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Importance
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Surging college costs price out middle class
by Education: News & Videos about Education - CNN.com
Jun 10, 2016
“What do you get when college costs skyrocket but incomes barely budge? Yet another blow to the middle class.”
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For-profit colleges face tougher funding standards
by Education: News & Videos about Education - CNN.com
May 31, 2016
“In order to receive federal funding for education programs, for-profit colleges now need to prove that their graduates are actually getting jobs.”
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Thousands of Fresno State Bulldogs are officially college graduates
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 25, 2016
“It's one of the largest classes to graduate at Fresno State -- 5,475 Fresno State students sit together in achievement -- but in the crowd some stand out among the rest.”
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Refugees and scholars: Colleges offer war-torn a route to US
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 25, 2016
“BOSTON (AP) — Colleges in the U.S. are opening their doors — and their financial aid — to Syrian refugees.”
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For-profit college company DeVry Education Group replaces CEO
by Education
May 25, 2016
“DeVry Education Group announced the departure of its chief executive Daniel Hamburger, whose tenure has been marred by a federal lawsuit and heightened regulatory scrutiny.”
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Frat apologizes for 'destruction' at popular California lake, calling it 'absolutely unacceptable'
by Education
May 25, 2016
“"The manner in which the Shasta-Trinity forest area was left is disgraceful," a University of Oregon official said. The school is "actively investigating" the mess left at Lake Shasta.”
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U-Md. investigates police use of pepper spray to break up graduation party after complaints of racism
by Education
May 23, 2016
“The University of Maryland Police Department is investigating whether excessive force was used in response to the party where two people were arrested.”
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Costs of celebrity college commencement speakers can add up
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 22, 2016
“When colleges pick their graduation speakers, many strive to put a celebrity behind the podium. This year, for instance, the University of Houston paid $35,000 to book retired astronaut Scott Kelly as the commencement speaker. Rutgers University paid $35,000 for journalist Bill Moyers, who spoke at one division’s ceremony after the schoolwide keynote speech from the unpaid President Barack Obama.”
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Veterans Groups Seek a Crackdown on Deceptive Colleges
by NYT > Education
May 22, 2016
“The Department of Veterans Affairs received letters calling for improved oversight of colleges that mislead students about the value of their programs while receiving G.I. Bill funds.”
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Sotomayor to graduates: Learn from your mistakes
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 22, 2016
“SOUTH KINGSTOWN, R.I. (AP) — U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor has advised the class of 2016 at the University of Rhode Island to hold onto the memories they've created and learn from their mistakes.”
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University of Miami Establishes Chair for Study of Atheism
by NYT > Education
May 20, 2016
“The position also includes humanism and secular ethics and came after a $2.2 million donation from Louis J. Appignani, a retired businessman.”
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University of Missouri criticized for firing professor who yelled at police and reporters during protests
by Education
May 20, 2016
“An investigating committee of the American Association of University Professors questions the University of Missouri's board of curators' decision to terminate Melissa Click for her actions during campus protests”
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SAE fraternity suspended for racist and anti-Semitic slurs
by Education
May 20, 2016
“The University of Wisconsin-Madison suspended its chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon after finding repeated instances of racist, anti-Semitic and anti-gay comments by members.”
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Do's, Don'ts for Career Changers Considering Community Colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 18, 2016
“With layoffs still in the news and "nonstandard employment" -- temping, for example, or part-time work -- the fastest-growing segment of the economy, there's no shortage of adults looking to change careers. To find the best path for you, think through your needs and wants and consider the ways a community college can help. U.S. News asked deans and workforce training leaders at four community colleges for career-changer do's and don'ts.”
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Trump's 'university' targeted by NY regulators
by Education: News & Videos about Education - CNN.com
May 17, 2016
“The company formerly known as Trump University is one of several for-profit schools under investigation by the New York Attorney General, a Trump spokesman confirmed Friday.”
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Weigh Pros, Cons of Associate Degrees at Arab Region Universities
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 17, 2016
“Students in the Middle East not yet ready to commit to a four-year college degree program need not fret -- they have options. Arab region universities offer many associate degrees, certificates and diplomas for students, including those considering options abroad, to begin their foray into higher education. Cost was one reason Jordanian national Riham Al Ramahi chose Al Khawarizmi International College, a private institution in the United Arab Emirates, where she completed an associate degree in computer graphics and animation in 2014.”
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Low-income high schoolers to get grants for college courses
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 16, 2016
“For the first time, thousands of low-income high-school students in nearly two dozen states will soon be able to get federal grants to take college courses for credit, part of a program the Obama administration ...”
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Before a key vote on renaming George Mason's law school after Scalia, university officials work to allay faculty concerns
by Education
May 16, 2016
“Final approval for rename GMU's law school after the late Supreme Court justice will be determined by a state council this week.”
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Dozens of colleges set to partake in dual-enrollment experiment
by Education
May 16, 2016
“Obama administration selects 44 colleges to participate in dual-enrollment experiment this fall.”
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Donald Trump Attends Daughter Tiffany's College Graduation in Pennsylvania
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 15, 2016
“Joe Biden also was there supporting his granddaughter Naomi.”
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"Loving and sweet-spirited." Missing Ivy League student has not been seen since May 4
by Education
May 14, 2016
“Columbia University student Nayla Kidd did not show up for final exams and has not responded to messages in recent days”
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Northeastern University's workforce training could be a roadmap for improving internships
by Education
May 14, 2016
“Boston school has one of the most extensive cooperative education programs in the country.”
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Minnesota Law School, Facing Waning Interest, Cuts Admissions
by NYT > Education
May 13, 2016
“By shrinking enrollment, and taking in less tuition income, the University of Minnesota hopes to preserve its national standing as a top law school.”
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It's actually getting cheaper to borrow for college
by Education
May 13, 2016
“The government will charge families less to borrow money for college this fall as interest rates on federal loans are set to drop to their lowest level in a decade.”
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U.S. News Twitter Chat: Choose the Right Online Bachelor's Program
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 10, 2016
“U.S. News Education will host a Twitter chat on Thursday, May 19, to help prospective students choose a best-fit online bachelor's degree program. Topics will include advice on how to explore the wide range of available options and tips to ensure that an undergraduate online program is legitimate. Who: U.S. News Education will moderate a panel of experts, including representatives of the Online Learning Consortium ( @OLCToday), Pennsylvania State University--World Campus ( @PSUWorldCampus), ASU Online at Arizona State University ( @asuonline) and UNC Online ( @UNCOnline), the online programs of the 17 institutions of the University of North Carolina.”
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Common Application changing question on criminal record
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 10, 2016
“LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Common Application used for college admissions at more than 600 institutions is changing a question it asks about student criminal records, as the U.S. Department of Education urged schools Monday to consider dropping the question altogether.”
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Federal government urges colleges to limit inquiries about criminal records
by Education
May 10, 2016
“The education secretary says he is worried that background questions deter many potential students from pursuing a degree.”
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President Obama Praises Shonda Rhimes, Beyonce in Howard University Grad Speech
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 08, 2016
“During Saturday's commencement speech, he addressed racism and income inequality while speaking to the 2016 graduating class.”
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On Religion: A Laboratory for Interfaith Studies in Pennsylvania Dutch Country
by NYT > Education
May 06, 2016
“Elizabethtown College, an unassuming dot on the intellectual landscape, has become the nation’s beta tester in the emerging field of interfaith studies.”
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Op-Ed Contributor: At Yale, a Right That Doesn’t Outweigh a Wrong
by NYT > Education
May 06, 2016
“Putting Pauli Murray’s name on a building doesn’t magically erase the racist John C. Calhoun’s name across the campus.”
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Your Money Adviser: Sallie Mae Now Offers Education Loans to Parents, Too
by NYT > Education
May 06, 2016
“As college costs continue to increase and the student debt burden grows, more lenders are offering flexible, and possibly cheaper, options.”
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Fixes: How Colleges Can Again Be Levelers of Society
by NYT > Education
May 06, 2016
“Higher education has become a guardian of class division and privilege, but leadership can reverse that.”
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Hundreds of Colleges Still Accepting 2016 Applications
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 06, 2016
“There are more than 350 public and private colleges and universities still accepting applications for the fall 2016 semester, according to the National Association for College Admission Counseling's annual College Openings Update. The list shows which of the organization's member institutions still have space for freshmen and transfer students, even though the May 1 national response date for college acceptances is past. Students can also see which schools have financial aid and housing still up for grabs.”
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Illinois Senate votes for $454 million higher-education package
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 06, 2016
“By Dave McKinney CHICAGO (Reuters) - For the second time in two weeks, the Illinois Senate moved to loosen the financial death grip on the state’s higher education system, which has been starved of operating revenue by a record-setting, 11-month state budget stalemate. The Senate on Thursday overwhelmingly approved and sent to the House of Representatives a $454 million spending package for eight public universities, community colleges and low-income students dependent on Monetary Award Program grants. The bipartisan move, which could stave off mass layoffs at several state universities, builds on a $600 million, higher-education appropriation that Republican Governor Bruce Rauner signed on April 25.”
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Harvard intensifies battle against single-gender clubs
by Education
May 06, 2016
“The university seeks to reduce the influence of exclusive private clubs. Some alumni -- male and female -- worry about fallout.”
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Gigi Hadid's Met Gala manicure cost a whopping $2000
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 04, 2016
“The 1% really know how to polish a nail. Model Gigi Hadid has a lot of money. At the May 2 Met Gala, she proved her wealth by sporting a manicure that cost — are you sitting down? — $2000. SEE ALSO: Vanessa Hudgens got a $190 manicure for Coachella, as one does Hadid rocked a Tommy Hilfiger gown that likely cost more than your college tuition. To complement the armored dress, she sported chrome nails with clusters of crystals hiding underneath each tip. The manicure was by celebrity manicurist Mar y Soul, in conjunction with Kiss Products. Unfortunately, these awesome robot nails were barely noticed or appreciated on the red carpet.  Seriously. Hadid herself didn't even Instagram them. [h/t Refinery29]”
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Spurred by student boycotters, school board members urge Virginia High School League to move championships from Liberty University
by Education
May 04, 2016
“Fairfax County school board members, who oversee the state's largest district, wrote a letter asking Virginia High School League to stop using Liberty University as a venue.”
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Michael Bloomberg Tells College Graduates to Reject "Safe Spaces," Demagoguery in Politics
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 03, 2016
“During his commencement address at the University of Michigan, the billionaire criticized "microaggression" and the current election conversation.”
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New Bangladesh hit-list threatens teachers, politicians
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 03, 2016
“Bangladesh police were Tuesday investigating a new hit-list that includes the head of a university, journalists and ruling party officials, after a series of gruesome killings. Among those named was the head of Rajshahi University, where a liberal professor was hacked to death by suspected Islamists less than two weeks ago. "The leaflet bears the name of Islami Liberation Front.”
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10 Surprising Degrees You Can Earn Online
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
May 03, 2016
“Certain disciplines seem better suited to online learning than others, but prospective students might be surprised at some of their degree options. Given the hands-on nature of the job, many online programs include an in-person component on top of online courses. Fresno Pacific University, for instance, offers a Master of Arts in Athletic Training with a clinical requirement.”
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Are conservative donors bullying this public university? Its president says no.
by Education
May 03, 2016
“Facing criticism from legislators, faculty and others that the university has been unduly influenced by donors' agendas, the president of George Mason University responds.”
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Malia Obama to Attend Harvard, but Not Until 2017
by NYT > Education
May 01, 2016
“President Obama’s oldest daughter will defer her college career until after her father leaves office.”
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At Small Colleges, Harsh Lessons About Cash Flow
by NYT > Education
Apr 30, 2016
“In the last few years, small liberal arts colleges struggling under financial siege have been forced to re-examine their missions and justify their existence.”
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Could these electronic glasses change a blind person’s life?
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 30, 2016
““Oh Mommy, there you are!” 12 year old Christopher Ward Jr. said as he saw his mother for the first time. He was born with optic nerve hypoplasia, so his view of the world ended about five inches from his nose. Luckily his mother learned about eSight glasses, and took him from Forest Virginia to Washington, DC to try them out. “When I looked at her she was pretty,” the young man said, bringing half of us to tears. eSight glasses use a small, high resolution camera and live streams enhanced video directly in front of the user’s eyes. Software ensures there’s no lag time allowing the wearer to seamlessly go from reading a book to looking at someone sitting across the room, then out a window. eSight Eyewear helped a mother see her baby for the first time, and kids as young as six years old see a world they’ve never been able to view before. “Pretty cool glasses huh?” Chris said, drawing a laugh. Related : Facebook uses AI to help the blind ‘see’ images Yes, indeed. They won’t work for everyone — for 14 percent of the world’s sight-impaired population, those completely blind or severely sight-impaired, eSight glasses are ineffective. But they do work for legally blind and those with low vision, like Chris. Unfortunately, one pair of eSight glasses carry a $15,000 price tag, though the company offers free demos. Ward’s mother Marquita Hackley told WSET, “Whatever it takes to raise the money for it, that’s what I was determined I was going to do.” The difference these glasses can make in Chris’ life is painfully evident. Because he can’t see the words on a printed page, he learned Braille and uses a special typewriter to turn in his school assignments, but even now, some textbooks aren’t available for him. As he moves on in life, specifically to high school, sticking to paper and a typewriter will become more difficult; for instance, his high school primarily uses computers, which Chris can’t see at all. So Chris’s mother set up a crowdfunding campaign for him. 565 donors raised $25,241 before Ms. Hackley closed the fundraiser. She’s overwhelmed by all the well-wishers. She said, “All the messages that we’ve gotten on Facebook and emails, I mean it’s just amazing.” The extra money will go into a trust fund for Ward’s college tuition.”
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When It Comes to College Costs, Middle-Class Kids Are Still Screwed
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 30, 2016
“The study by researchers at Vanderbilt University, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Institute for Research in Higher Education found that since 2008, overall college affordability has fallen 45 states, owing in part to slashed state spending on higher education in the years during and since the Great Recession. As a result, low- and middle-income earners in certain states now must spend as much as 76 percent of their annual income to pay a student’s tuition and expenses at a four-year public school, according to the study, The 2016 College Affordability Diagnosis. Meanwhile, financial aid doesn’t go as far as it did before, access to it has tightened, and a working student would need to work so many hours to pay the bills—and probably is already facing pressure to support him or herself, or a family—that college would take a backseat to finding a job, the study says.”
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New Partnership Helps Minority College Students Study Abroad
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 29, 2016
“The college student population has become increasingly diverse in the last few decades, but white students are still the majority of undergrads who study abroad. Only 8.3 percent of Hispanic college students and 5.6 percent of black undergrads typically study abroad, according to the Council on International Educational Exchange. Lack of money and familiarity with college study abroad programs are often obstacles for many minorities who want to enroll in an academic program overseas, experts say.”
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It's almost impossible for students to sue a for-profit college. Here's why.
by Education
Apr 29, 2016
“Enrollment contracts have become a popular way for career schools to protect their financial interest by tucking in clauses that bar students from filing class-action lawsuits.”
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Newtown Conspiracy Theorist Sues University That Fired Him
by NYT > Education
Apr 27, 2016
“A lawsuit by the professor, James Tracy, argues that Florida Atlantic University violated his right to free speech.”
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How To Get The Best-Possible Deal From Public Colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 27, 2016
“You can get a better deal from an out-of-state public college. Here's what you need to know.”
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Yale keeps name of college tied to 19th century slavery defender
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 27, 2016
“Yale University will keep the name of its Calhoun College, named after former U.S. Vice President John Calhoun, despite objections by students unhappy with its association with a prominent defender of slavery, the school said on Wednesday. The Ivy League school in Connecticut, which is among several universities that have recently faced calls to dissociate themselves from symbols associated with racism, said it hoped its decision would encourage the campus to confront the history of slavery. It also said it would change the title of the officers who lead its 12 undergraduate residential colleges to head of college from master, a term some people connected to slavery.”
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Academia and motherhood: We can have both
by Education
Apr 27, 2016
“A Yale University scholar questions the notion of a 'baby penalty' for ambitious faculty on college campuses.”
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Howard University gives tuition rebates to some members of its graduating class
by Education
Apr 27, 2016
“Howard University is refunding more than a hundred soon-to-be graduates half of the tuition they paid out of pocket this semester, in an effort to encourage more students to complete their education on time.”
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Illinois governor signs higher education stopgap funding bill
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 26, 2016
“Illinois Governor Bruce Rauner on Monday signed into law a bill to send $600 million to cash-starved state universities and community colleges, calling the measure "a first step toward compromise between Democrats and Republicans."  An impasse between the Republican governor and Democrats who control the legislature has left Illinois without a budget 10 months into fiscal 2016. In bipartisan votes in the House and Senate on Friday, lawmakers approved $600 million, or 34 percent, of the $1.7 billion Democrats had earmarked for higher education spending for the whole fiscal year, which began July 1. Illinois Comptroller Leslie Munger said on Friday that her office would immediately start processing payments for the universities, colleges and for college student grants funded by the legislation.”
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White House launches $100M competition to expand tuition-free community college
by Education
Apr 25, 2016
“The White House is pledging $100 million to expand workforce training programs at community colleges, building on President Obama's goal of making tuition at community colleges free.”
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Sheila Bair’s novel idea: Have colleges help pay student debt
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 24, 2016
“Washington College raised $313,000 to go toward paying some student loans.”
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Down to Lunch app gets friends together as developers shun money
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 24, 2016
““I’m over-wired and over-tired, DTL?” If that question makes sense, chances are you’ve already downloaded Down to Lunch. DTL is one of the hottest new social networking apps, according to the New York Times. As of this week, DTL was the second most downloaded iOS app overall and #1 for iOS social networking apps (not as high in the Android world). It’s clear why Down to Lunch is taking over with the students for which it was designed — the app is fast, easy, and hip. The co-founders and chief developers are as much part of the story as the application itself. Rather than meeting with potential investors, Nikil Viswanathan and Joseph Lau, both Stanford alumni, want to spend their time interacting with users and strengthening their application infrastructure. You can actually text them directly from within Down to Lunch. Related:  The history of social networking Down to Lunch has a simple function: help friends make plans and meet up in person. The app uses simple graphics to fill in the blanks in the following sentence, “I want to ____ with _____ at _____.” For each of the blanks, you choose from simple popup menus with icons and one or two-word descriptions. The application, conceived for and tested by college and high school students, is pre-filled with common activities. The first group, the “Popular” activities, are Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, Chill, and Study. Other categories include Sports, Fun, Bored, and Other (Church and Get a Ride). There’s also a big plus icon labeled New. When you tap it, your phone’s message app opens, ready to message your suggestion to the developers. If you receive an invite for an activity, you accept by clicking a button labeled “I’m Down.” Down to Lunch co-founders, Joseph Lau and Nikil Viswanathan DTL When you first sign up for Down to Lunch, the application searches your email for friends on the service. You can invite people individually or through lists. An early option let you invite your entire contact list, but when the developers started getting complaints about the volume of messages being sent, DTL removed it. Between them, Viswanathan and Lau had prior experience with big name tech companies including Facebook, LinkedIn, Google, Microsoft, and Pinterest. They’ve also tried to develop other social networking apps, but Down to Lunch is the first one to stick. They coded DTL in just one day. Right now their focus is keeping up with growth and customer communication and support. The developers also had to deal with the aftermath of what was apparently a destructive hate campaign, perhaps from a competitor. Claims were made accusing DTL as an app for human trafficking. The New York Times reported that the head of the human trafficking division of the Texas attorney general’s office investigated the allegations and found no evidence. With the current communications options overload — email, text messaging, Facebook messages, phone calls, etc. — another connections app might seem superfluous. But when 15 percent of the University of Notre Dame student body downloaded it within a 12 hour period (according to Viswanathan), it’s clear that DTL is filling a need for the simple, single-purpose app. Meeting up with friends has always been important — now it’s even easier to do so. Also watch: MacBook (2015) vs. Dell XPS 13 (2015): Spec Showdown Please enable Javascript to watch this video”
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Student video: 'When my teacher found out Prince died'
by Education
Apr 24, 2016
“You’ve probably seen or read a good deal of reaction to the death of Prince, but this is an unusual video you may not have viewed. It was posted on Twitter by a student of English Language Arts teacher Matthew Patterson of Banneker High School in College Park, Ga. When my teacher found out Prince […]”
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If you think these 'elite' summer programs will get your kid into college, guess again
by Education
Apr 24, 2016
“Two key misconceptions parents labor under when trying to "get" their kid into college.”
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Illinois lawmakers pass $600 million university stopgap
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 22, 2016
“Illinois’ cash-starved public universities and community colleges won a temporary financial reprieve on Friday after the state legislature approved a $600 million funding plan, offering a rare break in the state's long-running budget stalemate. The legislation now goes to Republican Governor Bruce Rauner, who praised its passage and is expected to sign it. “By passing this bipartisan agreement, lawmakers in both chambers put aside political differences to provide emergency assistance for higher education, ensuring universities and community colleges remain open and low-income students can pay for school," Rauner said.”
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Georgia lawmaker targets guidelines on campus sexual assault
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 22, 2016
“ATLANTA (AP) — A Georgia state lawmaker and his wife have filed a lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Education and its Office for Civil Rights, alleging that it is trying to "micromanage student sex lives" with its regulations on how colleges and universities should handle allegations of sexual assault and harassment.”
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Illinois lawmakers pass $600M aid for struggling colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 22, 2016
“SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Illinois' college and universities received a much-needed lifeline Friday when lawmakers approved a $600 million short-term funding fix for the institutions, which have been struggling without state funding during the monthslong budget stalemate, even laying off employees.”
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Jerry Falwell Jr.: Liberty University debate boycott is based on false assumptions
by Education
Apr 22, 2016
“Liberty president says his comments about wanting to "end those Muslims" was about stopping a specific terror attack, not a reference to "the many good and honorable Muslims who do not come into public spaces armed to kill innocents."”
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Budget woes force Kansas to delay road work, cut colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 21, 2016
“TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — Kansas plans to delay major highway projects and cut additional spending at state universities, a top aide to Republican Gov. Sam Brownback announced Wednesday, after a new pessimistic fiscal forecast blew a hole in the state's budget.”
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College students cancel concert by rapper Action Bronson
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 21, 2016
“HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Students at Connecticut's Trinity College have canceled a concert by rapper Action Bronson, saying his music and videos promote misogyny and hatred against gay and transsexual people.”
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Should you be saving for college using a 529 plan or a Roth IRA?
by Education
Apr 21, 2016
“Both accounts come with tax advantages and could grow your money. Which one is right for your family?”
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College students have a new career starter app with LinkedIn Student
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 20, 2016
“Concerned that your LinkedIn profile is bare? Have you only worked at fast food places, and is your only award the all-campus beer pong championship? LinkedIn feels your pain and has a new app just for you. LinkedIn Student launched yesterday, and focuses on American college students who are just starting to build their resumes and starting their career searches. Information provided to students will be based on major, graduation date, and the students’ own activity and choices on the site, according to a report on VentureBeat. After downloading the free app, students start their profiles and career searches by entering their colleges, majors, and expected graduation dates. After registering, students are shown recommended cards about careers related to their majors, as well as positions that employ similar skill sets. The crossover skill set data is gleaned from the profiles of regular LinkedIn influencers, a group of approximately 500 leading professional in various fields who are invited by LinkedIn to publish on the site. Related:  LinkedIn launches major mobile app revamp for iOS and Android Users navigate LinkedIn Student by swiping cards. Each choice is recorded and over time the program’s algorithms will shape the data presented. From the initial major-based career suggestion choices, the program can direct students to alumni from their schools in their fields of interest, as well as to current job postings on the regular LinkedIn site. There will also be articles written by influencers about their own job searches and career development. Five hundred such articles are already available. After students work through the recommended cards, they can work on building their profiles by adding awards, current projects, and other information. One of the best ways students can use the new app is to discover alumni working in their own desired fields in locations they prefer, and with that information, start to build their own networks. Except for alumni connections and university pages intended for career services departments, LinkedIn’s previous college-focused portal is being closed. LinkedIn Student is available in a mobile format only, for both iOS and Android phones. While international versions of LinkedIn Student are planned, the launch version is for U.S. college students only. Also watch: LinkedIn to Debut its First-Ever TV Ad During Oscars Please enable Javascript to watch this video”
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Friends, finances may affect how long women breastfeed
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 20, 2016
“Pediatricians recommend that infants be exclusively breastfed until at least 6 months of age because it can reduce their risk of ear and respiratory infections, sudden infant death syndrome, allergies, childhood obesity and diabetes. Researchers followed two groups of mothers who gave birth in Germany about a decade apart and found that, over time, women became more likely to continue breastfeeding for 4 to 6 months. “Lower educated women were less likely to overcome these barriers as easily as those with higher education,” said study co-author Dr. Dietrich Rothenbacher of Ulm University in Germany.”
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Turkey abduction lands 2 California college students in jail
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 20, 2016
“ORANGE, Calif. (AP) — Tim the Turkey's abduction did more than ruffle a few feathers.”
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'Muzzles' mine rich vein of speech limits among US colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 20, 2016
“RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The "Jefferson Muzzles," those dubious awards shaming the worst free-speech offenders, are taking aim at higher education this year — from tarring those at Yale who warned students against donning culturally insensitive Halloween costumes to feathering others for muzzling the press and more.”
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Save $90K in High School for College
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 19, 2016
“Michael Bervell, 18, now a freshman at Harvard University majoring in neurology and computer science , raised more than $90,000 during high school to pay for college. Many students, like Bervell, say paying for college is part of their responsibility and start saving in high school. A 2015 College Savings Foundation report, which surveyed 500 high school students, found that 81 percent think paying for some part of college is their responsibility.”
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Race/Related: 272 Slaves Were Sold to Save Georgetown. What Does It Owe Their Descendants?
by NYT > Education
Apr 19, 2016
“In 1838, the Jesuit priests who ran the country’s top Catholic university needed money to keep it alive. Now comes the task of making amends.”
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21 Liberal Arts Colleges With the Lowest Student-Faculty Ratios
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 19, 2016
“The U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: College, The Short List: Grad School and The Short List: Online Programs to find data that matter to you in your college or grad school search.”
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Best High Schools Breakdown: Who Gets Gold, Silver and Bronze
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 19, 2016
“The public schools honored among the U.S. News Best High Schools educate all of their students well, not just those who are likely to head to college. U.S. News reviewed more than 28,000 schools in all 50 states and the District of Columbia for the 2016 Best High Schools rankings. To earn a gold, silver or bronze medal from U.S. News, schools must pass a four-step evaluation, which looks at students' performance on required state tests, their graduation rates and their college readiness.”
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Lay the Foundation for Medical School Success in High School
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 19, 2016
“High school students should begin their planning early, and they should consider the advice below. Understand the impact of your high school performance: Your high school achievements are primarily evident on your medical school application in terms of their impact on your college record. A rigorous high school curriculum affects the undergraduate programs you'll be admitted to, whether you earn college credit for your work in high school and how well prepared you are for college.”
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Embattled college accrediting agency replaces controversial chief
by Education
Apr 19, 2016
“The Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools has announced the departure of its president and chief executive, Albert Gray, who defended the agency's decision to accredit controversial Corinthian Colleges.”
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Washington College gives graduating seniors a parting gift: Debt reduction
by Education
Apr 19, 2016
“All graduating seniors who took out federal student loans this semester will receive grants from the college to repay the debt.”
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Duke leaders call for repeal of North Carolina's 'bathroom law' on discrimination
by Education
Apr 19, 2016
“Duke University's president says the new state law, which requires people to use public restrooms in accordance with the gender on their birth certificates, is already hurting the reputation and economy of the state.”
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Demonstrators urge freedom for missing journalist Austin Tice
by Education
Apr 19, 2016
“Georgetown University students and others rally outside the White House for Tice, who disappeared in August 2012.”
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Top colleges put thousands of applicants in wait-list limbo, and some won't admit any
by Education
Apr 16, 2016
“Adding to the emotional turmoil of college admissions season, some students are given a sense of hope about getting into their dream schools, only to be left dangling.”
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Refugee teachers go back to school to train for work in Germany
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 15, 2016
“By Michelle Martin POTSDAM, Germany (Reuters) - Syrian asylum seeker Alaa Kassab can't believe her luck. Four months after arriving in Germany, the 23-year-old English instructor has joined a program that gives refugee teachers German lessons and qualifies them to work in German schools. Along with 25 other migrants, mainly from Syria, Kassab is spending six hours a day learning German at the University of Potsdam near Berlin.”
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When a Feminist Pledges a Sorority
by NYT > Education
Apr 15, 2016
“College women are embracing — and rethinking — the Greek life experience. And not just on the campuses you’d expect: in the Ivy League.”
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Common Application Saturates the College Admissions Market, Critics Say
by NYT > Education
Apr 15, 2016
“After a student was accepted to all the Ivy League schools, not everyone was cheering. Some say the Common Application system distorts elite college admissions.”
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Social Club at Harvard Rejects Calls to Admit Women, Citing Risk of Sexual Misconduct
by NYT > Education
Apr 15, 2016
“The all-male Porcellian Club, founded in 1791 and known for secrecy, drew criticism after its statement on a frequently debated issue at the university.”
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Students protest over Spain's education law, university fees
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 15, 2016
“MADRID (AP) — Thousands of high school students have staged demonstrations in cities across Spain to protest over the country's education law, changes in the duration of university degrees and university fee hikes.”
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German university starts training plan for refugee teachers
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 15, 2016
“POTSDAM, Germany (AP) — A German university has launched a program aimed at enabling teachers who fled Syria and other countries to return to the classroom, potentially helping them serve as bridge-builders between German schools and last year's many new arrivals.”
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20 Summer Job Ideas for High School and College Students
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 15, 2016
“If you're interested in making some serious cash to fund that summer fun, here are 20 great summer job ideas that can help you rake in dough while you enjoy a break from school work. To help find clients, create flyers and post them at local businesses, send out a mass email to family and friends or advertise at local schools before the school year ends. If you have access to a lawn mower and some basic lawn care tools, a summer job cutting lawns, trimming bushes and doing basic landscaping could be just the thing for you.”
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Teachers Who Fled War-Ravaged Schools Find Work in German Classrooms
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Apr 15, 2016
“One German university is hoping it can help get asylum seekers back to work, and help child refugees in the process. The University of Potsdam commenced its Refugee Teachers Program this week, Reuters reports.”
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I tried to confront racism head-on. People called me a sellout.
by Education
Apr 15, 2016
“A sophomore at Williams College writes about why he continues to push to bring controversial speakers to campus, despite increasingly personal backlash.”
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Pro-Trump, anti-Mexican messages chalked on California campus as 'chalkening' movement spreads
by Education
Apr 13, 2016
“Pro-Trump messages written in chalk spread on college campuses, with some seeing "chalkening" trend as more than just campaign slogans. Some see it as a challenge to political correctness and a voice for free speech. Others see racism.”
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Kentucky's attorney general sues governor over higher-education cuts
by Education
Apr 13, 2016
“Kentucky Attorney General Andy Beshear has filed a lawsuit to stop Gov. Matt Bevin from slashing the budgets of the state's public colleges and universities.”
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Booker calls for graduates to remember the details and 'stay faithful'
by The GW Hatchet
May 16, 2016
“Media Credit: Dan Rich | Photo Editor
Sen. Cory Booker, D–N.J. delivered the Commencement address to 2016 graduates on the National Mall. Booker told graduates to remember the people surrounding them.
Updated: May 16, 2016 at 8:44 a.m.
For Sen. Cory Booker, D–N.J., it's all in the details.
In his speech directed to the Class of 2016, Booker told graduates that in their drives to make big changes in the world, they should never forget the details and people along the way. He told them to always “stay faithful,” and to be aware of the people helping them, not just of the big goals they are trying to achieve.
“Sometimes you get so ambitious running to take the world that you forget that we need to change our world first and foremost, our world of friends, our world of neighbors,” Booker said.
Booker, a former Rhodes scholar and Stanford University and Yale Law School graduate, said at times during his crusade against injustice, he has forgotten the people immediately surrounding him.
When he was a city council member in his hometown of Newark, N.J., Booker lived in public housing in what he called a violent and drug-plagued neighborhood to better understand the plight of the poor in his city.
While he served as Newark’s mayor, he gained online fame and national attention for his interactions with constituents, including rescuing a neighbor from a burning building in 2012, shoveling out an elderly man’s sidewalk and rescuing a dog who was left out in the cold.
During his time in public housing, Booker said he befriended a group of boys who lived in the building. Hassan Washington, one of the boys, reminded Booker of his father, with his quick wit and his struggles of being raised by a single mother. Booker said he grew concerned when the boys started using drugs, which inspired him to want to start a mentoring program.
Then, in 2006, Booker became mayor and said he got distracted “chasing after my big dream of changing the world.”
About a month into his term, he was called to the scene of a shooting and said, at first, he hardly noticed who the victims were. When he got home later that night and checked the police report, he was “stung” to recognize one victim's name: Hassan Washington.
Booker said the sorrow at the funeral was unbearable, with mourners bemoaning “a reality that is all too common in America – another boy in a box.”
“We were all there for his death, but where were we for his life?" he said. "We are Americans one to another, but we lose thousands of our children each year because of indifference, because of apathy, because we are just tolerating one another. We aren’t linked by love."
Booker said his father, who died shortly before he became a U.S. senator, had said, "It's not about the world. It's about you." In that moment, Booker felt as if he had let his father down by not doing enough for Washington.
Media Credit: Ashley Le | Hatchet Photographer
Graduates of the Class of 2016 and their families gathered on the National Mall on Sunday for University Commencement.
Booker referenced his parents throughout his speech, shaping his words to the graduates based on advice from his father. He said speaking on the National Mall was a particularly poignant moment because his parents had their first date at the nearby Jefferson Memorial.
He said his father told Booker that there are two ways you can go through life – as a thermometer or as a thermostat – and that graduates should always be thermostats to change the world, not reflect it.
“A thermometer just reflects the world that is out there,” he said. “If it’s hot, you get hot. If it’s cold, you get cold. You are just a reflection of what is, but a thermostat, it changes the temperature. It focuses on itself, it sets the level. Tell your truth.”
He ended his speech telling the graduates to “stay faithful,” saying they have succeeded so far by believing in themselves, in each other and in their country. He said he succeeded because he was faithful to the lessons his parents taught him.
“I want you to know that the world is calling you, and your nation is calling you,” Booker said. “Heed that, but there are also small voices calling you, too right next to you, right around you. Heed that call. Understand that you may not be called to change the whole world, but to one person this day, you can make a world of difference.”
The social media-savvy senator took selfies with students gathered on the National Mall, and in the hours after the ceremony, Booker responded to tweets from students on Twitter, thanking them for listening to his words and wishing them luck.
Your incredibly generous words almost make me misty. Thank you for your graciousness. Congratulations! https://t.co/eR3t63MWAT
— Cory Booker (@CoryBooker) May 15, 2016
Such gracious words. Thank you so much and I wish you all the best. https://t.co/5A1IZRJkCI
— Cory Booker (@CoryBooker) May 15, 2016
Laurie, thank you! https://t.co/5DwoELbOkA
— Cory Booker (@CoryBooker) May 15, 2016
GW’s Snapchat account, where Booker first announced he would be Commencement speaker, showed students gathering on the National Mall Sunday. Officials had said they hoped to keep the audience engaged during the ceremony by using social media.
Julia Haigney, the student speaker who first received her bachelor’s degree in international affairs in 2011 and has now earned a law degree, told graduates to branch out and “try some green eggs and ham” before deciding what their interests are.
“Like Dr. Seuss’ main character in 'Green Eggs and Ham,' I often have strong opinions about what I like and what I don’t,” Haigney said. “But, also like Dr. Seuss’ main character, my first impressions often deceive me and trying new things has allowed me to maximize my GW experience.”
Haigney said her “green eggs and ham” included moving to a new city, studying abroad twice and living in Thurston Hall three times. She thanked her mentors and the community at GW for their support and congratulated the Class of 2016.
“As you move forward in the world, I ask that you find your own green eggs and ham and continue to try them,” Haigney said. “Pioneer a field, take a risk or start a new adventure. Your green eggs and ham may change the course of history.”
At the ceremony, Booker, Baroness Joanna Shields and Albert Harrison Small received honorary degrees. Shields, the under secretary of state and minister for internet safety for the United Kingdom, spoke at the business school's commencement celebration Friday. Small is a philanthropist and president of Southern Engineering Corporation, a real estate and construction firm. He donated the Washingtoniana Collection to the University in 2011.
University President Steven Knapp said in an interview that he hopes graduates will use the skills they learned at GW to benefit the larger community.
“I know they’re going to take what they’ve learned here and apply it to making a difference in the lives of others, and I encourage them to always keep those ideals in mind,” he said in an interview. “I think our graduates will be pleased to be sent out into the world with this kind of rousing send-off.”
At the end of the ceremony, Knapp left the graduates with a brief charge: “Go out, be the light, remain faithful and change our world.””

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High turnover plagues business school advising office
by The GW Hatchet
May 15, 2016
“Updated: May 16, 2016 at 6:23 p.m.
Eleven members of the business school advising center's staff have left the office over the last 14 months, according to archived versions of the center’s website.
Only two out of the six academic advisers currently in the business school have been at the University for more than a year. One former employee said that the high rate of turnover is due to a misleading job description, a chaotic environment and a “climate of fear” within the office.
The former employee, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, said four employees have left the office this year. The former employee said the turnover began in May 2011 when the advising office underwent massive restructuring.
Under this reorganization, academic advisers became “Undergraduate Student Experience Advisors,” and took on additional responsibilities like teaching sections of a two-semester, one-credit course required for freshmen on basic business practices.
That former employee said advisers were required to reapply for their positions after the changes to the office. A University spokesman declined to comment on this information.
Larry Fillian, the director of undergraduate advising at the time, left the University less than a year after the restructuring.
Six former employees of office declined requests for comment.
University spokesman Jason Shevrin said in an email statement that the University does not comment on individual personnel matters, but welcomes student feedback regarding their undergraduate business experiences.
“The GW School of Business is committed to ensuring every student has a positive and productive experience with their adviser,” Shevrin said.
Shevrin declined to say when the business school hopes to fill the empty adviser positions or if the office is exempt from hiring freezes.
Overworked
When Isabelle Bajeux-Besnainou became associate dean for undergraduate programs in May 2012, advisers were working at least 10 additional hours every week, the former employee said.
The former employee said Bajeux-Besnainou implemented “super Saturdays” once a month, requiring advisers to come to work on a Saturday to catch up on administrative tasks. Advisers were also required to do administrative work for Lemonade Day, a program that started in 2013 that pairs business school students with local elementary and middle schools to teach children about entrepreneurship.
The employee estimated that advisers were working between 50 and 60 hours per week, while the job description advertised 40.
“It’s so much more than published,” the employee said. “It’s completely false advertising. The job description is an absolute joke.”
The employee described Bajeux-Besnainou as “out of touch” with the employees who worked under her and said that she communicated with the office mostly through her assistant, rarely speaking with center employees directly.
Bajeux-Besnainou said in an email that she was “shocked” by the allegations and said that none of them were true.
She left the University last September to become the dean of the business school at McGill University.
Leo Moersen, the associate dean for undergraduate programs in the business school, said in an email that the claims about Bajeux-Besnainou are false.
“Isabelle Bajeux-Besnainou was a highly-valued leader who collaborated with students, faculty and staff to accomplish a significant amount during her time at GWSB,” Moersen said.
The advising center’s website lists one spot as open. Some of the former advisers have gone onto positions at other universities, while a few have remained employed within the University, taking positions in different offices.
Natalie McLemore is the most recent employee to leave the office. In an email to her advisees sent on May 5, she said she will leave at the end of this month. McLemore was hired in August 2013.
The former employee had been actively searching for other jobs during his last two years in the office and “aggressively” pursued them for six months before leaving. The former employee said one current employee is actively seeking other jobs.
Seventy percent dissatisfaction
The employee said the current executive director of undergraduate advising and programs, Mirasol Española, has also pushed undergraduate advisers to leave.
“Her lack of leadership ability and her lack of mentorship leaves the advisors with a sense of betrayal, since she does not advocate for them,” the former employee said in an email.
The former employee said he discussed the high turnover rates with Española. The former employee said Española used feedback against the former employee in his annual review and gave the former employee paper copies of job openings at other universities.
In 2014, employees underwent an office-wide survey of their experiences in the position. The employee said while colleagues gave “copious” responses about office morale, they never saw the full results.
One of the slides, the former employee said, showed that nearly 70 percent of the respondents reported being dissatisfied in their positions and that they would not recommend the job to a friend. The University spokesman declined to give the results of this audit.
Although the employee said many of his colleagues were distressed by this information, Española did nothing to indicate that the office would work on changing the negative climate.
“We don’t talk about what’s not working,” the former employee said.
Española could not be reached for comment, but Moersen, the associate dean, said Española is “widely recognized for the professionalism and collegiality that exist within Undergraduate Programs and Advising.”
Effect on the students
Alan Benson, an assistant professor in the Department of Work and Organizations at the University of Minnesota’s business school, said while high turnover is never something that offices hope for, it can be especially toxic in a field like academic advising where job success depends on advisers building long-term relationships with students.
Benson said that when advisers act as references for students, they are asked to account for how long they have known the applicant.
“If people are turning over within two years, it doesn’t give counselors enough time to develop a relationship,” Benson said.
He said the office should take this rate of turnover as an opportunity to restructure itself and improve the culture among employees.
Benson said the office should consider “repositioning itself, perhaps figuring out how it can attract the right kind of person and retain them and promoting a work environment that works for them and works for everybody."
This post is updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported the undergraduate advising office underwent restructuring in January 2010. It was in May 2011. We regret this error.”

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Engineering school officials begin to develop new strategic plan
by The GW Hatchet
May 15, 2016
“Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo
David Dolling, the dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, said he is preparing to create a new strategic plan for the school.
Officials in the School of Engineering and Applied Science are charting out their goals for the next five years, the school’s dean said this month.
David Dolling, the dean of the SEAS, said at a Faculty Senate meeting earlier this month that faculty and staff at the school have been working on the new plan for about four months and after a discussion with an advisory council last month, are ready to start writing the plan.
Dolling said at the meeting that some goals of the new plan include maintaining and improving the “strength, quality and productivity” of existing faculty, recruiting and educating the best possible students, and building support for research.
He said one challenge is finding the financial resources needed to accomplish these goals – like building new research laboratories.
“We need revenue streams to support a research intensive school,” Dolling said at the meeting. “Because I think everybody knows that the more successful you get, the more money you need.”
Dolling said in an email that the plan is in its “early stages,” and they are now "brainstorming and researching new ideas.”
Dolling did not provide details on the timeline for implementing the plan or what specific goals he has for SEAS.
Previously, SEAS had been operating under a plan called “SEAS 2020,” which the advisory council and select faculty created in 2008, shortly before Dolling took over as dean. Dolling said the plan, an executive summary with 11 points, was very “quantitative,” with goals of “doubling this or tripling that.” Dolling added that, for the most part, SEAS has met those goals.
Charles Garris, a mechanical and aerospace engineering professor and the chair of the Faculty Senate executive committee, said he thinks SEAS should make a new strategic plan but had not heard of the project until it was announced at the meeting.
“I think Dean Dolling is probably right,” Garris said. “Now is a good time to do some strategic planning, bring people together and start talking about the future and looking at opportunities and how we can plan for them. So I’m strongly in favor of proceeding as Dean Dolling is doing.”
Garris said he does not consider the current plan an official strategic plan because faculty did not vote on implementing it after a committee developed it.
“A strategic plan is only really good when everybody is involved in it, and it’s a lot of work to do it,” he said.
Jay Gore, a professor of engineering at Purdue University, said officials should create strategic plans every five years and that administrators should review those plans annually to determine how effective they are.
“If the plan is strategic, they are able to achieve their goals in a way that they can plan their resources,” he said. “They can apply the most efficient tools to get from point A to point B, so I think that having the strategic plan is critical to set your overall vision.”
Gore said Purdue’s College of Engineering's strategic plan emphasizes making a “positive impact” on problems involved with energy, health and education through engineering. He added that engineering schools tend to focus their strategic plans on improving research and education.
“Most engineering strategic plans have the goal to provide the best education to their students, and that’s the number one goal both at the graduate and undergraduate level,” he said.”

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No updates on climate survey, sexual assault prevention committee
by The GW Hatchet
May 15, 2016
“About seven months after officials distributed GW’s second campus climate survey to students, there are no updates on the results.
University spokesman Kurtis Hiatt said there is no new information on the results from the survey on sexual assault and abuse on campus or on the work of a committee focused on sexual assault and prevention that started meeting more than a year ago. Experts said officials should be transparent because informing the entire University community on their progress leads to more productive outcomes.
Rory Muhammad, the Title IX coordinator, declined to comment on progress from the meetings of the Committee on Sexual Assault Prevention and Response and what members are discussing in the meetings. Muhammad also declined to comment on reports from the committee and when the results of the campus climate survey will be released.
Climate survey
Officials confirmed in November that the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Office of Research and Analysis were conducting their second annual survey on unwanted sexual experiences on campus. In the second year of the survey, officials said they hoped to get feedback on recent efforts to prevent sexual assault on campus and educate students about available resources.
The first campus climate survey, which was taken by 713 graduate and undergraduate students, found that 80 percent of students surveyed did not know how to contact the Title IX office. The survey results were released in January last year.
The results of the survey fueled a student-led push for in-person sexual assault prevention training at freshman orientation. Freshmen were required to attend sexual assault prevention training, and 97 percent of those students completed the in-person program.
Katie Eichele, the director of the Aurora Center for Advocacy & Education at the University of Minnesota, which develops policies and protocols for responding to sexual assault, said it is important to share the results of the campus climate survey with the student body because students will push for policy changes.
“I have found that the student voice and the student perspective is probably the most powerful in engaging university administration across the nation,” Eichele said.
She said policies on releasing information differ among public and private institutions, and because GW is a private institution, officials might have more leeway on when they can release results.
“The notion of transparency regardless of what the results show in a campus climate survey is so important because if you don’t control the message, the message is going to control you,” Eichele said. “I think that is an institutional choice on why or why not they might release that information publicly.”
Nancy Chi Cantalupo, an assistant professor of law at Georgetown University and a research fellow with the Victim Rights Law Center, said evidence shows that without climate survey data being publicly accessible, it is hard to deal with sexual violence on campus.
“They provide the only real way to assess whether particular sexual harassment and sexual violence prevention methods actually prevent sexual harassment and sexual violence and by how much,” Cantalupo said. "The student body should have access to this data because the data is highly relevant to their lives and experiences as students.”
Committee remains silent
The Committee on Sexual Assault Prevention and Response at GW was created in October 2014 after University President Emeritus Stephen Joel Trachtenberg said colleges should be educating women about the dangers of overconsuming alcohol to protect themselves from sexual assault.
The committee is made up of students, staff and faculty members. Members meet monthly and report to the provost’s office.
Muhammad, who became Title IX coordinator after the position sat vacant for 11 months, leads the committee to monitor the University's compliance with federal laws and to plan education programs. Muhammad has not met with The Hatchet in more than a year after multiple requests.
Maya Weinstein, a former member of the committee who graduated earlier this year, said members had signed a confidentiality agreement, stating that they could not speak with anyone about the meetings.
“No updates is not entirely an accurate statement because this committee had been meeting for a year and developed recommendations, at least,” Weinstein said. “It is frustrating to me because I wanted to be on it and a significant part of the conversation, but I just felt that we needed more transparency.”
Weinstein said that there were four subcommittees that focused on different aspects of sexual assault on campus, such as response and prevention. She said she served as a co-chair of a response subcommittee.
“We created recommendations, and those were sent in December, and the meeting was cancelled,” Weinstein said. “I don’t know what was done with those and how they were discussed come spring. There was an expectation to have recommendations come from each subcommittee sent up to Rory by the end of 2015.”
Laura Zillman, the former vice president of Students Against Sexual Assault and a committee member, said in an email that SASA's focus this year has been on laying the foundation for new types of education and support. She said their biggest accomplishment was helping to start prevention training sessions for incoming students.
“Starting the sessions was prioritized by CSAPR last year, so that's one example of how it dovetails with our work,” Zillman said. “I still am not in whatever loop it is that decides when to release survey results or subcommittee reports.”
Amber Paulk, an associate professor of sociology and family studies at the University of North Alabama and a member of the college's Title IX advisory board, said her university’s Title IX advisory board meets monthly, and the meetings are open to the entire university community.
“Meetings are open to any faculty, student or community member that wants to come,” Paulk said. “It has really been critical, especially in this first year of programming, to be touching base often and hearing back from students about how the programming we planned is going.”
Paulk said universities should release progress reports from committees to show that they have “nothing to hide.”
“That is where people run into problems is when they collect this kind of data, and they don’t share the results, or they share the results in a way that is deceptive or not clear,” Paulk said.”

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Sara Merken: GW should make it easier to graduate early
by The GW Hatchet
May 15, 2016
“We’ve all heard that college should be the best four years of our lives. But for many students, four years isn’t all fun – it’s just extra debt.
And while it’s good that most GW students graduate within four years, the University should offer programs that allow students to graduate early or accomplish more things in the time that they are students. It’s hard enough to get through four years of college and complete requirements if students didn’t come to GW with college credits or if they want to study abroad or double major. And usually if they want to graduate early, studying abroad or double-majoring is downright impossible.
Media Credit: Cartoon by Lauren Roll
So, GW should create a specific path for students who want to graduate a semester or two early, so students can save money, start their careers earlier or get a head start on graduate school.
Students at American University, one of GW’s peer institutions, can graduate early through a three-year degree program. Incoming freshmen can apply directly into undergraduate programs that allow students to take classes during two summers in D.C. and take normal course loads during the school year.
If a student’s three-year program cost includes getting to live in D.C. for two summers, then students would be able to have internships. GW’s marketing is already so heavily geared towards internships , so if undergraduate programs required students to stay over the summer for classes, more students would be able to gain professional experience at the same time.
Each of American University’s three-year programs include majors similar to ones at GW, such as public policy and pre-law. But American University students finish their degrees in a shorter amount of time and can start their careers sooner. For some, an extra year of job experience could also make them more attractive to graduate schools.
While some students graduate early just because they have enough credits before their four years are up, a lot of students – like myself – would have been interested in planning to graduate early from the start. While you can take summer classes on top of GW’s normal four-year degree programs to get ahead on credits, those credits aren’t factored into the tuition. By the time you take all the summer classes you’d need, you're lessening the likelihood of lowering your post-graduation debt.
And while students can enroll in several combined degree programs in which they can graduate with bachelor's and master's degrees in five years, many students – like myself – are not interested in earning graduate degrees right away.
Officials should also work to smooth the process for transferring credits from study abroad and from other U.S. universities. When I went abroad last fall, only two of the courses from my abroad university counted toward my major and minor at GW. If all five of my classes were approved, I would have been able to graduate a semester early, saving my parents money and allowing me to jump right into my future plans.
One of my best friends from high school graduated this spring from the program at American University. We both graduated from high school in 2013 and began college the following fall, but he is beginning a full-time job this July, while I'm still in school for another year. Although I'm happy that I'm able to have a little more time enjoying college, attending his graduation made me think about what my life would have been like if I had the option to graduate earlier.
GW is a step behind its neighboring universities when it should be two steps ahead to show potential students that the University has the best opportunities in the area. Officials often boast about how prepared students are for life after college, but they make it harder for students to get there sooner.
Although students at GW could still make the decision to take the same courses and graduate in four years, the option to graduate early is valuable to students worried about debt and might attract future students who foresee financing a GW education as a challenge. A full year less of paying tuition can make a significant difference in plans after college, whether it’s paying for an apartment in D.C. or saving money for graduate school.
Sara Merken, a junior majoring in journalism, is a Hatchet opinions writer. Want to respond to this piece? Submit a letter to the editor.”

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Staff editorial: Stories to watch this summer
by The GW Hatchet
May 15, 2016
“If you’re not staying at GW this summer for classes or an internship, it’s easy to forget about things going on in Foggy Bottom and to tune out decisions that officials might make over the next few months.
Last summer, University officials made two big decisions while students were away from campus, including attempting to change Gelman Library’s hours and adding a new fraternity. Officials might make some more big decisions this summer – or at least make headway on them – and students can be on the lookout for stories that will likely come up over the next few months.
Finding a director of Mental Health Services
The former director of Mental Health Services, Silvio Weisner, stepped down last September after officials found out he was unlicensed to practice psychology in D.C. After almost eight months, officials have not filled the position and there have been no updates on the search for Weisner's replacement.
While there are probably several reasons officials haven’t hired someone yet – such as top notch applicants not applying due to the inner turmoil MHS seems to be in – it’s unfair for officials to not tell students what’s happening.
Officials have made mental health a main focus on campus , and student organizations have followed suit, especially after three suicides on campus two years ago.
But now that GW has gone almost a full academic year without providing any information on the search for a new director, it feels like the focus on mental health has fallen by the wayside. If students’ mental health is really a priority for University officials, we should at least hear about progress on the search this summer. It would be better for officials to come forward, acknowledge they made a mistake with Weisner – and other MHS staff who were unlicensed – and tell us when they plan to fill the director position.
After a year of instability, a new MHS director could change how students view MHS. Officials should look to bring in another university’s assistant director or someone with commensurate experience who can balance and restructure MHS. The summer seems like the opportune time to hire a new director, when the demand for clinicians on campus is lower, and the new director could have time to get to know the department and make key changes.
Changes in the provost's office
When former Provost Steven Lerman resigned , the University lost a provost that had close relationships with faculty, met regularly with students and was a known face on campus.
But Lerman leaving the post wasn’t the only change in the provost’s office this year. Interim Provost Forrest Maltzman has taken the initiative to make several important changes to roles in the provost’s office.
After Paul Schiff Berman, the former vice provost for online learning and academic innovation, stepped down, Maltzman consolidated his position with the vice provost for libraries. And when Vice Provost for Diversity and Inclusion Terri Harris Reed resigned last fall, Maltzman changed the position to include community engagement.
As officials prepare to launch the provost search, they should spend some time prioritizing what they want from a new provost, and try to find someone who works well within the changes that Maltzman has made to the office. A provost should be an active member of campus who makes it his or her priority to engage with students and faculty members. The new provost should be able to come to the University and continue the changes that Maltzman made, while also finishing out the University’s strategic plan that Lerman penned.
With the next round of budget cuts coming at the start of next fiscal year in July, we can expect that the provost’s office will have to cut from the strategic plan, given that many of the strategic plan’s goals have already been cut and delayed during previous rounds of budget cuts. And perhaps, the provost’s office will undergo more changes throughout the next few months as Maltzman continues to lead the office.
Smoothing out kinks in the housing system
In 2013, officials announced juniors would be required to live on campus, starting with the Class of 2018. In the first year of the new mandate, juniors have been placed on the waitlist before freshmen have even gotten housing assignments.
This summer will be a waiting game for students on the housing waitlist to see where they'll be placed. Some students, particularly rising juniors, might have some tougher waters to navigate. Not only are juniors forced to live on campus, but to be placed on the waitlist after not being able to move off campus is an unnecessary headache for these students.
As incoming freshmen get ready to move to campus, it’s important for them to be aware of the problems in the housing system. While they might end up getting a huge upgrade between their freshman and sophomore year housing assignments – since rising juniors no longer have housing priority over rising sophomores – they also might risk dealing with more cramped housing in the future if something doesn't change.
Officials need to make GW housing more attractive, especially for upperclassmen. They have the opportunity to do that by adding better food options to the basement of District House , which will be open when students come back to campus in the fall. The University needs to give students a reason to want to be on campus, and right now, some students don’t have that.
The editorial board is composed of Hatchet staff members and operates separately from the newsroom. This week’s piece was written by opinions editor Melissa Holzberg and contributing opinions editor Irene Ly, based on discussions with managing director Eva Palmer, culture editor Grace Gannon, homepage editor Tyler Loveless and assistant sports editor Matt Cullen.”

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Three years in, officials tout strategic plan successes
by The GW Hatchet
May 14, 2016
“Media Credit: Dan Rich | Photo Editor
Interim Provost Forrest Maltzman updated the Board of Trustees on the progress of the University-wide strategic plan.
University officials say they have checked off major goals from GW's decade-long strategic plan.
Interim Provost Forrest Maltzman gave a report on the progress of the University's strategic plan – a set of goals to steer the University’s future – at Friday’s Board of Trustees meeting. Fifty-two of the plan’s 60 goals have been met, five years before the deadline.
Maltzman focused on four areas of the strategic plan in which officials have made the most progress: international student enrollment, student diversity, interdisciplinary study and research.
With five years left in the strategic plan, Maltzman said he is going to improve the quality of the GW student experience and continue work on projects that staff have already begun.
“The plan is a living document, so I consider that to be part of it,” he said. “I want to make sure that the quality and experiences of our students are really a good thing.”
He said that as the plan has progressed, officials have had to delay some goals, like increasing graduate housing. Officials cut more than $8 million in strategic plan funding in 2014 after unexpected drops in graduate enrollment strained GW's budget.
Provost Steven Lerman created the plan in 2012. The search for a new provost will begin in the fall a year after Lerman announced his departure. Faculty and experts have said finding someone who can effectively lead strategic plan implementation will likely be a major goal of the search.
Maltzman said international undergraduate student enrollment has gone from 7 percent before the strategic plan to about 10 percent last fall, and he expects next academic year’s international undergraduate population to reach 12 to 13 percent. He said he also expects similar bumps within the international graduate population.
Maltzman said it has been challenging to equally recruit students from a variety of countries, especially as 47 percent of GW's international students are from China. He said he hopes for more equal enrollment from other countries in future years, especially from countries like India, where he said the University has untapped recruiting potential.
He said adopting a test-optional admissions policy, which officials linked to an increase in applications and partnering with foundations in different areas of the country, like the Posse Foundation in Atlanta, have helped increase enrollment from minority student populations.
“I think the real goal is to actually graduate these students that we bring in, not just to enroll additional students,” he said in his presentation. “But the challenges are cost of attendance, retention and graduation rate.”
Maltzman added that there has been progress in collaboration between GW's schools, like an increase in majoring or minoring in a school other than a student’s home school: 1,002 students majored or minored across schools in 2015, which is up from 676 in 2011.
“Crossing these interdisciplinary boundaries has been a real challenge,” Maltzman said during his presentation. “Getting faculty buy-in is a challenge. Going ahead and getting human advisors that are based in our schools to be able to give information about other schools - all of those are some of the challenges that we have.”
University President Steven Knapp said he thinks the implementation of the strategic plan has been successful, especially in creating faculty positions: More than 170 new faculty positions have been added since the plan's launch. He said the number of international students and the overall diversity of the student body have also increased.
Knapp added that he hopes people within the University continue to understand the plan and work to achieve its goals.
“The problem is if you pass a plan, people kind of forget about it, except the people who are working on it,” Knapp said. “And I think we need to do a better job of communicating it.”
Board of Trustees Chair Nelson Carbonell said it can be challenging to find the funding to start the programs outlined in the strategic plan.
“We want GW to be a place where we can have access to lots of different students, but then we have to look at the resources that we need to get the programs together,” Carbonell said. “It’s always a balancing act that we have to maintain, and hopefully we can do it, but that’s certainly a challenge.”
Robin Eberhardt contributed reporting.”

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Alumnus sues GW for discrimination based on disability
by The GW Hatchet
May 13, 2016
“Updated: May 13, 2016 at 2:07 p.m.
An alumnus is suing the University for breach of contract, harassment, discrimination and retaliation because of his disability.
Bruno Mpoy, who earned a master’s degree in education and human development last spring, is asking the University to remove a C+ grade and an incomplete/failing mark on his transcript. According to the lawsuit, he received the C+ grade in retaliation for a complaint he filed against the University and received the incomplete mark because he was refused the same internship his classmates completed.
The document alleges that Mpoy did not receive the same educational opportunities in the Graduate School of Education and Human Development as other students because of his disability. He received poor grades after the University would not assess a teaching internship he completed and alleged one professor did not treat him appropriately, according to the complaint.
“GWU granted plaintiff’s requests only when it was convenient for GWU and denied them when GWU was more interested in establishing a smoke screen for harassment, discrimination, and retaliation against Plaintiff,” according to the complaint.
Mpoy filed the lawsuit in the U.S. District Court April 4, according to court documents.
University spokeswoman Maralee Csellar declined to comment on the case, citing a University policy not to comment on pending litigation.
The complaint requests actual, compensatory and punitive damages from the University, but requests no specific dollar amount for the damages.
Mpoy is also asking for punitive damages from GW for violating Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The acts prohibit institutions that receive federal funding from discriminating against people with disabilities.
The University did not inform Mpoy that he was at a risk of receiving incomplete or failing grades he could only have received because of his disability, according to the complaint.
“Although some of Mr. Mpoy’s efforts were fruitful, resulting in his graduation, GWU refused to treat Mr. Mpoy fairly, provide him equal educational opportunity or refrain from discriminating against him on the basis disability,” according to the document.
Mpoy has a disability that “affects his ability to carry out major life functions and the performance of many daily activities,” according to the complaint. He was “capable of completing tasks” and his assignments at GW if he received “proper accommodation."
Mpoy said in an interview that people with disabilities can be more vulnerable than others. He said he filed the suit on behalf of all other students with disabilities will be treated fairly and lawfully.
“I’m not interested in money,” he said. “I’m interested in fairness.”
GW refused to assign Mpoy to a teaching internship he was required to take as part of his degree because of his disability, according to the document. Mpoy enrolled in the six-credit program and paid tuition for an internship that he found on his own.
“GWU refused to supervise, evaluate, assess or grade Mr. Mpoy’s teaching internships as it did for other students in the same program as Mr. Mpoy,” according to the complaint.
The complaint alleges that Mpoy received “mostly the grade of A” in his classes, except in his teaching internship. He requested an appeal of the grades and then wrote to the provost and the general counsel requesting to change the grades multiple times, according to the document.
GW typically notifies students when they receive failing or incomplete grades, according to the complaint, and Mpoy was not notified of a deadline for completing the internship before he received the incomplete grade.
Mpoy had previously filed a complaint through the University against Jay Shotel, a professor emeritus of special education and disability studies at GW. Shotel harassed Mpoy in front of other classmates by “saying he had a difficult life," according to the document.
The complaint alleges that Shotel gave Mpoy a C+ in a class as a form of retaliation against Mpoy’s complaint against him. Mpoy was denied a fair hearing for his complaint against Shotel, according to the document.
Michael Feuer, the dean of the Graduate School of Education and Human Development, called Mpoy about his complaint to “appease him with false promises,” according to the complaint.
Shotel said in an email that GW's earlier decision found that Mpoy's complaints were “without merit.”
“I spent the majority of my life and my career advocating for persons with disabilities,” Shotel said. “He was given due process in the issues he raised.”
Mpoy also sued the District government in 2012 after he was allegedly fired from a teaching job, Courthouse News Service reported. Mpoy said in an email he was not fired, but his contract was not renewed for the following year because he "refused to cheat on test scores."
This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that Mpoy received both failing and incomplete grades on his transcript. He just received an incomplete/failing grade. We regret this error. This post is also updated to include a statement from Mpoy.”

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Medieval Islam scholar joins history department
by The GW Hatchet
May 08, 2016
“Media Credit: Photo Courtesy of Patrick Hinely.
Joel Blecher will join the history department this fall. Blecher specializes in early and medieval Islamic history.
Updated: May 9, 2016 at 2:43 p.m.
A scholar specializing in early and medieval Islamic history is joining the history department this fall.
Joel Blecher, an assistant professor of religion and an adjunct law professor at Washington and Lee University, will join GW as an assistant professor of history, according to an announcement on the history department’s website . He said studying Islamic history is especially important today to understand global political and religious tensions.
He added that studying the religion in early periods helps people understand how the world was connected before modern globalization.
“What you would take away as a student from a course about Islamic history, whether or not you are interested in these debates over Islam, would be that you would really learn the way people in the pre-modern world, or the world in world history, have been connected across seas and oceans, religions and cultures,” Blecher said.
Blecher’s addition is one in a series of changes Katrin Schultheiss, the chair of the history department, said she would make when she became chair at the start of this academic year.
This fall, Blecher will teach a class called “The Formation of Islam to 1500,” exploring early Islamic history. He said he also plans to offer a graduate course that will be open to advanced undergraduates, called “Profit and Prophecy in Islamic History” and a course called “Jihad: Love and War in Islamic History” next spring.
In addition to teaching, Blecher said he will continue a digital humanities project on early Islamic history, which he began at Washington and Lee University. Students involved in the project collected, analyzed and visualized biographical data about the earliest transmitters of Islamic law, he said.
A graduate of Swarthmore College and Princeton University, Blecher said he became interested in Islam in 2004 at the end of his undergraduate career, as the religion dominated international conversation.
Blecher said most history scholars did not know much about Hadith – the practice of commenting on Islamic practices and sayings attributed to the prophet Muhammad – and he wanted to contribute to the field of study. He spent several years at the University of Damascus in Syria and returned to Syria almost every summer and winter until 2010 to learn more about Islamic history.
In Syria, Blecher studied Arabic and learned about Islamic traditions like hadith commentary. Blecher said he became interested in the social aspects of the commentary when he watched a scholar deliver a commentary on hadith to an audience and saw how people reacted to it.
This commentary then laid the foundation for Blecher’s first book, "In the Shade of the Hadith: Islam and the Politics of Interpretation across a Millennium," which is about the history of commentary on hadith and its social significance.
When the political situation became unpredictable in Syria in 2011, Blecher said he shifted his research to Islam in India. He said being in India made him think about Islam differently – as he had previously thought the religion was centered in the Middle East and North Africa.
“It was actually when I was forced to think outside of Islam in the Middle East that really expanded and transformed my whole understanding of Islamic history and the Islamic world,” Blecher said.
Blecher said he plans to work on his second book, "Profit and Prophecy: Islam and the Spice Trade from Venice to India," at GW. He recently received a fellowship to work on the project from the Council of American Overseas Research Center, supported by the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Education and Cultural Affairs.
Schultheiss, the chair of the history department, said while the department is already strong in the field of Middle Eastern and Islamic history, current faculty focus more on the early modern and modern periods.
She said Blecher’s will add insight about early and medieval Islamic history to the department and grow Islamic and Middle Eastern studies.
“He is looking at the reach of Islam in this early period even outside the Middle East, so this really is an effort to make GW’s history department a center for studying the Islamic world – not just in the Middle East but also in the rest of the world,” Schultheiss said.
This post is updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that Blecher said not many historians knew about Islamic history. He actually said not many historians know about Hadith. We regret this error.”

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