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Parents, daughter agree to drop college payment-tuition case
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 14, 2017
“CAMDEN, N.J. (AP) — A New Jersey man says he and his ex-wife are working to repair their relationship with their 23-year-old daughter after a state appeals court ruled the parents cannot be forced to pay her college tuition.”
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Pace University Names Head of Oberlin Its Next President
by NYT > Education
Feb 13, 2017
“Marvin Krislov, often a lightning rod over identity and free speech issues, is a former Rhodes scholar with three degrees from Yale.”
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Colleges Help Liberal Arts Students Find Careers
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 13, 2017
“More colleges are developing career-oriented programs to help liberal arts majors bridge the gap in their degree to enter the job market. Unlike an undergraduate degree in a technical field such as nursing, engineering or business, liberal arts students tend to be exposed less to direct career messaging within their disciplines, experts say. According to the most recent survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, conducted in January 2016, 54.1 percent of the class of 2015 had found full-time employment.”
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Yale renames Calhoun College because of historical ties to white supremacy and slavery
by Education
Feb 13, 2017
“Yale University will no longer have a residential college named in honor of 19th-century alumnus John C. Calhoun, known for his support of slavery. The decision reverses one made last spring, when the university president said he wanted to confront, rather than erase, history. The college will be renamed in honor of an alumna, Grace Murray Hopper, who was a pioneering computer scientist.”
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Your Money Adviser: How to Manage a 529 Plan for Your Child’s Education
by NYT > Education
Feb 11, 2017
“These plans shield college savings from taxes, but must be managed properly for maximum returns.”
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NJ teen suing parents for tuition loses court battle
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 11, 2017
“A South Jersey college student who sued her estranged parents for college tuition has lost a court battle.”
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Common Sense: Endowment Sweepstakes: How Tiny Houghton College Beat Harvard
by NYT > Education
Feb 10, 2017
“Houghton College outperformed colleges with the biggest endowments by getting out of hedge funds and moving to a mix of low-cost index funds and mutual funds.”
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10 Advantages of Federal Student Loans
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 10, 2017
“Most college students these days take out student loans to pay for the cost of higher education. In fact, 68 percent of college seniors who graduated from a public or nonprofit college in 2015 had student loans, according to a study by the Institute for College Access and Success. Here are 10 benefits of taking out a federal student loan.”
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Small colleges fight to survive, amid warnings of shaky finances
by Education
Feb 10, 2017
“But some are adapting to new market realities.”
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On Campus: American Universities Must Take a Stand
by NYT > Education
Feb 08, 2017
“Our cause is not partisan. It is to defend the pursuit of science, truth and freedom of thought.”
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Two British schools trialling body cameras for teachers
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 08, 2017
“By Ritvik Carvalho LONDON (Reuters) - Teachers at two British schools are trialling the use of police-style body cameras to help maintain discipline, a survey revealed on Wednesday, prompting a civil liberties group to warn that teachers could be turned into snoopers. "The aim is to reduce constant low level classroom disruption which is reducing the effectiveness of teaching," said Tom Ellis, a lecturer at the Institute of Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Portsmouth who will be advising the schools trialling the cameras. "Teachers are actually very concerned that they're spending their time managing order in the classroom instead of actually teaching," said Ellis, adding that students might become more aware of their behaviour if they knew it was being filmed.”
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Why low-income borrowers should avoid for-profit colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 08, 2017
“Students seeking degrees at public colleges have better success paying off their loans than students who attend for-profit colleges”
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Preteens who mistrust teachers less likely to reach college
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 08, 2017
“By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Students of color who perceive biased treatment from middle school teachers may be less likely to attend college than if they trusted instructors to treat them fairly, a small study suggests. “We don't think the discrimination and bias, by itself, had this effect,” said lead study author David Yeager, a psychology researcher at the University of Texas at Austin and co-chair of the Mindset Scholars Network at Stanford University in California. “Instead, we think these experiences made students disengage from the system,” Yeager added by email.”
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Yale professors: Trump puts U.S. scientific leadership at risk
by Education
Feb 08, 2017
“Two scientists at Yale University School of Medicine warn that recent decisions and appointments by President Trump make research and scientific progress historically vulnerable”
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FBI Issues Warning Over Scam Targeting College Students
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 07, 2017
“College students and recent graduates should be wary of a new scam that involves getting a free fake check in the mail for office supplies for their new job. It's gotten so bad that the FBI has had to issue a warning. This information comes by way of a public-service announcement on the Internet Crime Complaint Center website.”
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GOP lawmakers to meet with leaders of black colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 07, 2017
“WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are planning to meet with leaders of historically black colleges and universities in the nation's capital to discuss ways to help the schools survive in challenging times.”
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Sweet Briar's new president comes via Korea, Japan, London and U-Va.
by Education
Feb 07, 2017
“After nearly closing down forever two years ago, Sweet Briar College continues to rebuild with new leadership: Meredith Woo will take over as president in May.”
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Changes made to Common App essay prompts for 2017-2018 college admissions season. Here they are.
by Education
Feb 07, 2017
“There are some changes from last year.”
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D.C. program aims to curb need for remedial college math
by Education
Feb 06, 2017
“Data suggests many end up in courses that don’t count toward a college diploma.”
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This is how you and your child select the right college
by Education
Feb 06, 2017
“There are some things students seeking a tight-knit college experience might consider on that upcoming admitted-student visit.”
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Ivy League and other university presidents call on Trump to revoke — or change — immigration order
by Education
Feb 03, 2017
“Nearly 50 university presidents sign on to letter asking President Trump to reconsider an executive order on immigration”
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Creating a Safe Space for California Dreamers
by NYT > Education
Feb 03, 2017
“In a dorm for first-generation, low-income students at the University of California, Merced, the undocumented bond over hopes and, of course, fears.”
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Cost of College: With Falwell as Education Adviser, His Own University Could Benefit
by NYT > Education
Feb 02, 2017
“Liberty University’s president seeks to roll back regulations, the kind of standards that cast an unflattering light on ... Liberty University.”
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After Visa Ban, Hints of Hidden Tension on Mississippi Campus
by NYT > Education
Feb 02, 2017
“At Mississippi State, where roughly 80 students are affected by President Trump’s order, expressions of support for the ban have taken some by surprise.”
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Ed Talk: Fighting Racial Bias on Campus
by NYT > Education
Feb 02, 2017
“Shaun Harper offers a path for colleges and universities struggling with racism.”
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Will You Graduate? Ask Big Data
by NYT > Education
Feb 02, 2017
“Colleges are turning to predictive analytics to pinpoint hotspots for failure — say, a C in English comp, a B in a foundational course in your major.”
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The Hot New Brand of Higher Education
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 02, 2017
“President Donald Trump’s decision to tap the president of Liberty University to lead a task force within the U.S. Department of Education reflects two trends: a backlash against liberal policies at American colleges and universities and a hot new brand in higher education—the conspicuously conservative college.”
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Trump travel curbs pose revenue challenges for U.S. colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 02, 2017
“NEW YORK/SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - President Donald Trump's travel restrictions on people from seven countries could dampen international enrollment at U.S. colleges, at a time they have become increasingly reliant on tuition revenue from overseas students. "International student growth is important for many institutions," said Roy Eappen, municipal research analyst at Wells Fargo. Analysts said international student applications could be hit by the White House travel order.”
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Mass. college creates ‘refugee scholarship’ for a student affected by Trump’s travel ban
by Education
Feb 02, 2017
“The school says it the ban threatens the school's ability to fulfill its mission of reaching out to students around the world.”
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'I am trusting the American people’: Yale professor worries his wife and baby won't be allowed back from Iran
by Education
Feb 02, 2017
“A Yale University professor from Iran confronts President Trump's executive order on immigration; even with green cards, he worries that he's no longer sure of the rules and that leaving the country has become a risk.”
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Colleges may be happy Falwell will lead review of higher ed regulations, but students and parents should be worried
by Education
Feb 02, 2017
“Consumers do need protections as they ponder a major lifetime investment”
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Tennessee governor calls for tuition-free community college for adults
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 01, 2017
“The cost of a higher education in America has steadily risen for decades, with levels of college debt drawing criticism from politicians and students alike. Often, the high price of secondary degrees is prohibitive for lower-income individuals in an economy that increasingly requires a college education for workers to remain competitive. In Tennessee, however, a new proposal aims to make a going to a community college a lot more affordable for adults seeking a secondary degree or certificate.”
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Westminster Choir College students hold 24-hour music marathon to save school
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 01, 2017
“They are singing for survival in Princeton.”
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Coming out as conservative: Why a College Democrat left the party
by Education
Feb 01, 2017
“This U-Mass. student wants campuses to be more inclusive in political debates”
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Wanted: Factory Workers, Degree Required
by NYT > Education
Jan 30, 2017
“A high school diploma is no longer enough for today’s manufacturing jobs. Enter the employer. Apprenticeships are making a comeback, complete with college.”
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With students stranded abroad, colleges condemn travel ban
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 30, 2017
“BOSTON (AP) — Dozens of U.S. colleges are opposing President Donald Trump's sweeping travel ban that has left some students and professors stranded abroad.”
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Justice Sotomayor says universities need more diversity
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 30, 2017
“ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor on Monday said increasing diversity on college campuses is a key to diversifying society at large, noting that the number of black students at the University of Michigan is a "real problem."”
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U.S. colleges rush to help students, scholars affected by Trump’s immigration order
by Education
Jan 29, 2017
“Some students, scholars are stranded outside U.S., schools say.”
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Why so many college students decide to transfer
by Education
Jan 29, 2017
“A college counselor explains why more than a third of them do.”
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Mold at two Pittsburgh hospitals linked to 5 deaths
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - Mobile App Manual
Jan 28, 2017
“Heavy mold growth was found in the linens used at two University of Pittsburgh Medical Center hospitals where five mold-infection-related deaths occurred since October 2014, according to a report.”
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American University names new president: Obama Cabinet member Sylvia Mathews Burwell
by Education
Jan 28, 2017
“Burwell was director of OMB and later the secretary of health and human services, an unusual background for a university president.”
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U-Md. president calls sanctuary campus designation 'unnecessary'
by Education
Jan 28, 2017
“In responding to student demands, Wallace D. Loh says designation is unnecessary because "we already provide all the protections and support allowed under the law."”
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University of Florida suspends fraternity for 'serious physical hazing incident'
by Education: News & Videos about Education - CNN.com
Jan 25, 2017
“The University of Florida has temporarily suspended its chapter of the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity after learning about a hazing incident involving fraternity members, a university spokeswoman said.”
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Private Colleges Suggest New York’s Free Tuition Plan Limits Choices
by NYT > Education
Jan 25, 2017
“Some are worried that the governor’s proposal to make state college tuition free could imperil the finances of small colleges that recruit students mainly from New York State.”
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Harvard Makes Changes in Managing a Lagging Endowment
by NYT > Education
Jan 25, 2017
“The university, which has handled much of its money internally, would give the bulk of its funds to outside managers and lay off about half its staff.”
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E-cigarettes may encourage teenagers to smoke
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 25, 2017
“E-cigarettes may entice teenagers who would not have touched tobacco to smoke. According to a US study published in the journal Pediatrics, the arrival of e-cigarettes on the market has not contributed to a reduction in teenage smoking. The new study conducted by researchers from the University of California San Francisco, which surveyed 140,000 high school students between 2004 and 2014, confirms previous studies that found that e-cigarettes amount to a "gateway" to smoking addiction.”
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How Money From Slave Trading Helped Start Columbia University
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 25, 2017
“The revelation last year that Georgetown University had, in 1838, sold 272 slaves owned by the school in order to pay off debts reignited a conversation about how America and its old, elite institutions of higher education have continually failed to reckon with their ties to slavery.”
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A gift from two orthodontists to UNC: $25 million worth of art, including 7 drawings by Rembrandt
by Education
Jan 25, 2017
“Two orthodontists used scientists' eyes to identify unsigned works by Old Masters and build an important collection, now donated to the University of North Carolina's Ackland Art Museum.”
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When Campus Rapists Are Repeat Offenders
by NYT > Education
Jan 24, 2017
“Some students commit sexual assault more than once, research says. Many question whether colleges are doing enough to prevent these recurring crimes.”
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5 Questions to Consider About Online Degree Program Course Schedules
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 24, 2017
“As Anelle Ammons searched for an online graduate program, she says researching course schedule structures and academic calendars was important for finding the right fit. Currently pursuing a master's degree in horticultural sciences at North Carolina State University--Raleigh, Ammons juggles her education with raising her children. "They should think about whether the structure, schedule, format for the program meets their needs -- is that going to work for their life?" says Kim Scalzo, executive director of Open SUNY at the State University of New York, a collaboration between 64 SUNY campuses that offer online programs.”
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A group of college students wants to brew beer on the moon, because why not
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 24, 2017
“The moon: Great and all, but don't you think it's missing something? I mean, yes, it could use human-rated habitats, some moon buggies, maybe a little infrastructure. Beyond that, though, what does the moon really need?  It needs beer.  Or so says a team of obviously brilliant (though potentially drunk) engineering students from the University of California, San Diego, who want to brew suds. On the moon. All in the name of science. Their reasoning holds up, too. SEE ALSO: The first photos from a revolutionary new weather satellite are gorgeous “The idea started out with a few laughs amongst a group of friends,” team member Neeki Ashari said in a statement. “We all appreciate the craft of beer, and some of us own our own home-brewing kits." The team has entered a competition to fly to the surface of the moon with TeamIndus —one of the teams competing in the Google Lunar X Prize competition—before the end of this year.  Some of the tech behind the brew kit. Image: Erik Jepsen/UC San Diego Publications "When we heard that there was an opportunity to design an experiment that would go up on India’s moonlander, we thought we could combine our hobby with the competition by focusing on the viability of yeast in outer space," Ashari added. By learning more about how to ferment beer in space, the students could help figure out how bread and other yeast-rich foods might be made in space, as humans push further out into the solar system.  However, if their experiment is flown, it won't be the first time alcohol's made it to space or even the moon.  NASA astronaut Buzz Aldrin famously took communion on the moon's surface during his Apollo 11 mission. Before eating and drinking the wine and bread he brought from Houston, Aldrin said:  A Colorado-based team actually brewed a very small amount of beer on one of NASA's space shuttles as part of an experiment. According to NASA, the yeast behaved strangely when brewing the beer in space, but by many measures the beer was effectively the same as it was when brewed on Earth. According to another report, cosmonauts also drank doctor-recommended cognac on the space station Mir in the 1990s. Ardbeg whiskey was actually aged on the International Space Station as part of an experiment for more than two years before it was flown back home to Earth.  And of course, when it came back home, the experimenters needed to do a taste test.  "When myself and my team went to nose and taste the samples ... I was quite astonished at how different the samples were,"  Bill Lumsden, Ardbeg's director of distilling, said in a video. "That was the key result for me. The Earth control samples certainly resembled Ardbeg as we know and love it, but up on the Space Station, it was a whole new range of samples, some flavors I hadn't encountered before." BONUS: Enjoy draft beer anywhere with this portable tap”
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University of Phoenix sale clears a crucial hurdle
by Education
Jan 24, 2017
“The Higher Learning Commission, a college accreditation agency, has cleared the way for the $1.1 billion sale of the school's parent company to a group of investors.”
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Complete a Bachelor's Degree Online After Community College
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 20, 2017
“For Nathan Legleiter, a Kansas resident who works as a compliance analyst at a bank, community college was just the first step of a post-secondary education. During his first semester, Legleiter learned about a "2+2" option, or online bachelor's completion program, that would enable him to seamlessly transfer credits to the Kansas State University Global Campus, the school's online arm for adult learners. Attending Barton Community College not only allowed the 2015 graduate to save some money on tuition, he says, but also provided him with face-to-face student support nearby and the flexibility of online learning alongside his job and family responsibilities.”
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Kenya university teachers follow doctors in nationwide strike
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 20, 2017
“University lecturers in Kenya began a strike over pay Thursday, joining doctors who walked out in early December, crippling the country's healthcare. The strike was called by the Universities Academic Staff Union (UASU) to protest government failure to implement a four-year-old agreement to increase wages by at least 50 percent. Union chairman Muga K'Olale said failure to have their demands met had led to a "massive brain drain in public universities".”
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Let’s end the craziness of college admissions
by Education
Jan 20, 2017
“Although the most selective colleges and universities in the U.S. enroll fewer than 6 percent of American undergraduates, you might conclude from the angst around admissions every year that very few students are accepted into college in the United States. Not so.”
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GW's next president helped lead U. of Miami's rise
by Education
Jan 20, 2017
“Thomas J. LeBlanc comes to George Washington University after nearly 12 years in South Florida.”
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Democrats blast Trump's pick for Education Secretary
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 18, 2017
“(Corrects in 6th paragraph to clarify rules) By Lisa Lambert WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Democrats sliced holes in billionaire Betsy DeVos' credentials to be the next U.S. Education Secretary at a confirmation hearing on Tuesday, raising doubts whether President-elect Donald Trump's pick will win approval in the full Senate. The nomination of DeVos to head an agency that sets policy for younger children and universities and also administers a college financial aid program of $1 trillion has outraged Democrats who believe the Michigan Republican wants to dismantle public education. Teachers unions, a major constituency for the party, roundly oppose DeVos, a philanthropist and investor.”
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Cost of College: Programs That Are Predatory: It’s Not Just at For-Profit Colleges
by NYT > Education
Jan 17, 2017
“Even programs at prestigious universities like Harvard may not care enough about whether their degrees are worth the cost.”
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Immaculata University to cut tuition by 23% for 2017-18
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 17, 2017
“A Catholic college in suburban Philadelphia has announced plans to reduce its tuition by 23 percent for the 2017-18 academic year to offset the rising cost of higher education. Tuition to Immaculata University ...”
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10 Colleges Where the Most Applicants Are Wait-Listed
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 17, 2017
“The U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: College, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or graduate school search.”
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Pay the IRS late? At some companies, it's a strategic move
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 17, 2017
“NEW YORK (AP) — The idea of paying taxes late and incurring IRS interest charges elicits a stern "Don't do that!" from many tax professionals. Yet some business owners decide that it's cheaper and more convenient than taking out a loan. So those with short-term cash management issues or personal expenditures like college tuition may make a strategic decision to pay the government late.”
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Betsy DeVos, Trump’s education pick, hints at sweeping changes ahead
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 17, 2017
“Education Secretary-designate Betsy DeVos listens to Sen. Tim Scott, R-S.C., before testifying on Capitol Hill on Jan. 17, 2017, at her confirmation hearing before the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee. Betsy DeVos, Donald Trump’s choice to lead the Department of Education, indicated that she is open to radically rethinking the federal government’s role in education on issues from sexual assault cases on college campuses to cutting federal support for the nation’s public schools in a contentious confirmation hearing Tuesday evening. Democratic senators repeatedly pressed DeVos to spell out her specific vision for the Department of Education, but the education activist and billionaire from Michigan kept mostly to generalities, outlining a broad vision of school choice in which parents could use state money to send their kids to private or charter schools.”
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UC President Janet Napolitano hospitalized with cancer
by Education
Jan 17, 2017
“The University of California chief expects to return to her normal duties “very soon."”
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U-Va. to admit more Virginians and give some middle-class families a price break
by Education
Jan 17, 2017
“University of Virginia will add 100 in-state seats and offer new $2,000 scholarships.”
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Cost of College: Harvard, Too? Obama’s Final Push to Catch Predatory Colleges Is Revealing
by NYT > Education
Jan 14, 2017
“Many for-profit trade schools are punished, but even the most prestigious colleges may not care enough about whether their degrees are worth the cost.”
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Donations Pour In to Band From Black College That Will Play at Inauguration
by NYT > Education
Jan 14, 2017
“The Talladega College Marching Tornadoes have been under fire for agreeing to perform in the Trump inaugural parade.”
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District’s charter and traditional school principals to work together to solve problems
by Education
Jan 14, 2017
“A program at Georgetown University concentrates on leadership skills and collaborating.”
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Is a college degree the new high school diploma? Here's why your degree's worth is stagnant.
by Education
Jan 14, 2017
“Colleges and universities are going to need to prove their value or risk losing their best marketing pitch in decades about why it's worth going to their institution.”
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This college just paid a $28,000 ransom, in bitcoin, to cyberattackers
by Education
Jan 14, 2017
“Los Angeles Valley College sent a bitcoin payment to unlock its computer files, an alarming issue facing higher education.”
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College admission stats: Class of 2021
by Education
Jan 14, 2017
“You want numbers on selective schools? We've got them.”
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Virginia college student pleads guilty to federal computer malware charges
by Education
Jan 14, 2017
“The student began developing software in high school that can steal passwords and banking information.”
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Entrepreneurship: For Young Entrepreneurs, College Debts Can Snuff Out Start-Up Hopes
by NYT > Education
Jan 12, 2017
“Fewer millennials are founding companies at a time when student loans are on the rise. As one business founder put it, “The debt is always there, drowning you.””
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Jewel Plummer Cobb, 92, Dies; Led a California Campus
by NYT > Education
Jan 12, 2017
“Dr. Cobb, the first black female president of Cal State, Fullerton, had been denied a New York college post in a move that led to bias accusations.”
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Walker's Wisconsin tuition idea shuffles political alliances
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 12, 2017
“MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's proposal to cut tuition at the University of Wisconsin and use taxpayer funds to pay for it is shaking up normal political alliances with some Democrats expressing support while skeptical fellow Republicans worry it could put the state on a path toward socialist Bernie Sanders' free college tuition plan.”
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Bruce Springsteen's archives will go to Monmouth University on the Jersey Shore
by Education
Jan 12, 2017
“The university already has a massive collection of clippings, concert programs, recordings and books that Springsteen donated when the collection threatened to swallow the Asbury Park Public Library.”
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Charles Koch teams with black colleges on education and criminal justice research
by Education
Jan 12, 2017
“Conservative donor pledges $25.6 million to study ‘advancing opportunity.’”
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Elizabeth Bradley, Global Health Expert, Will Be Vassar’s New President
by NYT > Education
Jan 11, 2017
“Dr. Bradley, a professor of public health at Yale who has worked to improve health care systems worldwide, arrives as colleges debate questions of access and identity on campus.”
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2 degrees for price of 1: School offers free grad training
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 11, 2017
“Come for your college education, stay for a master's degree on the house. In the higher education equivalent of a fast-food value meal, at least one university is dangling tuition-free professional graduate ...”
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Embry-Riddle and Temple top U.S. News online college rankings
by Education
Jan 11, 2017
“Embry-Riddle Aeronautical tops a new list of online bachelor's programs”
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Suspect charged, 11 hostages safe near the University of Alabama
by Education
Jan 11, 2017
“18-year-old is charged with robbery, school officials said.”
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Consider 10 Things When Juggling Career Goals, Online Education
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 09, 2017
“1. Online education is ideal for career changers. Online learning's flexibility allows working adults, wherever they live, to switch careers, Melissa Venable, a Saint Leo University and University of South Florida online instructor and course designer, told U.S. News. Before online education, "You would say, 'I'm going to switch and go to school on the weekends,' or 'I'm going to have to save money so I can stop working and go to school,'" Venable says.”
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University settles with student who wouldn't counsel gays
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 09, 2017
“SPRINGFIELD, Mo. (AP) — Missouri State University has agreed to pay $25,000 to a former student who sued after he was removed from a master's degree counseling program because he said he wouldn't counsel gay couples.”
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Trial over fix for segregation at Maryland colleges begins
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 09, 2017
“BALTIMORE (AP) — A trial to determine the best way to cure inequality among Maryland's colleges and universities is underway in federal court in Baltimore.”
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Feds say too many career-training programs, for-profit schools leaving graduates saddled with debt
by Education
Jan 09, 2017
“Nearly a thousand career-training programs at for-profit colleges are leaving graduates saddled with debt that exceeds 12 percent of their total earnings, the Education Department says.”
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Can colleges teach intelligence? Three security studies professors argue they can, and should.
by Education
Jan 09, 2017
“Three professors write that colleges can teach students the skills they need to become national security intelligence analysts or to launch themselves in careers in the private sector.”
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Several Indian colleges ban sexist singers from performing on campus
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 07, 2017
“Women's colleges affiliated with Delhi University (DU), one of India's top educational institutions, have put their feet down regarding misogyny.  Student unions have barred certain musicians whose lyrics they deem sexist  from performing at upcoming student festivals.  SEE ALSO: This city now allows women to carry knives for 'self protection' on metro trains Colleges such as Miranda House, Lady Shree Ram, Gargi and Kamla Nehru are leading the charge, the Times of India reported. Artists who "objectify women and make sexist comments in their songs" are not being invited, they say.  The banned performers include Punjabi rappers Yo Yo Honey Singh and Badshah among others. These singers are currently very popular in India thanks in part to their musical involvement in Bollywood films.  But their tunes have earned the ire of young women.  One of the student union heads said, "We are trying to propagate the ideas of feminism and equality, while these artists are using their art form to demean women. The lyrics of their songs are offensive, abusive and completely opposite of what we are taught in college." DU colleges have traditionally been among the most active and socially conscious institutions in India and they continue their fight against patriarchy and misogyny.  So, more power to the girls! BONUS: Emma Watson takes her fight for gender equality to universities”
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Michelle Obama to young people in final official speech: This country belongs to you
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 07, 2017
““Do not ever let anyone make you feel like you don’t matter or like you don’t have a place in our American story, because you do,” Obama said Friday during a White House event honoring school counselors. Obama kicked off the event by celebrating the achievements of those who’ve participated in her Reach Higher initiative, which aims to make the U.S. college graduation rate the highest in the world by 2020. First lady Michelle Obama delivers remarks.”
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As college leaders wonder what to make of Trump, one takes comfort in what he hasn't said
by Education
Jan 07, 2017
“The higher education lobby seeks to work with a man few expected to win the presidency. Mary Sue Coleman, president of the Association of American Universities, doesn't want to make any presumptions about what's to come.”
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Of course, low-income students win with free tuition
by Education
Jan 07, 2017
“Experiences with free college programs in other states suggests that the Cuomo plan will help low-income students cope with living expenses by galvanizing action from the colleges and universities.”
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Lehigh aims to expand 20 percent, add health college
by Education
Jan 07, 2017
“"If you're not in health, you're not a player," says university President John Simon”
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George Washington University names new president
by Education
Jan 07, 2017
“Thomas J. LeBlanc, the University of Miami provost, will take the helm at GW.”
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GW researcher creates lemur recognition program
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 16, 2017
“You no longer have to turn to Zoboomafoo for your lemur knowledge – a GW researcher found a way to identify the animals faster than ever before.
Rachel Jacobs, a biological anthropologist at GW’s Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, coauthored a paper introducing “LemurFaceID.” The computer-assisted recognition system is able to identify individual lemurs in the wild based on their facial characteristics and compile the data for long-term research studies, according to a release .
“Senior author, Stacey Tecot (University of Arizona), and I weren’t particularly satisfied with the common approaches used in lemur research, so we aimed to do something different with red-bellied lemurs, and we sought the expertise of our computer science collaborators,” Jacobs said in the release.
The database will be a non-invasive, cost-effective means of conducting evolutionary studies related to survival, reproduction and population growth, Jacobs said in the release. These studies require long-term life history information on individual animals.
This new tracking method could also help conservation efforts identify endangered species in the wild and tracking trafficked lemurs if they are taken from the wild.
Lemurs were named the world’s most endangered group of mammals in 2012, according to the release.
The database could be applied to other species with similar hair and skin patterns in the future, like red pandas, Jacobs said in the release.”

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Weekend outlook
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 16, 2017
“This weekend, laugh it up at comedy shows and thank George Washington for a long weekend by attending a parade in his honor.
Friday
Sam Jay Johnson at Drafthouse Comedy
Head out to Drafthouse Comedy to enjoy a comedy show by an up-and-coming talent. You may recognize the comedian Sam Jay Johnson as the actress from Viceland’s TV series “Flop House” or from one of several comedy festivals she has headlined across the U.S. As a queer woman of color, Johnson brings a fresh voice to the stand-up comedy scene and relates her experiences to audiences in witty ways.
Drafthouse Comedy DC. 1100 13th St. NW. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $20.
Saturday
Late Night Improv
If you’re searching for a night of unpredictable comedy, check out the “The Blue Show,” where performers from ComedySportz, an improv group that has troupes around the world, unwind and turn up the humor without any rules. Earlier in the night, the cast of ComedySportz will perform a kid-friendly show but later on, all bets are off. Bring a good sense of humor and suggestions to help out these imrpov preformers.
DC Improv Lounge, 1140 Connecticut Ave. NW. 9:45 p.m. Ages 18+. $15.
Sunday
Willy Wonka and the Burlesque Factory – Bucket v. Wonka
Bier Baron, a beer bar west of Dupont Circle, is hosting a show that fits a need you never knew you had for a play that puts a racy twist on the childhood favorite movie and book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. In the play, Charlie is faced with a massive mid-life crisis and enlists the help of Veruca Salt, Mike Teevee and a near-extinct Oompa Loompa in suing Willy Wonka for all the trouble he caused them. With appearances by familiar characters like beloved Grandpa Joe and now-skinny Augustus Gloop, this show is sure to be a trip down memory lane.
Bier Baron Tavern, 1523 22nd St. NW. 2 p.m. Ages 21+. $12 in advance, $15 at door.
Monday
George Washington Birthday Parade
Celebrate our University’s namesake by hopping out of D.C. and heading over to historic Old Town Alexandria for the nation’s largest parade celebrating George Washington’s birthday. The parade, which is approaching its 100th anniversary, features bands, floats, horses, wagons, historic reenactment groups and additional performances to celebrate the spirit of President’s Day. The parade route runs from the intersection of Gibbon and South Fairfax streets through the town, ending at Wilkes and South Royal streets.
Old Town Alexandria. 1 to 3 p.m. Free.”

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Federal aid applications decline despite extended filing window
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 16, 2017
“Students now have three extra months to file for federal aid – but the number of applications nationally haven’t increased.
In 2015, the Department of Education announced that the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, will be opening in October 2016 rather than January and potential recipients can apply using older tax data. The applicant pool has decreased since the policy began, but experts say by the time the application window closes, numbers will likely be higher because students who are familiar with FAFSA will apply later on.
October applications increased by 21 percent nationally from normal first-month rates, indicating more students were applying early, according to a National College Access Network data analysis. Still, the application rate dropped after its initial increase, with only 5 million filings by Dec. 30 – 3 million fewer than normal for the first three months.
Laurie Koehler, the vice provost for enrollment management and retention, said the extended window and approval for applicants to submit earlier tax returns, rather than having to quickly compile the information from 2016, should make the process less stressful.
“While it is too soon to provide projections about how students and families are utilizing the new option and the implications of this on enrollment, we hope to see more prospective students submitting their aid applications earlier,” she said.
Koehler added that earlier submissions in October give employees in the Office of Student Financial Assistance more time to review the reported information, follow up with families to collect missing or additional details and provide more complete financial aid packages at the same time that students are admitted.
At GW, 45 percent of full-time undergraduates receive need-based financial aid, averaging at $29,433 per student.
GW’s net tuition is still ranked eighth highest among four-year private universities at $48,760, according to the Department of Education. Since 2008, tuition and financial aid awards have both been steadily increasing.
Department of Education officials said the number of applications could still end up around the same as in previous years because many students apply for state aid grants before going through the federal process.
While the short-term effects of the change may not be obvious, experts expect the longer application period to help universities and students, specifically low income students, in the long-term, the Chronicle of Higher Education reported.
Jodi Okun, the founder of College Financial Aid Advisors – which provides higher education financial aid counseling – said the drop in applications could be because the applications processed during this period were all from FAFSA newcomers.
“I think that that 5 million could possibly be new FAFSAs, and so the parents who have already been through this knew that they had some time,” Okun said. “Families whose students are sophomores, juniors and seniors didn’t do it in October because they knew they had some time and are now filling it out.”
February and March applications will likely come from students and families who have already filed a FAFSA in the past, which will bring the total number of applications up to the number in prior years, Okun said.
“We just have to see how families are behaving,” Okun said. “There’s a good majority still doing it right now across the United States and meeting priority deadlines.”
Sara Harberson, an admissions counselor and founder of the consulting service Admissions Revolution, said she isn’t surprised by the surge of applications in October and November and the dip in December because students applying for early decision and early action submit applications before December.
Early decision and early action students don’t normally require as much financial aid as regular decision applicants, so the smaller number of applications may reflect a pool of higher-income applicants, she said.
The dip may also be a result of poor communication: Many families don’t know about the extension yet, and do not “completely understand the benefits and the advantages” of an earlier FAFSA, Harberson added.
“The regular American family does not know about [FAFSA],” she said. “There are so many families who need need-based financial aid who don’t even realize that they can fill out the FAFSA until much later.”
Robert Kelchen, an assistant professor of higher education at Seton Hall University, said the three extra months might drive only a few extra students to apply, but those students may be the ones that especially benefit from need-based financial aid.
But the small increases may be overshadowed by less of a need for financial aid overall, Kelchen said.
“The economy is doing better, which means that fewer students may be attending college and that more students may not think they qualify for federal financial aid,” he said.”

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MPD recruits volunteers to build up declining officer count
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 16, 2017
“After struggling to recruit enough officers to accommodate the city’s growing population, the Metropolitan Police Department is searching for volunteers to join the police force.
MPD posted a release last week seeking volunteer applications for its an annual summer training session for reserve officers, auxiliary officers and citizen volunteers – especially those who like to work with youth. At a time when officials have said MPD needs to boost the number of officers in the department, experts said the program will prepare volunteers to potentially work full time for the department while saving money.
MPD spokeswoman Rachel Reid said in an email that the department is recruiting volunteers interested in the area’s youth because community members tend to want to help young people succeed.
“As residents who live and work in D.C., volunteers are uniquely positioned to assist us with continuing to strengthen our ties with the community,” she said.
Although auxiliary officer volunteers do not have the same duties as regular officers, MPD expects some reserve and auxiliary officers to take on positions at MPD later, Reid said. Reserve officer volunteers complement full-time officer responsibilities, while auxiliary officers work for community relations functions, station work, cell block and event assistance, Reid said.
Civilian volunteers would assist with the department’s daily operations, according to the release.
Reid said MPD plans to recruit at least 15 officers and 20 auxiliary officers. Currently, 90 volunteer reserve officers, 25 citizen volunteers and 40 college interns work in the department. Volunteers gave $3 million in supplemental contributions to MPD last year, Reid said.
D.C. officials, including Council members Vincent Gray of Ward 7 and Jack Evans of Ward 2, have said they are concerned about the decreased number of MPD officers. Gray and Evans proposed legislation to add funding to hire more police officers, but it failed to pass at the last D.C. Council meeting.
Experts said exposing volunteers to MPD operations will provide the department with potential new officers who might later pursue careers in the division.
Stephen Bigelow, the vice chairman of the DC Police Union, said adding volunteer officers to the force helps future officers understand the jobs’ difficulties before committing to a full-time officer position.
“You get people who are doing it because they want to do it, not necessarily because they benefit,” Bigelow said. “These are people that want to serve their community. They are honored to do it and they’re proud of it, and I think that’s what motivates them.”
MPD has been expanding volunteer duties since 2011 in addition to formally adding the Office of Volunteer Coordination in August 2016, Marvin Haiman, the director of the office, said in an email.
Adding volunteer officers to the force puts more officers on the streets, which makes police more visible and the public more safe, Jennifer Zoner-Peach, an officer and part of the recruit training team with the Baltimore County Maryland Police Department, said.
Zoner-Peach said community members appreciate Baltimore County auxiliary police department’s volunteers because they keep an eye out for suspicious events while getting to know the neighborhoods they patrol.
“It always makes people feel more comfortable and safer in their community when they see police officers driving around and when they see them out of their car and talking to people in the community,” she said.
MPD has prioritized community policing in the past year. Department leaders recently reorganized its sectors partially to focus on officer-community relations, and Interim Police Chief Peter Newsham has become more involved with District residents.
Other police departments, like the Arlington County Auxiliary Police Unit, use volunteer officers to deal with tasks like parking control and security at events, Auxiliary Lt. Heather Hurlock said.
“There are mundane chores and events that the auxiliaries can take care of for us,” Hurlock said. “They could provide services that would just not be permitted if you were paying an officer to do it.””

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Neighbors express worries about noise at Varsity on K
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 16, 2017
“As the new apartment complex Varsity on K shifts from being a GW residence hall to an off-campus housing option, neighbors expressed concerns about how their living experience might be affected by a potential increase in noise, a lack of security and ongoing construction.
Wendy Wright, the property manager and Kristine Hadeed, the assistant property manager of Varsity Investment Group, respectively, addressed these issues at a Foggy Bottom and West End Advisory Neighborhood Commission meeting Wednesday. They both said noise will be less of a problem at Varsity on K because only seniors and graduate students are able to live off campus at GW.
After neighbors cited problems with noise from the building’s time as City Hall, Hadeed said the quiet hours would be heavily enforced and would comply with D.C. law, which limits loud noises between 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.
“We will have several professional residents living in our building who would want a quiet atmosphere as well, so we are very active in enforcing our quiet hours and maintaining an environment of peace for our residents,” Hadeed said.
Varsity on K, located along 24th Street, has a resident handbook that lists quiet hours and 24/7 camera surveillance in its common areas. A overnight concierge will oversee access to the building.
“We have a warning process and if anyone violates that more than two or three times maximum they can be evicted,” Hadeed said. “We have experience handling students.”
Wright said the owners of the building, Durant Berkeley Partners, LLC, have completed a number of student projects and the noise issue in each complex varied depending on the students’ ages.
For example, freshmen living in an off-campus building at the University of Maryland destroyed the building, but the owners didn’t experience similar problems at another project at Johns Hopkins University where only older students could live.
“From what we’ve seen, I don’t anticipate that it’s going to be anything similar than what was happening there at the University of Maryland,” Wright said.
Sarah Maddux, a community member at the meeting, said construction has caused traffic problems along 24th Street and that she wanted workers to be mindful of traffic flow and trash they leave in the area.
“We’re not going to be nice about it, and if you don’t watch it, we are going to have the police on your case more times than you want,” she said.
Hadeed said they were doing as much as they could to get the construction cleaned up and that the construction itself was 99 percent finished, but it was difficult to minimize the impact of the project because the contractors have limited space for a massive renovation of the building.
Patrick Kennedy, chairperson of the ANC, told The Hatchet that City Hall, which GW leased as a residence hall from 2001 until 2016 , was an issue in the neighborhood because students tended to stay up late and disregard noise restrictions. The owners of City Hall sold the building for nearly $80 million in June 2016.
He said he hopes the landlord will be able to handle student noise levels and prevent disruptive student interaction with the community.
“It looks like a really nice facility,” he said. “I’m sure for seniors and for others who are moving off-campus it will be an attractive option due to its proximity, so we welcome those who move into the building.””

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Foggy Bottom restaurants to close on Day Without Immigrants
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 14, 2017
“Some D.C. restaurants powered by immigrant servers, cooks and other staff members will be short-staffed or closed for the Day Without Immigrants protest Thursday.
The nationwide strike is a response to President Donald Trump’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants, use of an “extreme vetting” process and plans to build a border wall along the Mexican border, the Washington Post reported Wednesday.
Sweetgreen will be closing 18 D.C. locations, including the Foggy Bottom location on I Street, Nancy Savage, the Foggy Bottom location’s manager, said.
“The information we received is that we would be closing down tomorrow because Sweetgreen wants to stand behind their employees and we couldn’t stay open without them,” Savage said. “They are what makes us special.”
Jetties and Surfside will be closing all locations except the shop on 19th and I streets tomorrow, according to a post on the business’s Instagram.
Lauren Matthias, general manager of Tonic, said that there are not any plans to close the restaurant but managers expect a staff shortage.
Matthias said a few schedules are being rearranged because two or three people have said that they will not work Thursday, but she does not expect business hours to be affected.
“As of right now, a couple of people have told us they won’t come in,” she said.
At Taylor Gourmet, a sandwich shop at 1750 Pennsylvania Ave. that accepts GWorld, employees will be allowed to exercise their rights and not show up to work with “zero repercussions,” according to DCist. The restaurant will remain open.
Chef José Andrés, a Spanish immigrant and the owner of several local restaurants including campus favorite Beefsteak, announced on Twitter that his restaurants Jaleo, Zaytinya and Oyamel will be closed Thursday in observance of the protest.
The general managers of Whole Foods Market in Foggy Bottom, Paul in the Shops at 2000 Penn, District Commons, Burger Tap & Shake and Beefsteak said they do not have plans to close.
Instead of closing up shop, some local restaurants are participating in the day’s protests by giving proceeds to charity. Bar Pilar will be swapping their regular menu for select Latin American dishes and a portion of cocktail sales will go to the American Immigration Council, according to the Washingtonian .”

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D.C. should eliminate sex-related crimes' statute of limitations
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 13, 2017
“Updated: Feb. 14, 2017 at 10:50 a.m.
Survivors of sex-related crimes deal with their experiences in their own ways and in their own time frames. Some might confide in friends and family immediately after the incident and some may not tell anyone for decades. A new bill under review by the D.C. Council’s Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety would eliminate a time limit survivors have to prosecute their assailants.
This bill would put an end to the statute of limitations on sex-related crimes in D.C. The current statute of limitations is 15 years for first-degree sex crimes, such as date rape, or second-degree sex crimes, like engaging in intercourse with someone who could not give consent. Sixteen states, including Virginia and Maryland, have already eliminated the statute of limitations for felony sex crimes. And this is the third time that the bill has been brought to the D.C. Council. The first two times the bill was brought to the Council, it didn’t even get a hearing. Council member and chairman of the Judiciary Committee Kenyan McDuffie last declined to move the bill forward for a public hearing in 2015, citing the committee’s busy schedule.
With sexual assault being such a relevant issue on college campuses and high-profile cases, like Bill Cosby’s , making national headlines, it’s more important than ever for the bill to not only receive a hearing but to become law. Survivors of sex-related crimes deserve to have the peace of mind to seek justice whenever they choose.
Statutes of limitations for all types of crimes are put in place for a reason. A statute of limitations makes sense for things like burglaries and certain civil suits, like fraud or injury, since prosecuting the crimes rely on time-sensitive proof. Evidence – especially DNA evidence – can become less reliable the later it’s found. Testimony from witnesses also becomes less reliable as time passes.
But the statute of limitations for sex-related crimes can have a profound and traumatic effect on survivors. With a time limit, sexual assault survivors have to work against a clock and are pushed into a difficult situation where if they want to report a sex-related crime, they must do so even if the person who assaulted them is still involved in their lives. This is especially relevant for college students living on the same campus as their perpetrators, since they must continue to reside near their assailants and potentially sit in classes with them. This gives survivors opportunities to run into the perpetrators before graduating, which can make survivors feel unsafe or uncomfortable reporting the crimes.
Plus, if survivors chose not to report the incident when it first happened but changed their minds at a different stage of their lives, the statute of limitations prevents them from being able to prosecute once the time limit is up. What someone wants when they are 18 years old is likely not the same as what they want when they are 40. Humans are complex and change their minds over time, and our justice system should reflect how people change.
Eliminating the statute of limitations isn’t going to automatically increase the number of sex-related crime convictions. If a person wants to pursue a case against someone, they have a better chance at getting a conviction by they pursuing legal action soon after the incident. If we were to do away with the statute of limitations, it’s likely that there could be more court cases that end without convictions. But sometimes it’s not about the conviction, it’s about just having a shot at justice.
And if a survivor chose to go to a hospital or to the police after being sexually assaulted and had a rape kit examination performed, any DNA evidence from that rape kit could be used at a later date. There’s only one hospital in D.C. that provides rape kits, which limits how many survivors go through the process.
Of course, not every survivor wants to go through an invasive rape kit exam, and some sex-related crimes don’t have the evidence to prove an assault. But our laws should reflect reality, and the reality is that if one person can go through legal proceedings years after an assault happens and serve justice, they should be able to.
One in five women are sexually assaulted on college campuses and one in 16 men are, as well. It’s likely that most of us know someone who’s a survivor, even if they haven’t shared it publicly. It should be up to survivors to decide when they want to tell their stories, how they want to seek justice and when they want to do that. And it’s up to the D.C. Council to give every survivor their day in court if and when they want it.
The editorial board is composed of Hatchet staff members and operates separately from the newsroom. This week’s piece was written by opinions editor Melissa Holzberg and contributing opinions editor Irene Ly, based on discussions with managing director Eva Palmer, homepage editor Tyler Loveless, contributing sports editor Matt Cullen and copy editor Melissa Schapiro.
This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that D.C. had a backlog of 6,000 rape kits. The backlog of rape kits in the District is unknown. We regret this error.”

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Admissions officers, consider applicants beyond their extracurricular activities
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 13, 2017
“Sports, honor societies, community service hours and at least a handful of clubs: These are just a few of the things students are expected to include in their college applications. In high school, it’s often a contest for who can have the most extracurricular activities because students think they’ll be more appealing to college admissions officers.
But some people, including Harvard University professor and psychologist Richard Weissbourd, are now arguing that being a good person should be enough to get into competitive and prestigious universities. Weissbourd has been advocating for this through his report “Turning the Tide,” which encourages college deans at universities around the nation to change admissions processes to take the emphasis off of students’ laundry lists of extracurricular activities. More than 120 universities have already endorsed his report.
Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo Irene Ly
Weissbourd wants colleges to care about the time students spend working part-time jobs or taking care of sick family members. If Weissbourd had it his way, a part-time after-school job at a fast food joint would have the same weight as going to a robotics camp, because these activities help build students’ empathy and understanding of the world.
As GW continues its efforts to increase the diversity of its applicant pool, officials should get on board with Weissbourd’s plans by highlighting the importance of such activities.
Many students – especially those from low-income backgrounds – have familial obligations or need to take on part-time jobs that keep them from joining more teams or clubs at school. Although the Common Application gives students space to report any responsibilities and activities outside of school, Weissbourd says universities are usually not explicit in what applicants can report. This makes students think they cannot list things like part-time jobs, which could keep applicants from reporting obligations that take up significant amounts of time.
These types of students are at a disadvantage compared to their peers who have the money and time to jet off on service trips or play organized sports. But students who can’t participate in expensive activities still have valuable experiences and interests. These kids have to sacrifice the extra time they would have to do homework or take part in school-organized activities. Adding equal weight to activities like caregiving and part-time jobs would make the admissions process fair to students from low-income or otherwise less privileged backgrounds, because they wouldn’t worry that never serving as the president of a club will keep them out of their top-choice college.
Making a change in the admissions process would not only enable more low-income students to feel like they can apply and get into competitive, prestigious colleges, but would also encourage students to be more caring and ethical, in general. It’s certainly desirable for teenagers and young adults to be ambitious so they can go on to have successful careers, but the competition for an admissions letter has forced applicants to put themselves first over caring for other people just to achieve success.
About a dozen colleges have already responded to Weissbourd’s report by making changes to their admissions formats that will impact students who are applying this year. For example, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, students are still encouraged to take rigorous classes but only in the topics that truly interest them, instead of in all areas. And Yale University now only includes slots for two extracurricular activities.
When I look back at my junior year of high school, I remember the panic that set in when I realized I wasn’t doing what I thought would be enough to get into my top choice colleges and started joining clubs left and right. Thankfully, it didn’t keep me from being committed to my three most notable extracurriculars, but I wish I hadn’t felt compelled to join things just to list them on college applications. I had classmates who could not get involved in teams or clubs because they worked jobs after school, but they deserved to go to GW just as much, or even more, than I did.
Adopting a test-optional policy has significantly helped GW  increase the number of applications it receives. The class of 2020 is the most diverse group of freshmen in University history, attracting both increases in low-income students and underrepresented minority groups.
But there are still steps that need to be taken to encourage qualified students who are not applying to GW for fear that their extracurriculars aren’t impressive enough. By adopting Weissbourd’s ideas into the admissions process, GW can create even more diverse classes full of empathetic and caring students.
Irene Ly, a junior majoring in psychology, is The Hatchet’s contributing opinions editor. Want to respond to this piece? Submit a letter to the editor.”

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Sororities drop formal fall recruitment as new policy takes effect
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 11, 2017
“Sororities will not hold formal recruitment during the upcoming fall semester as they transition to a deferred recruitment policy, leaders of the Panhellenic Association said last week.
The council made the decision after a vote among chapter leaders and a recommendation from the National Panhellenic Conference to limit primary recruitment to one semester each academic year, Panhellenic Association President Dani Harton and Vice President of Recruitment Elizabeth Jessup said. Council leaders said the switch would help the Panhellenic Association focus their resources and energy on one recruitment period.
“Our chapters came together to figure out whether it would be most beneficial to our campus to hold a quota-based structured recruitment in the fall or to limit that style of recruitment to our primary recruitment in the Spring,” Harton and Jessup said in a joint email. “The chapters overwhelmingly voted against holding a quota-based structured recruitment in the fall.”
The initial timetable for deferred recruitment, announced last April, allowed formal recruitment to take place for non-freshmen for a final time this fall. But Harton and Jessup said that since it was already decided that future formal recruitments would only be held in the spring, the chapters didn’t see a reason to deviate from the long-term plan for one semester.
Greek life administrators are implementing the new policy next academic year, mandating that freshmen complete 12 on-campus credits before joining a Panhellenic Associate or Interfraternity Council chapter. Student affairs officials said last spring that the new policy would help freshmen acclimate to college life before joining a fraternity or sorority.
This upcoming fall, Panhellenic Council chapters that have a membership below the median chapter size on campus – 153 members this semester – will be allowed to hold informal recruitment for non-freshmen, Harton and Jessup said. They said the process will be similar to how spring recruitment was conducted in past years.
Harton said the Panhellenic Association’s decision was based on guidance from the national conference not to hold two rounds of formal recruitment, one for freshmen and another for non-freshmen, within the same year.
Deferred recruitment will mean that chapters will have new members who are more prepared to enter their organizations and more informed about the commitment they are making.
An information manual from the National Panhellenic Conference also opposes deferred recruitment, arguing that “a fall primary recruitment has more advantages than any other recruitment time period” because it connects women with chapters quickly, helps with their adjustment to college, creates a more objective selection process and allows sororities to add members at the same time that other student organizations do on campuses.
At the time that deferred recruitment was announced, Greek leaders appeared divided over whether or not the new guidelines would benefit chapters, with some arguing that councils had been shut out of the decision-making process. But Harton and Jessup said the council believes deferred recruitment will be “incredibly positive for everyone involved.”
“Deferred recruitment will mean that chapters will have new members who are more prepared to enter their organizations and more informed about the commitment they are making,” Harton and Jessup said. “New members will benefit because they will have more time to get acclimated to GW and to figure out if Greek Life is the right place for them.”
Jessup said she contacted councils at the GW’s peer institutions that have already instituted deferred recruitment policies and will meet with recruitment officials in each GW chapter to help them transition to the new policy.
We want to make sure that individuals are as prepared as possible when deciding whether or not to join a greek organization.
The council also plans to revamp its education program for new members next academic year. It will be held in the fall prior to formal recruitment, instead of at the conclusion of the process, and will focus on helping potential new members decide if they want to join a sorority – rather than educating them once they’ve already received a bid, Harton said.
“We want to make sure that individuals are as prepared as possible when deciding whether or not to join a greek organization,” she said.
Dani Weatherford, the executive director of the National Panhellenic Conference, said the conference would base its advice to GW on past experiences with universities that switched to spring recruitment.
At least six of GW’s 14 peers schools have already implemented deferred recruitment for fraternities and sororities.
“We have peers and partners who’ve made this transition before, which means we can share resources and best practices with campus leaders and help ensure that the sorority community at GW doesn’t miss a beat as we move into next year,” Weatherford said.”

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• What you make of it?
• How Ivy League Admissions works
• On the Student/Faculty Ratio

• FAFSA: Who is a Parent?
• FAFSA: Parent Contribution
• FAFSA: Dream out of reach

• College Financial Planning
• Survive College and Graduate
• Sniffing Out Commuter Schools
• Preparing for College: A HS Roadmap
• Talking to Your Parents about College.
• Is a top college worth it?
• Why is college hard?
• Why Kids Aren't Happy in Traditional Schools
• Essential College Tips
• Cost of College Increasing Faster Than Inflation
• For parents filling out the FAFSA and PROFILE (from a veteran paper slinger)
• How to choose the right college?
• Create The Right Career Habits Now
• Senior Year (Tips and experience)
• Informational Overload! What Should I Look For in a College or University?
• Personality Type and College Choice
• A Free Application is a Good Application
• College Academic Survival Guide
• Getting Involved: The Key to College Happiness
• Choose a Path, Not a Major
• The Scoop on State Schools
• The Purpose of a Higher Education
• The Importance of Choosing the Right College Major (2012)
• How to choose a college major
• How to guarantee your acceptance to many colleges
• Nailing the College Application Process
• What to do for a Successful Interview
• I Don't Know Where to Start (General College Advice)
• Attitude and Dress Code for an Interview (General College Advice)
• Starting College (General College Advice)