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Importance
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Lessons from famous college dropouts
by Education: News & Videos about Education - CNN.com
Dec 13, 2016
“A college degree can be an important gateway to employment, a career and a better standard of living. But a college degree does not equate to someone's level of intelligence or talent. For those seeking the best workers or leaders, there is a plethora of intelligent, inventive people without degrees who should not be overlooked.”
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Yale Sets Policy That Could Allow Renaming of Calhoun College
by NYT > Education
Dec 02, 2016
“After intense debate over the legacy of slavery at Yale, a new report lays out broad principles for renaming buildings without erasing the past.”
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Creating a college behind bars
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Dec 02, 2016
“Up a lonely road lined with signs warning drivers not to pick up hitchhikers, on a hilltop surrounded by forest, the Clallam Bay Corrections Center at the northwest tip of Washington State feels like the ends of the earth. “We want to build a university in prison,” says Mr. Carter, a soft-spoken man with an earnest tone. The shortage of higher education opportunities in United States prisons has led inmates like Carter to take the initiative – seeking out textbooks, funds, instructors, and in some cases acting as teachers themselves.”
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10 Colleges With the Highest Acceptance Rates
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 30, 2016
“The U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Among the 1,255 ranked schools that submitted these data to U.S. News in an annual survey, nine reported acceptance rates of 100 percent in fall 2015. Also on the list is Cameron University in Oklahoma, which admitted 99.7 percent.”
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For-profit colleges expect fortunes to improve under Trump
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 30, 2016
“BOSTON (AP) — After nearing collapse under the Obama administration, the for-profit college industry is celebrating Donald Trump's election as a chance for a rebound.”
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Programs Bolster International Exchange at Community Colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 30, 2016
“Students don't need to attend a four-year college to have an international education experience. The U.S. government and some community colleges are working to provide more students at two-year institutions with exposure to global cultures and ideas. One effort aims to send more community college students abroad, while another brings international students to U.S. community colleges, creating more diverse campuses.”
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Tuition revenue isn't what it used to be for many universities
by Education
Nov 30, 2016
“Cost-conscious families are forcing colleges and universities to keep a tight rein on tuition increases as competition for students remains fierce, Moody's says.”
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In education, greater choice doesn’t always mean better outcomes
by Education
Nov 30, 2016
“The choice of Betsy DeVos, well known for her views on K-12 education, sent college officials scrambling just before the long Thanksgiving weekend to find anything DeVos might have said about higher education.”
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Lawsuit alleges Kansas State's 'indifference' to one rape helped lead to another
by Education
Nov 30, 2016
“Two women contend university is reluctant to investigate off-campus sexual assaults”
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Islamic State says Ohio State attacker was its 'soldier,' school seeks unity as classes resume
by Education
Nov 30, 2016
“As victims of a violent attack at Ohio State University were treated at hospitals Tuesday, classes resumed on a shaken campus.”
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Catholic college leaders pledge solidarity with undocumented students
by Education
Nov 30, 2016
“More than 70 sign a statement pledging to continue to educate a vulnerable student population.”
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ISIS Calls Ohio State University Attacker a ‘Soldier’
by NYT > Education
Nov 28, 2016
“A student who ran over people with a car and used a knife on the campus in Columbus was reported to have spoken about a sleeper cell.”
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SAT scandal shows tyranny of standardized testing
by Education: News & Videos about Education - CNN.com
Nov 28, 2016
“As education scandals go, the news that students at some of the best high schools on Long Island paid others to take their College Board tests seems mild. The Long Island scandal pales behind the sex scandal at Penn State.”
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Hampshire College Draws Protests Over Removal of U.S. Flag
by NYT > Education
Nov 28, 2016
“Military veterans protested the decision this weekend, adding their voices to a debate on the Massachusetts campus that has seen the flag lowered, removed and even burned since the election.”
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Ohio State student identified as campus attacker, nearly a dozen hospitalized
by Education
Nov 28, 2016
“Authorities said people had stab wounds and were struck by a car during the attack.”
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On Campus: Divisions in My Dorm Room
by NYT > Education
Nov 27, 2016
“Liberals and conservatives, on campus and off, have spent too much time in their own political bubbles.”
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Seeking students, public colleges reduce out-of-state prices
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 27, 2016
“HATTIESBURG, Miss. (AP) — Graduating high school seniors: does the University of Southern Mississippi have a deal for you!”
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Low-performing high school requires college-level course for graduation
by Education
Nov 27, 2016
“All Cardozo seniors must take Advanced Placement English Literature. Will it work?”
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Retiring: College Towns Can Be Attractive Later in Life
by NYT > Education
Nov 25, 2016
“University communities have advantages like intellectual stimulation, cultural amenities and a healthy economic base without a high price tag.”
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4 sentenced for kidnapping, torture of college students
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 25, 2016
“ROCHESTER, N.Y. (AP) — Four of five defendants who admitted to their roles in the kidnapping and torture of two University of Rochester football players have been sentenced for the crime.”
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Hundreds of colleges mobilize to defend immigrant students
by Education
Nov 25, 2016
“Higher ed leaders are pressing Trump to keep protections for undocumented students.”
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Cuomo Seizes On City College Scandal to Revive Push to Revamp CUNY
by NYT > Education
Nov 23, 2016
“A letter on behalf of the recently departed president of the school blaming top administrators for a scandal she is ensnared in seems to have energized the governor’s ethics campaign.”
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Big City: Trump’s Election? Some Students Are Too Busy to Worry
by NYT > Education
Nov 23, 2016
“Donald J. Trump’s victory may have paralyzed some elite campuses, but students at LaGuardia Community College in Queens remained focused on studies and jobs.”
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Cheerleaders investigated by the University of Kansas for photo captioned 'KKK go trump'
by Education
Nov 23, 2016
“Four cheerleaders were suspended from performing for the Jayhawks during an investigation of a photo posted on social media with a caption that some found racially offensive.”
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On Campus: A Dreamer’s Deportation Nightmare
by NYT > Education
Nov 21, 2016
“With Donald Trump headed to the White House, my future as a working community college student is uncertain.”
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South Africa's Curro buys 50 pct stake in Bostwana-based university.
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 21, 2016
“JOHANNESBURG (Reuters) - South Africa's biggest private education firm Curro Holdings, acquired a 50 percent stake in Botswana-based BA Isago University as part of its stated goal to run 80 campuses by 2020, the firm said on Monday. * The transaction will be done through Curro's wholly-ownedsubsidiary, The Embury Institute for Higher Education, thecompany said in a statement without giving any financialdetails. * Curro will fund the transaction by means of existing cashreserves and bank loans. ...”
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Along the Autism Spectrum, a Path Through Campus Life
by NYT > Education
Nov 19, 2016
“The first generation of students with an autism diagnosis is fanning out to schools across the country. They face a complex array of academic and social challenges.”
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How Counties Where Best Colleges Are Located Voted in the 2016 Presidential Election
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 19, 2016
“For some students, the political landscape surrounding a school is an important part of the college decision process.”
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Cost of College: With Trump, Investors See Profits Again in For-Profit Colleges
by NYT > Education
Nov 19, 2016
“Stock prices of the companies rose sharply after the election, perhaps because of an expectation of less regulation.”
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Donald Trump Agrees to Pay $25 Million in Trump University Settlement
by NYT > Education
Nov 19, 2016
“Former students said they were cheated out of thousands of dollars in tuition, and one of the cases was set to go before a jury in 10 days.”
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Moody's warns Trump presidency could hurt colleges counting on international students
by Education
Nov 19, 2016
“International students represent about 5 percent of the more than 20 million students enrolled in U.S. colleges and universities.”
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College graduation rates: Income really matters
by Education: News & Videos about Education - CNN.com
Nov 17, 2016
“It's getting more difficult for low-income students to climb the economic ladder as the college graduation gap between the rich and poor grows.”
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Yeshiva University Names Ari Berman President
by NYT > Education
Nov 17, 2016
“Rabbi Berman, a Queens-bred alumnus who led a Manhattan congregation and has spent eight years in Israel, will take over at a time of financial stress.”
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San Francisco teachers union offers anti-Trump lesson plan: Going too far?
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 17, 2016
“"Educators have a role to play to help them [students]  make sense of the new reality, especially those who come from the communities who have been attacked by Trump, and who now face a very uncertain future," the union wrote in its newsletter. Last week, more than 2,000 San Francisco high school students staged a citywide anti-Trump walkout and mass demonstrations. "Teachers often have a really difficult time to decide when to step in," Kei Kawashima-Ginsberg, director of the Center for Information & Research on Civic Learning and Engagement at Tufts University in Medford, Mass., tells The Christian Science Monitor.”
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Police searching for congressman John Conyers's son
by Education
Nov 17, 2016
“Carl Conyers, a 21-year-old student at the University of Houston, was last seen on Tuesday.”
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College students protest Donald Trump's deportation plans
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 16, 2016
“College students at campuses around the United States marched and rallied Wednesday, urging administrators to protect students and employees against immigration action under a Donald Trump presidency.”
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Professor predicts Trump impeachment
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - Mobile App Manual
Nov 15, 2016
“Allan Lichtman, a political historian at American University has correctly called every election since 1984. He is now predicting a Trump impeachment.”
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Importance
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Why Taking a 401(k) Loan Is Risky
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 15, 2016
“If you're in a short-term cash crunch, should you raid your 401(k) plan and take out a loan? Some of the most common reasons cited for 401(k) loans are paying for college education, medical expenses and the down payment on a home, says Craig G. Bolanos Jr., chief executive officer at Wealth Management Group outside of Chicago. "Typically a 401(k) loan is limited to the greater of 50 percent of your vested account balance up to a maximum of $50,000," he says.”
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Iowa lawmaker to colleges: 'Suck it up, buttercup'
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 15, 2016
“DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — An Iowa lawmaker plans to introduce what he calls the "suck it up, buttercup bill" to cut budgets at public universities that spend extra money on students upset about the presidential election.”
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Did the idea of free public higher education go down with the Democrats?
by Education
Nov 15, 2016
“Trump has been largely silent on higher education, but he has promised to work with Congress to reduce the cost of college.”
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Nobel laureate Steven Chu to be honored at UMass Lowell
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 14, 2016
“LOWELL, Mass. (AP) — Nobel laureate Steven Chu will receive an honorary degree from University of Massachusetts Lowell this week.”
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For-profit colleges could prosper under Trump: Barron's
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 14, 2016
“(Reuters) - For-profit education stocks have surged on expectations that President-elect Donald Trump and a Republican Congress may ease regulations imposed on the industry by the Obama administration, Barron's said in a report. Stocks such as Grand Canyon Education, DeVry Education Group and Capella Education rose about 14 percent last week. Trump won an upset victory in Tuesday's presidential election.”
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3 Overlooked Ways to Use Social Media to Research Colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 14, 2016
“You've likely heard about the downsides of social media and how oversharing and unprofessional comments can wreak havoc on your application. There are also less obvious ways that you can make Facebook, Twitter and other online connections more productive as you choose a college. Here are three ways college-bound students can use social media to research their school choices.”
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At deep-blue Yale University, students shocked to be facing Trump presidency
by Education
Nov 14, 2016
“Some at left-leaning campuses are stunned by the Republican’s victory, while supporters celebrate.”
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Greek Life at Colleges Comes With a Cost
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 10, 2016
“"The sororities at USC average around $1,800 per semester in dues," says Michelle Yramategui, 22, a recent grad from the University of Southern California and Alpha Phi member, who used her internship money to pay for chapter fees. The California native says she didn't know the exact cost of her sorority until part way through "rush" -- the sorority recruitment process. This is a fairly common practice among Greek organizations since their philosophy is making a decision based on social fit, not cost, says Mark Koepsell, executive director and CEO of the Association of Fraternity and Sorority Advisors, an association that represents university professionals that oversee Greek life on more than 700 campuses across the U.S.”
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Two college seniors got the election right when almost everyone else got it wrong
by Education
Nov 10, 2016
“St. Lawrence University statistics majors predicted the Trump triumph.”
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Donald Trump says he's proud of child Tiffany 'to a lesser extent' than the others
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 09, 2016
“It's Election Day, so Donald Trump only has a few more chances to let the nation know which of his children he likes the least. Calling in to Fox & Friends , the Republican nominee spoke about how proud he is of his adult children. Most of them, at least. "I'm very proud of my children. I mean, I'm just looking at them right now as an example... but I'm very proud 'cause Don and Eric and Ivanka and, you know, to a lesser extent 'cause she just got out of school, out of college, but, uh, Tiffany, who's also been so terrific. I mean, they work so hard." Did Trump have to say he's less proud of Tiffany? Of course not. Would it be Election Day if he didn't? No. No it would not. For posterity, here is a GIF showing the hosts' reactions as Donald states Tiffany's college graduation as a reason for being proud of her to a lesser extent. Happy Election Day, everybody. BONUS VIDEO: Meet the badass woman running for a key position ”
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Voter suppression? Maine gov. warns college students about residency
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 09, 2016
“In yet another case of alleged voter suppression, the governor of Maine stoked concerns by asserting that college students should establish residency if they want to vote in the state. Republican Gov. Paul LePage, known for his blunt demeanor and support for Donald Trump, issued the statement in response to fliers found on the campus of Bates College that indicated, amongst other things, students must change their driver’s license in order to vote and would incur hundreds of dollars in fees during the registration process. “Democrats for decades have encouraged college students from out of state to vote in Maine, even though there is no way to determine whether these college students also voted in their home states,” Governor LePage said in a statement.”
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College Students and Binge Drinking: When a Rite of Passage Becomes a Path to Destruction
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 09, 2016
“What do weekend parties, Greek life and football games have in common? For college students, the answer is obvious: alcohol. College life and binge drinking go hand in hand, but all too often the pairing ends tragically.”
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Virginia colleges are bracing for potentially significant state budget cuts
by Education
Nov 09, 2016
“With Virginia facing a $1.5 billion budget shortfall, public colleges and universities are looking for ways to offset the likely loss of state funding without raising tuition and fees next fall.”
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Mobs of tearful, angry students protesting Trump victory swarm college campuses
by Education
Nov 09, 2016
“Election results prompted rage at some colleges, with students marching through the streets in protest.”
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There needs to be a better way to rate the quality of colleges
by Education
Nov 07, 2016
“Higher education is an “experience good,” meaning students don’t know what they are buying until after they experience it.”
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The best thing about Harvard's cancellation of men's soccer season
by Education
Nov 06, 2016
“Harvard's decision could "shift the culture of men's college sports teams."”
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Phraseology: Oh, You Mean That Safe Space
by NYT > Education
Nov 05, 2016
“The University of Chicago, it seems, ranks No. 1 for protecting marginalized students.”
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Suspect in custody after stabbing at Rutgers
by Education
Nov 05, 2016
“Three people were injured, including a suspect, university officials say.”
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Jury finds reporter, Rolling Stone responsible for defaming U-Va. dean with gang rape story
by Education
Nov 05, 2016
“Deliberations about “A Rape on Campus” spanned three days.”
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City College Gets Interim Leader After President’s Sudden Exit
by NYT > Education
Nov 03, 2016
“Vincent G. Boudreau, dean of the Colin L. Powell school at City College, was appointed to take over for Lisa S. Coico, who quit last month amid a federal inquiry involving her personal expenses.”
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Plight of the Public U: How the University of Alabama Became a National Player
by NYT > Education
Nov 03, 2016
“State schools like Alabama are following a new survival strategy: lure top students, boost reputation, raise tuition, go big.”
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Arizona man arrested for hacking email accounts at universities
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 03, 2016
“By Nate Raymond NEW YORK (Reuters) - An Arizona man was arrested on Wednesday on charges that he hacked into over 1,000 email accounts for students and others at two universities, including Pace University in New York, and tried to do the same at 75 other higher-education institutions. Jonathan Powell, a 29-year-old Phoenix resident, was arrested based on a criminal complaint filed in federal court in Manhattan charging him with fraud in connection with computers, according to prosecutors. According to the complaint, Powell used password reset tools to try to access thousands of email accounts at two universities in New York and Pennsylvania, successfully changing the passwords for 1,050 accounts.”
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10 Types of Credentials You Can Earn Online
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 03, 2016
“When it comes to online learning, students should choose a credential that fulfills their goals while providing flexibility -- whether it's a single course certificate or a full degree. "There's such a wide range of offerings to them at economical prices that allow them to target their education specifically to their career plan," says Ray Schroeder, associate vice chancellor for online learning at the University of Illinois--Springfield. Here are 10 different credentials students can earn online.”
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Penn State fined $2.4 million for failures related to Sandusky child abuse
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 03, 2016
“Penn State University was hit with a $2.4 million fine on Thursday by the U.S. Department of Education for its mishandling of child molestation complaints against convicted former football coach Jerry Sandusky. The department issued the penalty alongside a scathing 239-page report that capped a five-year investigation into how the school complied with a federal law, the Clery Act, requiring schools to report campus crimes and warn students of any danger. The school violated the law when it failed to alert its students and employees that Sandusky was going to be criminally charged in 2011, according to the department.”
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UNC president on the 'bathroom law' and higher ed reform
by Education
Nov 03, 2016
“Margaret Spellings talks about college costs, access and student success in the 17-campus system.”
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U-Va. president calls for postelection unity after anti-Muslim slur found on campus
by Education
Nov 03, 2016
“Teresa Sullivan's call to “rise above hostility” was not a direct response to recent graffiti incidents, but they were on her mind, a university spokesman said.”
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Feds seek record $2.4 million fine against Penn State in Sandusky scandal
by Education
Nov 03, 2016
“Education Department investigators find numerous violations of federal campus safety law.”
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Life Beyond Bars: One Man’s Journey From Prison to College
by NYT > Education
Nov 02, 2016
“Juan Echevarria killed a man. He spent 14 years in prison. Now he desperately wants a college degree. Getting one may be the hardest thing he’s ever had to do.”
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Community Colleges Work to Support International Students
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Nov 02, 2016
“Today, Bishr, 19, is a second-year business and economics student at Santa Monica College, a community college in California. In 2014-15, a total of 91,648 international students -- 9.4 percent of all international students in the U.S. that year -- studied at community colleges, according to data from the Institute of International Education. Some community colleges with large international student bodies have developed services to address some of the biggest hurdles this population faces, including acclimating to a new education system, finding housing and getting involved on campus.”
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4 Need-to-Know Facts About State Aid for College
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Oct 31, 2016
“The College Board's 2016 Trends in Higher Education report found that undergraduate students received an average of $14,460 in financial aid during the 2015-2016 school year -- which includes $8,390 in grants from all sources. While federal and institutional grants represent a significant source of funding, state grants are another important funding resource for students. "I've definitely seen families that haven't received much in the way of the federal Pell Grant who received a larger award through the state," says Blaine Blontz, a financial consultant at Financial Aid Coach who advises parents and grad students on how to maximize financial aid awards.”
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Op-Ed Columnist: How to Make Sense of College Rankings
by NYT > Education
Oct 30, 2016
“As systems for rating colleges multiply like mad, here’s a guide for consulting — and ignoring — them.”
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Economic View: A Conveyor Belt of Dropouts and Debt at For-Profit Colleges
by NYT > Education
Oct 29, 2016
“How Congress and the Department of Education can fix an increasingly important system in which graduation rates are low and default rates are high.”
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Your Money: The School of Wants and Needs — and Wood-Fired Showers
by NYT > Education
Oct 29, 2016
“A prep school that prepares students for entry into competitive colleges, but also teaches them how to raise livestock, grow vegetables and chop wood.”
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At Least 6 Women Accuse University of Wisconsin Student of Assault
by NYT > Education
Oct 29, 2016
“The student, Alec Cook, 20, was charged with 14 felonies and one misdemeanor. “Dozens” have contacted the authorities, all “wanting to speak” about Mr. Cook.”
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U-Va. sought to kill alumni magazine article on campus sex assault. The story never ran.
by Education
Oct 29, 2016
“As Rolling Stone magazine was working on a story about campus rape, U-Va. officials blocked interviews with administrators. They spoke to the alumni magazine, but U-Va. urged the independent publication to kill the story.”
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Feds will restore grant funding for thousands of students burned by for-profit college closures
by Education
Oct 29, 2016
“The move could help thousands of students affected by the closures of Corinthian Colleges and ITT Technical Institutes in the past two years.”
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'Enjoy the holiday without being extremely offensive’: Some colleges advise students on Halloween costumes
by Education
Oct 29, 2016
“As Halloween parties begin, some colleges are trying to guide — or dictate — what costumes students wear”
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As college costs climb, why is student borrowing continuing to fall?
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Oct 27, 2016
“American undergraduates are relying less on student loans these days to fund their postsecondary education, but that does not mean their degrees are becoming more affordable. Two reports released Wednesday by The College Board, a nonprofit that aims to expand access to higher education, show that education borrowing declined for the fifth consecutive year, even as a slowing rise in tuition and fees continues to drive net costs higher. While reliance on loans fell to a two-decade low during the 2015-2016 academic year, grant funding for undergraduates rose to a two-decade high.”
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Why College Students Are Borrowing Less to Pay for School
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Oct 27, 2016
“Average published tuition and fees for full-time students for 2016-2017 is continuing to go up, but undergraduate students are relying less on loans to cover those costs, according to a new report from the College Board. The average published tuition and fees for those attending in-state four-year college this year increased 2.4 percent before inflation to $9,650. To cover those costs, students are borrowing less and relying more on federal grants.”
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S.African universities get an extra $1.2 bln to improve student enrollment
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Oct 26, 2016
“Students at South African universities and higher education institutions will receive an extra 17 billion rand ($1.2 billion) over the next three years, Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan said on Wednesday. The government of Africa's most industrilised country is under pressure to improve access to education following the protests that have disrupted learning at various campuses but has said in response to the protests that it could not allocate extra funds to education at the expense of health or housing. Weeks of demonstrations calling for the scrapping of university fees, prohibitive for many black students, have highlighted frustration at enduring inequalities in South Africa more than two decades after the end of white minority rule.”
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Researchers exonerate 'Patient Zero' in U.S. AIDS epidemic
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Oct 26, 2016
“To Richard Burns, New York City in the 1980s felt like a war zone. When he wasn't caring for friends stricken with AIDS or mourning their death, Burns was protesting in the streets, urging public officials to confront this mysterious disease afflicting the gay community. "It felt at the time like we were in a war, and the enemy was not only AIDS; the enemy was our own government," said Burns, who headed New York's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Transgender (LGBT) Community Center from 1986 to 2009. SEE ALSO: Scientists see early progress on potential HIV cure "You were living with fear and constant dying and caregiving and shell shock," he told Mashable . "There was a lot of anger and anguish in our community." Researchers say they now have answers about the early years of North America's outbreak of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).  What they found is surprising: the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) — the virus that causes AIDS — first "jumped" from the Caribbean to New York City in 1970 or 1971, roughly a decade before AIDS began claiming hundreds of thousands of U.S. lives.  From New York, the virus then spread across the country. About 100 demonstrators protested on the steps of New York's City Hall on Nov. 15, 1985, as a City Council committee considered legislation to bar pupils and teachers with the AIDS virus from public schools. Image: AP Photo/Rick Maiman The study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, may also finally debunk the myth that Gaetan Dugas, a male flight attendant referred to as the so-called "Patient Zero," first brought HIV out of Africa and into the Western gay community in the early 1980s.  Dugas died of complications from AIDS in 1984. Though earlier studies had cast doubt on the "Patient Zero" narrative, the Nature study proves there is no biological or historical data to support the story, said Richard McKay, a co-author of this week's study and a scholar specializing in the history of public health at the University of Cambridge in England. People magazine featured Gaetan Dugas as Patient Zero in 1987. This marked up copy, anonymously mailed to the San Francisco AIDS Foundation, exemplifies negative reactions. Image: National Library of medicine "This individual was simply one of the thousands infected before HIV was recognized," he said on a Tuesday conference call with reporters. According to the new research, once HIV arrived in the city, New York then became a "crucial hub" from which the virus spread across the continent, the researchers found based on an examination of genetic and historical data. Tracing the virus HIV is mainly transmitted through sexual contact or by using infected needles, although tainted blood transfusions can spread the virus and women infected with HIV can pass it to their children. HIV weakens a person's immune system by destroying important T-cells that fight disease and infection. If left untreated, HIV can lead to the development of AIDS, which leaves people extremely vulnerable to other types of infections without treatment. Around 36.7 million people worldwide had HIV/AIDS at the end of 2015, including 1.8 million children, according to UNAIDS. Decades later, U.S. cases of AIDS have drastically declined as drug therapies and prevention education improved. But questions had remained about how this deadly condition first arrived on America's doorstep. A woman draws a red AIDS ribbon on Castro Street in San Francisco for World AIDS Day, Dec. 1, 2015. Image: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images For the Nature study, the researchers began by screening more than 2,000 blood serum samples collected in New York and San Francisco between 1978 and 1979. The samples belonged to men who had sex with men, and who had participated in a vaccine study for Hepatitis B, another sexually transmitted virus, said Michael Worobey, a co-author of the study and an expert on virus evolution at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Abbreviation: MSM, men who have sex with men. Image: CDC Since many clinics and research facilities toss out old samples over time, Worobey said it was "miraculous" they were able to find these 2,000 samples. Yet all of the nearly 40-year-old samples had degraded over time. So Worobey said he borrowed ideas from the field of ancient DNA research and developed a technique to "stitch together" complete genomes. Using this technique, the researchers recovered eight viral RNA genome sequences of the strain of HIV that started the North American outbreak. These sequences are now considered the oldest HIV genomes in North America. "It's direct evidence of many years of circulation of this virus in the United States before HIV and AIDS were finally recognized," Worobey told reporters on a press call. The researchers found extensive genetic diversity in the earliest HIV genomes they recovered from New York, which indicated the start of the outbreak.  This particular strain of HIV likely first emerged in the Democratic Republic of Congo in the early 20th century. At some point, a chimpanzee first spread the virus to a human, who later spread it to other humans. Subtype B endured for decades, and by the 1960s, it crossed the Atlantic and took hold in Haiti and the Caribbean. The early patterns of HIV-1 subtype B spread in the Americas. Image: michael worobey/nature From there, the strain arrived in New York, then traveled to San Francisco, South America, Western Europe, Australia and parts of Asia, Worobey said. The methods used in this study also have implications beyond the field of HIV/AIDS, experts said. These new molecular techniques to restore genetic material from aging tissue samples could help scientists study the outbreaks of other infectious diseases, such as the Ebola and Zika viruses, said John Coffin, a professor of molecular biology and microbiology at Tufts University in Massachusetts. "The study really tells us what we need to know, in a sense, about how epidemics spread, how they develop," said Coffin, who was not involved in Wednesday's study. "It resets our understanding of the very early days [of AIDS] in a very useful way," he told Mashable. Tracing Patient Zero narrative   While the study proves when HIV arrived in North America, it doesn't reveal who or what first brought the virus.  An individual of any nationality may have brought the virus from the Caribbean, or the virus could've traveled in blood products imported from Haiti. "How the virus moved from the Caribbean to the United States and New York City in the 1970s is an open question," Worobey told reporters. What is certain, however, is that Dugas, or "Patient Zero," was not to blame for spreading the virus to North America. A thousand of the newest blocks of The Aids Memorial Quilt are displayed June 26, 2004, in Washington, D.C. Image: Shaun Heasley/Getty Images Researchers studied the HIV genome of this man and found it appeared typical of U.S. strains that were already circulating in the 1980s.  They also traced the historical origins of the Patient Zero myth. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had interviewed him for a 1984 cluster study. Investigators first identified him as Case 057, and then "Patient O," because he came from "Out(side)-of-California."  Through a typographical error, the number "0" replaced the letter "O," hence "Patient Zero." Dugas, who was born in 1952, was a flight attendant for Air Canada in the 1970s and 80s. He said he had about 250 different partners a year between 1979 and 1981, close to the average of 227 partners reported by other patients.  The man gave CDC the names of 72 sexual partners, eight of whom had developed AIDS. Four of those men were in southern California, and four were in New York City. At the time, the investigators thought he matched the profile of someone who may have helped spread the disease quickly among men who have sex with men. But researchers never insinuated that Patient Zero was the source of the North American epidemic, and they never publicly identified him. Instead, the journalist Randy Shilts named the individual in his 1987 book And The Band Played On and highlighted the man's "unique role" in the HIV epidemic. That book later became a movie starring Alan Alda and Matthew Modine (the latter of Stranger Things fame). Protesters carry signs, including one showing President Ronald Reagan, during a demonstration outside the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. ,on Sept. 9, 1987, the year "And the Band Played On" was published. Image: AP Photo/Dennis Cook Shilts, who was gay and died of AIDS-related complications in 1994, had sought to highlight the epidemic's heroes and victims and shift the tone of the national public debate. Media coverage later reinforced Shilts' suggestions. Richard Burns, the activist in New York, said the narrative around Patient Zero was largely irrelevant to him and his peers as they struggled through the AIDS epidemic. Burns is now interim executive director of North Star Fund and is on the board of the NYC AIDS Memorial, which will open in Manhattan's West Village neighborhood on Dec. 1 on World AIDS Day. "We really didn't care about so-called Patient Zero at all," Burns recalled. "People were getting sick, the government didn't care, drug companies were not responding appropriately, the media was homophobic and AIDS-phobic," he said. "We were living in a world where the larger culture seemed to not care about us."”
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The Path to College
by NYT > Education
Oct 25, 2016
“College is the goal. Will these three teenagers get there? Anemona Hartocollis brings you their stories in this Facebook Live series.”
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3 High School Graduation Figures Educators Should Know
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Oct 25, 2016
“Previous generations may have been able to get a manufacturing job without a high school diploma and still have a middle-class life, but that doesn't exist anymore, says Bob Balfanz, director of the Everyone Graduates Center at John Hopkins University, which is working to help get all students to graduate. "The fact that the nation's graduation rate continues to go up is important because it means more kids are better prepared and have a better shot at a successful life," he says. New graduation rate data was released last week and more students are finishing high school than ever before.”
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11 Colleges Where the Most Students Join Fraternities
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Oct 25, 2016
“The U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: College, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or graduate school search.”
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Living in a College Town, and Not Attending School
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Oct 25, 2016
“Caroline Held, a manager at a McDonald’s in Ames, Iowa, talks about taking a job in food service while many of her peers pursued higher education.”
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Ask a Swedish Indie Band: What's the Deal With the Far Right?
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Oct 24, 2016
“Sweden can seem to liberal Americans like a social-democratic paradise. Were it not for work and family obligations, the land of universal health care, free college tuition, and 480 days paid parental leave might make a decent place to recline on a Söderhamn and ride out a hypothetical Trump presidency. And Swedish pop, from Abba to Ace of Bass to everything Max Martin touches, can sound like an outpouring of pure sonic joy from Nordic utopia.”
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Hong Kong jury to see 'torture' video as British banker's trial begins
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Oct 24, 2016
“By Farah Master HONG KONG (Reuters) - A Hong Kong judge warned jurors that they will have to view video filmed by former British banker Rurik Jutting of the torture and vicious killing of two Indonesian women he is accused of murdering as the trial got under way on Monday. Jutting, who studied at Cambridge University and Winchester College, one of Britain's most prestigious private schools, pleaded not guilty to murder on grounds of "diminished responsibility". During the jury selection, Deputy High Court Judge Michael Stuart-Moore warned potential jurors that if they were unable to cope with viewing extreme violence they should not take part.”
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Pennsylvania college faculty ends strike after tentative deal
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Oct 22, 2016
“(Reuters) - A union representing public college faculty in Pennsylvania ended a three-day strike on Friday after reaching a tentative deal with the state on pay, benefits and working conditions. The new agreement, which ends on June 30, 2018, was announced separately by the State System of Higher Education and by the union, the Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties. "Our primary goals were to preserve quality education for our students, protect our adjuncts from exploitation, and make sure the varieties of faculty work are respected," the union's president, Kenneth Mash, said in a statement.”
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WHY IT MATTERS: Education
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Oct 22, 2016
“WASHINGTON (AP) — THE ISSUE: Hundreds of billions of taxpayer dollars are spent each year on the country's public schools. The U.S. has a record-high graduation rates, 83 percent, but also stubborn achievement gaps and dismally lagging math and reading scores compared with other countries. And university degrees are leaving millions mired in debt. Few issues touch the lives of families like the state of education.”
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Professor earns $3.2 million to study environmental impact on child health
by The GW Hatchet
Dec 01, 2016
“A psychology professor is studying adopted children to better understand how children's environments can impact their health.
Jody Ganiban, a professor of clinical and developmental psychology, along with two faculty members at other institutions, received a $3.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to conduct research on the genetic and environmental factors on childhood development.
Leslie Leve, a professor of counseling psychology and human services at the University of Oregon and Jenae Neiderhiser, a professor of psychology at Pennsylvania State University, are also working on the project.
This research is part of a project called the Early Growth and Development Study, which focuses on a group of 561 children who were adopted by nonbiological parents during the first few days of their lives. The study, which has been going on for several years, follows how genetic and environmental factors influence emotional development as well as prenatal factors, like prenatal drug use, influence emotional development.
This research will follow this same sample of children, whose ages range from seven to 13 years old, through their adolescent years, studying their height and weight as well the children’s exposure to pollution and environmental toxins. The grant will also include the study of the adopted children's siblings, whether they are also adopted or are biological.
Ganiban said collecting data on siblings is an important part of the new study and may provide more information about the influence of genes and the environment.
“The important part of this design is then we’ll be able to look at whether or not weight is something that’s determined by the children’s postnatal environment, by their adoptive parents and practice of their adoptive parents, if the adoptees are more similar to their adoptive parents, versus factors that are more genetically or prenatally influenced,” Ganiban said.
As a part of the new grant, Ganiban’s cohort of 561 children will be studied alongside 34 other NIH cohorts of children, creating a group of about 50,000 children. This larger group is the NIH’s Environmental influences on Child Health Outcomes initiative – a seven-year project aimed at advancing knowledge about how children's environments affect their health.
This new research will also include in-home assessments, which will be led by the NIH with Ganiban and the other investigators’ input.
Ganiban said these studies are significant because they have a great potential impact on understanding children’s health and how influential a child's environment is.
“[NIH] is hoping with the power of 50,000 participants we will get a better handle not only on the development of childhood obesity, but the overall project will be looking at environment on genetic contributions to asthma, as well as the newer developmental outcomes of mental health,” Ganiban said.
Ganiban’s previous studies looked for patterns in psychiatric in children, which could lead to the identification of critical periods in a child’s life when professional intervention may be necessary.
“It’s all about identifying when children need help the most, when children become most vulnerable and perhaps would benefit from intervention the most,” she said.
In addition to her work with EGAD, Ganiban also works the Boston University Twin Project, another NIH-funded research project, which focuses on the development of children's personalities during the preschool years from an environmental and a genetic perspective.
Ganiban said her research has an impact in her developmental psychology and development of psychopathology classes, and her students also have an impact on her research, whether as undergraduate researchers or through the questions they ask in class.
“I can draw upon the research concepts and findings that I have in my own work and apply it to the classroom,” Ganiban said. “Some of the questions that the students ask, the holes that they find or they just tell me, ‘That just doesn’t make sense,’ I can also apply that to my research. My students keep on my toes.””

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Campus buildings found to not have lead
by The GW Hatchet
Dec 01, 2016
“University officials found pipes in campus buildings have not been affected by lead, contradicting records from D.C. Water.
The D.C. Water map, released in June, shows 17 buildings owned by GW or used by students that have pipes that may be affected by lead. University spokesman Brett Zongker said the University surveyed and physically inspected the buildings owned by GW shown on the map and determined that they did not have lead.
“The physical inspection did not find any lead piping on campus,” Zongker said.
The University also tested the water from certain buildings and found “no traceable levels of lead.”
The D.C. Water tool compiles available data about buildings in the District and labels them on a map based on how likely they are to use lead pipes. Some buildings D.C. Water found that could have been affected included Bell Hall, the NROTC building on F Street, the GW Deli, Building JJ and the Kappa Alpha Order townhouse on 22nd Street.
D.C. Water uses the most up-to-date information the agency has to fill in the map. If residents see incorrect information on the map they are encouraged to contact D.C. Water so staff members can update the map.
Zongker said the University has informed D.C. Water of the inconsistencies, and GW is collaborating with the agency to change the map.
Melanie Mason, the water coordinator for D.C. Water, spoke at an Advisory Neighborhood Commission Meeting for Foggy Bottom and the West End two weeks ago, teaching residents how to sign up for the city test their water.
Mason said the city cannot test pipes on private properties, but the agency encourages residents to check their own water for lead. Residents can request a bottle from D.C. Water on the agency’s website to fill with their tap water and ask the city to test for lead for free, she said.
Water pipes that were installed before 1950 in D.C. contain lead, which can can contaminate water, Mason said. She said the city added chloramine instead of chlorine to the water flowing through the pipes in 2000, which exposed the lead in older pipes and may have contaminated the water flowing through the pipes.
She said the city then started adding orthophosphate to the water to prevent further corrosion of the lead pipes.
“At the time, it wasn’t known that switching from chlorine to chloramine could disrupt the lead coating on pipes,” Mason said. “We had to change the way that we were adding chemicals to the water.”
Marisa Sinatra contributed reporting.”

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DeVos nomination breeds uncertainty in higher education
by The GW Hatchet
Dec 01, 2016
“Media Credit: Photo used under the Creative Commons license
Faculty and experts said they are uncertain how Betsy Devos, the nominee for U.S. Secretary of Education, will affect higher education policies.
Faculty and experts say that uncertainty about the new Secretary of Education’s effects on higher education could result in speculation of policies that may never happen.
After U.S. President-elect Donald Trump nominated Betsy DeVos to the nation’s highest education position last week, universities' leaders found themselves on the cusp of a potential sharp turn away from President Barack Obama’s higher education initiatives, like student loan repayment and tuition-free college. Because little is known about DeVos’ higher education views, educators and policymakers may find themselves questioning what the next administration will bring.
DeVos has most recently served as the chairwoman of the American Federation for Children and as a trustee of the American Enterprise Institute but has made few public statements about her positions on higher education. DeVos is the former chairwoman of the Michigan Republican Party and has been called a “principled conservative” by Frederick M. Hess of AEI.
GW faculty and experts say that DeVos’ lack of transparency on potential education policies means that reforms could be slowed down because having a pre-set agenda can make policies change faster.
Michael Feuer, the dean of the Graduate School of Education and Human Development, said he is unsure what policies DeVos will enact but is concerned that Trump's “fundamentally bigoted” rhetoric will be evident in education policies.
“As an institution dedicated to academic freedom and to the ideal of inclusivity in education, we need to be committed to our vision and our mission,” Feuer said.
Feuer said he is particularly concerned about DeVos’ support of charter schools and voucher programs, which he said could affect the types of students from across the U.S. that GW could admit. DeVos worked to prevent more regulation of charter schools in Michigan.
Charter schools are intended as alternatives to poorly performing public schools in areas where mostly low-income families live. Voucher programs work with these charter schools by using the amount of money that would have been spent on a student at a public school for the student's charter school tuition. DeVos has been a vocal supporter of both, which Feuer said could be problematic for education policy because they have proven ineffective.
“The kinds of privatization solutions that she has favored up until now have ultimately proven to be unsuccessful and in some cases have caused considerably more harm than good,” Feuer said.
Charter schools have been criticized for having limited oversight from the government and taking away money from public schools in low-income communities of color. With GW’s interest in increasing the diversity of their applicant pool, these communities may have more students who struggle to gain admittance or be adequately prepared for coursework.
But Feuer said that the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act in 2015 shifted more power to states and districts by allowing states to expand quality standards for their schools and create teacher evaluations.
Feuer said he expects the Trump administration, including DeVos, to be less involved in federal civil rights compliance. For GW and other universities, that could mean less of an emphasis on Title IX compliance and the way sexual assault is handled. GW has committed to policies like required education on sexual assault and victim confidentiality that may not be priorities for DeVos.
Daniel Klasik, an assistant professor of higher education administration, said GSEHD researchers are especially interested in Trump's and DeVos' impact on education research money.
“Many faculty members in GSEHD receive research funding,” Klasik said. “A reduction in funding available could be a big blow to the work we do.”
Klasik said he was not very worried about higher education affordability because Pell Grants, direct aid from the federal government to colleges that cover tuition costs for low-income students, are popular and bipartisan. About 15 percent of this year's freshman class received Pell funding.
Klasik said even though Trump has not been supportive of free college – a concept trumpeted by former candidates Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and Hillary Clinton – GW could make itself more affordable.
“It does not mean that colleges like GW cannot pursue policies that reduce the cost of college for their students on their own,” Klasik said. “It just means that the federal government won’t be leading the way.”
John Banzhaf, a public interest law professor, said Title IX-associated cases, specifically lack of due process in rape cases, was of particular concern to the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, which DeVos has donated to. He said the Republican party in general has been dissatisfied with the treatment of sexual assault cases.
“You can’t focus simply on Betsy DeVos,” Banzhaf said. “You also have to look at some of the other players.”
Banzhaf added that because Trump doesn't believe in climate change, GW could receive less government funding for sustainability research.
Robert Kelchen, an assistant professor of higher education at Seton Hall University, said Obama’s agenda for higher education, like providing free community college and changing student loan repayment, will likely be disregarded by the next administration. But Trump is not a typical conservative and may surprise higher education leaders with policies on affordability, Kelchen said.
Kelchen said Trump’s pick for under secretary of education could be as important as his choice of DeVos, as the person who fills that position often handles higher education policies.
Current Under Secretary of Education Ted Mitchell held administrative positions at the University of California at Los Angeles and Occidental College, while former Secretary of Education Arne Duncan had limited knowledge of higher education and leaned on suggestions from his under secretary.
“We don’t know how much Trump is willing to be involved in education,” Kelchen said.”

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Multicultural Greek Council to add Latino interest fraternity
by The GW Hatchet
Dec 01, 2016
“Media Credit: Olivia Anderson | Contributing Photo Editor
Clare Lewis, the president of the Multicultural Greek Council, said the council selected Phi Iota Alpha to join after the organization gave a presentation on campus. The Latino fraternity will recruit its first pledge class next fall.
GW's first Latino interest fraternity will be coming to campus next fall.
The Multicultural Greek Council voted to add a Phi Iota Alpha chapter earlier this semester after an on-campus presentation from the national organization. Multicultural Greek Council President Clare Lewis said the new charter would fill a gap in Greek life for Latino men.
“Right now we have two Latina interest sororities, but we do not have a Latino interest fraternity,” Lewis said.
Hispanic students make up 10.5 percent of the Class of 2020 – an 11 percent increase from last year.
Lewis said when considering which charter to admit, Multicultural Greek Council members consider whether or not the potential fraternity or sorority would mesh with the existing community and if it would tap into a group that currently isn’t represented in Greek life.
For example, there are already three historically black sororities on campus, which would make the Multicultural Greek Council hesitant to add another, Lewis said.
"Unless they had something like really unique they wanted to represent on our campus, it might be more difficult to get a membership base," Lewis said.
Phi Iota Alpha representatives attended Multicultural Greek Council events earlier in the year and already know of some students who want to join, Lewis said. Representatives of Phi Iota Alpha showed a vested interest in joining GW's Greek community, which won over many Multicultural Greek Council members, she said.
The national chapter for Phi Iota Alpha did not return multiple requests for comment.
Phi Iota Alpha has 61 chapters and is the oldest Latino fraternity. The fraternity’s philanthropy efforts include partnerships with UNICEF and a focus on increasing disability awareness, according to the fraternity's website . Phi Iota Alpha brothers include former presidents of Honduras, Panama and Columbia, according to the website .
There has been a steady increase in the number of chapters affiliated with the Multicultural Greek Council over the last several years. Multicultural Greek Council members, along with those from the Interfraternity Council and the Panhellenic Association, expressed interest earlier this year in adding between one and three chapters to campus by 2018.
The Multicultural Greek Council has added three returning and one new chapter in the past calendar year for a total of 15 chapters on campus.”

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Sara Brouda: Palestinian flag had no place at student walk-out
by The GW Hatchet
Dec 01, 2016
“Like many students, the outcome of the U.S. presidential election not only upset me, but made me scared for the future of our country. When several prominent student organizations coordinated a walk-out one week after the election, I was excited to stand with my fellow classmates against a rising movement that legitimizes xenophobic, racist and hateful views. For me, the walk-out was meant to send the message that everyone is included and supported on campus.
Though I was strongly in support of what the walk-out stood for and was a proud participant myself, I was uncomfortable with some of the participants’ use of the Palestinian flag at the gathering in Kogan Plaza. The flag stood for a message that I did not agree with, and it hindered the walk-out's goal of promoting equality. During a time of such divisiveness, it doesn’t make sense to further divide students at a rally that should have brought us together.
Students for Justice in Palestine had every right to support and co-sponsor the walk-out, but bringing the flag was a move that put an unrelated issue into focus and ostracized members of the community who supported the movement against President-elect Donald Trump's policies and the rally's demands but not SJP’s mission.
The flag is a symbol of an organization that can promote values that make other groups of students, especially Jewish students, feel unsafe and unwelcome . For many Israel advocates, the flag is representative of an active and mobilized group against their homeland and their values. Students shouldn't have introduced this controversial symbol in a place where students were meant to feel safe.
There is a difference between standing in solidarity with social movements on campus for a greater purpose and actively promoting your own beliefs. SJP could have participated in the rally and supported the GW community at large, but instead, they used the flag to promote their own causes and not to unify students.
There wouldn’t be an issue with the flag if a student participant in the rally had brought it. But the flag was front and center and held by student leading the protest. Rather than sending a message against hate to University administrators and passersby, participants may have looked like they were allied with SJP.
GW posted a photo on Facebook and Twitter of the rally in Kogan Plaza with a clear view of the flag with the caption, "No hate, no fear. Everyone is welcome here." In the photo, the flag was the most dominant image. There are a few anti-Trump signs and a few other flags, but none are quite as prominent.
This post by the University took a de facto political stance – a stance that many students disagree with. By sharing the picture and saying that there is no hate or fear related to the rally's causes, GW is silencing students who disagree with the message the Palestinian flag sends.
An Israeli flag wouldn't have belonged at the rally any more than the Palestinian one did. Both distract from the message that the student body stands against the hatred that came out of this election and the incoming U.S. presidential administration. Politicizing the event in this way made it more divisive than unifying.
The walk-out, which was supported by multiple student organizations, demonstrated that we are a strong community. But to have a truly supportive community, differing opinions need the same freedoms and protections. Moving forward, students need to actively work toward true solidarity that isn’t overshadowed with divisive causes.
Sara Brouda, a sophomore majoring in international affairs, is a Hatchet opinions writer. Want to respond to this piece? Submit a letter to the editor.”

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College Democrats begin planning for next election cycle
by The GW Hatchet
Nov 21, 2016
“Media Credit: Siobhan Finnerty | Hatchet Photographer
College Democrats announced that they will launch new programs, including a blog and campaigning "boot camp," at a general body meeting Thursday.
Less than two weeks after the U.S. general election, GW College Democrats leaders are already thinking about the next cycle.
Leaders of the group said they will launch several new programs, like a blog and a campaign “boot camp," with the hope of keeping members active, so they do not feel helpless in the wake of an election that produced Republican majorities in Congress and a Republican president-elect.
Levi Debose, the vice president of communications for College Democrats, said the group will start a blog next semester to help build a stronger and more accessible online presence, both on campus and in the D.C. area, so interested people can know what the College Democrats are working on.
“We want to get our message and our story out to our members and to the wider public,” Debose said. “It is very important to know what our members are doing and what is important to us so it can get out to the larger D.C. community.”
The blog, which was announced to the general body at a meeting Thursday, will feature event coverage, announcements and personal statements from members, Debose said.
College Democrats President Lande Watson said the group will continue to encourage activism to hold President-elect Donald Trump accountable throughout his presidency.
“A lot of young people, a lot of GW Dems members, have some feelings, have some stories, have some opinions,” Watson said. “We want to serve as a place for people to be able to amplify that.”
To discuss and advocate for women’s rights, reproductive rights and sexual violence prevention, College Democrats will also launch “Fem Dems” – a branch of the national College Democrats focusing on women’s rights advocacy – this upcoming semester.
“It sort of serves as a hub for the women’s advocacy in our organization,” Watson said. “I think Fem Dems is a leadership community of individuals who identify as College Democrats on this campus and want to work on feminist issues.”
The branch will launch during Trump's administration, as some women have expressed concerns with the president-elect’s proposed health policies, which could limit access to birth control and abortion clinics, The Atlantic reported .
Fem Dems already has branches at schools like the University of Pennsylvania and California State University, Sacramento.
Watson added that the College Democrats will hold “boot camps” next semester for students who want to learn the proper format for making campaign calls and canvassing.
“There are a lot of people who were not necessarily involved in campaign stuff leading up to this election, who we can train and get out there,” Watson said. “We are having them knock on their first doors, making their first calls and realizing how impactful working on a campaign can be.”
The campaign boot camps are designed to get students ready to go on campaign trips for the Democratic candidate in the 2017 Virginia gubernatorial race, Watson said.
Watson added that the boot camps give the College Democrats a chance to train new voters to be advocates and campaign for the 2018 midterms, even looking further ahead to the 2020 presidential elections.
Executive Vice President Josh Kirmsse said the group has to start mobilizing for the Democratic candidate in the 2017 Virginia gubernatorial race, as well as for the DNC chair race, by voicing support for specific candidates.
“They really do care about college student support, and it is not something that people get hyped up or vocal about,” Kirmsse said. “We as an organization should support a specific candidate and make sure they know these things are important for college students across the country.”
Kirmsse added that the 2018 midterms must be a “Senate takeover” for Democrats because Republicans now hold a majority in both the Senate and the House of Representatives. He said the College Democrats’ campaign committee is going to lead canvassing and phone banking for Democratic Senate candidates.
“The 2018 cycle is going to be here faster than we think it will be. We need to be prepared for it,” Kirmsse said. “Frankly, it is supposed to favor Republicans. There are a lot of conservative seats up, and there are Democrats in swing states that are up that people are forecasting are going to have a difficult race.””

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Potential Trump financial policies concerning for universities, faculty say
by The GW Hatchet
Nov 21, 2016
“Media Credit: Siri Nadler | Hatchet Designer
As Inauguration Day nears, officials and faculty across the country are discussing approaches to potential hits to the financial health of higher education institutions – including GW.
Although it’s uncertain what policies that affect higher education President-elect Donald Trump will enact, some of his proposed tax policies and education reforms could impact GW’s financial foundation, fundraising and research.
Trump’s website does not outline specific policies for higher education, but speculation about cuts to federal aid, privatization of the student loan system and regulations on endowment spending have drawn ire from universities' leaders .
University spokesman Brett Zongker said GW will not alter resources and support offered to students and applicants in anticipation of any financial policy changes.
“We are not in a position to speculate on President-elect Trump's policies,” Zongker said in an email. “As we have said in the past, we will continue to monitor market conditions and our capital needs and make strategic decisions that invest in the institution and support the academic and financial health of the University.”
John Banzhaf, a public interest law professor, said the most significant effects of these policies could be on research funding. Because Trump has emphasized a need for more “practical” and technical college opportunities, it is likely that he would cut federal support for research in humanities and politics, Banzhaf said.
The University has benefitted from federal research funding, which is expected to bring in $3 million this year in the engineering school alone. But as GW officials have worked to establish the institutions as a leader in science, technology, engineering and mathematics research, humanities faculty have complained that they are being left by the wayside – a feeling that could be perpetuated by proposed policies.
“How can we increase our share of that, and in the humanities areas and others that might not seem as immediately productive, how can we shield that if grants are cut off?” Banzhaf asked. “The time to start studying that is now rather than when it happens.”
GW and other universities with large endowments have been under scrutiny by lawmakers for the past few years, who say that universities should be required to spend a certain percentage of their financial foundations on financial aid. This effort has been led by Rep. Tom Reed, R-N.Y., and Banzhaf said the policy is likely to make headway in a Trump administration.
Banzhaf added that a boost in the stock market after Trump's election could also improve families’ financial standings, encouraging more students to choose GW. Stocks rose significantly the morning after Trump's election.
Anthony Yezer, a professor of economics, said in an email that while the rise in the stock market after the election could help grow the endowment, debt that the University needs to service in the next few years could see higher interest rates. The University’s debt recently surpassed $1.7 billion, which is slightly more than the endowment.
“If interest rates rise because economic activity picks up and the Fed raises short term rates, the interest cost of servicing GW debt could increase, and that would not be good,” Yezer said. “Whatever can be done now to insulate the budget from rising interest rates as debt matures and is rolled over should be done.”
Charles Garris, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and the chair of the Faculty Senate’s executive committee, said because so much of GW’s endowment is invested in D.C. real estate, the financial foundation should be relatively stable, even if there are significant market fluctuations. GW owns the second-largest amount of real estate in the region, trailing only the federal government.
“The University has been very fortunate in that sense, over many years,” Garris said. “That has sheltered us from a lot of downturn, like in 2008. Universities like Harvard and Yale all had hiring freezes. We flourished in that period because we were able to hire great faculty. We didn’t have the competition for great faculty that we would normally have.”
Garris said that he is more concerned about the potential for Trump to cut federal support for low-income students. Officials have been focusing the final year of University President Steven Knapp's term on fundraising for student aid.
Trump could also reduce the amount of available funding for some of GW’s prominent research on sustainability, Garris said.
“One of the pillars in our strategic plan is sustainability, and Trump has said that he thinks that’s a Chinese hoax,” he said. “All of the funding that we get on sustainability could be impacted.”
Garris said while he “can’t think of anything particularly optimistic” about Trump’s effect on higher education, he is confident that GW and other universities will still thrive.
“I don’t think there’s any reason for tremendous gloom – we will try to adapt and work with the system.” he said. “I think the University will do well.””

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Language course fees reduced for spring semester
by The GW Hatchet
Nov 21, 2016
“Media Credit: Alyssa Bogosian | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Richard Robin, the chair of the department of Romance, German and Slavic languages and literatures, said language fees are being reduced because the Language Center’s technology is no longer needed. Students in language courses will pay $15 instead of $60 next semester.
Students taking language courses will not have to pay as much in fees next semester.
Officials in the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences lowered foreign language course fees from $60 to $15 for the next semester. They said that as more tools become available for free online, they were able to cut back on charges for resources that students no longer use.
The fees, which go directly go to CCAS and not to individual language departments, fund the Language Center, a group of classrooms and labs that supports language teaching and learning for students and faculty through resources like tutoring or testing.
Paul Wahlbeck, the vice dean for programs and research, said in an email that the fees were lowered because students no longer need to go to language labs when they can access materials online. He added that individual language departments and officials also wanted to reduce the course fees because students were no longer using some services in the Language Center.
“After consulting with departments and the Provost's office, we decided to reduce the fees to $15,” he said. “The remaining fees support the tutoring services that are provided to students in the language courses.”
María José De la Fuente, the director of the Spanish language program, said in an email that her department had been considering lowering the fees for a few years after they realized students were not using the Language Center as often as they used to.
“The language course fees, or ‘language lab’ fees, were lowered because language learning at GW no longer requires the use of a 'lab,'” she said. “As language instruction has evolved, students no longer need to visit the Language Center for language practice.”
She added that the amount students pay now is enough to cover services they do use in language classes, like tutoring and movie screenings.
Richard Robin, the chair of the department of Romance, German and Slavic languages and literatures, said in an email that up until recently, the Language Center was used to provide backup for technology required for foreign language teaching and for access to expensive equipment that anyone can now access from a laptop.
“The first media server ever installed in the Language Center cost $35,000. But today, nearly everyone has access to this technology at home,” Robin said. “The Language Center no longer needs to have massive amounts of equipment on hand to borrow.”
Robin said the Language Center has other non-technological functions, like tutoring, and its staff coordinate the work of student peer tutors.
He added he does not believe the fee change will lead to increased enrollment. While enrollment in language classes in the department of Romance, German and Slavic languages and literatures has generally been high, with Spanish enrollment often almost exceeding the number of classes available, faculty have said they hope more students would take languages as a part of a well-rounded education.
“Unfortunately, the CCAS G-PAC does not allow students to count basic foreign language learning towards graduation – something in my view that takes away from the notion of GW as a place of international learning,” he said. “Our enrollments will rise when the College recognizes that learning a foreign language widens the window onto new information and experiences.”
Pardis Minuchehr, the director of the Persian program and an assistant professor of Persian, said she would like to see students use the language labs again for extra experience to help learn the languages.
“In the past, language classes had a lot of audio material that was used in language labs, but now everyone has internet access and a computer, so the need for it has been lessened,” she said. “But to tell you the truth, I would have like to see more language labs, and more students coming and participating in them.”
These cuts in the fees also fit into a larger push from officials and student leaders to help make classes more affordable.
Student Association President Erika Feinman and Executive Vice President Thomas Falcigno both included affordability as a major part of their platforms during their campaigns last spring. And the SA passed a resolution at the beginning of this academic year requiring each of the senate’s committees to create a report on affordability to present at the end of the academic year.
Officials have also advocated for smaller changes that could help reduce costs for students. At this month’s Faculty Senate meeting, Provost Forrest Maltzman encouraged faculty to think about the cost of materials for their courses when developing their syllabi for the spring semester.
“We have open access materials and the utilization of journal articles in the library,” Maltzman said at the meeting. “Small reductions in each of our courses have significant impacts for students. Just be mindful of that.”
Johnny Morreale contributed reporting.”

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Crime log
by The GW Hatchet
Nov 21, 2016
“Destroying/Defacing Structures
Potomac House
11/07/2016 - Unknown time
Open case
A male student reported finding graffiti on his front door to his residence hall room. The matter is still under investigation.
-Open case.
Lewd and Obscene Acts/Sex Offense
Off Campus
11/07/2016 - 10:00 p.m.
Case closed
A female student reported to the University Police Department that a man approached her and exposed himself outside her apartment building on the 900 block of 25th Street NW.
-Off campus incident.
Blackmail
Potomac House
11/08/2016 - Multiple Dates
Case closed
A male student reported to UPD that he was contacted by an unidentified individual via Skype who demanded money in exchange for not releasing material on the internet.
- Referred to Metropolitan Police Department.
Destruction of Property/Vandalism
Health and Wellness Center
11/11/2016 - Unknown time
Case closed
A Health and Wellness Center staff member reported seeing graffiti on the main garage door.
- No suspects or witnesses.
Unlawful Possession of Alcohol/Possession of Drugs
Munson Hall
11/11/2016 - 11:05 a.m. to 1:10 p.m.
Case closed
GW Housing staff conducted an administrative search and found marijuana-related paraphernalia and alcohol. The items were disposed of on scene.
- Referred to the Division of Student Affairs.
Disorderly Conduct/ Intoxication/Liquor Law Violation
Public Property on Campus (1900 Block of F Street NW)
11/12/2016 8:05 to 8:45 p.m.
Case closed
UPD responded to a report of a highly intoxicated student who was belligerent and combative at the scene. EMeRG transported the student to GW Hospital .
- Referred to DSA.
Destruction of Property/Vandalism/Theft
Public Property on Campus (22nd and I streets)
11/14/2016 -10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Open case
A female student reported to UPD that her bicycle was stolen from a bike rack outside the Science and Engineering Hall. The student also reported that the person had cut the cable lock to the bicycle.
- Open case.
Harassment
Mitchell Hall
11/14/2016 - Unknown time
Open case
UPD responded to a report of a vandalization of a poster board that was shared by residence hall residents.
- Open case.
- Compiled by James Levinson.”

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English professor creates group to challenge spike in hate crimes
by The GW Hatchet
Nov 21, 2016
“Media Credit: Naishi Jhaveri | Hatchet Staff Photographer
Jeffrey Cohen, a professor of English, started a group called Writers Artists Thinkers Challenge Hate, made up of international artists and academics.
An English professor is taking a stand against what he calls a normalization of hatred.
Jeffrey Cohen, a professor of English, created a group called Writers Artists Thinkers Challenge Hate with about 20 of his Facebook friends – who are mostly academics and artists – from around the world to challenge hate. Cohen's goal echoes messages from officials, schools and departments around GW that have issued statements over the past two weeks reaffirming their commitment to stand against discriminatory actions in the wake of this month’s election results.
President-elect Donald Trump’s victory earlier this month has been pegged as the cause for many of these acts, like racist messages being sent to black freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania and the robbery of a Muslim student at San Diego State University. Trump’s campaign has been considered one of the most divisive in recent history, and many of his supporters have also been blamed for an increase in intolerance and a spike in racist attacks since his election.
Cohen said he and his friends created the group – which is open to anyone – in response to the increase in hate crimes following the election. He said he and colleagues on social media were frustrated and concerned by students and fellow faculty members' comments, which spurred them to found the group. Five days after its launch, the group totals about 370 members.
“Rather than become despondent, which it is kind of easy to do, we wanted to brainstorm ways to be more positively engaged in bringing about change and actually bringing about safety and refuge for our students and colleagues who need it,” Cohen said.
He said he was particularly motivated to create the group when swastikas were drawn on the walls in his daughter’s middle school. Cohen is worried that as these kinds of incidents become daily occurrences, people won't be as outraged as they should be, he said.
The group has focused on finding ways to challenge hateful rhetoric, he said. He said it has been helpful to share “statements of affirmation” – messages confirming an institution’s or academic department’s commitment to diversity and tolerance – in the group to help encourage people at other universities to pen their own.
“We feel like in these troubled times, it’s too easy to get into a reactive mode where you’re condemning things after they happened rather than affirming the kind of community that you’re interested in fostering and putting into place,” Cohen said.
The English department issued a statement on the department's blog last week asserting the its commitment to diversity and critical thought. Cohen said the statement was crafted to show students what the department’s values are, not to make a political statement.
Several officials have issued similar statements. University President Steven Knapp and Provost Forrest Maltzman both addressed students' post-election concerns at this month’s Faculty Senate meeting and said they would continue to celebrate diversity and urged civility among students.
Ben Vinson, the dean of the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, Reuben Brigety, the dean of the Elliott School of International Affairs, and Sanjit Sethi, the director of the Corcoran School of the Arts and Design, also issued statements reaffirming their commitments to inclusion.
“We, as an institution, aspire to cultivate minds and provide the world with individuals who are ready to tackle the toughest questions, to wrestle with the ethics of what tomorrow may bring and to unknotting the challenges that plague us,” Vinson said in his statement.
Academic departments and programs, including those for history, organizational sciences and communication, American Studies, Spanish and University Writing, have issued their own statements with similar themes.
Katrin Schultheiss, the chair of the history department, said her department decided to issue its statement to students after faculty expressed concerns about harassment on other campuses. Faculty members wanted to make clear to students that the department supports the University’s diversity and inclusion mission.
“That’s not just words that we throw out there because they look good, but values and principles that we think are absolutely essential to carrying out the mission of the University,” she said. “And if we don’t articulate them and stand by them when they're under fire, then they are meaningless.”
Schultheiss said she wanted to make it clear that the department also wasn’t taking a political stance, but rather standing up for diversity and inclusion as essential parts of the learning environment at GW – a topic she said isn’t partisan.
“Those of us who have relatively secure positions, I think have an obligation be there for those who are in more vulnerable positions,” she said. “And so I think it’s really important that we recognize that and not be scared out of some sense of decorum or some false idea of what neutrality means to not act when we need to act.”
Elisabeth Anker, an associate professor of American studies, said she has spent a lot of time over the past two weeks supporting students who are feeling vulnerable in the aftermath of the election. She said part of a professor’s job is to make sure classrooms are safe places for students to learn.
Anker has participated in several protests and vigils on or near campus since the election, including a march alongside 400 others to the White House and to deliver a list of demands to administrators aimed at supporting marginalized students.
“When we see the changes in policies that really seem to go against our general American values of freedom, equality, justice and democracy, I think as citizens, it’s our job to stand up to that, regardless of political party,” she said.
Rachel Riedner, the executive director of the University Writing Program, said in an email that the statement her program issued demonstrates a commitment to providing safety to groups who could be targeted.
Their statement, which was unanimously approved by faculty at a meeting last week, reaffirms a statement Knapp issued the day after the election, reminding students of the program’s commitment to celebrating diversity and maintaining civility.
“In the statement, we are not responding to a particular political decision nor are we aligning ourselves with a particular party or figure,” she said. “Academic learning and scholarship cannot take place in the absence of a sense of personal safety and an evident commitment to civil discourse.”
Catherine Moran contributed reporting.”

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GW Libraries collect millions of election tweets
by The GW Hatchet
Nov 21, 2016
“Media Credit: Isabella Brodt | Hatchet Photographer
Geneva Henry, the dean of libraries and academic innovation, said the libraries collect social media data for research purposes. Library staff collected more than 3.6 million tweets for political science and communications research on election night.
Updated: Nov. 21, 2016 at 10:50 a.m.
On GW Libraries’ website, students and faculty can skim academic articles, check on the status of requested books and, now, read millions of tweets about the election.
After the U.S. presidential election on Nov. 8, library staff collected more than 3.6 million tweets from election night and 279 million tweets about or from candidates, parties, conventions and debates throughout the election cycle. The dean of libraries said the collection can help researchers who are studying the 2016 presidential election gain insights on what people said on Twitter throughout the election process and on election night, specifically.
The collection is available on Social Feed Manager, a tool created in 2014 with a $24,000 grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Studies, and currently supported by a $130,000 grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission, to assist in research through social media outlets. Researchers can access this collection of tweets from the election season by emailing the library's data email account.
Geneva Henry, the dean of libraries and academic innovation, said in an email that the libraries collect the social media data for “research, archiving and academic purposes” and know that political events are particularly important for researchers in multiple disciplines.
“We expect that the data will be used by GW faculty and students in their published research and assignments for years to come as researchers examine this election cycle,” Henry said.
Holly Cowart, a communications professor at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, said as the world progresses digitally, researching social media can become increasingly telling of the world at large.
“I think that on the one hand social media has influenced how we get information,” Cowart said. “It was a way to understand what people were talking about. Collecting all these tweets tells you what’s important as a journalist or as a researcher.”
Tweets from this election cycle could also uncover hidden perspectives crucial to understanding the unanticipated results of the election, when President-elect Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, Cowart said.
“The idea that polls were wrong, that the polls did not necessarily reflect reality, is something that people are talking about,” Cowart said. “So being able to have these theories, form these theories and then use that information that’s been collected, those tweets, as a way to verify or discount those theories, is probably the best in my mind the best way to go about it.”
Cowart said social media has had strong impacts on journalism and politics, and that politicians increasingly use social media as a tool to control public conversation.
Throughout his campaign, Trump revolutionized the way candidates utilize social media, using Twitter to spread his political messages. Since winning the election, Trump has been vocal on Twitter about protesters, the media and his selections for his cabinet.
“Look at how Trump managed social media in this election,” Cowart said. “Most people looked at that and said it seems like he’s just digging himself deeper, it’s not an effective form of communication. But yet, it got him a lot of attention, and in politics it’s important.”
Sorin A. Matei, an associate professor of communications at Purdue University and a researcher for the Social Media Research Foundation, said it would take more than the 300 million tweets GW collected to understand this election.
“The story of this campaign started last year and to understand it we, unfortunately, need more than 300 million tweets,” Matei said. “We need 100 times more than that. We need 30 billion tweets.”
Matei added that social media isn’t always a reliable tool for research.
“It's like a box of chocolates,” Matei said. “You never know what you are going to get. Anonymity and pseudonymity often makes it very hard to know who said what, to whom, and for what reason. We only know that something was said at a specific time and maybe specific place. The lack of context often leaves us guessing.”
Marc A. Smith, a sociologist and a member of the Social Media Research Foundation, said that although the compilation of tweets may give an indication of some trends in this election, it is a small fraction of what Americans were thinking on election night.
“It is not necessarily saying that these 300 million tweets is America on the eve of, during and shortly after a momentous election,” Smith said. “It’s Twitter, before, during and after a momentous election. Now is Twitter going to give us any insight into the social world around us? Maybe and yes, but it’s not perfect, and Twitter doesn't equal America.”
This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that the Social Feed Manager was created by a National Historical Publications and Records Commission grant. The tool is currently being supported by this grant, but was initially developed through with a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Studies. We regret this error.”

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Squash programs eager to prove themselves among nation's best
by The GW Hatchet
Nov 21, 2016
“Media Credit: Sam Hardgrove | Assistant Photo Editor
Freshman Jamie Oakley hits the ball in men's squash's game against Georgetown on Nov. 9. Oakley swept his opponent in GW's 8–1 win.
Men’s and women’s squash opened the 2016–2017 season on Nov. 9 as two of GW’s highest nationally ranked teams. Both squads will look to prove their dominance this winter and earn a chance to compete nationally at the end of the year.
Men's and women’s squash both have high expectations for the season, entering the season as No. 11 and No. 13 in the U.S., respectively.
In 2015–2016, the men (1–2) made their first ever appearance in the Hoehn Cup (B Division) of the College Squash Association National Championship. Although the team graduated two top contributing seniors Reid Breck and James Reiss, they plan for their new freshmen to take on major roles.
“We have a strong core of returners, including three seniors and three very talented freshmen, including one who is playing the No. 1 for us, Jamie Oakley from New Zealand,” head coach Wendy Lawrence said. “With this set of players, my goal is to climb into the top eight in the nation to gain a spot in the A Division at CSA Nationals.”
Lawrence, who helms both programs, was recently named to Squash Magazine’s Top 50 – a list that recognizes the most influential people in each state for their leadership in the sport of squash.
During her nine-year tenure as head coach, Lawrence has pushed her players to train hard for the season, emphasizing the importance of offseason individual work for the benefit of the team.
“Everyone on the team worked really hard individually over the summer wherever they were,” junior captain Oisin Logan said. “There was a group of us in D.C. over the summer, and we trained together almost every day. We got to hold each other accountable for playing even when it wasn't mandatory.”
Logan is joined by seniors Andres de Frutos and Nicolas Valderrama, who as a pair have compiled 62 individual victories and 31 team wins as Colonials. A trio of juniors in Billy Berner, John Bassett and Omar Mussehl, as well as sophomore Moudy Abdel-Maksoud, round out the lineup.
“We are a stronger team in the four through seven positions on the ladder, which is where we were weak last year,” Lawrence said. “We are also stronger at the top, so I believe we can beat several teams who are not as deep.”
The team took down Georgetown 8–1 in its season-opener earlier this month but was swept at No. 6 Penn and defeated by No. 12 Princeton 8-1 over the weekend.
The women’s team (2–2) graduated four seniors, including four-time All-American and the program’s all-time wins leader Anna Gabriela Porras, but welcomes five new freshmen.
“We worked hard to find a great, talented group of freshmen who we felt would inject energy and enthusiasm,” Lawrence said. “They really solidify the middle core of our lineup.”
Two of the freshmen, Engy El Mandouh and Samira Baird, competed in the U.S. Squash Intercollegiate Doubles Championship in October and finished second overall. Freshman Emma Tryon led the lineup with a win at the No. 1 spot during last Sunday’s match against Johns Hopkins.
Two seasons ago, the women's team appeared in the Howe Cup for the first time in program history. Last year, the Colonials were unable to repeat that performance, mainly due to injury of three top players. To remain healthy this season, the team has focused on strength and conditioning more than they have in the past, senior captain Breanne Flynn said.
“Since we've been back at GW at the start of fall, we have been doing a lot of conditioning on the squash court and matched that with building our strength in the weight room,” Flynn said. “It was a grueling two months, but at the end of it we are stronger, fitter and eager to face our opponents.”
The strong lineup begins with Flynn, who is coming off of an All-American season and a victory at the B Division D Draw Championship. Joining Flynn is junior duo Mary Jo Mahfood and Abby Shonrock. With her 18 career wins at GW, Shonrock had a run in the B Division C Draw at the CSA National Individual Championships this past spring.
“This year we are all eager to improve and prove to other teams that we are a force to be reckoned with,” said Flynn.
The squad jumped to a 2–0 record with sweeps of Georgetown and Johns Hopkins to open the year but, along with the men, dropped contests at No. 2 Penn and No. 4 Princeton.
Both teams return to action at Virginia on Dec. 2.”

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While you're doing homework, these students are building businesses
by The GW Hatchet
Nov 21, 2016
“Media Credit: Elizabeth Rickert | Hatchet Photographer
Ari Krasner, a junior, started the crowdfunding website Givebutter. Krasner and two friends have run the business while still enrolled as undergraduate students.
Most students’ schedules are already busy between classes, student organization meetings and internships, but some students have added more to their plates by starting their own businesses while still in college.
From custom sneakers to a preppy clothing line to a fundraising website, these students have built businesses between classes and are each looking for new ways to grow them. These are three student-run businesses to keep an eye on.
SneaxByArish
Junior Annie Rishty painted her first pair of shoes for her best friend during her senior year of high school. Now she runs a custom sneaker company called SneaxByArish and has sold 27 pairs since she began selling on Etsy during her freshman year at GW.
“I was kind of scared to do it, because I had never done it before, and I hadn’t taken a drawing or art class in years,” Rishty said. “But I started sketching some stuff out, and it just kind of came together. The first pair took me about a week to do, and my friend cried when I showed him the final product.”
Rishty purchases white Vans sneakers and then covers them with sketches tailored to the customer’s preferences. A typical pair costs $154, and she sells them exclusively on Etsy. Last summer, Rishty partnered with the Japanese snack brand Pocky to design a pair of shoes for the brand that would be featured in its Etsy shop.
Rishty, a business administration major with concentrations in innovation and entrepreneurship and marketing, said her entrepreneurship classes at GW don’t describe the process of starting a business correctly.
“I’m thinking to myself, ‘That’s not how you do it,’” Rishty said. “There’s no way to tell you how to start a business. You just do. You might go into debt, and you might struggle and you might get a lot of rejection, but that’s the risk you take.”
Rishty only produces her custom sneakers during the summer and school breaks, but she markets her products year-round, she said.
Rishty plans to get a full-time job after she graduates, but she also wants to continue designing and selling the shoes, too. She said she plans on expanding her services next year to paint custom designs on other products like laptop cases.
“After a stressful day at work, you’re going to want to do something that you love and enjoy,” Rishty said. “I just love making people happy.”
Rufus & Royce
Juniors Calista Tavallali and John Kim wanted to enter the rapidly growing market of preppy wear, so they teamed up with Tavallali’s brother last June to start Rufus & Royce – a website that they described as selling affordable upscale clothing, specializing in embroidered shorts.
“Preppy wear is really big right now,” Tavallali said. “Chubbies is huge. These companies are doing really well, so we just wanted to get in that market now while it’s still hot.”
One of their designs is a $65 pair of shorts called “The Reagans,” which feature pink stripes and the Republican elephant in small embroidered patches. The women’s version is called “The Nancies.” Other products include a $30 “‘Merica” hat with an embroidered American flag.
Tavallali, an organizational sciences and business administration major, and Kim, a psychology major and business administration minor, entered their business idea in GW’s New Venture competition in January and were semi-finalists. The competition offers young entrepreneurs the chance to develop their business ideas to win funding. Tavallali and Kim didn’t win any prize money as semi-finalists, and they are currently funding operations with money they make and money they've saved.
“It was a great way when we were first starting out to think about our business plan, think about who we want our customers to be, and figure out what our values as a company were,” Tavallali said. “GW definitely helped us formulate what the company is today.”
Travallali and Kim are heavily invested in Rufus & Royce, but they're not certain if they will be able to proceed after they graduate.
“We’re definitely all passionate about it, and so we’d still like to work on it,” Kim said. “But we might graduate and get jobs where we’re not allowed to have another business because of conflict of interest.”
Givebutter
When junior Ari Krasner and his friends Max Friedman and Liran Cohen decided to create Givebutter, a fundraising website to promote charitable giving in college students, they did not expect it to become a near-full-time venture.
“We came up with an idea, we wanted to do it and we did it within three days,” Krasner said. “The rest of it just happened.”
Through Givebutter, organizations who want to raise money create profiles to publicize their causes. Those who donate to their projects can write their own personal messages about why they donated money to appear on the organization’s profile.
“We wanted to take the fun, excitement, everything you do when you’re donating offline and put it online, so we can change the industry for the better,” Krasner said.
In May, students in Jewish Colonials Chabad teamed up with Givebutter to raise more than $16,000 for a Kosher food truck on campus.
For Krasner and his partners, being college students helps establish a connection with clients who are also their peers.
“We are actually students, we were student leaders and we know the needs of students. We’re not pretending to be something that we’re not," Krasner said.
Over the summer, Givebutter started an ambassador program to tell other college students about the site. The 160 staff members, referred to as Butter Ambassadors, are stationed on about 100 campuses.
Krasner said he plans to work on Givebutter full-time after graduation.
“It is absolutely not even a question that we will continue this in the future and continue to secure larger and larger partnerships with organizations," he said. "Full steam ahead."”

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Corcoran acquisition propels GW up fundraising rankings
by The GW Hatchet
Nov 17, 2016
“Media Credit: Yonah Bromberg-Gaber | Graphics Editor
The University experienced a 151.8 percent increase in private support last year, moving up 176 spots on the Chronicle of Philanthropy’s list of the 400 top fundraising organizations.
GW had the highest percent change of any private university in the ranking and ranks 16th among private universities on the list. GW received nearly $250 million in private support in fiscal year 2015, the first time private support totaled more than $100 million since the report began collecting information in 1991, according to the Chronicle.
University officials confirmed that the acquisition of the Corcoran Gallery of Art and the Corcoran College of Art + Design was the largest single contribution to the University’s fundraising in fiscal year 2015.
The Chronicle of Philanthropy ranks the amount of revenue raised by 400 of the largest U.S. nonprofit organizations. The survey only includes money raised from individuals, corporations and private foundations, and does not include federal funding.
Aristide Collins, the vice president for development and alumni relations, said that fiscal year 2015 was a “robust” year for fundraising, with growth in endowment and annual giving in addition to assets gained through the Corcoran merger.
“We realized that this would be difficult to replicate in FY16, especially given the cyclical nature of philanthropy and development work,” Collins said in an email.
Collins said that although rankings like the Philanthropy 400 are “interesting,” fundraising results can fluctuate regardless of whether or not the University is in the midst of a fundraising campaign.
GW announced the public phase of a $1 billion fundraising campaign in June 2014, and officials said recently they plan to reach their goal by June 2017 – a year ahead of schedule. As of last week, more than 61,000 people had contributed more than $900 million to the campaign.
“Our focus continues to be on achieving our $1 billion campaign goal,” Collins said. “We are very actively engaging other individuals and organizations who can support GW’s mission with significant philanthropy, but it’s important to realize that the timing of a gift is ultimately up to the donor.”
Drew Lindsay, the senior editor of The Chronicle of Philanthropy, said universities’ revenues tend to fluctuate from year to year because they are based on large gifts, bequests and fundraising campaigns.
Before last year, GW had received about $80 million to $100 million in private support for the past six years.
Although the University’s largest gift, the $80 million that renamed the Milken Institute School of Public Health, was donated in fiscal year 2014, private support still increased the following year because of the acquisition of the Corcoran. Another large gift, a $2 million donation from Trustee Avram Tucker, was donated in October 2014, which is part of fiscal year 2015.
“Universities are what some people call 'lumpy' in giving from year-to-year,” Lindsay said. “They change a good bit.”
Lindsay said it's common that a university's revenue increases during a fundraising campaign, especially at the beginning of the campaign.
GW’s campaign has lost momentum since it began at the end of fiscal year 2014. Experts have said that fundraising campaigns tend to be more successful earlier in the campaign and decrease over time because fundraisers tap into big donors first and then rely on students and alumni later.
Katy George, the assistant director of annual giving and direct marketing at the University of Oregon, said when a university rises in the fundraising rankings, it can convince more donors to give. The University of Oregon also saw a large increase in giving the same year, gaining 112 percent from the year before.
“I think that when your school is on the up and up, when things are improving, people want to be part of that,” George said.
George said the number of people donating to higher education throughout the country is generally declining, so this kind of rise in the rankings is significant.
“Everyone is seeing their participation decrease pretty much,” George said. “To buck that trend is a huge deal.””

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