students. “My goal is to continue to plant Clark at the forefront of independent study and learning,” he said. He lauded Krefetz, who is retiring after 43 years at Clark, for her leadership and thanked her for her friendship. “Thank you very much for what you’ve done for my family, for this program, and for the Clark community,” he said.
Krefetz said being involved with the fellowship program, which she will continue to oversee for another year, has been a “labor of love.” She thanked the Anton and Steinbrecher families for their support and encouragement. “I’ve had such joy and pleasure working with students when they do their fellowship projects and seeing what they go on to do after they become alumni,” she said.
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Reunion keynote speaker to address millennial generation in the workforce
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Apr 29, 2015
“Lauren Stiller Rikleen ’75 will give the Reunion Dinner keynote address on May 15.
Lauren Stiller Rikleen ’75, a nationally recognized expert on developing a thriving, diverse and multigenerational workforce, will be the keynote speaker at the May 15 Clark University Reunion Weekend Dinner in Tilton Hall.
Rikleen’s talk is titled “Developing Millennials to Challenge Convention and Change our World.”
As president of the  Rikleen Institute for Strategic Leadership , Rikleen conducts workshops, speaks at conferences, retreats, and professional events, and provides training programs focusing on unconscious bias, strengthening intergenerational relationships in the workplace, and women’s leadership and advancement.
She is also the executive-in-residence at the  Boston College Center for Work & Family in the Carroll School of Management , which links academic research and corporate practice to create workplace cultures that support individual and organizational success.
Rikleen is the author of “ You Raised Us — Now Work With Us: Millennials, Career Success, and Building Strong Workplace Teams .” The widely acclaimed book provides new insights and rebuts old stereotypes about millennials as they begin their careers in the midst of an economic crisis, and offers practical recommendations for all generations to help navigate their differences.
She also is the author of “ Ending the Gauntlet: Removing Barriers to Women’s Success in the Law , and  Success Strategies for Women Lawyers .” She has written for and been interviewed by publications and media outlets across the country, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, National Public Radio and Forbes Woman.
As a former law firm equity partner, Rikleen managed a diverse environmental law practice, bringing her strategic and negotiating skills to her clients’ enforcement and compliance problems. For two decades, she was selected by her peers to be listed in Best Lawyers in America . She has also been included in Chambers USA America’s Leading Lawyers for Business and Massachusetts Super Lawyers .
Rikleen is the recipient of numerous awards. In 2011, she received the “Friend of the Division” Award from the Law Student Division of the American Bar Association for her guidance, support, and mentorship and was honored by the Boston College Law School Women’s Law Center as its Woman of the Year. Among her other honors, she was a 2010 Leading Women Award recipient from the Girl Scouts of Eastern Massachusetts, a recipient of the Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly 2009 Women of Justice Award, the 2007 Barbara Gray Humanitarian Award from Voices Against Violence, the 2005 Lelia J. Robinson Award from the Women’s Bar Association of Massachusetts, the Boston College 2004 Alumni Award for Excellence in Law, and the Boston College Law School 75th Anniversary Alumni Medal.  In 1997, the MetroWest Chamber of Commerce named her Business Leader of the Year, and she was the 2001 winner of its Athena Award.”

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Youth Summit at Clark explores race, class, education and identity; draws h.s. students from across state
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Apr 13, 2015
“Caleb Encarnacion ’18, Kefiana Kabati ’17, Johanna Merlos ’16 and Clark visiting professor of education Raphael Rogers spoke at the 2nd annual Youth Summit on Race, Class and Education, at Clark University (April 9).
More than 100 high school students from across Massachusetts attended the second   annual Youth Summit on Race, Class and Education, organized by the Jacob Hiatt Center for Urban Education at Clark University, April 9.
Students from high schools in Amherst, Cambridge, Framingham, Springfield, and Worcester gathered in Tilton Hall for a daylong program focusing on how race and class shapes their educational experience and personal identity.
“You’re here today because we value your voices, we value your attempt to do better in your schools,” Clark visiting assistant professor of education Raphael Rogers said as he welcomed the participants.
“We have diversity in our schools. … I think beyond identity, a lot of students struggle with sort of figuring it all out,” Rogers told a reporter from Charter TV3’s “Worcester News Tonight.” ( Click here to access video.)
Nastasia Lawton-Sticklor, research scientist at the Jacob Hiatt Center for Urban Education at Clark University, holds up a Youth Summit T-shirt. All of the student participants received a shirt.
Three Clark University undergraduates spoke to the gathering, sharing their personal experiences with regard to identity and overcoming societal and personal barriers in their journeys toward academic success.
“I always knew I wanted to go to colleges,” said Caleb Encarnacion, a first-year at Clark and recent graduate of the University Park Campus School in Worcester. He recalled how people questioned his choice to apply to Ivy League colleges, based on assumptions about his background and abilities.
Encarnacion graduated with honors from UPCS. He encouraged the students at the Summit to seek out mentors, adding a shout-out of appreciation to his major mentor, Marianna Islam, who was a panelist later in the day. “Know who you are,” Encarnacion said. “Let what other people say about you push you harder.”
Kefiana Kabati ’17 spoke about moving to the United States from Kenya and how, despite her already strong English skills and academic record in Africa, her school tried to push her into ESL courses and sought to block her desire to enroll in honors classes. With her mother’s strong support, she was able to overcome the “hierarchy of classes” and educational “sorting mechanisms” she encountered, as well as   doubters who assumed that she “wouldn’t be able to keep up or catch on.”
Students from Framingham High School hold up their Youth Summit T-shirts before the start of the day’s events at Clark University (April 9).
Kabati admitted that she tried very hard to fit in, to be like everyone around her. “Throughout high school I was trying to erase who I was, and I was not being authentic. In college I realized how wrong that was. You don’t have to silence yourself … Be OK with who you are.”
The third Clark speaker was Johanna Merlos ’16, who discussed her experiences living in Brooklyn and Queens. She said her ESL experiences made her feel excluded and “punished” as a younger child. “Coming to Clark was the first place where I’ve talked about race,” she said, adding that she loves Worcester’s diversity and that, eventually, many peers reached past the cultural and language barriers to become close friends. “Being bilingual is a beautiful thing, and I appreciate that every day. When we talk about identity, it’s complicated.”
“Throughout high school I was trying to erase who I was, and I was not being authentic. In college I realized how wrong that was. You don’t have to silence yourself … Be OK with who you are.”
The summit included interactive group activities, led by assistant professor of education Eric DeMeulenaere and joined by several teachers and staff from the Hiatt Center for Urban Education and accompanying educators from the visiting high schools.
An afternoon panel of professionals shared how their identities shaped their school experiences and professional and personal lives. The panelists were Whitney Battle-Baptiste ,  an associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at University of Massachusetts/Amherst and the Director of the W. E. B. Du Bois Center at UMass; Marianna Islam , founding member of Youth Empowerment & Activism and an activist involved in several coalitions working to increase Worcester’s leadership capacity to address issues related to racial justice; and Macken Toussaint , an attorney at the law firm of Reimer and Braunstein in Boston.
Participating high schools included UPCS (Worcester), Claremont Academy (Worcester), Community Charter School of Cambridge, Framingham High School, Renaissance Expeditionary High School (Springfield), and Amherst Regional High School.
Related links:
Speaker: Time for U.S. to address the education achievement gap
Clark University education professor co-authors book, says ‘coaching makes better teachers’
Gurel lecturer: Prepare students for life in a digital world
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Clark University language students share poetry, songs, video with poet, AIDS activist
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Apr 07, 2015
“Belén Atienza, associate professor of Spanish, introduces poet and AIDS activist Norberto Stuart (seated) to students and guests in her classroom in Estabrook Hall, March 30.
On March 30, Clark University and the Department of Language, Literature and Culture welcomed a special guest, poet and AIDS activist Norberto A. Stuart, who inspired students and faculty alike as he shared both his poetry and his story.
An AIDS activist who has been living with the disease for 25 years, Stuart encouraged students to think about their futures and how to use their talents to help others.
Hannah Corney, a Clark University first-year student, reads Norberto Stuart’s poem “El pez muerto flota panza arriba” (The Dead Fish Floats Belly-Up), the inspiration for a painting that she presented to the poet.
His bilingual poetry touches on not only the death and grief that surrounds the disease but his works also talks about what it is like to be a survivor, his nostalgia for the loved ones he has lost to the disease, as well as the pain and suffering he endured when his family rejected him as a gay man. His work covers these themes of pain and grief, but it is also about life and having hope.
Stuart was born in Puerto Rico, where he became interested in theology and social justice. He moved to the United States in 1988 in order to further his education. He began his career doing social services. In 1992 he was diagnosed with HIV which quickly developed into AIDS, at a time when the disease was a virtual death sentence. As soon as he was able to, Stuart turned to activism, becoming involved in organizations like ACT UP . For years he wrote a monthly column for the magazine SIDAhora , covering various aspects (political, medical, social, etc.) of struggling with life with HIV. Stuart helped countless people deal with the realities of being underprivileged, sick, and at risk.
In 1998, Stuart authored a book of poetry entitled “Estoy hecho de rabia y de pena” which translates to “I Am Made of Rage and Sorrow.” He writes in both Spanish and English and often translates his own work. His translations in themselves reflect issues of conflicting identities, hybridity, and the relationship between language and perception.
Belén Atienza , Associate Professor of Spanish, organized the event. Her classes (SPAN 105 and SPAN 140) and students from other language courses already had been studying, translating, and discussing Stuart’s poems.
“Norberto really inspired my students to become artists and activists,” Atienza said. “He inspired them to continue their work as writers, painters, scholars—all types of artists—in order to transform the world and help others, the way he did as an AIDS activist. He is bilingual and Latino… but above all his life is transformative; he touches the lives of those, like our students, who are seeking inspiration to become better citizens and to make a difference in the world.
“This is one of the experiences during their time at Clark that they will not forget for their entire lives.”
Stuart’s visit was an interactive event; several of Atienza’s students played a role, engaging in his work by making personal and creative connections to the poetry—reciting dramatic readings, creating and performing music, and showing visual depictions of the poetry, both in Spanish and English.
Clark University sophomore John Hite performs the Norberto Stuart poem “Mama Mártir” to a tune he composed.
Sophomore John Hite created and performed an original music composition, singing the words to Stuart’s poem “Mama Mártir.” Hite said the event was “a wonderful opportunity to speak with and hear from a poet who has dealt with so much in his life, and processed his struggles and experiences through his poetry. He is such a warm soul, and the room lit up when he entered.”
Senior Benjamin Sax produced a video in which he reads Stuart’s poem “Duelo” (“Mourning” in English). The video is subtitled in Spanish and features Sax’s fellow Clarkie, Thomas Rizzo ’15. Click here to watch the video.
Hannah Corney, a Clark first-year student,  used Norberto Stuart’s poem entitled “El pez muerto flota panza arriba” (The Dead Fish Floats Belly-Up) as the inspiration for a painting that she presented to the poet.
Elyse Waksman, a sophomore, gave a dramatic reading of the English translation of Stuart’s poem, “I Will Not Have Life.” It reads:
“I will not have life
slip through my fingers
like a fine sand
while clenching my fists,
trying to hold on to it
only to hasten its escape.
My final act will not be a gesture of despair
or resignation.
Despite tremor or hesitation
my hands will thrust forward
and open –
because I will them to –
and release countless red petals
into the wind, or the abyss…
Their flight will celebrate
The end of my lament.”
“I think it is very important for people like Mr. Stuart to advocate for living with the disease [AIDS] in the way that he has chosen, through poetry,” said Becca Hadik ’17. “I am learning about the various misrepresented and marginalized populations of society in several classes right now … Many people who are diagnosed feel that they need to hide themselves away and pretend they are not affected by the disease. They think that society will be embarrassed by them. Mr. Stuart has chosen instead to reveal even some of the most raw and heart breaking effects that his diagnosis has had on his life.”
Stuart’s appearance inspired others in the Clark community to look at his work, Atienza said. Instructors and students from the Professor Stacey Battis’ French courses translated a selection of Stuart’s poetry from English into French as well.
Stuart expressed his joy at watching the performances by the students and “seeing them find meanings different than what I had in mind when composing the poems, flipping the perspective …” He remarked how these provided a “refreshing reminder that a work only finds its full expression when shared with an audience, in that space between concept and perception where possibilities are more numerous — something more eloquently (and poetically) stated by Emily Dickinson: ‘I dwell in possibility, a house fairer than prose, more numerous in windows, superior for doors!’
“It was also immensely satisfying to see my work inspire them to produce in the various mediums (music, painting, video) they themselves pursue,” Stuart added.
The Dean of the College as well as the departments of English , Language Literature and Culture and Visual and Performing Arts, as well as the Henry J. Leir Chair in Comparative Literature funded the event.
Atienza noted how Stuart’s own experiences in liberal arts education made him such a fitting guest for her students, and how this creative and interactive event reflected the mission of Liberal Education and Effective Practice (LEEP), Clark’s pioneering model of education.
“This was truly a collaborative event between faculty, students, and artists,” Atienza said. “I was so happy with the event that, at one point, while we were singing together a song at the end of the session, my eyes were filled with tears of joy. I was so excited to see my students shine and grow.”
~ By Emma Ogg ’17, Media Relations Assistant
 
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Clark University community mourns death of former president Frederick Jackson
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Mar 28, 2015
“The following statement was sent by President David Angel to Clark faculty, staff and alumni:
The Clark University community was saddened to learn of the passing of former Clark president Frederick H. Jackson on March 20, 2015, in Beaumont Rehabilitation and Skilled Nursing Center at Westborough [Mass.].
Dr. Jackson, 95, was University president from 1967 to 1970.
Dr. Jackson presided over Clark during a restless period in the nation’s history, marked by student protests against the war in Vietnam. He helped Clark make history of its own by overseeing the completion of the Goddard Library. The May 19, 1969, ribbon-cutting ceremony drew luminaries like astronaut Buzz Aldrin, just months away from flying to the moon, Sen. Edward Kennedy, and Esther Goddard, widow of the new library’s namesake, rocketry pioneer Robert Goddard.
During his time at Clark, Dr. Jackson took a leadership role in the establishment of the Worcester Consortium for Higher Education, which fostered a collaborative partnership among Worcester’s colleges and universities, and opened up opportunities for students to take courses at any of the city’s institutions of higher learning.
A native of Connecticut, Dr. Jackson earned his bachelor’s degree in English literature from Brown University and his master’s and doctoral degrees in American civilization from the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to his arrival at Clark, he was vice president for humanities and social sciences, assistant executive vice president and professor of history at New York University. He’d previously worked as a grants officer for the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
He enjoyed a distinguished career as director of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, the consortium of eleven major Midwestern universities composed of the Big Ten and the University of Chicago, where he worked until his retirement in 1984. Among the CIC’s many initiatives was a major effort to increase the number of minority students entering engineering schools and minority doctoral fellowship programs in the social sciences, humanities and science and engineering.
Our thoughts and prayers are with the Jackson family.”

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Clarkies pursue opportunities to better themselves, help others during Spring Break
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Mar 16, 2015
“While it’s safe to say that the majority of Clarkies went home or ventured to sandy beaches as a respite from studying and shivering here in Central Massachusetts, dozens of students participated in organized activities that allowed them to stay active, exercising their problem-solving skills and helping others during Spring Break.
The Clark University LEEP Center sponsored a LEEP Civic Challenge in partnership with the National Science Foundation -funded Art of Science Learning as one Alternative Spring Break option. This challenge allowed interested Clark undergraduate and graduate students to enhance their creativity, collaboration, problem-solving skills and capacities as they worked in teams to find creative opportunities and provide innovative solutions to a public health issue.
Pictured from left to right: Josephine Munene ’15 MBA, Nan Zhao ’18, Joshan Niroula ’17, Yanlin Wang ’16, Qilin Jiang ’16, and Monica Marrone ’16 worked together as a team during the LEEP Civic Challenge.
“It was remarkable to watch students from many disciplines and departments engaging with the arts while learning about some of the most complex STEM challenges. They worked collaboratively to sharpen their abilities to make a difference in the community of which they are a part,” said Clark Associate Provost and Dean of Research Nancy Budwig, who helped organize the opportunity.
Approximately twenty-five students participated in the LEEP Civic Challenge. Monica Marrone ’16, a biology major, was part of a group that focused on creating a STEM-based solution to help tackle the problem of obesity in Worcester.
Pictured from left to right: Guo Fei ’15 MSF, Jiaqi Wang ’16, Enyuan Wang ’16 MSF, Sarah Benyamin ’16, Mengjie Yu ’15 MPC, and Jiayi Wang ’16 MSF work during the LEEP Civic Challenge.
“The process involved various creative and informative experiences such as using models to visually explore our ideas or listening to experts lecture about the problems,” said Marrone.
Marrone’s team ultimately created a technology-based invention that could be used in grocery stores to help close the information gap between the customer and food products; this invention helps to convey a particular item’s nutritional information to members of the at-risk population before purchase.
Eliana Hadjiandreou ’16, a psychology major, said that participating in the LEEP Civic Challenge provided her with a unique perspective on how art and science can be intertwined.
“I had a chance to understand innovation through practice, hone problem-solving skills, and make new friends,” she said.
Including the word “challenge” in the title of the opportunity was fitting, however.
“Coming up with a truly innovative idea is tough. Our team would have terrific ideas, only to realize soon after a Google search that someone else out there had the same notion and even acted on it. This made the task of innovating all the more challenging,” said Hadjiandreou. “Nevertheless, we realized that small tweaks to already-existing solutions could still bring about innovation and newness.”
Pictured from left to right: Ali Gillard ‘18, Ben Gardner ’12 and Sam Kennedy ‘18, pose with site leaders from Break a Difference at a food bank in NYC.
“It was impressive to see how quickly the teams could work collaboratively to arrive at compelling solutions,” said Budwig.
In addition, over a dozen Clark University students recruited by Clark U Hillel joined four students from University of Vermont Hillel and traveled to Berlin, Germany to learn about Germany’s relationship with Jews and Judaism before and during the Holocaust and also about the Jewish community in Germany today.
Clark’s Community Engagement Office sponsored students who traveled to New York City and worked with Break A Difference , a Washington, D.C.-based organization that arranged for the group to volunteer at the Boys and Girls Club of Newark and at a food bank in Manhattan. Ben Gardner ’12, coordinator of student programs & LEEP Center advisor, accompanied the group.
In addition, seven members of Clark’s Global Student Embassy Club ( GSE ), a group affiliated with a non-profit organization in California that focuses on agricultural development and reforestation, traveled to Ecuador to participate in development projects around Bahía de Caráquez. The group was accompanied by Rich King, a doctoral candidate in biology.
Members of Clark’s GSE in Ecuador. (From left to right) Sarah Maloney ‘17, Cailley Culotta ‘16, Rebekah Vineyard ‘17, Celine Miranda ‘17, Zac Peloquin ‘16, Sam Most ‘18, and John Kaplan ‘17. MIssing from photo is doctoral candidate Rich King.
The Clark team helped local schoolchildren plant hundreds of trees in an area that was once a thriving creek bed.
“We spent a few days camping on the beach in Bahía and several days learning about the culture and history of Ecuador in Quito,” said Celine Miranda ‘17, vice president of the new student organization.”

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Clark University is no. 10 in Peace Corps ranking of volunteer-producing schools
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Feb 19, 2015
“Clark University is number 10 on the   Peace Corps ’ 2015 rankings of the top volunteer-producing colleges and universities in the U.S. Clark is ranked on the list of small universities and colleges, with 11 alumni volunteering worldwide.
Since 1961, 239 Clark alumni have served in the Peace Corps, but the University last appeared in the national ranking in 2012, when it held no. 20 for small schools. A complete rankings list is available online.
Christopher MacAlpine-Belton, a 2009 Clark graduate, is a Peace Corps secondary education volunteer in the Dominican Republic.
Clark alumni serve in Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Malawi, Morocco, Panama, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania, Tonga and Zambia, working in disciplines that include  education, health and youth development.
“My central focus is in child literacy,” said Christopher MacAlpine-Belton, a 2009 Clark graduate who is a secondary education volunteer in the Dominican Republic. “My goal is to ensure that local Dominican children become completely literate – being able to read and write with proficiency in Spanish – and that they develop critical thinking skills. I have had the chance to develop reading materials for use in the classroom and promote the use of electronic resources in my barrio – a fundamental part of working with a population in an urban context.”
In 2010, Clark University’s Graduate School of Management (GSOM) became a partner with the Paul D. Coverdell Fellows program . Through GSOM, returned Peace Corps volunteers can work toward an M.B.A. with various concentrations, including social change. The social change track comprises courses in social entrepreneurship, environmental policy and community development. Participating Fellows receive at least a 50 percent reduction in tuition with the possibility for further merit aid.
 
 
 
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge convention. Change our world. ”

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Entrepreneurial Clark senior’s promising startup aims to foster financial literacy
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Feb 11, 2015
“Clark University senior and entrepreneur Rebecca Liebman’s startup provides tools that teach financial literacy.
“You’re doing too much. Try picking one direction.” That’s what Rebecca R. Liebman says her teachers have been telling her for years. Her response: “What other time in my life can I do this much?”
Liebman, a senior Global Environmental Studies (GES) major and Innovation & Entrepreneurship minor at Clark University is engaged in several academic realms, entrepreneurial pursuits, student activities and more. If she has learned one thing, she says, it has been to “love many things,” referring to a quote by Vincent Van Gogh that she keeps on the cover of her planner for inspiration.
Liebman is a model entrepreneur , Clark Making a Difference scholar, four-time selected member of the Clinton Global Initiative University (CGI U), and co-founder of a promising startup. Her irrepressible curiosity and skills at multi-tasking are setting the foundation for a busy and exciting future.
Besides delving into the GES program at Clark, Liebman discovered a passion for finance while taking an entrepreneurship class in the fall of her junior year. She began to think about the importance of finance in the American economy and realizing how few young adults are taught about what to do with their money. “I found it interesting that our society values getting a job so much, but nobody tells you what to do once you start to earn money,” she says.
After spending months in Kenya and working in the Boston startup scene, Liebman decided to   create something to teach people these important skills. She cofounded and began to pitch, sell, and produce the startup idea that has become LearnLux , an online site that teaches personal finance skills and financial literacy through interactive learning tools. It is the team’s hope that LearnLux will address and help solve a crucial problem plaguing not just emerging adults, or millennials, but many adults today: financial illiteracy.
“I found it interesting that our society values getting a job so much, but nobody tells you what to do once you start to earn money.”
LearnLux marked several milestones in the last year, Liebman notes. Most recently she won first place out of student teams at the TechSandbox annual Pitch fest Competition, where she took home the $500 prize.
While Liebman has found a passion for startups, her passion for environmental sustainability remains strong. She is most intrigued when the two are able to come together and, while they may not seem interchangeable, “The economy means nothing if you don’t have a working environment where people can live.”
Liebman, a graduate of South Windsor High School in Connecticut, reflects on her Clark University experiences: “I initially came to Clark because I saw the opportunity to take initiative and saw that students really make things happen. That has held true during my time here. Clark brings passionate, intelligent people together to make a collaborative community.”
Liebman’s other activities and accomplishments include working with the Student Alumni Relations Committee (SARC) , being a member of the Clark Women’s Club Lacrosse Team, and working with the Admissions Office . She was selected to participate in the upcoming Up to Us competition, sponsored by the Peter G. Peterson Foundation and in partnership with the Clinton Global Initiative, which aims to educate and engage campus communities on America’s growing long-term fiscal challenges and how they impact students’ future opportunities. Liebman will be campaigning with her campus team through Feb. 20.
Is Liebman taking on too much? Time will tell, and as she says, this is her time. As the Van Gogh quote continues, “Love many things, for therein lies the true strength, and whosoever loves much performs much, and can accomplish much, and what is done in love is done well.”
~ By Emma Ogg ’17, Media Relations Assistant
Click here to learn more about entrepreneurship at Clark.
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge convention. Change our world.
 
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Clark innovators offer novel transportation solutions at Worcester incubator event
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jan 29, 2015
“Clark University was well represented at the Art of Science Learning Worcester Incubator for Innovation event at Union Station, Jan. 22. From left are: Ph.D. candidate Moumita Dasgupta (BA ’10/MA ’12 physics), Christopher Markman (BA ’08 screen studies), Lisa Drexhage (MBA ’11 social change), Daniel Rees (BA ’09 geography/MA ’11 GISDE), Amanda Gregoire (BA ’10 government/MPA ’11), Robin Miller (MBA/M.S. Environmental Science and Policy ’16), and Rosemarie Boulanger, who earned a BA in English and MBA in marketing at Clark and was observing the event in her role as a program committee leader with The Venture Forum.
Several Clark University graduate students took part in a special Worcester Incubator for Innovation Launch event on Jan. 22, at Union Station in Worcester. As Fellows in the Art of Science Learning  program, the presenting teams offered novel solutions for some of Worcester’s transportation challenges.
Two years ago, Worcester, Chicago and San Diego were selected by Art of Science Learning to host Incubators for Innovation as part an initiative funded by a $2.6-million  National Science Foundation grant. The purpose of the grant was to explore innovation at the intersection of art, science and learning.
The Worcester Incubator, hosted by EcoTarium and Clark University, has focused on developing innovative solutions to the area’s urban transportation challenges.
According to Joyce Kressler, director of the Worcester Incubator for Innovation, dozens of volunteers drawn from across sectors of education, sciences, business and the arts, have spent the past eleven months learning about innovation and working as innovators, using a cutting-edge new arts-based curriculum to spark innovation in STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) and STEM learning. Supported by national experts and local mentors, the Art of Science Learning Fellows have been developing transportation solutions to enhance Worcester’s economic activity, connect its communities, and improve the quality of life for its residents and visitors.
Christopher Markman ’08, who works as an academic technology specialist at Clark, discusses “Wires Over the World” with Jeff Schiebe, lead entrepreneur-in-residence in Clark’s Innovation & Entrepreneurship program.
Nancy Budwig, associate provost and dean of research, served on the Art of Science Learning National Advisory Council. Jack Foley, vice president for government and community affairs and campus services, served on the Worcester Incubator Advisory Council, as did the late Ted Buswick, former executive-in-residence for leadership and the arts in Clark’s Graduate School of Management.
Following are brief descriptions of the innovations created by the seven Worcester teams, which were unveiled during the launch event, along with names of team participants from Clark:
PedSim  route modeling is a new geospatial big-data tool that allows urban planners and private developers to model and quantify the potential impact of site selection and infrastructure improvements on pedestrians and cyclists.
               Amanda Gregoire (BA ’10 Government/MPA ’11)
               Daniel Rees (BA’09 geography/MA ’11 GISDE)
               The PedSim group was approached by business owners and developers interested in the design, Rees said. “The incubator provided me with both the human capital (my teammates) and physical capital (money for the software to develop the model). It also provided a structured space for us to work and develop the idea and implementation of the model,” he added. “The work I did to build the model wouldn’t have been possible without the skills I learned at Clark. My courses in geography and computer programming as well as urban geography formed the backbone of the theory and skillset that I used to develop the model.”
Secret City Interactive  is a new service that uses augmented reality and social media to create a visually engaging, interactive pedestrian experience designed to encourage neighborhood, historic, and cultural exploration, and the creation of user-user generated content to foster community learning and connections.
               Lisa Drexhage (MBA ’11 social change)
               The experience “pushed me out of my comfort zone on more than one occasion and reminded me that creativity is essential for any job or position,” Drexhage wrote. “I hope to take some of what I learned with me as I continue to work as a Project Manager for the Worcester Business Development Corporation (WBDC). I met some of the most creative and passionate people through this experience including some fellow Clarkies. I hope to continue to work with some of these individuals to promote the City of Worcester as a great place to live and work. Clark University pushes students to think critically and creatively.   I used many concepts that I learned through the Graduate School of Management to help organize the team and push the project forward.”
Smart Transit for Healthcare  is a new service that improves the ability of patients reliant on public transportation to access healthcare through a database/ application/web-based interface. The system allows service providers to optimize patient-transportation efficiency when scheduling appointments and provides patients with clear routing and timing information.
               Ph.D. candidate Moumita Dasgupta (BA ’10/MA ’12 physics)
Sprezza  is a dynamically routed, multi-modal, demand-driven system that is built on a novel algorithm that integrates use patterns with real-time traffic and weather information to determine optimal bus and shuttle routes, hub locations and frequencies.
STEM Unplugged  is a new middle-school science curriculum that uses the arts to teach transportation-related subject matter, as the focus of a series of lessons and classroom experiences that align with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS).
Tasks for Transit  is a new process that increases the ability of low-income community residents to gain access to public transportation, while stimulating support for community-based social services. The process leverages the sharing economy by recording hours worked by non-profit volunteers into bus passes, which partnering non-profit organizations dispense to individual clients in need.
               Robin Miller (MBA/M.S. Environmental Science and Policy ’16)
          Miller, who has worked with Stand up for Kids, the South Worcester Neighborhood Center, and Sustainable Clark, expressed the gratification she felt after learning that a man using their bus pass to get to a job interview did get the job. Miller said she thought the incubator project was “a really interesting model for approaching innovation in the community … just a great way to learn, to meet a lot of people. I used a lot of the knowledge I’ve gained at Clark while doing something to benefit the community.”
Wires Over the World  is a new project-based, NGSS-aligned, high-school science curriculum that consists of a MOOC (Massively Open On-Line Course) about urban-transportation alternatives coupled with an engineering and design competition focused on aerial-transportation technology and systems.
               Christopher Markman (BA ’08 screen studies)
               Markman worked on the project’s website design and had “even taken some aerial photos of Worcester with my drone camera to help show people what it would be like to see the city from that point of view.”
The incubator program could serve as national model, Art of Science Learning founder Harvey Seifter told the Boston Globe’s Beta Boston : “We’ve done the first broad-based experimental study of the impact of arts-based learning on creative thinking skills, collaborative behavior, and innovation outputs … The projects are just amazing, and in each community they’ve dug deeply into these deeply intractable problems.”
There are plans to replicate/pilot a similar Art of Science Learning effort at Clark University in the future, Seifter added.
Click here for more information about the Art of Science Learning program
 
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Gurel lecturer: Prepare students for life in a digital world
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jan 01, 2015
“Dr. Nichole Pinkard delivered the Dr. Lee Gurel ’48 lecture at Clark University on Dec. 3
The word “literacy” traditionally has meant knowing how to read the printed word.
That definition is so last century.
Today, literacy also means having the ability to make a video, navigate online search engines, or produce a podcast. As information technology evolves from the printing press to the farthest reaches of the virtual universe, the United States must find ways to nurture learning environments that will build digitally savvy citizens for the 21 st century.
So went the message of Dr. Nichole Pinkard, associate professor of computing and digital media at DePaul University, who delivered the fifth annual Dr. Lee Gurel ’48 Lecture on Dec. 3 in Tilton Hall. The lecture was co-sponsored by Clark University’s Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise , the Adam Institute for Urban Teaching and School Practice , and the Hiatt Center for Urban Education .
Pinkard noted that society’s definition of what it means to be literate is “inextricably tied to the technological innovations of the time,” citing new modes of communication that incorporate the visual, aural, cinematic and interactive. Today’s students must become facile in these skills, she said, because “If you’re not literate in these, you’re not prepared.”
In 2006 Pinkard founded the Digital Youth Network to help students in Chicago schools, most in low-income areas, develop technical, creative and analytical abilities that will help them thrive in a digital world.
While many young people are consumers of technology like animation, videos and graphic design, few are producers of it, which has led to a “participation gap,” Pinkard said. “If your kids aren’t producing in these media, can they occupy the jobs of the future,” she asked.
Pinkard said the challenge is to incorporate digital literacy in all the “ecosystems” of a child’s life: home, school, after school, city and nation. She has worked to fashion spaces in public schools that connect students to activities that interest them and enhance their proficiency. She described one Chicago middle school where sixth graders learn music production, seventh graders engage in digital storytelling, and eighth graders produce a digital yearbook. After school, students work on projects that they are passionate about with the assistance of mentors.
The outcomes have been positive. According to Pinkard, in one study comparing inner-city Chicago students in the Digital Youth Network with children raised in Silicon Valley, the Chicago children from sixth to eighth grade had more opportunity to create digital productions than did the Silicon Valley students. The study also showed that the Silicon Valley students learned most of their technical skills from their parents and friends, while the Chicago students learned them from their teachers and after-school mentors.
“We can create environments, spaces and ecologies that get to the same place, but do it differently,” Pinkard said.
Pinkard offered an example of how modern technologies intersect with traditional literature. Students were assigned to read Toni Morrison’s “A Mercy,” which was then used as a foundation for videos, podcasts and other methods for exploring the books structure and themes. She said the key is to expose students to these new forms of learning and connect them to overall educational goals.”

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Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar shares insights during two-day program at Clark
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jan 01, 2015
“Jeffrey Alexander meets with Professor of Sociology Shelly Tenenbaum, left, and assistant professor of English Esther Jones, at a Dec. 2 reception hosted by the Strassler Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies, in the Siff Gallery, Cohen-Lasry House, Clark University. (Photo by Tyler Sirokman ’18)
The Greek initials ɸBK – Phi Beta Kappa – express the motto, “Love of learning is the guide of life.” Esteemed scholar, social theorist, and 2014-15 Phi Beta Kappa Society Visiting Scholar Jeffrey Alexander recently spent two days (Dec. 1 -2) at Clark University engaged in and helping to guide a host of lively intellectual activities, focusing mostly on the field of cultural trauma and collective identity.
Alexander is founder and co-director of the Center for Cultural Sociology at Yale University. As a Phi Beta Kappa Society Visiting Scholar , he has been participating at a number of colleges and universities, spending two days at each and taking part in the academic life of the institutions.
Sophomore Steven Isaacson continues the conversation with guest lecturer Jeffrey Alexander before leaving Prof. Robert Boatright’s political science class (Dec. 2).
At Clark, Alexander delivered a public lecture on Dec. 1 titled, “Cultural Trauma, Social Solidarity, and Moral Responsibility: Reactions to the Holocaust and Other Modern Mass Murders.” His other activities included a breakfast with President David Angel and guests; a campus tour; luncheon and discussion hosted by the Department of Sociology; a visiting lecture to Political Science associate professor Robert Boatright’s class (U.S. Campaigns and Elections); a Holocaust and Genocide Studies reception coordinated by Professor of Sociology Shelly Tenenbaum; and a Student Researchers Workshop, hosted by members of the Psi Chi chapter at Clark.
“This kind of elbow-learning is central to Clark’s identity and mission as a research-based liberal arts institution that emphasizes early student research training,” said assistant professor of English Esther Jones, a key organizer of the visit.
Jones is the E. Franklin Frazier Chair of African American Literature, Theory and Culture at Clark, as well as president of Phi Beta Kappa Society , Lambda of Massachusetts. Professor Alexander was selected to visit Clark because of the strong synergies between his foundational work on cultural trauma and collective identity and Clark University’s own strengths in the areas of psychology, sociology, and Holocaust and genocide studies, Jones noted. “His work spans disciplines that align with the current trans-disciplinary nature of much scholarly research and teaching at Clark.”
Alexander taught at UCLA for 25 years and held visiting appointments at the University of Cambridge, the University of London, and the Library of Congress. His areas of interest include theory, culture, and politics. His recent books include “Obama Power,” (2014), “The Dark Side of Modernity” (2013), and “Trauma: A Social Theory” (2012).
“I found Clark students to be sharp, independent, and creative, and was deeply impressed with the collegiality of the departments and centers,” Alexander said.
Alexander’s visit was sponsored by the Clark University Lambda chapter of the Phi Beta Kappa Society. Co-hosts included the Offices of the President and Dean of the College, departments of psychology, sociology, the Center for Holocaust and Genocide Studies , and the Psi Chi chapter at Clark.
Founded in 1776, Phi Beta Kappa is the nation’s oldest academic honor society, with chapters at 283 institutions and more than half a million members throughout the country. Its mission is to champion education in the liberal arts and sciences, to recognize academic excellence, and to foster freedom of thought and expression.
The Lambda of Massachusetts Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa was established at Clark University in 1953. Every year, a select group of seniors who exemplify excellence in the Arts and Sciences, great character, and high potential are invited to join the chapter. Selection is made on the basis of outstanding academic achievement, demonstrated breadth and depth of studies in the liberal arts, intellectual curiosity and integrity, and tolerance for diverse views.
 
 
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Clark University graduate students recount challenges, share experiences of Haiti fieldwork with NGOs
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Nov 20, 2014
“Clark graduate students Deviyani Dixit, Deviprasad Adhikari, Caitlin Alcorn, and Federico Sotomayor, along with Jude Fernando, associate professor of International Development and Social Change, recapped their Haiti fieldwork, at an October dinner and presentation held in the National Grid Sustainability Hub on Main Street, Worcester.
As the spring semester was coming to an end, a dozen Clark University graduate students embarked on a field trip to conduct research for two non-government organizations in Haiti. In mere hours, they moved from one of the richest nations in the world to one that is acknowledged as the poorest in the Western Hemisphere.
The small island nation of Haiti remains remarkably unrestored since the massive earthquake that struck on January 12, 2010. By all accounts, the natural devastation heaped unfathomable pain on a population already suffering from poverty and political corruption.
On Oct. 30, the Clark group reunited for an evening of panel discussions, photos and video presenting their research and reflecting upon results and shared experiences. The gathering featured an abundance of food and culminated with a question-answer session.
The students’ goal during their Haiti visit (May 4 -15) was to assist Groupe Technologie Intermediaire d’Haiti (GTIH), an NGO working in Cap Haitien, and Sustainable Organic Integrated Livelihoods (SOIL), Haiti, which “helps restore soils and improve agricultural yields, at the same time improving the dignity and health of people without sanitation.”​ The students applied their diverse skills and efforts to:
conduct surveys on water, sanitation, hygiene and livelihood;
do program evaluation for GTIH;
draft a strategic plan;
and guide grant proposal writing.
To see photos taken during the Haiti trip, click here .
The Clarkies also visited other NGOs, local authorities, and IDP (internally displaced persons) camps.
The students traveled from Port-au-Prince to Cap Haitien.
“Haiti is one of the best places to link theory with practice,” said student participant Marie Frumence Blaise Gasemar (CDP ’14) at the recent presentation. She served as a guide and key resource for the group while in her home country of Haiti.
Jude Fernando , associate professor of International Development and Social Change in the Department of International Development, Community, and Environment (IDCE), coordinated the trip, one of several field study visits he has made to Haiti in recent years with Clark students. This is the sixth field trip to Haiti, where Fernando and students worked in collaboration with the local universities, non-profit organizations and the local communities. “These partnerships are designed to make field schools mutually beneficial to Clark students and our partners in Haiti,” Fernando said, adding that the field experiences prove valuable for students as they seek jobs. “In fact, many students come to IDCE specifically looking for this kind of field-based experience.”
“Working in the field is very different from working in the classroom” and experiential learning is key, Fernando said. The trip’s ground-level, stakeholder-focused mission also reflects a hallmark of the Clark/IDCE approach to development interventions. Fernando and his students arrived in Haiti with no predetermined, set notions on how best to deploy their efforts. Instead, he said, they would present themselves with this attitude: “Here we are. Tell us what to do.”
Graduate student Haiti trip participants share experiences. From left, are Jeremy Gleed, Marie Frumence Blaise Gasemar, and Erika Marchant, with Professor Jude Fernando. (Photo: Thomas Mengebier, IDSC ’16)
Participants on the Haiti trip included: Adegbolagun Perez Adebanjo (IDSC ’14), Deviprasad Adhikari (ES&P ’15), Caitlin Alcorn (IDSC ’14), Ben Carver (IDSC ’15),  Deviyani Dixit (BA ’13/IDSC ’14), Jeremy Gleed (CDP ’15), Marc Jean (IDSC ’14), Camilla Mahon (GISDE ’15), Erika Marchant (IDSC ’15), Daga Moudwe (IDSC ’14), Federico Sotomayor (IDSC ’15), and Blaise Gasemar, Marie Frumence, (ESAP 12),
The students talked about their role on the field project as well as their thoughts and feelings — about the international NGO presence on the island, the extreme conditions they witnessed, and the barriers to progress encountered by Haiti’s residents nearly five years after the earthquake.
“Coming from a developing country myself, viewing the extreme poverty of Haiti – talk about contrast,” said Adebanjo, who is from Nigeria. He flew to Port-au-Prince from Miami, moving in one and a half hours from the richest country in the world to the poorest. “You land and you see the contradictions. …  You can study and read about Haiti, but to see it in person makes a real difference.” He said it bothered him to see all the money and NGO organizations’ efforts seemingly doing so little to lift the country’s people, “pumping in money, taking so much back.”
Marchant, a returned Peace Corps Volunteer with experience in the Philippines and China, said she’d “never seen such a presence of so many different international organizations – the white SUVs with ‘UN’ written across their hoods were everywhere. It seemed like a training ground for NGOs, and that Haitians had little control over what was actually happening in their own country.”
Gleed said he’d “learned how important it is to network with community members and to be involved with stakeholders.”
“This was an awesome experience,” said Mahon, the GIS specialist of the group who used her skills to provide spatial references for their survey sites. She said she was especially interested in the “marriage between technological and qualitative research.”
Prof. Fernando asked the students how conditions they encountered compared to prevailing media accounts of the situation and people in post-quake Haiti. They agreed as he noted, “Not all people in Haiti are victims.”
 
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Speaker: Time for U.S. to address the education achievement gap
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Nov 20, 2014
“Eric Schwarz presents “The Opportunity Equation”
If Rip Van Winkle awoke from a 99-year nap he would discover a world that had vastly changed in all areas except one: education. A lone teacher imparting academic lessons to a classroom of students remains the familiar, comfortable model that has persisted for generations.
But is it still effective?
Eric Schwarz, the co-founder and former CEO of Citizen Schools , used the Rip Van Winkle analogy to spark a discussion about the ways that public education can be improved when he took the podium in Tilton Hall on Nov. 18 to deliver the latest in the Clark University President’s Lecture Series. Schwarz is the author of “The Opportunity Equation: How Citizen Teachers are Combating the Achievement Gap in America’s Schools.”
Citizen Schools deploys AmeriCorps members and volunteer “Citizen Teachers” to teach extended-day middle school classes in engineering, law, business, the arts and more. The program operates in 12 mostly lower-income school districts across seven states.
The current era of “unprecedented inequality” poses the greatest challenge to closing the achievement gap in schools, Schwarz said, citing standardized test scores that show children from lower income households are two years behind in skill level to children from higher income households and earn college degrees at an 8 percent rate compared to 80 percent for high-income children.
“The dialogue about education is so broken; there are different camps and a deep distrust among them,” Schwarz said. The American public education system has been made a convenient scapegoat, he said, though public education in many other countries is remarkably successful. Allowing public education to be shaped by market forces, or ridding schools of standardized testing, are not the answers, he said.
At the core of the widening gap is what Schwarz describes as the “shadow education system” — the opportunities outside of school, such as preschool, enrichment activities, family trips, coaching and tutoring, that are available to children of higher economic standing. Upper income families invest nine times more than lower income families on everything from SAT preparation to robotics camps to violin lessons — activities that help them build “the muscle memory of success,” he said.
Schwarz noted that the gap is not only reflected in academics but also in jobs and internships, where those in higher income brackets have access to more opportunities thanks to family connections.
The solution to shrinking the gap, Schwarz believes, lies in marshalling “citizen power” to attack the problem through creativity, innovation and urgency. Dating back to the Revolutionary War, America’s greatest achievements have been citizen-led, he noted, adding that politicians typically “follow more than they lead.”
“If we wait for [U.S. Secretary of Education] Arne Duncan, if we wait for [Massachusetts Governor-elect] Charlie Baker, if we wait for the Worcester superintendent of schools, if we wait for school principals to be the leaders in narrowing the achievement gap in the country, the state, the community, we’ll be waiting a long time,” he said.
Schwarz challenged audience members to “enter our local schools with minimum judgments and maximum love and empathy to find a way to teach and mentor someone.” When civic engagement with public schools reaches a critical mass only then will political leaders come on board to help “lead a revolution in the paradigm for K-12 education.”
By expanding the learning day by three hours and bringing in community members to oversee apprenticeships in everything from carpentry to rocketry to video game creation (students take four apprenticeships in a school year), Citizen Schools are providing students in low-performing schools a formalized brand of the shadow education available to others in economically advantaged areas. This enrichment motivates students to care about school, allows them to learn in different ways, and boosts their self-confidence and social skills, he said.
During the question-and-answer session, Schwarz acknowledged that good parenting is crucial to children’s academic development. He said parents in low-income households — rather than the “ogres” they’re often depicted as — harbor dreams of academic and professional success for their children and are more eager to participate in that process than they are typically given credit for. Simple measures such as having teachers regularly call parents to report on positive progress and announcing school events through flyers written in the language of non-English speakers can be critical to nurturing more parental interest, he said.
Making the Citizen Schools model the “new normal” will require partnerships involving public school administrators, legislators and government leaders. “It will be most effective if it flows from experience and tangible examples [of success],” Schwarz said. When school and community leaders commit with local families to this education initiative, “that’s a pretty unbeatable combination.”
Schwarz said he was excited to learn about Clark University’s LEEP model for education because it takes an “uncommonly serious” approach to experiential learning. He said he’s looking at incorporating similar LEEP-like themes into Citizen Schools.”

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Clark U. History Professor investigating rare, century-old photos of Worcester’s early residents of color
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Nov 12, 2014
“ 
History Professor Janette Greenwood
Clark University History Professor Janette Greenwood has teamed up with retired teacher and Charlton historian Frank Morrill to research the identities of some early Worcester residents—people of color—pictured in rare photographs that date back to the turn of the last century.
The photos are those of the late William Bullard, of Worcester, a photographer who, between 1894 and 1914, took thousands of images of the city’s streetscapes, businesses and local residents. Morrill, who has published books about Worcester , purchased Bullard’s collection—approximately 4,800 glass plates—with the intent to publish another book focused on the city’s streets and architecture. It wasn’t until his granddaughter inquired about a person of color in one of the photos that he realized he possessed a unique historical treasure—roughly 200 images of people of color—many of whom lived in the Beaver Brook area of Worcester within the first four decades after obtaining their freedom.
A mutual acquaintance connected Morrill and Professor Greenwood, aware that the latter had researched the migration of former slaves to Worcester in the late 19 th century. The pair joined forces in January, and since then, they have identified all but a quarter of the people in the photographs by referencing the photographer’s log book, census and other historical documents.
“The number of negatives he had and the fact that we could identify most of the people in them by name, and even street number, was incredible,” said Professor Greenwood.
Professor Greenwood immediately recognized some of the names of people she uncovered while conducting research for her book, “First Fruits of Freedom: The Migration of Former Slaves and Their Search for Equality in Worcester, Massachusetts, 1862-1900,” published in 2010. However, these photos revealed much more. They gave valuable clues about this period of history.
“People focus too often on the Civil War and they look at the Civil Rights Movement when they think about black history, but there’s so much in between,” she said. “The collection represents a unique time often overlooked.”
Professor Greenwood and Morrill were struck by the photographer’s obvious skill and also by the tone of his photographs. Bullard, a white photographer, treated his subjects with a great deal of respect. All of the people in his portraits appear dignified and proud; some of them are featured wearing formal attire, sitting proudly in their living rooms.
The Johnson Family
“[The photos] reflect a real interest, a real respect for this group of people, which is uncommon at the time,” said Professor Greenwood.
Professor Greenwood and Mr. Morrill created a blog to record the progress they’ve made identifying the photographs. The website is also being used to thank people who’ve helped uncover details about the photos, and is a way for the general public to view a list of the people featured in the collection, and enlist their help assigning names to photos, providing context and information regarding descendants.
Professor Greenwood plans to enlist her undergraduate students this spring to continue the historical research on the pictures.
“This is a tremendous opportunity for students to participate in groundbreaking research that will not only impact multiple individuals, but an entire community, with national implications. This real-world project is a perfect example of the type of meaningful exercise we look to offer students through Clark’s innovative new Liberal Education and Effective Practice LEEP initiative.”
Professor Greenwood and Mr. Morrill hope to curate an exhibit with between 40-60 of the photographs and their stories. She also hopes to publish a book featuring the photos.
Professor Greenwood teaches a variety of courses in U.S. History including Race and Ethnicity in American History, History of the American South, Reconstruction, and The Gilded Age, and is affiliated with Clark’s program in Race and Ethnic Relations. She has taught at Clark since 1991.
–Angela Bazydlo, Associate Director of Media Relations, and Natalie Bonetti ’17
 
Related Links:
“Turn-of-20th-century photos offer new glimpse into Worcester’s black life,” from the Telegram & Gazette, October 9, 2014.
“ Illuminating Worcester History ,” Telegram & Gazette editorial, October 28, 2014.
WCVB-TV’s “CityLine” features Clark Professor Janette Professor Greenwood and The People of Color Photo Project , WCVB-TV, Channel 5, Boston, October 19, 2014.
 
 
 
 
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‘Black lives matter’: Alumnus shares perspective on Ferguson shooting
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Oct 29, 2014
“President David Angel introduces Steven Roberts ’74 and his wife Eva Louise Frazer, M.D. prior to their presentation about Ferguson, Missouri.
The Aug. 9 killing of African-American teenager Michael Brown by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., sparked a wave of protests in the immediate aftermath, and the incident is emblematic of a nationwide scourge in which the lives of young black men are regarded as “disposable and without value,” Clark University Trustee Steven Roberts ’74 told a standing-room-only audience in Clark University’s Dana Commons on Oct. 23.
Roberts and his wife, Eva Louise Frazer, M.D. , who are residents of St. Louis, delivered a compelling presentation that used the events in Ferguson to urge a wider conversation on how law enforcement interacts with men of color in hostile, often deadly, ways. To illustrate the scope of the problem, Roberts began by reading a lengthy and “grisly roll call” of names of unarmed black men recently killed by police.
“As in every decade in American history, black men live with the unjust and unreasonable threat of deadly force for adjusting a belt or a seatbelt in a car, reaching for a wallet, suddenly changing direction while running, or, in the case of Trayvon Martin, for simply being perceived as not having the right to be present at a given place in time despite not violating any law or even [being] on a public street,” he said.
Roberts pointed to FBI statistics from 2005 to 2012 that reveal deadly force is used against a black person two times every week. Seventeen percent of those killed by police were under the age of 21, compared to 8.7 percent of white people killed by police within the same time period.
“Is this America?” Roberts asked. “Each of us must take a stand and make the point that black lives matter.”
Roberts led the audience through a detailed timeline of the Aug. 9 events, which began with Brown and his friends being confronted by Police Officer Darren Wilson for jaywalking and ended with Brown being shot six times, including in the eye and the top of his head. The entire incident unfolded in just over two minutes. Roberts shared cellphone footage broadcast on CNN, which shows nearby workers watching the encounter and gesturing to police that Brown’s hands are up in surrender after he’d fled from Wilson’s cruiser following a struggle.
Dr. Frazer, a St. Louis native, recalled the protests the following night that were met by a police force armed with battle gear, with one officer, later fired, caught on tape saying that protestors “should be put down like rabid dogs.” She soon found herself galvanized to take action. “It really didn’t matter that the officer was white. It really shouldn’t matter that the teenager was black. What really mattered was that an individual had been shot in the act of surrendering,” she said.
In response, Frazer and a group of friends created a group and social media presence called Michael Brown is Our Son. They organized a rally in Ferguson, which coincided with a rally led by the Rev. Jesse Jackson. The group conducted research into the rates of arrest against the poor, and they’ve been working with county politicians to implement change, she said. It was later uncovered that Ferguson police had been subject to multiple federal lawsuits for violent episodes against residents, including one in which a man was beaten then subsequently charged with destroying city property because his blood had spilled on an officer’s uniform.
Frazer stressed that the problem extends well beyond Ferguson. She played a video clip depicting an African-American man being shot by a South Carolina state trooper after reaching into his vehicle to retrievehis driver’s license. Another case involved a 21-year-old white man from Wisconsin who was shot in the temple when an officer mistakenly believed the man was reaching for the officer’s gun, despite the fact that the victim’s hands were cuffed behind his back. In the latter case, the officer was cleared within 48 hours following an internal review and remains on the force. The victim’s father discovered that since 1885 in Wisconsin there had never been an internal finding against a police officer for an unjustified homicide, and he successfully worked toward the creation of a citizen review board.
The history of police officers’ threatening interactions with young men of color has personal ramifications, Frazer told the audience.
“I have two African-American sons and I have had ‘the talk’ with them,” Frazer said. “I told them not to ever talk back to a police officer, to always keep your hands in plain view, to submit to whatever they want to do, and then when you get to the station make your one phone call — because I want you to survive that interaction.”
Frazer offered three takeaways:
What happened in Ferguson is a nationwide problem. Part of the solution is that police should be required to wear body cameras and use dash cams. They should also undergo more cultural sensitivity training that Frazer recommended be delivered by colleges and universities.
The nation must address the problem of implicitracial bias and move toward creating “sustainable equality and opportunity for all.” She noted that the U.S. is spending huge sums on prisons rather than on education and job opportunities.
Everyone has a role to play in implementing change.“Your voices independently and collectively can and will make a difference,” Frazer said.
“Do not stand silently or turn away in the face of injustice,” she advised. “It’s everyone’s responsibility to stand against racism and systemic practices that divide us and suppress the hopes and dreams of so many.”
The Oct. 23 presentation was sponsored by the Clark University Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Office of the President .
“I felt that the event, led by a trustee and his partner, and attended by a wide range of staff, students, and faculty, clearly evidenced the entire Clark community’s deep commitment to social awareness and justice,” said Betsy Huang, Clark University’s chief officer for diversity and inclusion.
 
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Five new members join Board of Trustees
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Sep 18, 2014
“The Clark University Board of Trustees appointed four new members on July 1, and welcomed a familiar face back for another term.
New members are Jason M. Barnett ’90 of Irvington, N.Y., Vickie H. Riccardo, P ’17, of Darien, Conn., and Wendi G. Trilling ’86 of Los Angeles, who were appointed to six-year terms, and Mona Domosh ’79, M.A. ’83, Ph.D. ’85, of Lebanon, N.H., who was elected by her fellow alumni for a six-year term. Former board member Robert J. Stevenish, P ’86, of Norwalk, Conn., was appointed to a term of six years.
The board also reappointed Robert J. Stevenish II ’86 and Peter D. Klein ’64, both of whom will serve for four more years.
Jason Barnett ’90
Jason Barnett is a founding managing partner of RXR Realty LLC, where he serves as vice chairman, general counsel, and secretary of the company. In addition to being responsible for all legal and compliance matters, Barnett oversees transactional activities and corporate initiatives. He is also the senior executive vice president, general counsel and member of the Board of Directors of RNY Property Trust, a public real estate company listed on the Australian Securities Exchange. Barnett is a member of the American Bar Association, National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, and Real Estate Board of New York, and is admitted to the Bar of the State of New York. He attended the London School of Economics and earned his Juris Doctor from Emory University School of Law.
Mona Domosh ’79, M.A. ’83, Ph.D. ’85
Mona Domosh is The Joan P. and Edward J. Foley, Jr. Professor in the Department of Geography at Dartmouth College, where she has been on the faculty since 2000. From 2010 to 2013, she served as chair of the department. Dr. Domosh is a cultural-historical geographer, with research interests in early (pre-1920) United States-based globalization; examining in what ways ideas of femininity, masculinity, consumption, and “whiteness” played into American empire-building during the late 19th and early 20th centuries; understanding the connections between gender, class and the cultural formation of large American cities in the 19th century; and exploring feminist perspectives in relationship to matters of space and place. She has authored, co-authored or co-edited six books and over 50 more than chapters and articles in academic journals. In April 2014, Dr. Domosh was elected president of the American Association of Geographers, a national organization that serves more than 10,000 members. Dr. Domosh and her husband reside in Lebanon, N.H.
Vickie Riccardo, P ’17
Vickie Riccardo has degrees from William & Mary (B.A.’76), Rutgers University (M.L.S. ’80) and Rutgers Law School (J.D. ’86). She is a retired attorney who has a lengthy history of public service in Darien, Conn., and the surrounding community. Riccardo was a member of Darien’s elected Representative Town Meeting from 1999-2006, where she served on several committees, including Rules, Planning Zoning and Housing, Public Safety, and Town Government Structure and Administration. She served as chairman of the town’s Charter Revision Commission (2006-2008), and was elected to the Planning and Zoning Commission in 2009. In 2012, she joined Darien’s Environmental Protection Commission, and has served as its chairman since 2013. A former at-large board member of the Darien League of Women Voters, she has also volunteered with the Darien Democratic Town Committee. Riccardo is interested in education and advocacy for children with special needs. Like many parents, she worked with her local Parent Teacher Organization. She was the founder and manager of an LLC for transportation to the Windward School, an independent school for dyslexic children. Prior to her extensive volunteering, Riccardo worked as a securities lawyer for The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America, and was an associate in the New Jersey law firm of Manger, Kalison, Murphy & McBride. She also worked as the corporate law librarian for The Prudential Insurance Company of America, while completing her M.L.S. and J.D. degrees. She and her husband have two daughters. The younger is currently a Clark University student.
Robert J. Stevenish, P ’86
Robert Stevenish is the retired president and chief operating officer of Modell’s Sporting Goods in New York City. Prior to this appointment, he served as CEO of Trilegiant Corporation and as a senior executive at other major retailers such as Montgomery Ward and JC Penney where he spent 27 years in senior management positions. Stevenish is the chairman of the Audit Committee of Myron Corporation. He also serves on the Board of Directors for TZP Group, The Edelweiss Fund – Zurich, and Stew Leonard’s. Previously, he served on the boards of Modell’s Sporting Goods, One Price Clothing Stores, Fedco Retail Stores, Vitesse Limousine and Air Charter Corporation, and the Retail Industry Leaders Association. He has served as a consultant of Vantage Group LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Goldman Sach’s Inc., and currently is a consultant to DeMatteo Monness LLC. He and his wife Isabella have two grown children and live in Norwalk, Conn.
Wendi G. Trilling ’86
Wendi Trilling graduated with a B.A. in screen studies from Clark University in 1986. She has served as the Executive Vice President, Comedy Development at CBS Entertainment in Los Angeles since 2004. She is the programming executive responsible for developing the network’s most successful comedies, including “Everybody loves Raymond,” “The King of Queens,” “Two and a Half Men,” “The Big Bang Theory,” and “How I Met Your Mother,” among others. Trilling serves as event committee chair for The Alliance for Children’s Rights “Right to Laugh” annual comedy event. She is also involved with Food Allergy Research and Education and PS1 Pluralistic School. She and her husband Stephen have twin sons and reside in Los Angeles.
 
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Importance
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Community Thrift Store reopens in grand style to ‘Save, Grow, and Give. Together.’
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Sep 25, 2014
“Clark University President David Angel speaks before a ribbon-cutting event at the Clark Community Thrift store, Sept. 5. (From video by Carlos Deschamps ’16)
A core of dedicated and passionate Clark students, with the enthusiastic support of the Clark administration and mentors, reopened the Clark Community Thrift Store  in a new location and with a renewed mission: “Save, Grow, and Give. Together.”
The not-for-profit, student-founded and student-run business serving the Clark and Worcester communities held a grand re-opening on Sept. 5at its new storefront at 930 Main Street in  Worcester, not far from the University Boosktore and several popular eateries and shops.
Clark President David Angel joined a spillover crowd who had gathered to help celebrate the reopening. Before leading a ribbon-cutting ceremony, Angel spoke about the store’s history and extolled its mission. He said the Thrift Store’s history “reflects Clark University at its very best,” and that its original mission continues to “make a fantastic impact on our community, not only in terms of our environmental footprint, but also in terms of how we engage with the community on our campus – our students, our faculty and our staff – and out in the world.”
To watch a video of the grand opening event, by Carlos Deschamps ’16,  click here . Follow the Community Thrift Store on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/clarkthrift .
The first Thrift Store was razed last winter after the City of Worcester discovered structural damage in the adjacent church building and ordered the demolition of the property for safety reasons.  After the closure, the Thrift Store operated “pop-up stores” around campus and above the University Bookstore.
The new location features a new aesthetic based on the research and work of Lloyd Schramm ’16. Schramm spent the summer working on a LEEP Project with  Sustainable Clark . He researched shop’s history, identified its core values and learned more about the world of “thrifting.” He collaborated with the store’s management team, Geory Kurtzhals GSOM/IDCE MBA ’15; Jeff Stanmyer ’14; Robert (Gus) Meissner ’14; and several other Thrift Store employees to redesign the entire look and feel of the store.
At the grand reopening, Jenny Isler, director of Sustainability at Clark, offered heartfelt remarks to the students: “We are so honored to have worked with you, learned from you, and created this beautiful, beautiful thing that is the Community Thrift Store, through LEEP Projects, through mentoring, through watching you overcome obstacles and continue to act sustainably toward the planet, toward our neighbors—being the leaders to further develop the culture at Clark of ‘Reduce. Reuse. Recycle.’ ”
Amy Whitney, director of the Innovation & Entrepreneurship program and LEEP adviser, also expressed her appreciation of the students’ “entrepreneurial spirit that is ingrained and embedded in all Clark students.”
Whitney presented to the student team a framed portrait of the original storefront, including a formal listing of all the students who have played a part in the store through the years.
The Clark Community Thrift Store was created by Clark students Rachel Gerber ’11 and Alexa Lightner ’11, who won a grant from the Innovation & Entrepreneurship program’s U-Reka! Big Idea Contest.  After observing the amount of perfectly good items students threw away during move-out time, the two envisioned a way to increase Clark’s sustainability by capturing the items for resale in a store that would serve the community, rather than sending the items to a landfill.
Since its opening in 2010, the Thrift Store has diverted approximately 30 tons from landfills by collecting donations from Clark students and employees for resale to members of the Clark and Worcester communities, creating significant savings for their customers and becoming a Clark landmark as they fulfill their mission.
“You have truly done something that is going to last and that will make a lasting difference,” Angel said.
Related links:
Clark ranks high on Forbes list of most entrepreneurial universities
Students’ Thrift Store plan wins annual Big Idea innovation contest
MBA student, entrepreneur excels at ‘elevator pitch’ competition”

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Importance
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Clark gets its close-up in McConaughey film
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Sep 19, 2014
“Matthew McConaughey films “The Sea of Trees” outside of Sackler Sciences Center on Sept. 5.
Chuck Agosta could have anticipated many things when he chose to become a physics professor, from dealing with procrastinating students to vying for dwindling pools of grant money.
But he never would have expected to be coaching a movie star on how to deliver his lines.
On Sept. 5, Agosta, chair of the Clark University Physics Department, found himself by Matthew McConaughey’s side, advising the Oscar-winning actor on classroom protocol and the jargon associated with teaching physics at the university level.
“He was a very quick study,” Agosta says. “When it came to working on his lines, he was sharp, animated and engaged.”
McConaughey visited Clark to film scenes for “ The Sea of Trees ,” a story of personal reflection and redemption. He plays Arthur Brennan, a physics professor whose life has unraveled to the point where he treks into Aokigahara , a dense forest at the base of Mt. Fuji in Japan, to contemplate suicide.
Check out more photos from McConaughey’s visit to campus.
The production company filmed most of the movie in Central Massachusetts, including at Wachusett Mountain and Purgatory Chasm (both doubling for Aokigahara). To film a flashback sequence depicting Arthur’s university days, director Gus Van Sant (“Good Will Hunting”) turned his attention to Clark, visiting the Sackler Sciences Center weeks in advance to find an office that could double as Arthur’s. He was impressed with Agosta’s space, which featured the perfect blend of brilliant-mind intellectualism (lots of books, papers and gadgets) with a touch of scholarly clutter (lots and lots of books, papers and gadgets). Van Sant also settled on a physical chemistry lab in Sackler to film a scene featuring McConaughey with his students (played by Agosta’s physics students as well as his daughter Elyza).
On the morning of Sept. 5 trucks, trailers and an army of crew members descended on Clark for the day-long filming, a process that to an observer may have seemed chaotic, but which in fact was remarkably controlled. Agosta was setting the images on his office computer screen in preparation for the afternoon’s filming when a staffer rushed in and said, “They need you in the classroom.”
“I was escorted to the lab, and this guy turned around, and for the first time I saw Matthew McConaughey. He immediately asked for help with his lines.”
With the production crew waiting to begin rolling, Agosta walked the actor through the proper usage of science terms and also advised him about how a professor might speak to students who are displeasing him. He says he admired McConaughey’s ability to pick up on key phrases and incorporate some of his own ad-libs to polish the dialogue. “There are some great lines,” Agosta notes with a laugh. “My seed’s in there.”
The scenes were set in late fall, and, despite that day’s temperatures exceeding 90 degrees, the student extras were asked to dress in flannels, boots and jeans. Adding to their discomfort, the air conditioning in the lab was shut off so the boom mics wouldn’t pick up its hum.
The only time McConaughey ventured outside of Sackler was to circle the building for some exterior shots. By this time, word was out that the actor was on campus and he was quickly trailed by an excited cadre of students, staffers and fans firing off photos on their smartphones.
In the afternoon and into the evening, McConaughey sat at Agosta’s desk shooting take after take of a conversation between the professor and a student. A day earlier, Agosta, a self-described pack rat, worked with the set decorators to spruce up his space, which meant, among other things, removing boxes of old student exams. “It was actually a great help to me, because most of those exams will go into the shredder,” he says. “It’s a once-every-twenty-years kind of thing.”
McConaughey remained locked into his character throughout the day, always looking straight ahead when he walked through a hallway or to a waiting van and keeping his interactions to a minimum. Agosta watched the office scenes on a nearby monitor shoulder to shoulder with Van Sant, and, when asked, he would give McConaughey technical tips for keeping the dialogue physics-consistent.
“There was no small talk; I was always dealing with him during the middle of a scene,” Agosta says. “When he left he tapped me on the shoulder and thanked me. That was nice.”
Getting an audience with Matthew McConaughey wasn’t necessarily the goal of every Clarkie. Film studies major Emma Ogg ’17, who staked out the set for much of the day, says she was most thrilled to have a brief chat with Van Sant.
“I started to understand that our overenthusiastic nature about movie stars and directors is maybe more about the deep admiration we have for their work rather than just wanting to meet a celebrity,” she says. “Their jobs are about transporting an audience someplace else, teaching us something, or making us feel something different than we do in the everyday, and that is the important work.”
— Jim Keogh, Assistant Vice President for News and Editorial Services
 
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Clark U. welcomes nine tenure-track faculty
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Sep 15, 2014
“Clark University welcomes new tenure-track faculty members for the 2014-2015 academic year.
David Correll, GSOM
David Correll , Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Management, graduated from Iowa State University with a Ph.D. in supply chain management and an M.S. in sustainable agriculture, as well as biorenewable fuels and technology. His research applies elements of operations research and ecology to envision and test new ideas for sustainable supply chain design. David is especially interested in energy issues and has published articles on supply chain design for advanced biofuels, served as an ad hoc reviewer for the journal Energy Policy, and served in various capacities to build entrepreneurial waste vegetable oil-to-biodiesel facilities while in graduate school. Before earning his graduate degrees, David worked as an oil and gas analyst at a private energy consultancy in New York City and as an oil and gas economist for the U.S. Department of Energy in Washington, D.C. He earned his B.A. in international relations from the George Washington University in Washington.
David Cuberes, Economics
David Cuberes , Associate Professor of Economics, is an economist with interests in macro and urban economics. His research covers a wide range of topics including economic growth and institutions, gender inequality, urbanization and city growth, and the demographic transition. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago and has been an assistant professor at Clemson University, the University of Alicante (Spain), and the University of Sheffield (United Kingdom). He has acted as a consultant to the World Bank since 2003, explaining the diffusion of technology across countries, the process of rural urban transformation in South Asia, and the productivity cost associated with gender inequality in the labor market in different countries. His research has been discussed in The Wall Street Journal, The Economist, the BBC, and the economics blog voxEU, among others.
Eric L. De Barros, English
Eric L. De Barros , Assistant Professor of English, holds a Ph.D. in English literature with an emphasis in Renaissance literature and education from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research centers on the politics of embodied subjectivity and specifically examines how early modern thinkers variously confronted the theoretical tension between the body and discourse in an effort to work through the period’s most pressing concerns. His main book project, “The Labors of Hercules: Embodied Learning and Male Domestication in Early Modern Culture and Literature,” explores the tendency of educational theorists to focus on the bodies of grammar schoolboys and rhetorically materialize learning and cognitive processes into the physical and materialistic terms of their aristocratic patrons. Eric has taught a range of courses including “Shakespeare and the Pedagogy of Sexual Violence,” “Epic Masculinities: From Homer to Milton,” and “Autobiographies of Black Masculinity.”
Rob Drewell, Biology
Rob Drewell , Associate Professor of Biology, is a developmental biologist. His research utilizes experimental molecular genomic, mathematical and computational approaches to investigate the regulation of gene expression during embryonic development. Much of his work is focused on using insect model species, including the fruit fly and honey bee. Prior to arriving at Clark, Rob was an associate professor at Harvey Mudd College in Claremont, Cal. He has received research grants from the National Institutes of Health, a CAREER award from the National Science Foundation and been recognized as a Distinguished Mentor by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge and a bachelor’s degree (with honors) in molecular genetics from King’s College, University of London.
John Gibbons, Biology
John Gibbons , Assistant Professor of Biology, is an evolutionary genomicist. His research aims to shed light on the evolutionary forces and genomic processes underlying phenotypic variation. In particular, John’s research is focused on understanding how humans have altered the genomes of domesticated microbes and how large-scale genomic alterations influence the virulence of fungal pathogens. He earned a B.S. in biology from Keene State College and a Ph.D. in biological sciences from Vanderbilt University. Since receiving his doctorate, John has worked as a postdoctoral research fellow at Harvard School of Public Health.
John Magee, Math and Computer Science
John Magee’s (Assistant Professor of Math and Computer Science) primary research interests include computer vision, human-computer interaction, and assistive technology. He investigates novel user interface technologies that enable people with profound disabilities to communicate and participate socially in the world around them through computers. A major focus area is ability-based interfaces that change and adapt to provide for the diverse education, communication, and social needs of users of all abilities. He is also interested in applying computer vision and human-computer interaction techniques to interdisciplinary problems and establishing collaborations with biology, GIS, psychology, and education. John holds a Ph.D. and M.A. in computer science from Boston University, and a B.A. in computer science and mathematics from Boston College. For the past three years, he has been a visiting assistant professor in Clark’s Mathematics and Computer Science Department.
Mary Ellen Morris, GSOM
Mary Ellen Morris is a Lecturer/Director of MS Programs in the Graduate School of Management. She most recently served as lecturer and adjunct faculty in the accounting program at the University of New Hampshire Durham, teaching in the undergraduate and M.B.A. programs and advising undergraduate accounting majors. She also spent four years as a visiting professor of accounting and adjunct faculty at the University of Massachusetts Lowell, serving as a thesis advisor to the undergraduate Honors Program. She’s taught accounting at Bentley University, Northern Essex Community College, and Park University at Hanscom Air Force Base. Mary Ellen previously held numerous senior level corporate positions, including audit manager, controller, director of finance and CFO in insurance, healthcare, manufacturing, engineering, research and development, and software. She has also worked in public and non-profit organizations. She holds bachelor’s in finance from UMass Amherst, a master’s in finance from Bentley University, and is AACSB certified.
Nicole Overstreet, Psychology
Nicole Overstreet’s (Assistant Professor of Psychology) program of research examines sociocultural factors that contribute to mental and sexual health disparities among black women and other marginalized groups. Her primary research examines the consequences of intimate partner violence-related stigma on health outcomes from a multi-level perspective (i.e., personal, interpersonal, structural level). Her second line of work focuses on the influence of societal stereotypes around race and gender on the sexual health and well-being of marginalized groups. Nicole earned her Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Connecticut and was a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS at Yale University.
Andrew L. Stewart, Psychology
Andrew L. Stewart , Assistant Professor of Psychology, is a social psychologist studying intergroup relations in the contexts of gender, race, nationality, sexual orientation, and class. His research examines how widespread beliefs about social groups contribute to intergroup violence and discrimination, and how to change those beliefs to reduce violence and discrimination. For example, Andrew’s research has examined how sexist and traditional masculinity norms contribute to violence and discrimination against women, and he has administered and evaluated sexual assault prevention programs for college men to reduce sexual violence. Andrew received his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees in social psychology from the University of Connecticut and B.S. degrees in psychology and mathematics from Colorado State University.
Zhenyang (David) Tang, GSOM
Zhenyang (David) Tang , Assistant Professor in the Graduate School of Management, taught investments and introduction to finance at the University of Alberta prior to joining Clark University. His research interests include empirical corporate finance and market efficiency, with a recent focus on how trading by corporate officers and directors affects stock price informativeness, cost of capital and firm value. He also works extensively in fields such as corporate investment decisions, corporate executive characteristics and accounting information quality. David received his Ph.D. in finance from the University of Albert, and bachelor’s and master’s degree in economics from Tsinghua University.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Importance
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Community Thrift Store reopens in grand style to ‘Save, Give, and Grow. Together.’
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Sep 12, 2014
“Clark University President David Angel speaks before a ribbon-cutting event at the Clark Community Thrift store, Sept. 5. (From video by Carlos Deschamps ’16)
A core of dedicated and passionate Clark students, with the enthusiastic support of the Clark administration and mentors, reopened the Clark Community Thrift Store  in a new location and with a renewed mission: “Save, Give, and Grow. Together.”
The not-for-profit, student-founded and student-run business serving the Clark and Worcester communities held a grand re-opening on Sept. 5at its new storefront at 930 Main Street in  Worcester, not far from the University Boosktore and several popular eateries and shops.
Clark President David Angel joined a spillover crowd who had gathered to help celebrate the reopening. Before leading a ribbon-cutting ceremony, Angel spoke about the store’s history and extolled its mission. He said the Thrift Store’s history “reflects Clark University at its very best,” and that its original mission continues to “make a fantastic impact on our community, not only in terms of our environmental footprint, but also in terms of how we engage with the community on our campus – our students, our faculty and our staff – and out in the world.”
To watch a video of the grand opening event, by Carlos Deschamps ’16,  click here . Follow the Community Thrift Store on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/clarkthrift .
The first Thrift Store was razed last winter after the City of Worcester discovered structural damage in the adjacent church building and ordered the demolition of the property for safety reasons.  After the closure, the Thrift Store operated “pop-up stores” around campus and above the University Bookstore.
The new location features a new aesthetic based on the research and work of Lloyd Schramm ’16. Schramm spent the summer working on a LEEP Project with  Sustainable Clark . He researched shop’s history, identified its core values and learned more about the world of “thrifting.” He collaborated with the store’s management team, Geory Kurtzhals GSOM/IDCE MBA ’15; Jeff Stanmyer ’14; Robert (Gus) Meissner ’14; and several other Thrift Store employees to redesign the entire look and feel of the store.
At the grand reopening, Jenny Isler, director of Sustainability at Clark, offered heartfelt remarks to the students: “We are so honored to have worked with you, learned from you, and created this beautiful, beautiful thing that is the Community Thrift Store, through LEEP Projects, through mentoring, through watching you overcome obstacles and continue to act sustainably toward the planet, toward our neighbors—being the leaders to further develop the culture at Clark of ‘Reduce. Reuse. Recycle.’ ”
Amy Whitney, director of the Innovation & Entrepreneurship program and LEEP adviser, also expressed her appreciation of the students’ “entrepreneurial spirit that is ingrained and embedded in all Clark students.”
Whitney presented to the student team a framed portrait of the original storefront, including a formal listing of all the students who have played a part in the store through the years.
The Clark Community Thrift Store was created by Clark students Rachel Gerber ’11 and Alexa Lightner ’11, who won a grant from the Innovation & Entrepreneurship program’s U-Reka! Big Idea Contest.  After observing the amount of perfectly good items students threw away during move-out time, the two envisioned a way to increase Clark’s sustainability by capturing the items for resale in a store that would serve the community, rather than sending the items to a landfill.
Since its opening in 2010, the Thrift Store has diverted approximately 30 tons from landfills by collecting donations from Clark students and employees for resale to members of the Clark and Worcester communities, creating significant savings for their customers and becoming a Clark landmark as they fulfill their mission.
“You have truly done something that is going to last and that will make a lasting difference,” Angel said.
Related links:
Clark ranks high on Forbes list of most entrepreneurial universities
Students’ Thrift Store plan wins annual Big Idea innovation contest
MBA student, entrepreneur excels at ‘elevator pitch’ competition”

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Students in the class of 2018 tell their stories
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Aug 28, 2014
“Students in the class of 2018 share the stories of why they came to Clark University.
There’s an adage in journalism that everybody has a story.
The LEEP Center set out to prove it true in a fun and revealing Orientation exercise in which first-year students were asked to compose personal narratives that will help them chart their unique Clark paths.
The Aug. 23 session, “Telling Your Story,” held in Atwood Hall, introduced students to the LEEP Center advising model and used personal testimony to expose them to the breadth of offerings available to them at Clark University. Michelle Bata, associate dean and LEEP director, noted that academics, study abroad, internships and a host of other experiences will “shape your story and the person you will become four years from now.”
See more images from the “Telling Your Story” session  here . 
Three guest speakers took the stage to relate their own stories.
Clark University President David Angel recalled his days as a geography undergraduate at Cambridge University in England, revealing that while he studied hard and played sports, he realized after graduating that his university experience had been lacking. Under the British system, Angel said, one declares a major by 16 years old and remains entirely focused on that subject throughout his/her university career to the exclusion of other intellectual experiences. While he felt underserved by the institution, he also acknowledged, “It was my fault I hadn’t taken full advantage of the opportunities available to me.” Later, he reasoned, “We can do better, advise better, coach better.”
For one first-year student, Clark is a school that never says no.
After arriving at Clark as a geography professor in the late 1980s, Angel said, some of his most productive research into economic development was conducted in collaboration with faculty from other disciplines — fortuitous “collisions” that offered fuller, more varied perspectives on the subject matter. As president, he told the newest Clarkies, he’s passionate about creating an education experience that not only allows students to take full advantage of Clark’s resources but will launch them effectively into productive lives and careers.
Katie Bogen ’15 assured the students that one’s path does not always follow a straight line. She entered Clark as a theater arts major, but a course about Latin American politics awakened an unknown academic passion. She switched her major to comparative politics with a Latin studies minor, though she exercised her creative muscles as a member, and now director, of the campus a cappella group Counterpoints.
Employing “Harry Potter” imagery, Bogen talked of securing LEEP and Barth internships that allowed her to move from “the castle of Clark” to create and lead workshops on gender, sex and sexuality, and reproductive health for immigrant female teens in Worcester. She’s now planning on applying for a Fulbright scholarship to conduct research on the availability of reproductive services to Guatemalan women.
“Clark forced me out of my comfort zone,” she said, urging the students to take risks and explore opportunities. Or, in Harry Potter terms, “battle the dragon and find the unicorn.”
Sanjiv Fernando ’16 recalled that he was a transfer student to Clark last year, sitting in Atwood Hall and considering his own path. The environmental studies major had a “burning passion” for wildlife since childhood that culminated in an extraordinary opportunity. Fernando received a $10,000 grant from Davis Projects for Peace, and, with additional funding as a LEEP Fellow, he oversaw the building and installation of leopard-proof mesh enclosures to project cattle in his native Sri Lanka. The enclosures helped provide income security for 12 farmers by keeping their animals safe, and, in turn, protected the endangered Sri Lankan leopards from being killed in retaliation.
“If a year ago someone told me I’d be on this stage talking about my LEEP project , I wouldn’t have believed you. But here I am. The great part is next time it could be you.”
Following the presentations in Atwood, the first-year student broke up into smaller advising groups where the students were given paper and crayons to depict on paper how their story opens. The question they were asked to answer through their drawings was: Why did you choose Clark?”

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Student researchers present key findings on beetle infestation’s impact on Worcester’s environment, policies and people
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Aug 26, 2014
““Prior to the infestation, our neighborhood was an area of beautiful tree lined streets. Shade was abundant and the neighborhood looked lovely. Now our area is barren and depressing.” This is one Worcester resident’s response to a survey question posed by student researchers at Clark University , who, for the past three years, have examined the impacts of the Asian long-horned beetle (ALB) infestation on the physical environment, politics, and society of the Worcester area.
On July 31, students involved with the national  Human-Environment Regional Observatory  (HERO) program based at Clark and sponsored by the National Science Foundation through its Research Experiences for Undergraduates Site (REU Site) program, held a Stakeholder Summit. They presented findings from their summer research on the impacts of the beetle infestation on forests and communities in the region. After the presentation, community members and representatives from official organizations met in groups to discuss the findings and identify new areas of concern.
 To see a video of the entire Stakeholder Summit presentation, click here .
Click here to watch a TV news segment about the HERO Summit at Clark University.
The 2014 HERO Fellows pause at the start of their summer research program in early June. From left: Amber Todoroff (University of Florida), Albert Bautista (Humboldt State University, CA), Amy Phillips (Clark University), Andrew Veruzzo (College of the Holy Cross), Ali Jackman (Whittier College, CA), Elizabeth Anderson (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, NY), Anona Miller (Appalachian State University, NC), Marina Khananayev (Clark University), Gaia Khairina (Clark University), Ben Ewald (Clark University) and Hannah Rush (Clark University).
Based on a competitive application process, the eight-week HERO program draws from a diverse group of undergraduate students from across the country. This year’s HERO Fellows came from as far away California and Florida and as close as Clark and Holy Cross. Leading the program were geography associate professors John Rogan and Deb Martin, along with research assistant professor Verna DeLauer and doctoral student Arthur Elmes.
Fellows learned how to use various research methods, including GIS, remote sensing, geostatistical modeling, interviews and focus groups. They are paired with Clark faculty mentors   and other researchers on the HERO team in one of two research domains: Beetle Impact Assessment or Place-Making Assessment. The PMA team noted that residents’ experience with change in community character increases their receptiveness to information regarding environmental issues. BIA group members stated that maintaining a continuous replanting program is necessary to offset the high mortality rate of young trees and ensure that residents will benefit from Worcester’s urban forest in the future.
The HERO-REU program reflects the human-environment research focus that is a hallmark of the Graduate School of Geography at Clark University.
At the opening meeting of the 2014 HERO Fellows program in early June, Anthony Bebbington, Geography department chair, told the students: “This is a chance for you to get to know Worcester, as a team that includes undergraduates, master’s and Ph.D. students. You will see how proud we are of this department. There is nowhere else in the States that has this environment. It clicks here, partly because of the HERO program. You’ll take away a sense of skills and orientations that you’ll use in any environment — from the World Bank to a city government.
“This will be a summer to take away a set of skills that are going to be with you forever.”
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge convention. Change our world.  www.clarku.edu
 
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Clark U. senior receives $10,000 stipend from Davis Projects for Peace, helps cattle farmers and leopards coexist in Sri Lanka
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Aug 15, 2014
“ 
Sanjiv Fernando ’15 (left) shakes hands with W.P. Piyadasa, a cattle herder who received one of Fernando’s leopard-proof mesh enclosures.
Clark University senior Sanjiv Fernando received a $10,000 grant from Davis Projects for Peace which he used to fund his self-designed conservation project “ Mitigating the Human-Leopard Conflict in Southeast Sri Lanka ” this summer in his native country.
With funding from the Davis Foundation and support from Clark’s LEEP initiative , Fernando spent the summer just outside of Yala National Park , an area known for having the highest density of leopards in the world, building and installing leopard-proof mesh enclosures for Sri Lankan farmers to protect their cattle. The enclosures helped provide income security for 12 farmers by keeping their animals safe, and, in turn, protected the endangered Sri Lankan leopards from being killed in retaliation.
“A lot of the theory I learned in Ecology was critical in forming an understanding of the conflict and also proved useful when implementing solutions to combat the issue,” said Fernando. “It was rewarding to be able to apply classroom theory to enforce real-world solutions.”
Fernando said that the experience made him feel closer to his home country of Sri Lanka; he spoke mostly in Sinhala while carrying out his project, allowing him to “significantly improve [his] command of the native tongue.”
Fernando, who is passionate about wildlife, said he designed his project to allow him to continue the work he did last summer while interning with the John Keells Group and their initiative “ Project Leopard .”
“I have left behind a system that safeguards the livelihoods and incomes of cattle herders, and have helped cattle farmers embrace the ecological and commercial importance of the leopard, an animal they once considered a pest,” said Fernando.  “Overall, I have created a platform that fosters peaceful coexistence between humans and leopards.”
Fernando said that this opportunity has provided him with the experience and skills he needs to succeed in his career, and says his project represents “the first major achievement in what hopefully will be a long career dedicated to protecting endangered species and preserving their habitats.”
“We are pleased to once again help young people launch some initiatives that will bring new energy and ideas to improving the prospects for peace in the world,” said Philip O. Geier, Executive Director of the Davis United World College Scholars Program which administers Projects for Peace.
Fernando is a member of the Class of 2015 at Clark; he majors in environmental science and policy and minors in French .  He plays Club Tennis and Club Volleyball and is a member of both the International Students Association (ISA) and the South Asian Students Association (SASA).  Fernando will serve as a Peer Adviser for Week One 2014 (first-year student orientation). He hopes to take advantage of Clark’s Accelerated BA/Master’s Degree Program before embarking on a career in wildlife conservation.
Fernando is a 2011 graduate of the American International School Dhaka (AISD) .
Other Clark students who have received funding from Davis Projects for Peace in the past include:  Melat Seyoum ’15 in 2013 for “The YWCA Critical Dialogue Program in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia;” Bonginkhosi (Petros) Vilakati ’13 in 2012 for “Recycling for Peace-Swaziland;” Amanda Mundt ’13 in 2011 for “Lekol Dete for Restavek and Free Children in Les Cayes;” Anuj Adhikary ’10 and Joseph Kowalski ’10 in 2010 for “The Energy for Education Project;” and Chelsea Ellingsen ’10 in 2009 for her project “Seeds of Change.”
Davis Projects for Peace invites all undergraduates at the 91 American colleges and universities which are partners in the Davis United World College Scholars Program to compete for these grants. A total of 127 winning projects were selected and awarded $10,000 each for implementation this summer.
Beginning in 2007, on the occasion of her 100th birthday, international philanthropist Kathryn W. Davis chose to celebrate by committing $1 million to  Projects for Peace .  Now in its seventh year, the Davis Projects for Peace continue to support and encourage today’s motivated youth to create and test their own ideas for building peace.”

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Clark U. senior receives $10,000 stipend from Davis Projects for Peace, helps cattle farmers and leopards coexist in Sri Lanka
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Aug 11, 2014
“ 
Sanjiv Fernando ’15 (left) shakes hands with W.P. Piyadasa, a cattle herder who received one of Fernando’s leopard-proof mesh enclosures.
Clark University senior Sanjiv Fernando received a $10,000 grant from Davis Projects for Peace which he used to fund his self-designed conservation project “ Mitigating the Human-Leopard Conflict in Southeast Sri Lanka ” this summer in his native country.
With the support from the Davis Foundation and additional funding from Clark’s LEEP initiative , Fernando spent the summer just outside of Yala National Park , an area known for having the highest density of leopards in the world, building and installing leopard-proof mesh enclosures for Sri Lankan farmers to protect their cattle. The enclosures helped provide income security for 12 farmers by keeping their animals safe, and, in turn, protected the endangered Sri Lankan leopards from being killed in retaliation.
“A lot of the theory I learned in Ecology was critical in forming an understanding of the conflict and also proved useful when implementing solutions to combat the issue,” said Fernando. “It was rewarding to be able to apply classroom theory to enforce real-world solutions.”
Fernando said that the experience made him feel closer to his home country of Sri Lanka; he spoke mostly in Sinhala while carrying out his project, allowing him to “significantly improve [his] command of the native tongue.”
Fernando, who is passionate about wildlife, said he designed his project to allow him to continue the work he did last summer while interning with the John Keells Group and their initiative “ Project Leopard .”
“I have left behind a system that safeguards the livelihoods and incomes of cattle herders, and have helped cattle farmers embrace the ecological and commercial importance of the leopard, an animal they once considered a pest,” said Fernando.  “Overall, I have created a platform that fosters peaceful coexistence between humans and leopards.”
Fernando said that this opportunity has provided him with the experience and skills he needs to succeed in his career, and says his project represents “the first major achievement in what hopefully will be a long career dedicated to protecting endangered species and preserving their habitats.”
“We are pleased to once again help young people launch some initiatives that will bring new energy and ideas to improving the prospects for peace in the world,” said Philip O. Geier, Executive Director of the Davis United World College Scholars Program which administers Projects for Peace.
Fernando is a member of the Class of 2015 at Clark; he majors in environmental science and policy and minors in French .  He plays Club Tennis and Club Volleyball and is a member of both the International Students Association (ISA) and the South Asian Students Association (SASA).  Fernando will serve as a Peer Adviser for Week One 2014 (first-year student orientation). He hopes to take advantage of Clark’s Accelerated BA/Master’s Degree Program before embarking on a career in wildlife conservation.
Fernando is a 2011 graduate of the American International School Dhaka (AISD) .
Other Clark students who have received funding from Davis Projects for Peace in the past include:  Melat Seyoum ’15 in 2013 for “The YWCA Critical Dialogue Program in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia;” Bonginkhosi (Petros) Vilakati ’13 in 2012 for “Recycling for Peace-Swaziland;” Amanda Mundt ’13 in 2011 for “Lekol Dete for Restavek and Free Children in Les Cayes;” Anuj Adhikary ’10 and Joseph Kowalski ’10 in 2010 for “The Energy for Education Project;” and Chelsea Ellingsen ’10 in 2009 for her project “Seeds of Change.”
Davis Projects for Peace invites all undergraduates at the 91 American colleges and universities which are partners in the Davis United World College Scholars Program to compete for these grants. A total of 127 winning projects were selected and awarded $10,000 each for implementation this summer.
Beginning in 2007, on the occasion of her 100th birthday, international philanthropist Kathryn W. Davis chose to celebrate by committing $1 million to  Projects for Peace .  Now in its seventh year, the Davis Projects for Peace continue to support and encourage today’s motivated youth to create and test their own ideas for building peace.”

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Clark U. to offer Professional Certificate in Youth Work Practice
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jul 24, 2014
“In a world where racism, sexism, and homophobia exist, it is important for young people to have access to role models they can trust and respect—individuals who can help them develop knowledge, skills, and a sense of purpose.  Clark University is now helping to train those leaders by offering a Professional Certificate in Youth Work Practice .
“Whether leading a youth development organization, managing youth programs, or working at the frontlines with young people, youth workers put the well-being of young people at the center of their efforts,” said Laurie Ross , associate professor of Community Development and Planning at Clark and director of the certificate program.  “Most of the time, youth workers have to learn how to do this on their feet. There are very few opportunities for professional education for this field.” Clark’s certificate program, the only one of its kind in the area, will combine theory, dialogue, reflection, and practice to ensure that students are effective with young people and have the administrative skills to demonstrate their impact. “One of the most exciting aspects of this program is that it was co-created with local youth workers,” said professor Ross.  “We essentially created the type of academic program they were looking for.” Clark’s program is designed for both current master’s degree students at Clark as well as practicing youth workers from the Greater Worcester area and beyond. The program consists of six core courses as well as learning, teaching and action in the context of a Community of Practice (CoP) that includes Clark faculty directly engaged in youth work along with aspiring, novice, and experienced youth workers. Individuals who pursue the certificate will learn to:
identify and analyze community forces that positively and negatively affect young people and how to apply this analysis to youth work;
appraise and respond to complex and ambiguous youth work problems and to think and act on one’s feet;
involve young people in their own analysis of oppressive systems;
develop, run, manage, evaluate, and fund theoretically grounded youth development programs and organizations; and
network with other youth development professionals and share resources.
Students can select from a wide array of courses offered by Clark’s International Development, Community, and Environment (IDCE) Department , as well as other departments at Clark.  Courses include youth and community development, public communication, non-profit management, and grant writing.  Faculty from seven departments are involved in this specialization ; all are directly engaged in some form of youth work practice or research. Ross said the courses in the program, like all courses at Clark under Liberal Education and Effective Practice (LEEP) , are designed to encourage reflection, empowerment, and development of a professional collective identity. Students in the program can also get involved in several ongoing research projects Clark faculty are conducting with our community partners aimed at helping vulnerable youth in the city of Worcester.
For more information on the Youth Work Certification Program, visit http://www.clarku.edu/graduate-admissions/contact/program-contacts.cfm .”

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New report finds LGB parents and their children faring well despite heterosexism
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jul 25, 2014
“Clark University associate professor of psychology Abbie Goldberg
A new report co-authored by Clark University associate professor of psychology Abbie E. Goldberg  finds that lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) parents and their children are functioning quite well despite confronting heterosexism in a variety of social contexts, including healthcare, legal and school systems.
Co-written with Williams Institute scholars Nanette K. Gartrell and Gary Gates, the Research Report on LGB-Parent Families is the result of collaborative research Goldberg conducted while serving as a visiting scholar at the institute during 2013 and early 2014. The report provides an overview of the contemporary research on LGB-parent families and highlights research gaps on the experiences of LGB parents and their children.
“Studies on LGB parenting have grown in number and scope over the past several decades,  which enables us to understand how LGB parents and their children are doing when compared to different-sex parent families,” said Goldberg. “Despite concerns that the sexual orientation of LGB parents will negatively affect children, research is consistent in indicating that sexuality is not relevant to adults’ parenting capacities and the outcomes of their children.”
Key findings in the report include:
• In the majority of contemporary LGB-parent families, the children were conceived in the context of different-sex relationships as opposed to being conceived or adopted in the context of same-sex relationships; however research is lacking on LGB stepfamily formation post-heterosexual divorce.
• Same-sex couples are approximately 4.5 times more likely than different-sex couples to be rearing adopted children. However, many LGB prospective parents are vulnerable to discriminatory attitudes on the part of adoption professionals—or denied adoption altogether.
• Studies that have compared lesbian, gay, and heterosexual parents in terms of mental health, perceived parenting stress, and parenting competence have found few differences based on family structure.
• Research findings are consistent in showing that psychological adjustment outcomes, academic achievement outcomes and social functioning outcomes for children born into LGB-parent families do not vary significantly from those in different-sex parent families. In addition, children of LGB parents do not seem to self-identify as exclusively lesbian/gay at significantly higher rates than children of heterosexual parents.
“We’ve seen growth in the research on LGB parenting, but many studies have focused on a very specific portion of this population,” Gartrell said. “More research is needed that explores the experiences of working-class and racial minority LGB-parent families, as well as LGB-parent families living in non-urban environments. Such work is especially timely given demographic data showing that many LGB-parent families are residing in unexpected regions of the country.”
Click here for the full report.
Professor Goldberg, who joined the psychology faculty at Clark in 2005, is co-editor of “LGBT-Parent Families: Innovations in Research and Implications for Practice” (Springer, October 2012) , and author of “Gay Dads: Transitions to adoptive fatherhood” (NYU Press, July 2012) .  Her first book, “Lesbian and Gay Parents and their Children: Research on the Family Life Cycle” (APA Books 2009) , won several awards. She served as senior research fellow at the Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute in Newton. Goldberg also has blogged for Psychology Today and the Huffington Post .
The Williams Institute is dedicated to conducting rigorous, independent research on sexual orientation and gender identity law and public policy. The Institute produces high-quality research with real-world relevance and disseminates it to judges, legislators, policymakers, media and the public.
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge convention. Change our world.
www.clarku.edu
Related links:
“Clark University professor receives $700K grant from NIMH to study postpartum depression issues”
At White House forum, Clark U. psychologist Abbie Goldberg shares research on gay fathers
Clark psychologist publishes groundbreaking book on gay dads
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Clark University graduate named to All Star Model UN Team
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jul 11, 2014
“Recent Clark University graduate Yohan Senerath is on the North American College All Star Model UN Team.
Clark University graduate Yohan D. Senerath ’14 has been named to the select roster of the 2013-2014 North American College All Star Model UN Team.
The list of best delegates in the how do i get viagra in canada College Circuit in the United States and Canada is published by Bestdelegate.com , the premier organization in charge of advocating for Model UN and promoting it worldwide.
Senerath’s profile at the site reads: “As Head Delegate, Yohan has not only been a major source of encouragement and passion, but also a source of great knowledge. He has been the team’s guru, helping even the most experienced delegates with substantive and strategic committee advice. Although Yohan draws from a massive source of natural talent, he relies heavily on his passionate work ethic and managed to win an award at every competitive conference he attended.”
Clark University is among the top 20 in Best Delegate's just-released  North America Final College Rankings  for 2013-2014.
“Yohan is an exceptional student of international relations and history,” added Clark University Model UN faculty adviser Srini Sitaraman, associate professor of  Political Science . “He has deep interest and unbounded enthusiasm for international diplomacy.  His mastery over Model UN debate procedures and his personal knowledge is extraordinary.  I believe that Yohan will go on to do great things in the world of diplomacy.”
Senerath, who received a BA,  magna cum laude , in political science and history at Clark's Commencement on May 18, has been accepted into the top-ranked Masters of Science in Foreign Service Program at Georgetown University. He is among fewer than 100 applicants to be accepted from among a pool of 800; with a mere 10 percent entering straight from college (about four years of work experience is generally required).
Senerath was a member of the Global Scholars Program at Clark University (2010-2014). His other honors and activities include a Harrington Public Affairs Fellowship for Political Science Majors and induction into Pi Alpha Theta – National History Honors Society and Pi Sigma Alpha – National History Honors Society for Academic Accomplishment in Political Science. His internship experiences include work with the National Peace Council Sri Lanka as Election Monitor for People's Action for Free and Fair Elections monitoring the first Local Council Elections held in the war-ravaged Northern Province in Sri Lanka; the Sri Lankan Mission to the UN in New York; and a position with the office of the Permanent Observer of the Caribbean Community at the United Nations in New York.
Senerath was accepted as a Clark LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) Pioneer, receiving a research grant to study, during the summer of 2013, Sri Lankan foreign policy during the fourth phase of the Sri Lankan Civil War.
As Head Delegate Clark University Model United Nations, Senerath consistently excelled at competitions and was named Outstanding Delegate at the Harvard National Model United Nations, the Security Council Simulation at Yale University, and the Five College Model UN Conference at Mount Holyoke College.  He earned Honorable Mention Delegate awards at Harvard, Columbia, and Georgetown.
“The social intelligence that I acquired from this activity nicely complemented my academic training in political science and history, which helped enrich my diplomatic skill set immensely – a perfect blend of theory and practice of international affairs,” Senerath said. “The individuals you meet at Model UN are a fantastic bunch of people who are incredibly aware about the world and determined to make a positive change.”
Senerath is a 2009 graduate of the Colombo International School in Sri Lanka.
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge convention. Change our world.  canadian pharmacy
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Clark University named a 'best buy' in 2015 Fiske Guide to Colleges
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jul 10, 2014
“The Fiske Guide to Colleges, revised and updated for 2015, includes Clark University as a “Best Buy” among the list of the “best and most interesting of the more than 2,200 four-year colleges in the United States.”
Clark is one of just 41 institutions — 21 public and 20 private — to receive the Fiske “Best Buy” rating, which identifies “schools that offer outstanding academics with relatively modest prices.”
The guide — which covers a range of topics, including academic quality, student body, social life, financial aid, campus setting, housing, food, and extracurricular activities — states about Clark: “The foundation of a Clark education is the Program of Liberal Studies, which promotes the habits, skills, and perspectives essential to lifelong learning. ... About 40 percent of students participate in undergraduate research, and first-year students have access to a variety of programs aimed at helping them transition into college life.”
Find more information on Clark University in the rankings here . 
Also included in Clark’s profile are anonymous quotes from students of various grade levels. “Clark students are, well, Clarkies,” says one senior. “... intelligent, talented in a quiet way,
and probably the best people you will ever meet.”
The Fiske Guide is compiled by Edward B. Fiske, who served for 17 years as education editor of the New York Times.  Now a leading independent voice in college admissions, Fiske has published this popular annual guide to provide a selective, subjective, and systematic look at 300+ colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada, and Great Britain.
The Fiske Guide to Colleges is also available as an iPad app on iTunes and a Web app on CollegeCountdown.com .”

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Clark collaborates with the EcoTarium on prototyping 'City Science' Exhibits
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
May 09, 2014
“Students work with museum staff and young patrons  to develop exhibits on bird habitats, neighborhoods
Where do city birds nest?  What is your neighborhood made of, and how does it work? How do you feel when you look at your lawn?  These questions are the focus of some of the museum exhibits on urban ecology Clark University students are preparing with the help of the young visitors at Worcester’s EcoTarium , thanks to funding from a National Science Fund (NSF) grant.
The exhibits, which are part of the program “From the Lab to the Neighborhood: An Interactive Living Exhibit for Advancing STEM Engagement with Urban Systems in Science Museums,” will become part of a new permanent exhibit, “City Science,” at the EcoTarium, and could remain on the Worcester museum’s floor for up to a decade.  More importantly, the exhibit is a pilot for a national movement to bring urban ecology education to science museums.
This spring, Associate Professor of Geography Colin Polsky , Co-Principal Investigator of the NSF grant (along with researchers at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst and Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles), led 12 students on a mission to cull through current urban ecological research and translate it into exhibit prototypes.
Ali Knopf '15 and Jeremy Marshall '16 staff the "Magnetic Neighborhood" exhibit with their partners from UMass Amherst
The groundbreaking program asks museum visitors (i.e. school children) to participate in the social science research process, so, in January, Professor Polsky’s class, comprising 11 undergraduates and Geography Ph.D. student Will Collier, had to be trained how to identify evidence of children exhibiting science process skills.
“We use these data to help us create the next iteration of the prototypes,” said Betsy Loring, director of exhibits at the EcoTarium.  “It’s important to watch for new visitor behaviors.”
The Clark students staffed the exhibit prototypes during February and April vacation weeks, and collected critical data while watching the young visitors use their displays.
In addition to time spent observing their target audience, the students logged hours presenting to their peers and to the other academic partners, and collaborating in small and medium-sized groups. The students presented several times to museum staff, and became quite accustomed to receiving feedback, brainstorming and working to refine their ideas based on their partner’s extensive knowledge of exhibit design.
“Each exhibit prototype can go through a dozen iterations in a matter of weeks,” said Loring.
Amanda Duquenoy '17 and Alex Merriam '17 observe a museum patron at the "Maps as Models" exhibit prototype
Throughout this process, flexibility and the ability to incorporate feedback is paramount.
Professor Polsky says the partnership has been mutually beneficial, and noted the students are helping to characterize something few if any researchers have studied to date:  the perspectives of future city-dwellers.
“The research that is conducted on how people value urban environments and what they like and don’t like about such environments often does not include the perspective of children,” he said.
Eliza Lawrence ’14, a student in the class said, “As the world continues to populate cities it is important for us not only to think about city science and urban ecology, but to find ways to teach future generations this information as well.”
Professor Polsky said that this summer the group will share what they’ve learned with area teachers and use the results from the prototyping to inform new curriculum modules. Over the next few months, the group will take the work they’ve done for the younger children and adapt it for an older audience.
Sarah MacLachlan '14 and Savannah Sanford '17 watch as museum patrons guess city bird habitats
Also this summer, the class’s TA, Will Collier, will continue his work at the museum, along with Alex Merriam and Ali Knopf, who have received LEEP Fellowships to serve as Exhibit Department interns.  Each will focus on taking a single prototype through more iterative stages of development.
“The cutting-edge research we’re doing with the EcoTarium is a perfect example of the kind of innovative learning opportunities Clark is incorporating into its curriculum through Liberal Education and Effective Practice (LEEP),” said professor Polsky. “Not only are our students applying the knowledge they’ve gained in their field, they are learning to be adept at translating and  transferring that knowledge while simultaneously acquiring critical skills needed to succeed in tomorrow’s workplace.”
Clark’s work with the EcoTarium will continue through 2015.
"We’ve been impressed with how enthusiastically the students have embraced the prototyping process.  They’ve been thoughtful and professional and it’s always good to bring in a fresh perspective to the exhibits,” said Loring.
Betsy Loring of the EcoTarium (left) and professor Colin Polsky (third from left) look on as student observe rats that could be used in an exhibit
A complete list of students involved in the collaboration with the EcoTarium follows:
Max Boenhert ’17
James Caneff ’14
William Collier Ph.D. ’18
Jessica Cusworth ’16
Amanda Duquenoy ’17
Will Heikes ’16
Alexandra “Ali” Knopf ’15
Eliza Lawrence ’14
Sarah MacLachlan ’14
Jeremy Marshall ’16
Alexander Merriam ’17
Savannah Sanford ’17
About the EcoTarium
EcoTarium is New England's leading science and nature center, an indoor-outdoor experience dedicated to inspiring a passion for science and nature in visitors of all ages. The center offers a museum building with three floors of interactive exhibits and is home to live animal habitats, interpretive nature trails through forest and meadow, the Alden Digital Planetarium, a tree canopy walkway (seasonal) and a narrow-gauge railroad.
The EcoTarium, located at 222 Harrington Way in Worcester, Mass., is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sundays 12 to 5 p.m. Admission is $14 for adults, $8 for children 2-18, $10 for seniors 65+ and students with ID. WOO card holders receive $2 off one adult admission and $1 off one planetarium show.  Parking is free.
About the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 "to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense…" With an annual budget of about $7.0 billion (FY 2012), we are the funding source for approximately 20 percent of all federally supported basic research conducted by America's colleges and universities. In many fields such as mathematics, computer science and the social sciences, NSF is the major source of federal backing.
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge convention. Change our world.  www.clarku.edu
For more photos of this partnership, visit Flickr:  https://www.flickr.com/photos/clarkuniversity/sets/72157644517308242/
Related link:  http://news.clarku.edu/news/2013/12/09/clark-university-to-partner-with-museum-on-city-science-exhibit/
 
 
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Obesity, diabetes on the table at 2014 Family Impact Seminar
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Apr 22, 2014
“Legislators and other officials listen to a presentation by Ira Ockne, M.D., during the Family Impact Seminar.
The Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise at Clark University made its annual visit to the Massachusetts State House on March 26 to apprise policymakers on the toll that obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease is taking on the state’s residents, particularly those within low-income and minority communities.
“A Lot On Our Plate: Chronic Health Threats in Massachusetts” was the Institute’s fifth Family Impact Seminar, which attracts legislators and officials from various state and private agencies. Past seminars have delved into issues covering men’s mental and physical health, the recession’s effect on families, and the social and physical factors that put youths at risk.
Following introductory remarks from James Gomes, director of the Mosakowski Institute, and Denise Hines, Ph.D., Clark University research associate professor in psychology and the director of the Family Impact Seminars, three speakers offered views on some of the most pernicious health issues facing both Massachusetts and the wider world.
With their long legs, human beings are designed to live physically active lives, Ira S. Ockene, M.D. , director of the Preventive Cardiology Program at University of Massachusetts Medical School, told the audience. We may not be the fastest sprinters in the animal kingdom, but we are only one of four animal groups built for endurance running, dating back to the species’ earliest days as hunters pursuing their prey on foot over long distances.
Unfortunately, in the contemporary world, cardiovascular disease is at epidemic proportions, largely because of our susceptibility to a variety of risk factors, many of them driven by a sedentary lifestyle and poor diet, Ockene said. High cholesterol, smoking, high blood pressure, low physical activity, diabetes and obesity are among the greatest culprits, he said, but they are often preventable and treatable. “Unlike diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease is not an inevitable part of human life,” he said.
Increasing one’s physical activity rather than eating fewer calories is the most important factor to losing weight and improving heart health because the human body requires a certain level of nutrients, Ockene said. Still, the American diet is proving problematic as it spreads to other countries and replaces low-calorie, high-fiber fare. Ockene cited one study that predicts by 2030 half the world’s diabetics will be in India.
He had three recommendations for public policymakers:
Improve access to healthy food by prioritizing nutritional access and education among citizens and through the promotion of community-based projects.
Increase the barriers to access tobacco. Ockene said the war against smoking has been “one of the great public health triumphs.”
Consider prioritizing infrastructure projects that promote physical activity, such as outdoor spaces for recreation and roadwork projects that emphasize sidewalk access.
One piece of good news, Ockene added, is that in the United States, death rates related to cardiovascular disease have decreased in the past 30 years by 50.1 percent for men and 49 percent for women, thanks largely to changes in lifestyle and improvements in medical therapies.
♦♦♦♦♦
An an elementary school student in Worcester in the 1960s, Christina Economos, Ph.D., recalled, her annual class photos typically included a couple of students who were overweight. Similar class photos today would stand in stark contrast, given that 16.9 percent of children ages 2 to 19 nationwide are obese, according to a 2009-2010 study. Obesity rates are worse among low-income, and black and Hispanic families, both in Massachusetts and across the United States, according to the National Survey of Children’s Health.
The rates of overweight and obese children in the United States have doubled in the last three decades, and the rates of adolescent obesity have tripled in the same time frame, said Economos, who is associate director of the John Hancock Research Center on Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Obesity Prevention ; the New Balance Chair in Childhood Nutrition, and an associate professor at the Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy and the School of Medicine, Tufts University .
Economos cited some progress in recent years, especially since First Lady Michelle Obama has made healthy living one of her primary causes. But Americans’ sedentary behaviors and a culture that spends billions marketing fast foods, with many of those ads targeted at children, has made the war on obesity a long, difficult slog.
Economos supplied an example of one city where a concerted effort to lower the risk of obesity showed positive results. Shape Up Somerville, a study Economos and her colleagues conducted from 2002-2005 in three elementary schools in Somerville, Mass., included a number of community-based interventions designed to prevent and reduce obesity among elementary school children. Through a number of measures ranging from enhancing time at recess to revamping the school lunch program to providing education to students and their families, the students’ Body Mass Index decreased and researchers reported a nearly 30 percent reduction in the rate of obesity.
Economos stressed that the effectiveness of the Shape Up Somerville program derived from the community’s willingness to partner with the schools and the researchers to create a culture where healthy living was a priority. In that vein, she recommended a number of national policies. Among them:
Focus prevention efforts on groups at risk (e.g., low-income and minority populations)
Start prevention efforts as early as early as infancy
Support intervention programs promoting robust, long-term community engagement and civic participation
Create policies for physical activity in school.
♦♦♦♦♦
As one of the fastest growing public health crises today, Type 2 diabetes wreaks havoc on bodies, burdens communities and boosts health-care costs.
Barbara Goldoftas , assistant professor of environmental science and policy, noted that the disease is a leading cause of blindness, kidney disease and amputations. The number of people with the disease has been rising since the 1950s, has climbed markedly since the 1970s, and has doubled in the last 10 years.
Why? No one knows for certain, Goldoftas said, but “an interconnected array of risk factors” has been identified as triggers. Poor nutrition, inactivity and sedentary activities, and overweight and obesity are cited as common contributors. As an environmental epidemiologist, Goldoftas also considers the “population perspective,” which factors in social and environmental determinants like the nature of neighborhoods, chronic stress, environmental contaminants and changes in “gut ecology” (the microbiota that inhabit our intestines).
Goldoftas conducts studies of type 2 diabetes in rural Nicaragua and found that, while the diet is traditional (little or no fast food) and the people are typically active, the disease is the leading cause of illness and death in the country. This conundrum has spurred a search for alternative explanations for the disease’s prevalence. (At this writing Goldoftas was awaiting data on possible contributing factors like pesticides and antibiotics.)
The lack of awareness about the disease among populations she’s worked with in Nicaragua and in Worcester’s Vietnamese community is alarming, Goldoftas said. Changes in diet and activity are typically more effective than medication, she said, but altering long-held traditions in food choices and preparation can be daunting.
She noted that diabetes disproportionately affects people with less education and lower income and varies by age, gender and race/ethnicity.
With such pronounced disparities by race/ethnicity, there is a need for culturally and linguistically appropriate programs, health information, and practitioners to help ease the burden among various groups who are greatly affected, she said. Programs that target youth, families and communities could reach pre-diabetics and the undiagnosed, and foster critical family and social support.
Related Links:
Youth At Risk, part 2: Children In Need (2013)
Youth at Risk: Part 1, 2012 Massachusetts Family Impact Seminar
Men at risk: The Physical, Mental and Social Health of Men in Massachusetts (2011 seminar)
The Great Recession and its Impact on Families (inaugural seminar, 2010)
 
 
 
 
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Clark U. political science students tour U.N., meet with ambassadors
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jan 01, 2014
“Clark University students, along with Prof. Srini Sitaraman, visited the United Nations on April 17.
Students from the Clark University Model United Nations Program , along with students enrolled in the University’s “United Nations and International Politics” course, made a field visit to United Nations Headquarters in New York on April 17.
The delegation, led by Political Science Professor Srinivasan Sitaraman , included a visit to the Permanent Mission of Sri Lanka to the United Nations, where the students were briefed by Ambassador Dr. Palitha Kohona and Minister-Counsellor Mr. Waruna Sri Dhanapala on the active role Sri Lanka is playing the Open Working Group on Health and Development.
The Clark group also visited Germany’s Permanent Mission to the United Nations, where they had a fruitful discussion on Germany’s role in the United Nations and its prospects of securing a permanent seat in the U.N. Security Council . The students then met with Ms. Tamara Cummings-John from the Office of Legal Counsel of the United Nations, a former lawyer in the International Criminal Court (ICC), who talked about the challenges of international criminal prosecution and her experiences serving in the Special Court in Sierra Leone and International Criminal Tribunal in Rwanda. Ms. Cummings-John remarked how she found the Clark students to be “an inspiration and a reminder of how passionate we should all be about the work of this Organization [U.N.] and the ICC.”
After the briefings, the students received a tour of U.N. headquarters and briefly observed the proceedings that were being held at the Trusteeship Council meeting room.
Students taking part in the trip included Lauren Meininger ’17; Patrick Burchat ’15; Cassandra Grandeau ’16; Xinyun Zhang ’15; Selena Ahmed ’16; Wandong Yang ’16; Yohan Senarath ’14; Katherine Dixon ’16; Brenna Dougherty ’15; Maria Zander ’17; Bethany Burgess ’17; Bongani Jeranyama ’15; Seble Alemu ’14; Jake Kailey ’14; Lance Yau ’14; Kevin Kim ’16; Stephanie Vachon ’16; Dulara de Alwis ’15; Riley Bright ’15; Nusrat Islam ’17; Savannah Donohue ’17; Corie Welch ’17; Matt Isihara ’14; Spring Pillsbury ’17; Dea Dodi ’17; Lisaflora Lara ’17; Hasini Assiriyage ’17; and Michael Pierce ’16.
This field trip to the United Nations was made possible with the support from the Francis A. Harrington Fund.
Related links:
Clark Model U.N. Team excels at Harvard, McGill conferences
Clark University Model U.N. Team racking up the awards this year
Clark Model UN delegates stand out at Harvard National Conference
Clark team places 11th of 210 at Harvard Model UN Conference
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Clark University police 'Finish Strong' in Watertown 5K
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Apr 24, 2014
“From left: Officer Efrain Diaz, Officer Francis Torres, University Police Office Manager Melissa Tula and Chief Stephen Goulet took part in the April 19 Finish Strong 5K.
Members of the Clark University Police Department participated in the April 19 Watertown Police Finish Strong 5K, held on the one year anniversary of the capture of the surviving Boston Marathon bombing suspect. The goal of the event, organized by the Watertown Police Supervisors Association, was “to fill the streets of Watertown in a celebratory 5k road race.”
Money raised by the runners will benefit the WPSA, local charity & victim funds, the One Fund, and the Watertown Police Foundation, a new fund to support youth community programming and school safety initiatives.
Clark’s runners shared their thoughts on the special day: 
“To experience all the emotion and camaraderie of this race was beyond words. You just felt it and took it all in. I’m proud of our team and how they represented Clark U.”
Chief Stephen Goulet
“It was a great experience accomplishing a 5K with my co-workers.  The team building and general camaraderie makes for lasting friendships.”
Officer Francis Torres
“It was my first run of the year and I enjoyed running it with those I work closely with. It was a beautiful day, it was for a worthy cause and I look forward to doing it again.”
Officer Efrain Diaz
“This was my first 5K and I’m glad I was able to run it with a group of people who dedicate their lives to helping others.  There were more than 1,600 first responders, friends and family participating and the feeling of solidarity was overwhelming.”
Melissa Tula, University Police Office Manager”

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Clark University, City of Worcester forge academic health partnership
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Feb 27, 2014
“The Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise at Clark University will partner with the Worcester Division of Public Health.
The  City of Worcester  and  Clark University  announce the creation of an innovative Academic Health Department, the result of a partnership combining scholarship and practice to improve public health.
The city’s  Division of Public Health  and the University’s  Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise , together through the Academic Health Department, will harness a variety of relationships and, based upon consideration of local needs and resources, will focus on the following:
Community engagement/Improve the public’s health
The ultimate goal is to ensure that prevention and intervention efforts are supported by science and effective practice to improve the public’s health through the Community Health Improvement Plan.
Student education/Workforce development
Engaging with timely, relevant topics to increase knowledge and skills, this two-way communication contributes to both workforce development and faculty connection with practitioners.
Practice-focused research
Relevant research opportunities are identified as stakeholders discuss needs, emphasizing the iterative cycle where research translates to practice and practice informs research.
Shared funding opportunities
Existing resources may be leveraged or new ones identified through collaboration.
“We’re gratified to play a key role in this collaboration, which should benefit the city as well as the University,” said Clark University President David P. Angel. “Clark’s intellectual resources and foundation of student engagement in the community make the University a valuable ally in this effort to improve and transform public health in Worcester and beyond.”
John G. O’Brien, the Jane and William Mosakowski Distinguished Professor of Higher Education at Clark University and past president and CEO of UMass Memorial Health Care and a national leader in advocating for the health of vulnerable populations, and Worcester Public Health Director Derek Brindisi led the Academic Health Department partnership process.
“We are extremely excited to foster this renewed relationship,” Brindisi said. “People may say, ‘Why Clark?’ I say, look at everything Clark already does in the areas of GIS, urban planning and global health. Their programs touch on everything we do or want to do in public health.”
Several Clark faculty actively provided guidance throughout, O’Brien noted. They include: Marianne Sarkis, professor in the department of International Development, Community, and Environment (IDCE); fellow IDCE professors Laurie Ross, Ellen Foley and Yelena Ogneva-Himmelberger; John Brown, Mosakowski Distinguished Faculty Research Fellow; and Jacqueline Geoghegan, professor of Economics.
In 2013, Worcester announced its Community Health Improvement Plan, a roadmap to making Worcester “the healthiest city in New England by 2020,” particularly by improving outcomes among residents in need of improved living conditions and better access to consistent, high-quality care.
Creation of the Academic Health Department marks the beginning of a new offensive to   improve health outcomes for Worcester residents facing poor nutrition, untreated mental illness, violence and injury. The goal is to foster healthy behaviors that will curtail more serious illnesses later on — in effect improving lives, cutting treatment costs and preserving communities.
For more information, contact the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise, at 508-421-3872 or  mosakowskiinstitute@clarku.edu .
The mission of the Mosakowski Institute for Public Enterprise is to improve the effectiveness of government and other institutions in addressing social concerns through the successful mobilization of use-inspired research. Learn more about  use-inspired research .
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Clark Model U.N. Team excels at Harvard, McGill conferences
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Feb 25, 2014
“Clark University’s Model United Nations Team performed well at the 60th session of the prestigious Harvard National Model U.N. Conference (HNMUN 2014), which took place Feb. 13 - 16 in Boston.
The Harvard Model U.N. conference is one of the most competitive conferences in the Model U.N. circuit, attracting more than 3,000 student delegates from 75 countries. “Our team did an exceptional job this year, especially in the smaller crisis committees,” said Model U.N. Faculty Adviser Srini Sitaraman, Associate Professor of Political Science.
Clark University students won awards in highly competitive committees. Melat Seyoum ’15 and was awarded the Best Delegate for focused work in the Futuristic U.N. Commission for Science and Technology, Yohan Senarath ’14 and Shane D’ Lima ’14 were awarded Outstanding Delegate in the U.N. Security Council, and Dulara de Alwis ’14 won the Outstanding Delegate in the Special Summit on Sustainable Development.
Several delegates received Honorable Mentions, including Vahid Sharifov ’15 in the Joint Cabinet Crisis: Berlin – East German Cabinet; Matt Isihara ’14, Tsar Alexander III Court; Sheila Qamirani ’15, Community of Latin American and Caribbean States; Themal Ellawala ’17 and Beliansh Assefa ’17, Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice; and Doga Bilgin ’16 and Patrick Bruchat ’15, Commission on Status of Women. Cori Welch ’17 received a Verbal Commendation in the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States.
Award Winners at the McGill Model U.N. Conference, January 2014, from left: Dulwara de Alwis '14, Dea Dodi '17, Doga Bilgin '17, and Jake Kailey '14
In January, a small delegation of Clark University students participated in a major international Model U.N. Conference at McGill University. Jake Kailey ’14 and Dulara de Alwis ’14 received the Outstanding Delegate award in the United Nations Special Session on Aging; Dea Dodi ’17 received the Outstanding Delegate award in the International Civil Aviation Organization Committee; and Doga Bilgin ’17 received a Book Award for his contribution to the committee on United States Council of Economic Advisors.
The team will next head to the Brown University Crisis Simulation and it will also host the annual Middle School Model U.N. Conference on March 22 at Clark, with the cooperation of the U.N. Association of Greater Boston. The season will close at the Five Colleges Model U.N. Conference at Mount Holyoke
College in April.
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Clark University to partner with museum on 'City Science' exhibit
by Clark News Hub » News Releases
Jan 01, 2014
“Professor/co-PI Colin Polsky and Clark students to contribute urban ecology expertise, research for prototype activities
A $250,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) grant will be used to develop "City Science ,"  an interactive exhibit at the EcoTarium. The grant was awarded to a team of researchers led by Robert L. Ryan, professor of landscape architecture and regional planning at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst.   Additional partners include Clark University  and   Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles.
The collaboration with exhibit designers and science educators at the EcoTarium, New England's leading science and nature center, is funded as a pilot grant from the NSF's Advancing Informal STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Learning program. The museum, at 222 Harrington Way in Worcester, attracts nearly 150,000 visitors each year.
"This grant allows us to work with researchers to bring incredible science to our visitors," said EcoTarium President Joseph Cox. "We will create innovative ways to engage our visitors in conversations about building a better city and share this exciting work with science museums nationwide."
Colin Polsky, Clark University Associate Professor of Geography: "Here, a cutting-edge NSF research project will be brought into the classroom, and students will have the opportunity to shape the outcome."
The project, "From the Lab to the Neighborhood: An Interactive Living Exhibit for Advancing STEM Engagement with Urban Systems in Science Museums," will develop prototype exhibits about the science people encounter in their every day lives, but rarely stop to consider: What keeps our buildings and bridges standing? What is the hidden infrastructure that brings water in and out of our houses? What is a better solution for a problem road intersection? How do trees affect temperature -- and our air conditioning bills?
Using Worcester as a backdrop, the exhibit will explore the connections between cities and the people, plants, and animals that live in them.  With hands-on experiment stations, visitors of all ages will discover these connections from different perspectives in a city -- above, below, and street-level.
School children to take part in the social research process
"From the Lab to the Neighborhood" breaks new ground by asking museum visitors, including school children, to participate in the social science research process, an area that has received less attention in many science museums. The project builds on existing urban ecology research conducted by the UMass/Amherst environmental conservation department.
"I'm pleased that this federal grant will allow the EcoTarium to further their innovative work and harness local partnerships to bring cutting-edge research on urban ecology to a wide range of people," said Congressman Jim McGovern. "This program will be used as a model for others across the country, enhancing the EcoTarium's reputation as a hub for pioneering scientific education."
Co-principal investigator Colin Polsky, Associate Professor of Geography at Clark University , will provide technical assistance and engage Clark students in some of the prototyping activities.
"This exciting award serves as another illustration of how Clark University's LEEP program can create 21st-century learning opportunities for undergraduate students," said Professor Polsky. "Here, a cutting-edge NSF research project will be brought into the classroom, and students will have the opportunity to shape the outcome. In the process, students will develop valuable team-building, communication, and project-management skills. The goal is to develop students' abilities to manage complexity and uncertainty alongside their knowledge of urban ecology."
Curriculum will connect teachers and students to scientific process 
The project will also integrate an NSF-funded K-12 urban ecology curriculum into the exhibit, using the results from the prototyping to inform new curriculum modules. Led by project team member Eric Strauss of Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, this new curriculum will let science teachers and their students try out the exhibit prototypes as they are being developed and learn about the scientific research process. Ultimately, these lessons will allow urban children to see the city around them as an ecology laboratory.
National impact on museums
"From the Lab to the Neighborhood" is seen as a pilot for a national model to bring urban ecology research to science museums across the country.  It will bring together staff from six other science museums in California and New England to review the exhibit prototypes, and to discuss how their museums can develop new urban ecology exhibits.
This pilot project builds on preliminary City Science exhibit planning already conducted by the EcoTarium staff and focuses on trying out these new exhibit ideas with visitor feedback.  This study will inform the permanent exhibition, for which the EcoTarium is currently pursuing funding to complete.
About the EcoTarium
EcoTarium is New England's leading science and nature center, an indoor-outdoor experience dedicated to inspiring a passion for science and nature in visitors of all ages. The center offers a museum building with three floors of interactive exhibits and is home to live animal habitats, interpretive nature trails through forest and meadow, the Alden Digital Planetarium, a tree canopy walkway (seasonal) and a narrow-gauge railroad.
The EcoTarium, located at 222 Harrington Way in Worcester, Mass., is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sundays 12 to 5 p.m. Admission is $14 for adults, $8 for children 2-18, $10 for seniors 65+ and students with ID. WOO card holders receive $2 off one adult admission and $1 off one planetarium show.  Parking is free.  For more information, visit www.ecotarium.org .
About the National Science Foundation
The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 "to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense…" With an annual budget of about $7.0 billion (FY 2012), we are the funding source for approximately 20 percent of all federally supported basic research conducted by America's colleges and universities. In many fields such as mathematics, computer science and the social sciences, NSF is the major source of federal backing.
Founded in 1887 in Worcester, Massachusetts, Clark University is a liberal arts-based research university addressing social and human imperatives on a global scale. Nationally renowned as a college that changes lives, Clark is emerging as a transformative force in higher education today. LEEP (Liberal Education and Effective Practice) is Clark’s pioneering model of education that combines a robust liberal arts curriculum with life-changing world and workplace experiences. Clark’s faculty and students work across boundaries to develop solutions to complex challenges in the natural sciences, psychology, geography, management, urban education, Holocaust and genocide studies, environmental studies, and international development and social change. The Clark educational experience embodies the University’s motto: Challenge convention. Change our world.  www.clarku.edu
 
 
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