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Friendship Public Charter School scraps plan to offer courses from Liberty University
by Education
Feb 18, 2017
“A course under consideration would have taught students how to “apply a biblical perspective” to speech writing.”
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College Costs Too Much? N.Y.U. Paves Way to Graduate Faster
by NYT > Education
Feb 17, 2017
“New York University will offer more classes, broaden its allowance for transfer credits and advise students on creating schedules to finish in three years.”
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Parents, daughter agree to drop college payment-tuition case
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 14, 2017
“CAMDEN, N.J. (AP) — A New Jersey man says he and his ex-wife are working to repair their relationship with their 23-year-old daughter after a state appeals court ruled the parents cannot be forced to pay her college tuition.”
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Pace University Names Head of Oberlin Its Next President
by NYT > Education
Feb 13, 2017
“Marvin Krislov, often a lightning rod over identity and free speech issues, is a former Rhodes scholar with three degrees from Yale.”
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Colleges Help Liberal Arts Students Find Careers
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 13, 2017
“More colleges are developing career-oriented programs to help liberal arts majors bridge the gap in their degree to enter the job market. Unlike an undergraduate degree in a technical field such as nursing, engineering or business, liberal arts students tend to be exposed less to direct career messaging within their disciplines, experts say. According to the most recent survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, conducted in January 2016, 54.1 percent of the class of 2015 had found full-time employment.”
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Yale renames Calhoun College because of historical ties to white supremacy and slavery
by Education
Feb 13, 2017
“Yale University will no longer have a residential college named in honor of 19th-century alumnus John C. Calhoun, known for his support of slavery. The decision reverses one made last spring, when the university president said he wanted to confront, rather than erase, history. The college will be renamed in honor of an alumna, Grace Murray Hopper, who was a pioneering computer scientist.”
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Your Money Adviser: How to Manage a 529 Plan for Your Child’s Education
by NYT > Education
Feb 11, 2017
“These plans shield college savings from taxes, but must be managed properly for maximum returns.”
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NJ teen suing parents for tuition loses court battle
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 11, 2017
“A South Jersey college student who sued her estranged parents for college tuition has lost a court battle.”
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Common Sense: Endowment Sweepstakes: How Tiny Houghton College Beat Harvard
by NYT > Education
Feb 10, 2017
“Houghton College outperformed colleges with the biggest endowments by getting out of hedge funds and moving to a mix of low-cost index funds and mutual funds.”
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10 Advantages of Federal Student Loans
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 10, 2017
“Most college students these days take out student loans to pay for the cost of higher education. In fact, 68 percent of college seniors who graduated from a public or nonprofit college in 2015 had student loans, according to a study by the Institute for College Access and Success. Here are 10 benefits of taking out a federal student loan.”
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Small colleges fight to survive, amid warnings of shaky finances
by Education
Feb 10, 2017
“But some are adapting to new market realities.”
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On Campus: American Universities Must Take a Stand
by NYT > Education
Feb 08, 2017
“Our cause is not partisan. It is to defend the pursuit of science, truth and freedom of thought.”
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Two British schools trialling body cameras for teachers
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 08, 2017
“By Ritvik Carvalho LONDON (Reuters) - Teachers at two British schools are trialling the use of police-style body cameras to help maintain discipline, a survey revealed on Wednesday, prompting a civil liberties group to warn that teachers could be turned into snoopers. "The aim is to reduce constant low level classroom disruption which is reducing the effectiveness of teaching," said Tom Ellis, a lecturer at the Institute of Criminal Justice Studies at the University of Portsmouth who will be advising the schools trialling the cameras. "Teachers are actually very concerned that they're spending their time managing order in the classroom instead of actually teaching," said Ellis, adding that students might become more aware of their behaviour if they knew it was being filmed.”
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Why low-income borrowers should avoid for-profit colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 08, 2017
“Students seeking degrees at public colleges have better success paying off their loans than students who attend for-profit colleges”
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Preteens who mistrust teachers less likely to reach college
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 08, 2017
“By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Students of color who perceive biased treatment from middle school teachers may be less likely to attend college than if they trusted instructors to treat them fairly, a small study suggests. “We don't think the discrimination and bias, by itself, had this effect,” said lead study author David Yeager, a psychology researcher at the University of Texas at Austin and co-chair of the Mindset Scholars Network at Stanford University in California. “Instead, we think these experiences made students disengage from the system,” Yeager added by email.”
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Yale professors: Trump puts U.S. scientific leadership at risk
by Education
Feb 08, 2017
“Two scientists at Yale University School of Medicine warn that recent decisions and appointments by President Trump make research and scientific progress historically vulnerable”
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FBI Issues Warning Over Scam Targeting College Students
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 07, 2017
“College students and recent graduates should be wary of a new scam that involves getting a free fake check in the mail for office supplies for their new job. It's gotten so bad that the FBI has had to issue a warning. This information comes by way of a public-service announcement on the Internet Crime Complaint Center website.”
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GOP lawmakers to meet with leaders of black colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 07, 2017
“WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are planning to meet with leaders of historically black colleges and universities in the nation's capital to discuss ways to help the schools survive in challenging times.”
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Sweet Briar's new president comes via Korea, Japan, London and U-Va.
by Education
Feb 07, 2017
“After nearly closing down forever two years ago, Sweet Briar College continues to rebuild with new leadership: Meredith Woo will take over as president in May.”
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Changes made to Common App essay prompts for 2017-2018 college admissions season. Here they are.
by Education
Feb 07, 2017
“There are some changes from last year.”
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D.C. program aims to curb need for remedial college math
by Education
Feb 06, 2017
“Data suggests many end up in courses that don’t count toward a college diploma.”
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This is how you and your child select the right college
by Education
Feb 06, 2017
“There are some things students seeking a tight-knit college experience might consider on that upcoming admitted-student visit.”
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Ivy League and other university presidents call on Trump to revoke — or change — immigration order
by Education
Feb 03, 2017
“Nearly 50 university presidents sign on to letter asking President Trump to reconsider an executive order on immigration”
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Creating a Safe Space for California Dreamers
by NYT > Education
Feb 03, 2017
“In a dorm for first-generation, low-income students at the University of California, Merced, the undocumented bond over hopes and, of course, fears.”
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Cost of College: With Falwell as Education Adviser, His Own University Could Benefit
by NYT > Education
Feb 02, 2017
“Liberty University’s president seeks to roll back regulations, the kind of standards that cast an unflattering light on ... Liberty University.”
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After Visa Ban, Hints of Hidden Tension on Mississippi Campus
by NYT > Education
Feb 02, 2017
“At Mississippi State, where roughly 80 students are affected by President Trump’s order, expressions of support for the ban have taken some by surprise.”
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Ed Talk: Fighting Racial Bias on Campus
by NYT > Education
Feb 02, 2017
“Shaun Harper offers a path for colleges and universities struggling with racism.”
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Will You Graduate? Ask Big Data
by NYT > Education
Feb 02, 2017
“Colleges are turning to predictive analytics to pinpoint hotspots for failure — say, a C in English comp, a B in a foundational course in your major.”
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The Hot New Brand of Higher Education
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 02, 2017
“President Donald Trump’s decision to tap the president of Liberty University to lead a task force within the U.S. Department of Education reflects two trends: a backlash against liberal policies at American colleges and universities and a hot new brand in higher education—the conspicuously conservative college.”
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Trump travel curbs pose revenue challenges for U.S. colleges
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 02, 2017
“NEW YORK/SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - President Donald Trump's travel restrictions on people from seven countries could dampen international enrollment at U.S. colleges, at a time they have become increasingly reliant on tuition revenue from overseas students. "International student growth is important for many institutions," said Roy Eappen, municipal research analyst at Wells Fargo. Analysts said international student applications could be hit by the White House travel order.”
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Mass. college creates ‘refugee scholarship’ for a student affected by Trump’s travel ban
by Education
Feb 02, 2017
“The school says it the ban threatens the school's ability to fulfill its mission of reaching out to students around the world.”
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'I am trusting the American people’: Yale professor worries his wife and baby won't be allowed back from Iran
by Education
Feb 02, 2017
“A Yale University professor from Iran confronts President Trump's executive order on immigration; even with green cards, he worries that he's no longer sure of the rules and that leaving the country has become a risk.”
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Colleges may be happy Falwell will lead review of higher ed regulations, but students and parents should be worried
by Education
Feb 02, 2017
“Consumers do need protections as they ponder a major lifetime investment”
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Tennessee governor calls for tuition-free community college for adults
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 01, 2017
“The cost of a higher education in America has steadily risen for decades, with levels of college debt drawing criticism from politicians and students alike. Often, the high price of secondary degrees is prohibitive for lower-income individuals in an economy that increasingly requires a college education for workers to remain competitive. In Tennessee, however, a new proposal aims to make a going to a community college a lot more affordable for adults seeking a secondary degree or certificate.”
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Westminster Choir College students hold 24-hour music marathon to save school
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Feb 01, 2017
“They are singing for survival in Princeton.”
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Coming out as conservative: Why a College Democrat left the party
by Education
Feb 01, 2017
“This U-Mass. student wants campuses to be more inclusive in political debates”
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Wanted: Factory Workers, Degree Required
by NYT > Education
Jan 30, 2017
“A high school diploma is no longer enough for today’s manufacturing jobs. Enter the employer. Apprenticeships are making a comeback, complete with college.”
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With students stranded abroad, colleges condemn travel ban
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 30, 2017
“BOSTON (AP) — Dozens of U.S. colleges are opposing President Donald Trump's sweeping travel ban that has left some students and professors stranded abroad.”
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Justice Sotomayor says universities need more diversity
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 30, 2017
“ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor on Monday said increasing diversity on college campuses is a key to diversifying society at large, noting that the number of black students at the University of Michigan is a "real problem."”
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U.S. colleges rush to help students, scholars affected by Trump’s immigration order
by Education
Jan 29, 2017
“Some students, scholars are stranded outside U.S., schools say.”
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Why so many college students decide to transfer
by Education
Jan 29, 2017
“A college counselor explains why more than a third of them do.”
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Mold at two Pittsburgh hospitals linked to 5 deaths
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - Mobile App Manual
Jan 28, 2017
“Heavy mold growth was found in the linens used at two University of Pittsburgh Medical Center hospitals where five mold-infection-related deaths occurred since October 2014, according to a report.”
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American University names new president: Obama Cabinet member Sylvia Mathews Burwell
by Education
Jan 28, 2017
“Burwell was director of OMB and later the secretary of health and human services, an unusual background for a university president.”
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U-Md. president calls sanctuary campus designation 'unnecessary'
by Education
Jan 28, 2017
“In responding to student demands, Wallace D. Loh says designation is unnecessary because "we already provide all the protections and support allowed under the law."”
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University of Florida suspends fraternity for 'serious physical hazing incident'
by Education: News & Videos about Education - CNN.com
Jan 25, 2017
“The University of Florida has temporarily suspended its chapter of the Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity after learning about a hazing incident involving fraternity members, a university spokeswoman said.”
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Private Colleges Suggest New York’s Free Tuition Plan Limits Choices
by NYT > Education
Jan 25, 2017
“Some are worried that the governor’s proposal to make state college tuition free could imperil the finances of small colleges that recruit students mainly from New York State.”
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Harvard Makes Changes in Managing a Lagging Endowment
by NYT > Education
Jan 25, 2017
“The university, which has handled much of its money internally, would give the bulk of its funds to outside managers and lay off about half its staff.”
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E-cigarettes may encourage teenagers to smoke
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 25, 2017
“E-cigarettes may entice teenagers who would not have touched tobacco to smoke. According to a US study published in the journal Pediatrics, the arrival of e-cigarettes on the market has not contributed to a reduction in teenage smoking. The new study conducted by researchers from the University of California San Francisco, which surveyed 140,000 high school students between 2004 and 2014, confirms previous studies that found that e-cigarettes amount to a "gateway" to smoking addiction.”
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How Money From Slave Trading Helped Start Columbia University
by Education News Headlines - Yahoo! News
Jan 25, 2017
“The revelation last year that Georgetown University had, in 1838, sold 272 slaves owned by the school in order to pay off debts reignited a conversation about how America and its old, elite institutions of higher education have continually failed to reckon with their ties to slavery.”
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A gift from two orthodontists to UNC: $25 million worth of art, including 7 drawings by Rembrandt
by Education
Jan 25, 2017
“Two orthodontists used scientists' eyes to identify unsigned works by Old Masters and build an important collection, now donated to the University of North Carolina's Ackland Art Museum.”
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Sexual assault prevention committee members host first public event
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 20, 2017
“The Committee on Sexual Assault Prevention and Response hosted its first-ever public event Wednesday to hear how student organizations are preventing campus sexual assault.
About 120 students attended a sexual assault prevention town hall to discuss what they are doing to address the topic of sexual assault and how the University can promote prevention education. Students on the committee, who organized and led the town hall, said the committee will plan future programming based on information from the meeting.
Erika Feinman, the president of the Student Association and a member of the committee, said students on the committee proposed the idea of the town hall and developed the event over the course of the semester. Students planning the town hall decided the event should focus on finding out what student organizations are doing to prevent sexual assault and if they need more direction, Feinman said.
“We knew what the University was doing to try to prevent it, but we didn’t necessarily know what student organizations were already doing to prevent sexual assault,” Feinman said. “And so that’s where the idea for this town hall really came about.”
The Committee on Sexual Assault Prevention and Response was created in October 2014. The committee is made up of about 35 students, staff and faculty members who meet monthly and report to the provost’s office.
We really wanted to make this as student-focused and peer-to-peer as possible.
Students sat around tables at the town hall, which media was not allowed to attend, to hear prompts from student committee members about bystander intervention and situations they may encounter, Feinman said.
“We really wanted to make this as student-focused and peer-to-peer as possible, because we feel like that is the most successful way to get students to speak openly about their experiences,” Feinman said.
Feinman said the committee sent emails through OrgSync to all student groups and tried to have representatives from every student organization, but some groups sent more than one student. There are about 450 student groups currently registered with the University.
Students filled out a survey at the end of the town hall where they answered detailed questions about their experiences of sexual assault education within their organizations, Feinman said. They said the committee will analyze the results of the survey and use the data to set future goals.
Jocelyn Jacoby, co-president of Students Against Sexual Assault, said it was important that the town hall created a larger discussion of the issue and that people left with goals that they want to discuss with their organizations. Jacoby said she hopes to see all organizations on campus talking more about sexual assault prevention.
“It’s hard to know what to prevent if you don’t know where the community is at and what they need,” she said. “Removing that shame and talking about sex and consent and letting everyone know of the resources on campus is just such an important first step.”
It’s hard to know what to prevent if you don’t know where the community is at and what they need.
University spokeswoman Maralee Csellar said in an email that the committee supports the students’ work to organize the meeting and find out how their peers feel about sexual assault education.
“The meeting was a student-only discussion and we are glad that students were presented with a forum to be able to engage in dialogue in an open supportive environment,” she said.
Csellar said the committee will use the information gathered from the town hall to brainstorm ideas about how to remove real or perceived barriers to reporting instances of sexual assault and improve processes, trainings and communication.
Members of the committee are required to sign confidentiality agreements, and reports that come from the committee are generally not available to the public.
Csellar declined to comment on whether the committee will host more town halls in the future, how administrators would be involved, what is discussed in committee meetings, how many reports have been produced from the committee since it launched and if the committee will hold events other than town halls.
Kalpana Vissa, co-president of Students Against Sexual Assault and a member of the committee, said students reflected on how they could take leadership roles in their own communities to look after each other.
“I think that it’s just up to us as advocates and students to make sure that people at our campus are getting the resources that they need and deserve,” she said.
Kei-Matthew Pritsker, a member of the committee and SASA peer educator, said the town hall will help the committee better understand how student groups are preventing sexual assault. He said he hopes the results will tell them which communities are most impacted by the issue.
I think that it’s just up to us as advocates and students to make sure that people at our campus are getting the resources that they need and deserve.
“I would say this is a huge accomplishment, definitely the largest and most engaging conversation on this topic in recent memory, so it is definitely a good start,” Pritsker said.
Pritsker said some questions in the second campus climate survey on sexual assault were not worded properly and couldn’t give a full understanding of the issue, like asking graduate students about whether or not they had been harassed on campus, when the majority live off-campus. He said that having events like this one could help reach more populations that otherwise don’t get to discuss topics like sexual assault.
The results of the second campus climate survey were released in September and did not distinguish between graduate and undergraduate students. After releasing the results, officials said they would distribute the survey every other year going forward.
“There is the sense that SASA can’t hit every single community, and there are some communities that we know have these issues,” he said. “We wanted a way to address everyone.””

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GW researcher creates lemur recognition program
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 16, 2017
“You no longer have to turn to Zoboomafoo for your lemur knowledge – a GW researcher found a way to identify the animals faster than ever before.
Rachel Jacobs, a biological anthropologist at GW’s Center for the Advanced Study of Human Paleobiology, coauthored a paper introducing “LemurFaceID.” The computer-assisted recognition system is able to identify individual lemurs in the wild based on their facial characteristics and compile the data for long-term research studies, according to a release .
“Senior author, Stacey Tecot (University of Arizona), and I weren’t particularly satisfied with the common approaches used in lemur research, so we aimed to do something different with red-bellied lemurs, and we sought the expertise of our computer science collaborators,” Jacobs said in the release.
The database will be a non-invasive, cost-effective means of conducting evolutionary studies related to survival, reproduction and population growth, Jacobs said in the release. These studies require long-term life history information on individual animals.
This new tracking method could also help conservation efforts identify endangered species in the wild and tracking trafficked lemurs if they are taken from the wild.
Lemurs were named the world’s most endangered group of mammals in 2012, according to the release.
The database could be applied to other species with similar hair and skin patterns in the future, like red pandas, Jacobs said in the release.”

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Weekend outlook
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 16, 2017
“This weekend, laugh it up at comedy shows and thank George Washington for a long weekend by attending a parade in his honor.
Friday
Sam Jay Johnson at Drafthouse Comedy
Head out to Drafthouse Comedy to enjoy a comedy show by an up-and-coming talent. You may recognize the comedian Sam Jay Johnson as the actress from Viceland’s TV series “Flop House” or from one of several comedy festivals she has headlined across the U.S. As a queer woman of color, Johnson brings a fresh voice to the stand-up comedy scene and relates her experiences to audiences in witty ways.
Drafthouse Comedy DC. 1100 13th St. NW. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $20.
Saturday
Late Night Improv
If you’re searching for a night of unpredictable comedy, check out the “The Blue Show,” where performers from ComedySportz, an improv group that has troupes around the world, unwind and turn up the humor without any rules. Earlier in the night, the cast of ComedySportz will perform a kid-friendly show but later on, all bets are off. Bring a good sense of humor and suggestions to help out these imrpov preformers.
DC Improv Lounge, 1140 Connecticut Ave. NW. 9:45 p.m. Ages 18+. $15.
Sunday
Willy Wonka and the Burlesque Factory – Bucket v. Wonka
Bier Baron, a beer bar west of Dupont Circle, is hosting a show that fits a need you never knew you had for a play that puts a racy twist on the childhood favorite movie and book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. In the play, Charlie is faced with a massive mid-life crisis and enlists the help of Veruca Salt, Mike Teevee and a near-extinct Oompa Loompa in suing Willy Wonka for all the trouble he caused them. With appearances by familiar characters like beloved Grandpa Joe and now-skinny Augustus Gloop, this show is sure to be a trip down memory lane.
Bier Baron Tavern, 1523 22nd St. NW. 2 p.m. Ages 21+. $12 in advance, $15 at door.
Monday
George Washington Birthday Parade
Celebrate our University’s namesake by hopping out of D.C. and heading over to historic Old Town Alexandria for the nation’s largest parade celebrating George Washington’s birthday. The parade, which is approaching its 100th anniversary, features bands, floats, horses, wagons, historic reenactment groups and additional performances to celebrate the spirit of President’s Day. The parade route runs from the intersection of Gibbon and South Fairfax streets through the town, ending at Wilkes and South Royal streets.
Old Town Alexandria. 1 to 3 p.m. Free.”

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Federal aid applications decline despite extended filing window
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 16, 2017
“Students now have three extra months to file for federal aid – but the number of applications nationally haven’t increased.
In 2015, the Department of Education announced that the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, will be opening in October 2016 rather than January and potential recipients can apply using older tax data. The applicant pool has decreased since the policy began, but experts say by the time the application window closes, numbers will likely be higher because students who are familiar with FAFSA will apply later on.
October applications increased by 21 percent nationally from normal first-month rates, indicating more students were applying early, according to a National College Access Network data analysis. Still, the application rate dropped after its initial increase, with only 5 million filings by Dec. 30 – 3 million fewer than normal for the first three months.
Laurie Koehler, the vice provost for enrollment management and retention, said the extended window and approval for applicants to submit earlier tax returns, rather than having to quickly compile the information from 2016, should make the process less stressful.
“While it is too soon to provide projections about how students and families are utilizing the new option and the implications of this on enrollment, we hope to see more prospective students submitting their aid applications earlier,” she said.
Koehler added that earlier submissions in October give employees in the Office of Student Financial Assistance more time to review the reported information, follow up with families to collect missing or additional details and provide more complete financial aid packages at the same time that students are admitted.
At GW, 45 percent of full-time undergraduates receive need-based financial aid, averaging at $29,433 per student.
GW’s net tuition is still ranked eighth highest among four-year private universities at $48,760, according to the Department of Education. Since 2008, tuition and financial aid awards have both been steadily increasing.
Department of Education officials said the number of applications could still end up around the same as in previous years because many students apply for state aid grants before going through the federal process.
While the short-term effects of the change may not be obvious, experts expect the longer application period to help universities and students, specifically low income students, in the long-term, the Chronicle of Higher Education reported.
Jodi Okun, the founder of College Financial Aid Advisors – which provides higher education financial aid counseling – said the drop in applications could be because the applications processed during this period were all from FAFSA newcomers.
“I think that that 5 million could possibly be new FAFSAs, and so the parents who have already been through this knew that they had some time,” Okun said. “Families whose students are sophomores, juniors and seniors didn’t do it in October because they knew they had some time and are now filling it out.”
February and March applications will likely come from students and families who have already filed a FAFSA in the past, which will bring the total number of applications up to the number in prior years, Okun said.
“We just have to see how families are behaving,” Okun said. “There’s a good majority still doing it right now across the United States and meeting priority deadlines.”
Sara Harberson, an admissions counselor and founder of the consulting service Admissions Revolution, said she isn’t surprised by the surge of applications in October and November and the dip in December because students applying for early decision and early action submit applications before December.
Early decision and early action students don’t normally require as much financial aid as regular decision applicants, so the smaller number of applications may reflect a pool of higher-income applicants, she said.
The dip may also be a result of poor communication: Many families don’t know about the extension yet, and do not “completely understand the benefits and the advantages” of an earlier FAFSA, Harberson added.
“The regular American family does not know about [FAFSA],” she said. “There are so many families who need need-based financial aid who don’t even realize that they can fill out the FAFSA until much later.”
Robert Kelchen, an assistant professor of higher education at Seton Hall University, said the three extra months might drive only a few extra students to apply, but those students may be the ones that especially benefit from need-based financial aid.
But the small increases may be overshadowed by less of a need for financial aid overall, Kelchen said.
“The economy is doing better, which means that fewer students may be attending college and that more students may not think they qualify for federal financial aid,” he said.”

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MPD recruits volunteers to build up declining officer count
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 16, 2017
“After struggling to recruit enough officers to accommodate the city’s growing population, the Metropolitan Police Department is searching for volunteers to join the police force.
MPD posted a release last week seeking volunteer applications for its an annual summer training session for reserve officers, auxiliary officers and citizen volunteers – especially those who like to work with youth. At a time when officials have said MPD needs to boost the number of officers in the department, experts said the program will prepare volunteers to potentially work full time for the department while saving money.
MPD spokeswoman Rachel Reid said in an email that the department is recruiting volunteers interested in the area’s youth because community members tend to want to help young people succeed.
“As residents who live and work in D.C., volunteers are uniquely positioned to assist us with continuing to strengthen our ties with the community,” she said.
Although auxiliary officer volunteers do not have the same duties as regular officers, MPD expects some reserve and auxiliary officers to take on positions at MPD later, Reid said. Reserve officer volunteers complement full-time officer responsibilities, while auxiliary officers work for community relations functions, station work, cell block and event assistance, Reid said.
Civilian volunteers would assist with the department’s daily operations, according to the release.
Reid said MPD plans to recruit at least 15 officers and 20 auxiliary officers. Currently, 90 volunteer reserve officers, 25 citizen volunteers and 40 college interns work in the department. Volunteers gave $3 million in supplemental contributions to MPD last year, Reid said.
D.C. officials, including Council members Vincent Gray of Ward 7 and Jack Evans of Ward 2, have said they are concerned about the decreased number of MPD officers. Gray and Evans proposed legislation to add funding to hire more police officers, but it failed to pass at the last D.C. Council meeting.
Experts said exposing volunteers to MPD operations will provide the department with potential new officers who might later pursue careers in the division.
Stephen Bigelow, the vice chairman of the DC Police Union, said adding volunteer officers to the force helps future officers understand the jobs’ difficulties before committing to a full-time officer position.
“You get people who are doing it because they want to do it, not necessarily because they benefit,” Bigelow said. “These are people that want to serve their community. They are honored to do it and they’re proud of it, and I think that’s what motivates them.”
MPD has been expanding volunteer duties since 2011 in addition to formally adding the Office of Volunteer Coordination in August 2016, Marvin Haiman, the director of the office, said in an email.
Adding volunteer officers to the force puts more officers on the streets, which makes police more visible and the public more safe, Jennifer Zoner-Peach, an officer and part of the recruit training team with the Baltimore County Maryland Police Department, said.
Zoner-Peach said community members appreciate Baltimore County auxiliary police department’s volunteers because they keep an eye out for suspicious events while getting to know the neighborhoods they patrol.
“It always makes people feel more comfortable and safer in their community when they see police officers driving around and when they see them out of their car and talking to people in the community,” she said.
MPD has prioritized community policing in the past year. Department leaders recently reorganized its sectors partially to focus on officer-community relations, and Interim Police Chief Peter Newsham has become more involved with District residents.
Other police departments, like the Arlington County Auxiliary Police Unit, use volunteer officers to deal with tasks like parking control and security at events, Auxiliary Lt. Heather Hurlock said.
“There are mundane chores and events that the auxiliaries can take care of for us,” Hurlock said. “They could provide services that would just not be permitted if you were paying an officer to do it.””

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Neighbors express worries about noise at Varsity on K
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 16, 2017
“As the new apartment complex Varsity on K shifts from being a GW residence hall to an off-campus housing option, neighbors expressed concerns about how their living experience might be affected by a potential increase in noise, a lack of security and ongoing construction.
Wendy Wright, the property manager and Kristine Hadeed, the assistant property manager of Varsity Investment Group, respectively, addressed these issues at a Foggy Bottom and West End Advisory Neighborhood Commission meeting Wednesday. They both said noise will be less of a problem at Varsity on K because only seniors and graduate students are able to live off campus at GW.
After neighbors cited problems with noise from the building’s time as City Hall, Hadeed said the quiet hours would be heavily enforced and would comply with D.C. law, which limits loud noises between 10 p.m. to 7 a.m.
“We will have several professional residents living in our building who would want a quiet atmosphere as well, so we are very active in enforcing our quiet hours and maintaining an environment of peace for our residents,” Hadeed said.
Varsity on K, located along 24th Street, has a resident handbook that lists quiet hours and 24/7 camera surveillance in its common areas. A overnight concierge will oversee access to the building.
“We have a warning process and if anyone violates that more than two or three times maximum they can be evicted,” Hadeed said. “We have experience handling students.”
Wright said the owners of the building, Durant Berkeley Partners, LLC, have completed a number of student projects and the noise issue in each complex varied depending on the students’ ages.
For example, freshmen living in an off-campus building at the University of Maryland destroyed the building, but the owners didn’t experience similar problems at another project at Johns Hopkins University where only older students could live.
“From what we’ve seen, I don’t anticipate that it’s going to be anything similar than what was happening there at the University of Maryland,” Wright said.
Sarah Maddux, a community member at the meeting, said construction has caused traffic problems along 24th Street and that she wanted workers to be mindful of traffic flow and trash they leave in the area.
“We’re not going to be nice about it, and if you don’t watch it, we are going to have the police on your case more times than you want,” she said.
Hadeed said they were doing as much as they could to get the construction cleaned up and that the construction itself was 99 percent finished, but it was difficult to minimize the impact of the project because the contractors have limited space for a massive renovation of the building.
Patrick Kennedy, chairperson of the ANC, told The Hatchet that City Hall, which GW leased as a residence hall from 2001 until 2016 , was an issue in the neighborhood because students tended to stay up late and disregard noise restrictions. The owners of City Hall sold the building for nearly $80 million in June 2016.
He said he hopes the landlord will be able to handle student noise levels and prevent disruptive student interaction with the community.
“It looks like a really nice facility,” he said. “I’m sure for seniors and for others who are moving off-campus it will be an attractive option due to its proximity, so we welcome those who move into the building.””

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Foggy Bottom restaurants to close on Day Without Immigrants
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 14, 2017
“Some D.C. restaurants powered by immigrant servers, cooks and other staff members will be short-staffed or closed for the Day Without Immigrants protest Thursday.
The nationwide strike is a response to President Donald Trump’s crackdown on undocumented immigrants, use of an “extreme vetting” process and plans to build a border wall along the Mexican border, the Washington Post reported Wednesday.
Sweetgreen will be closing 18 D.C. locations, including the Foggy Bottom location on I Street, Nancy Savage, the Foggy Bottom location’s manager, said.
“The information we received is that we would be closing down tomorrow because Sweetgreen wants to stand behind their employees and we couldn’t stay open without them,” Savage said. “They are what makes us special.”
Jetties and Surfside will be closing all locations except the shop on 19th and I streets tomorrow, according to a post on the business’s Instagram.
Lauren Matthias, general manager of Tonic, said that there are not any plans to close the restaurant but managers expect a staff shortage.
Matthias said a few schedules are being rearranged because two or three people have said that they will not work Thursday, but she does not expect business hours to be affected.
“As of right now, a couple of people have told us they won’t come in,” she said.
At Taylor Gourmet, a sandwich shop at 1750 Pennsylvania Ave. that accepts GWorld, employees will be allowed to exercise their rights and not show up to work with “zero repercussions,” according to DCist. The restaurant will remain open.
Chef José Andrés, a Spanish immigrant and the owner of several local restaurants including campus favorite Beefsteak, announced on Twitter that his restaurants Jaleo, Zaytinya and Oyamel will be closed Thursday in observance of the protest.
The general managers of Whole Foods Market in Foggy Bottom, Paul in the Shops at 2000 Penn, District Commons, Burger Tap & Shake and Beefsteak said they do not have plans to close.
Instead of closing up shop, some local restaurants are participating in the day’s protests by giving proceeds to charity. Bar Pilar will be swapping their regular menu for select Latin American dishes and a portion of cocktail sales will go to the American Immigration Council, according to the Washingtonian .”

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D.C. should eliminate sex-related crimes' statute of limitations
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 13, 2017
“Updated: Feb. 14, 2017 at 10:50 a.m.
Survivors of sex-related crimes deal with their experiences in their own ways and in their own time frames. Some might confide in friends and family immediately after the incident and some may not tell anyone for decades. A new bill under review by the D.C. Council’s Committee on Judiciary and Public Safety would eliminate a time limit survivors have to prosecute their assailants.
This bill would put an end to the statute of limitations on sex-related crimes in D.C. The current statute of limitations is 15 years for first-degree sex crimes, such as date rape, or second-degree sex crimes, like engaging in intercourse with someone who could not give consent. Sixteen states, including Virginia and Maryland, have already eliminated the statute of limitations for felony sex crimes. And this is the third time that the bill has been brought to the D.C. Council. The first two times the bill was brought to the Council, it didn’t even get a hearing. Council member and chairman of the Judiciary Committee Kenyan McDuffie last declined to move the bill forward for a public hearing in 2015, citing the committee’s busy schedule.
With sexual assault being such a relevant issue on college campuses and high-profile cases, like Bill Cosby’s , making national headlines, it’s more important than ever for the bill to not only receive a hearing but to become law. Survivors of sex-related crimes deserve to have the peace of mind to seek justice whenever they choose.
Statutes of limitations for all types of crimes are put in place for a reason. A statute of limitations makes sense for things like burglaries and certain civil suits, like fraud or injury, since prosecuting the crimes rely on time-sensitive proof. Evidence – especially DNA evidence – can become less reliable the later it’s found. Testimony from witnesses also becomes less reliable as time passes.
But the statute of limitations for sex-related crimes can have a profound and traumatic effect on survivors. With a time limit, sexual assault survivors have to work against a clock and are pushed into a difficult situation where if they want to report a sex-related crime, they must do so even if the person who assaulted them is still involved in their lives. This is especially relevant for college students living on the same campus as their perpetrators, since they must continue to reside near their assailants and potentially sit in classes with them. This gives survivors opportunities to run into the perpetrators before graduating, which can make survivors feel unsafe or uncomfortable reporting the crimes.
Plus, if survivors chose not to report the incident when it first happened but changed their minds at a different stage of their lives, the statute of limitations prevents them from being able to prosecute once the time limit is up. What someone wants when they are 18 years old is likely not the same as what they want when they are 40. Humans are complex and change their minds over time, and our justice system should reflect how people change.
Eliminating the statute of limitations isn’t going to automatically increase the number of sex-related crime convictions. If a person wants to pursue a case against someone, they have a better chance at getting a conviction by they pursuing legal action soon after the incident. If we were to do away with the statute of limitations, it’s likely that there could be more court cases that end without convictions. But sometimes it’s not about the conviction, it’s about just having a shot at justice.
And if a survivor chose to go to a hospital or to the police after being sexually assaulted and had a rape kit examination performed, any DNA evidence from that rape kit could be used at a later date. There’s only one hospital in D.C. that provides rape kits, which limits how many survivors go through the process.
Of course, not every survivor wants to go through an invasive rape kit exam, and some sex-related crimes don’t have the evidence to prove an assault. But our laws should reflect reality, and the reality is that if one person can go through legal proceedings years after an assault happens and serve justice, they should be able to.
One in five women are sexually assaulted on college campuses and one in 16 men are, as well. It’s likely that most of us know someone who’s a survivor, even if they haven’t shared it publicly. It should be up to survivors to decide when they want to tell their stories, how they want to seek justice and when they want to do that. And it’s up to the D.C. Council to give every survivor their day in court if and when they want it.
The editorial board is composed of Hatchet staff members and operates separately from the newsroom. This week’s piece was written by opinions editor Melissa Holzberg and contributing opinions editor Irene Ly, based on discussions with managing director Eva Palmer, homepage editor Tyler Loveless, contributing sports editor Matt Cullen and copy editor Melissa Schapiro.
This post was updated to reflect the following correction:
The Hatchet incorrectly reported that D.C. had a backlog of 6,000 rape kits. The backlog of rape kits in the District is unknown. We regret this error.”

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Admissions officers, consider applicants beyond their extracurricular activities
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 13, 2017
“Sports, honor societies, community service hours and at least a handful of clubs: These are just a few of the things students are expected to include in their college applications. In high school, it’s often a contest for who can have the most extracurricular activities because students think they’ll be more appealing to college admissions officers.
But some people, including Harvard University professor and psychologist Richard Weissbourd, are now arguing that being a good person should be enough to get into competitive and prestigious universities. Weissbourd has been advocating for this through his report “Turning the Tide,” which encourages college deans at universities around the nation to change admissions processes to take the emphasis off of students’ laundry lists of extracurricular activities. More than 120 universities have already endorsed his report.
Media Credit: Hatchet File Photo Irene Ly
Weissbourd wants colleges to care about the time students spend working part-time jobs or taking care of sick family members. If Weissbourd had it his way, a part-time after-school job at a fast food joint would have the same weight as going to a robotics camp, because these activities help build students’ empathy and understanding of the world.
As GW continues its efforts to increase the diversity of its applicant pool, officials should get on board with Weissbourd’s plans by highlighting the importance of such activities.
Many students – especially those from low-income backgrounds – have familial obligations or need to take on part-time jobs that keep them from joining more teams or clubs at school. Although the Common Application gives students space to report any responsibilities and activities outside of school, Weissbourd says universities are usually not explicit in what applicants can report. This makes students think they cannot list things like part-time jobs, which could keep applicants from reporting obligations that take up significant amounts of time.
These types of students are at a disadvantage compared to their peers who have the money and time to jet off on service trips or play organized sports. But students who can’t participate in expensive activities still have valuable experiences and interests. These kids have to sacrifice the extra time they would have to do homework or take part in school-organized activities. Adding equal weight to activities like caregiving and part-time jobs would make the admissions process fair to students from low-income or otherwise less privileged backgrounds, because they wouldn’t worry that never serving as the president of a club will keep them out of their top-choice college.
Making a change in the admissions process would not only enable more low-income students to feel like they can apply and get into competitive, prestigious colleges, but would also encourage students to be more caring and ethical, in general. It’s certainly desirable for teenagers and young adults to be ambitious so they can go on to have successful careers, but the competition for an admissions letter has forced applicants to put themselves first over caring for other people just to achieve success.
About a dozen colleges have already responded to Weissbourd’s report by making changes to their admissions formats that will impact students who are applying this year. For example, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, students are still encouraged to take rigorous classes but only in the topics that truly interest them, instead of in all areas. And Yale University now only includes slots for two extracurricular activities.
When I look back at my junior year of high school, I remember the panic that set in when I realized I wasn’t doing what I thought would be enough to get into my top choice colleges and started joining clubs left and right. Thankfully, it didn’t keep me from being committed to my three most notable extracurriculars, but I wish I hadn’t felt compelled to join things just to list them on college applications. I had classmates who could not get involved in teams or clubs because they worked jobs after school, but they deserved to go to GW just as much, or even more, than I did.
Adopting a test-optional policy has significantly helped GW  increase the number of applications it receives. The class of 2020 is the most diverse group of freshmen in University history, attracting both increases in low-income students and underrepresented minority groups.
But there are still steps that need to be taken to encourage qualified students who are not applying to GW for fear that their extracurriculars aren’t impressive enough. By adopting Weissbourd’s ideas into the admissions process, GW can create even more diverse classes full of empathetic and caring students.
Irene Ly, a junior majoring in psychology, is The Hatchet’s contributing opinions editor. Want to respond to this piece? Submit a letter to the editor.”

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Sororities drop formal fall recruitment as new policy takes effect
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 11, 2017
“Sororities will not hold formal recruitment during the upcoming fall semester as they transition to a deferred recruitment policy, leaders of the Panhellenic Association said last week.
The council made the decision after a vote among chapter leaders and a recommendation from the National Panhellenic Conference to limit primary recruitment to one semester each academic year, Panhellenic Association President Dani Harton and Vice President of Recruitment Elizabeth Jessup said. Council leaders said the switch would help the Panhellenic Association focus their resources and energy on one recruitment period.
“Our chapters came together to figure out whether it would be most beneficial to our campus to hold a quota-based structured recruitment in the fall or to limit that style of recruitment to our primary recruitment in the Spring,” Harton and Jessup said in a joint email. “The chapters overwhelmingly voted against holding a quota-based structured recruitment in the fall.”
The initial timetable for deferred recruitment, announced last April, allowed formal recruitment to take place for non-freshmen for a final time this fall. But Harton and Jessup said that since it was already decided that future formal recruitments would only be held in the spring, the chapters didn’t see a reason to deviate from the long-term plan for one semester.
Greek life administrators are implementing the new policy next academic year, mandating that freshmen complete 12 on-campus credits before joining a Panhellenic Associate or Interfraternity Council chapter. Student affairs officials said last spring that the new policy would help freshmen acclimate to college life before joining a fraternity or sorority.
This upcoming fall, Panhellenic Council chapters that have a membership below the median chapter size on campus – 153 members this semester – will be allowed to hold informal recruitment for non-freshmen, Harton and Jessup said. They said the process will be similar to how spring recruitment was conducted in past years.
Harton said the Panhellenic Association’s decision was based on guidance from the national conference not to hold two rounds of formal recruitment, one for freshmen and another for non-freshmen, within the same year.
Deferred recruitment will mean that chapters will have new members who are more prepared to enter their organizations and more informed about the commitment they are making.
An information manual from the National Panhellenic Conference also opposes deferred recruitment, arguing that “a fall primary recruitment has more advantages than any other recruitment time period” because it connects women with chapters quickly, helps with their adjustment to college, creates a more objective selection process and allows sororities to add members at the same time that other student organizations do on campuses.
At the time that deferred recruitment was announced, Greek leaders appeared divided over whether or not the new guidelines would benefit chapters, with some arguing that councils had been shut out of the decision-making process. But Harton and Jessup said the council believes deferred recruitment will be “incredibly positive for everyone involved.”
“Deferred recruitment will mean that chapters will have new members who are more prepared to enter their organizations and more informed about the commitment they are making,” Harton and Jessup said. “New members will benefit because they will have more time to get acclimated to GW and to figure out if Greek Life is the right place for them.”
Jessup said she contacted councils at the GW’s peer institutions that have already instituted deferred recruitment policies and will meet with recruitment officials in each GW chapter to help them transition to the new policy.
We want to make sure that individuals are as prepared as possible when deciding whether or not to join a greek organization.
The council also plans to revamp its education program for new members next academic year. It will be held in the fall prior to formal recruitment, instead of at the conclusion of the process, and will focus on helping potential new members decide if they want to join a sorority – rather than educating them once they’ve already received a bid, Harton said.
“We want to make sure that individuals are as prepared as possible when deciding whether or not to join a greek organization,” she said.
Dani Weatherford, the executive director of the National Panhellenic Conference, said the conference would base its advice to GW on past experiences with universities that switched to spring recruitment.
At least six of GW’s 14 peers schools have already implemented deferred recruitment for fraternities and sororities.
“We have peers and partners who’ve made this transition before, which means we can share resources and best practices with campus leaders and help ensure that the sorority community at GW doesn’t miss a beat as we move into next year,” Weatherford said.”

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Think outside the box with unique Valentine's Day date ideas
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 11, 2017
“Dinner and a movie is a tired date night combination. If you want to spice up your Valentine’s Day with a unique date, check out these creative ideas that are sure to help you woo that special someone.
Tinder Live! With Lane Moore at the Lincoln Theatre
Perfect for: Couples who met on Tinder and miss the comedy of choosing to swipe left or right.
For $25, watch as comedian Lane Moore live swipes through Tinder profiles and comments on potential matches during this interactive comedy show. Throughout the night, Moore asks the audience to give feedback on whether to swipe left or right on the bachelors she comes across and how to reply to any messages she gets during the show. If you don’t want your date and the rest of the audience to know you have a Tinder profile, you might want to delete the app before the show.
Iron Gate: Tunnel of Love
Perfect for: 21+ couples looking for a step up from an average dinner date.
Cupid and some clever interior designers targeted Iron Gate, a swanky small-plate restaurant, this Valentine’s Day to create an over-the-top decorated dinner spot for couples. The restaurant and bar is filled with candles and other Valentine’s Day-themed decor with shareable dishes like the “Iron Gate Mixed Grill” with potatoes, tzatziki sauce and pita on the menu. Even the names of the drinks were struck by Cupid’s arrow, with names like “Better Put a Ring On It” and “You Make Me Want To Be A Better Martini.”
Watch airplanes land at Gravelly Point at sunset
Perfect for: Couples who are “doing it for the ‘gram”
Bundle up with your partner and bring a blanket, bottle of wine and some takeout food to watch airplanes land next to Ronald Reagan airport. Arrive at around 5:45 p.m. to get a gorgeous view of the sunset during your picnic. Gravelly Point Park is a field that sits on the Potomac River that is about a 30-minute walk from campus or quick Uber ride away. Gravelly Point Park is the perfect way to switch up your typical monument walk or picnic.
Flight Trampoline Park in Springfield, Va.
Perfect for: Active couples who are fidgeting before the appetizer is served
Head over to this trampoline park for an energetic Valentine’s Day date. For $15 each, you and your date can spend an hour playing dodgeball, jumping into a pit full of foam balls and showing off your best flips. The park is about 20 minutes away by car, but friendly competition and massage chairs to relax in after make it worth the trek.”

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Saudi Arabia funds new cancer biology professorship
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 10, 2017
“The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is funding a new professorship in the School of Medicine and Health Science, according to a University release Wednesday.
Edward Seto, the associate director for basic sciences at the GW Cancer Center, was installed as King Fahd Professor of Cancer Biology Monday according to the release. It is unclear exactly how much Saudi Arabia contributed for the professorship.
Seto, who is also a professor of biochemistry and molecular medicine, studies cancer epigenetics and histone deacetylase enzymes, or HDACs, in order to treat cancer. Seto is working to turn off genes and transform cancer cells to normal cells, according to the release.
“I’m honored today to be given this opportunity to contribute, no matter how small, to the GW Cancer Center, the medical school, the university and to the educational ambitions and goals of the late King Fahd,” Seto said in the release.
The newly installed professorship is named in honor of King Fahd bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, who was the country’s minister of education from 1954 to 1960 and ruled Saudi Arabia from 1982 until his death in 2005.
Abdullah Al-Saud, King Fahd’s grandson and Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to the United States, said in the release that his grandfather was committed to education and helped build Saudi Arabia’s national education system.
“I’m very happy to be here and very happy to be part of the celebration of something that somebody I knew was behind,” Al-Saud said in the release.
Provost Forrest Maltzman said Saudi Arabia and GW began working on education together under the late King Fahd in the 1990s, according to the release.
GW’s education school began partnering with a Saudi Arabian institution, Taibah University, for a doctoral program in educational leadership in 2015.
“We are grateful for King Fahd’s vision and generosity,” Maltzman said in the release. “The King Fahd Professorship of Cancer Biology will enhance the ability of Dr. Seto and support the GW Cancer Center’s research initiatives.””

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Research office, CCAS offer $20,000 humanities seminar grants
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 08, 2017
“Administrators are working together to highlight the humanities and fund a seminar series featuring from scholars outside GW.
Leo Chalupa, the vice president for research, and Ben Vinson, the dean of the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, are teaming up to give as much as $20,000 to fund conferences with humanities scholars during the next academic year.
The offices are each providing up to $10,000 for the program. Faculty members across disciplines must pitch proposals – including a series topic, prospective speakers and a tentative timeframe – to Chalupa and Vinson.
Chalupa said two seminar series proposals – one on Latinx culture in America and the other on vulnerability and race in America – were approved for funding in December.
The faculty members who received funding are still in planning phases with the goal of hosting the events next academic year.
“The Office of the Vice President for Research is discussing replicating this incentive model with other deans and research deans and anticipates sponsoring one or two events per school as long as the school is willing to match OVPR’s support,” Chalupa said in an email.
Chalupa said seminar series give visiting scholars the chance to come to GW and learn more about the University.
“We funded two conferences already and we are going to do that across the campus. Why do we do that?” Chalupa said in an interview. “We want faculty to come here for conferences to see how great GW is.”
Chalupa said scholars learn more about the University’s educational opportunities when they physically come to campus, which could attract new faculty to GW. He added that visiting scholarship has already reinvigorated STEM programs, and he hopes the program will do the same for the humanities.
“People come here for neuroscience and they say, ‘Wow, this place is great,’” Chalupa said. “That is true across the campus. You need faculty to boost those people.”
The research office is also offering a $1,000 reward to any humanities researcher who applies for an outside grant as another way to encourage humanities research.
Vinson said it is sometimes hard to find funding for humanities conferences and that the seminar series will bring attention to those fields.
“This is an amazing boost for the humanities as it is sometimes difficult to secure funding for conferences in these fields, which rely greatly upon scholarly exchange to advance important ideas that can have field-shaping impact,” Vinson said in an email. “When the opportunity to have additional support from OVPR was presented to us, the idea was to spotlight the humanities.”
Vinson said CCAS plans on funding a maximum of two events per year, as long as the OVPR is willing to match funding. The seminar series will provide mutual benefits to GW faculty members and visiting scholars, he added.
“We are able to expose new audiences to GW, while showcasing our attributes with scholars who may not have been familiar with us before,” Vinson said.
One of the seminar series proposals that has received funding is called “Latinx-ing the Humanities: Indigeneity, Blackness, and la Tierra” and was proposed by a group of faculty from the Spanish, history, English and American studies departments.
Antonio Lopez, an English professor, said the seminar series will give students and faculty opportunities for discussion about Latinx culture in the U.S.
“It’s an occasion for students and faculty to come to campus and spend time with the most expressive, thorny and joyful thinkers and artists around,” Lopez said in an email.
The seminar series will aim to address a number of questions surrounding Latin culture in America, especially in light of President Donald Trump’s negative comments about Mexican citizens and other minority groups, Lopez said.
He added that the seminar series responds to declining national interest in the humanities by offering educational and transformative experiences within the humanities.
“People often talk about a crisis in the humanities in higher education – we’re in need of more students, more funding, more attention – and that is true,” Lopez said. “My colleagues and I also know that when it comes to transforming oneself and others in meaningful public and private ways, nothing beats an experience with the most exciting, pleasurable and powerful materials the world has to offer, and that’s the humanities.”
The other approved seminar series, “The Politics of Vulnerability: Understanding Race in America,” was proposed by a group of American studies faculty.
Gayle Wald, the chair of the American studies department, said the joint funding is an opportunity for multiple disciplines in the humanities to approach questions of race and vulnerability together.
Wald said she and her colleagues proposed four seminars, each consisting of several events, including a talk, a graduate seminar and a group discussion about vulnerability and race. The events will be spread out throughout the school year, with two in the fall and two next spring, she said.
The seminar series allows faculty members to showcase how essential the humanities are to education, she said.
“We strongly believe the humanities are more relevant than ever, and relevant to those in the sciences, in medicine, in politics, in policy and in foreign affairs,” Wald said.”

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SA leader proposes double-sided printing program to save students cash
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 07, 2017
“A Student Association leader is proposing a new policy to decrease the cost of double­-sided printing at campus printer kiosks.
Logan Malik, the chairperson for the SA’s student life committee, says offering a discount to students who print double-sided will provide an incentive to reduce the amount of paper used at GW.
The policy, which Malik said he is still planning, aims to decrease paper consumption on top of saving students money. If the policy’s discounted prices increased double­-sided printing by 20 percent, the University would save 1,027,000 pages annually, according to Malik’s policy report.
Malik, who ran for his SA seat on improving sustainability, said he first began to work on the proposal after learning that the University used more than 4,000 cases of paper annually in each of the past two years. Each case contains 5,000 pieces of paper, meaning GW used more than 20 million pages in one year, according to the proposal.
“For a massive institution, finding a way to lower that will have a massive impact over time,” Malik said. “It wasn’t until I did the research that I realized how much changing these policies could have an effect.”
Meghan Chapple, the director of the Office of Sustainability, said paper reduction is a “critical” component of decreasing the University’s carbon footprint, and that it fits in with GW’s overall sustainability goals.
Chapple said sustainability officials are supportive of students like Malik who propose sustainability projects.
“Logan is keen on addressing both environmental and cost issues with his proposal,” Chapple said. “He is addressing a key component of any natural resource issue – the involvement of every person in reducing waste.”
Chapple said the sustainability office and procurement department have partnered to remove non-recycled paper from iBuy, the system offices use to purchase products. Currently, users can only purchase paper with 30, 50 or 100 percent recycled fiber content.
Peak Sen Chua, MISPH-U, said SA members were surprised to find out that there wasn’t a cost reduction for double-sided printing.
“We were pretty outraged that the small price increase for double-sided printing actually existed,” Chua said.
Similar programs have had trouble getting off the ground in the past, which initially made some SA senators wary of Malik’s proposal, Chua said.
“Past administrations have worked on it and failed,” he said. “The conflict, if any, was probably about whether someone would seriously and methodically pursue this.”
Malik said he will meet with representatives from Academic Technologies this month to discuss the the proposal’s logistics.
Printing through the WEPA printing kiosks currently costs $0.07 cents per black-and-white side and $0.85 cents per color side, with no discounts for double-sided printing.
Malik’s research in his policy proposal states that when comparing the printing prices with other peer schools, GW’s mono printing prices are higher than the average at GW’s peer schools.
The proposal states that many of GW’s market basket schools offer a discount to students, staff and faculty for double­-sided printing, and that GW charges the second-highest rate for black-and-white double-­sided printing. The highest is the University of Southern California, where students pay $0.20 per page and $0.08 per double-sided page, according to Malik’s report.
Although GW is the only school out of its peers that is in contract with WEPA, the company offers discounts on double-sided printing at other universities. At the University of Georgia, which uses WEPA printing services, students pay $0.06 per black-and-white page but only $0.03 per side for double-sided prints.
Calandra Waters Lake, the director of sustainability at the College of William and Mary, said the proposal would be a simple solution to a larger sustainability problem.
“It would certainly help promote sustainability through less resource use, but also demonstrate a sustainability connection that is both environmentally and economically savvy,” Waters Lake said. “The encouraging part is that it is something people can do relatively easily.”
Grace Noyola, the communications manager for sustainability at Michigan State University, said reducing paper consumption at a university can directly affect the paper industry’s production.
“The more we are able to reduce our own use, the less incentive the industry has to continue producing paper,” Noyola said. “This would be a direct benefit for the land that is displaced in the process of papermaking.””

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SA Senate votes to support international students after immigration ban
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 06, 2017
“In the wake of President Donald Trump’s recent immigration ban on those from seven Muslim-majority nations, the Student Association Senate passed a resolution with unanimous consent pledging support for international students Monday night.
On Jan. 27, Trump signed an executive order blocking the entry of all people, including U.S. visa holders, from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.
Seventy-three GW students, scholars and alumni currently working in the D.C. area are affected by the executive order.
SA President Erika Feinman said the resolution was designed to support international students impacted by the executive order that “threatens members of our campuses.”
“We met with several administrators, including Provost Maltzman, about what this means for our students, staff, and faculty from the impacted countries,” Feinman said.
Prior to the vote, Feinman added that if the resolution passes, they plan on reaching out to student government leaders across the nation to renounce the executive order.
The senate also passed a resolution expressing the group’s support for incoming University President Thomas LeBlanc.
LeBlanc, the current executive vice president and provost at the University of Miami, is credited for assisting in increasing diversity and improving retention rates.
Sen. Imani Ross, CCAS-U, said she sponsored the bill because it highlights the future president’s accomplishments and what he can bring to the student body experience.
“It is a great time to get new president and I hope that we can help him with his transition,” Ross said.
Nathan Boll and Justin Oparaugo were also confirmed to fill a vacant graduate-at-large and graduate school of business seats at Monday’s meeting.”

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Research office adds $1,000 incentive for humanities faculty
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 06, 2017
“Every time a humanities researcher applies for a grant, they’ll get a grand in return.
Leo Chalupa, the vice president for research, said in an interview last week that his office will now offer a $1,000 reward to any humanities researcher who applies for an outside grant. Researchers in those fields say it can be hard to find and get grants, and this incentive from GW could inspire more faculty to start projects and earn larger grants.
We want to promote research across the campus, not just in science.
Chalupa said he wants to promote research across departments – not just in science where research is often concentrated. Many of the available grants in the humanities are small and limited, which can be discouraging for researchers who are trying to get funded, Chalupa said.
“I don’t want people looking at this office and just seeing science and engineering and medicine,” he said. “We want to promote research across the campus, not just in science.”
The incentive is available now and will be publicized this week, Chalupa said. He said any humanities faculty identified by the dean’s office in Columbian College of Arts and Sciences are eligible to receive the funding one time during the program period from Jan. 1 to June 30.
Chalupa said the number of $1,000 awards given out will depend on the number of submitted proposals. Any proposal submitted to external sponsors will qualify for the award, he said.
The purpose of the program is to get humanities faculty, who normally feel like they are not part of the University’s broader research efforts, motivated to apply for more grants and do more research, he said.
“I want to make sure that the humanities faculty make sure they feel like they are included,” he said. “We want to promote excellence across the campus, I don’t care whether you are in physics or Spanish.”
The research budget for the National Endowment for the Humanities is already less than 1 percent of the federal budget for scientific research, and faculty members have expressed concerns that President Donald Trump will make cuts to research, especially in the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities.
Tyler Anbinder, a professor of history who has a grant from the NEH to study bank records and ancestry databases of New York’s Irish immigrants, said funding in the humanities is “very limited,” which is discouraging to researchers.
“What happens is humanities faculty just don’t apply because it is just so depressing. The odds of getting funding are just so small that people figure, ‘Why should I spend a month or two months spending time on a grant proposal that is probably going to fail?’” Anbinder said.
Anbinder said the $1,000 could be used to hire a student research assistant or to pay for a research trip.
“Unlike the sciences, $1,000 in the humanities is a lot of money,” he said. “There is a tiny fraction of the funding available to faculty in the humanities compared to that in the sciences.”
Anbinder said when researchers try to get funding, it can help crystallize ideas and make connections with scholars. Chalupa’s new program will likely give the financial motivation for researchers to at least try, he said.
“Let’s give those humanities people an incentive to try because if you don’t try you can’t succeed, and he knows that it is better to try to get funding and fail than to not get funding at all,” Anbinder said.
Research is the lifeblood of any academic discipline.
Katrin Schultheiss, the chair of the history department, said the way people understand historical events today is far different from the way many understood the same events 20 or 30 years ago because of research. Schultheiss said ongoing research also brings attention to historical subjects that have been ignored.
“Research is the lifeblood of any academic discipline,” she said. “Without research, we would be teaching the same material over and over again.”
Schultheiss said that grant funding is competitive in all fields, but there are fewer grants in the humanities, and those that do exist are smaller than grants in science fields. Many of her colleagues – especially those who travel to do research – have cut down on the length or number of research trips because of a lack of adequate funding, she said.
“But historians do need to travel to archives, often far away. Travel can be expensive especially if you need to make multiple trips to, say, Asia or Africa,” she said. “Larger humanities grants can give us the time and resources we need to conduct our research and to write the articles and books that are the fruit of that work.””

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Macpherson brings pro coaching experience to men's tennis
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 06, 2017
“On and off the court, David “Macca” Macpherson has enjoyed success at the highest level of men’s tennis.
He racked up 16 ATP tour doubles titles in a decorated 19-year pro playing career, and in 2005, went on to coach Mike and Bob Bryan – one of the best American duos the sport has ever seen – for more than a decade.
This summer, Macpherson decided he wanted to try something new. The 49-year-old was named GW men’s tennis coach in August, taking over a program that has won three consecutive Atlantic 10 titles and opened its 2017 season last month.
“It was a time for me to try something new in my life and I was very excited when I heard the GW position was available,” Macpherson said. “I kind of fell in love with the city and the program.”
While Macpherson has lived in Sarasota, Fla. – where he founded his own tennis academy in 2004 – since he was 20 years old, he learned the game in his native Australia.
The Tasmania native grew up during a tennis boom in the land down under, watching Australian greats like Rod Laver, Tony Roche and John Newcombe win Grand Slam titles in the 1960s and 70s.
“I just picked up a racket at four or five years old and never put it down,” he said.
In 1984, Macpherson began his professional career on the ATP tour. He quickly became well-known as a doubles player. He reached a career-high ATP individual doubles ranking of No. 11 and a doubles team ranking of No. 8 to go along with 288 career tour victories.
The GW hire said the doubles game came most naturally to him.
“As a player, my skill set suited doubles better,” Macpherson said. “I had a good volley, quickness around the net, anticipation – the sort of things you need for doubles. In singles my ground strokes weren’t too strong, so as a player it suited me well.”
Two years after retiring, Macpherson started coaching the Bryan Brothers, who were in the midst of a breakout phase in their career.
He helped lead the pair to 15 Grand Slam titles, a 2012 Olympic gold medal and a record 10 year-end world No. 1 rankings.
“[Coaching the Bryan Brothers] was an amazing privilege,” he said. “They were great, great champions. There are so many incredible memories I couldn’t even describe it all. Just so many incredible battles and triumphs.”
Macpherson also guided singles stars Roger Federer and Stanislas Wawrinka to a 2014 Davis Cup doubles title en route to being named World Team Tennis Coach of the Year.
Men’s tennis junior Chris Reynolds said he learned that the elite coach would be filling the vacancy at GW while scrolling through Instagram over the summer. He saw a post by the Bryan Brothers announcing the end of their partnership with Macpherson a few days before the official announcement.
“As tough as it is to part ways, it is also an exciting time for him as Macca has accepted the head coaching job at George Washington University,” Bob Bryan’s post reads. “Mike and I are extremely grateful for not only his loyal friendship, but for his tireless effort and dedication to our careers.”
Macpherson now helms one of the best rosters in the A-10, led by seniors Julius Tverijonas and Fernando Sala and anchored by a core of juniors in Reynolds, Chris Fletcher, Christos Hadjigeorgiou and Jabari Stafford.
This spring, the program will look to win the league crown for a fourth straight year, but Macpherson said hopes he can push the program to even greater heights.
“They are a very talented bunch of guys and their terrific fellas as well,” Macpherson said of his new team. “Trying to make our schedule tougher and tougher each year is my goal. Not only be competitive with A-10 but with other power conference schools too.”
A few weeks into the season, Reynolds said the transition has been smooth. GW is currently 4-2 overall and most recently took down Morgan State 4-0 last Thursday.
“So far it’s been an amazing experience,” he said. “[Macpherson] brings such a great energy to the courts, to the practices and on top of that he’s just a really nice guy.”
Men’s tennis continues its non-conference schedule this weekend against Florida State and Monmouth. 
Jack Borowiak contributed reporting.”

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Importance
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Crime log
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 06, 2017
“Drug Law Violation/Liquor Law Violation
Shenkman Hall
1/23/2017 – 4:28 p.m.
Case closed
The University Police Department responded to the smell of burning marijuana near a residence hall room. An administrative search was conducted by GW Housing which revealed marijuana, drug paraphernalia and alcohol.
– Referred to the Division of Student Affairs.
Simple Assault
Public Property on Campus
10/01/2014 – Unknown
Case closed
A person reported the incident Jan. 27, but the incident occurred in 2014.
– No further action.
Fraud
Off Campus
01/26/2017 – Unknown
Case open
An individual not affiliated with the University reported to UPD that an unknown individual pretending to be a GW student defrauded $30 from him. The complainant went on Reddit and responded to an ad – posted by a person who claimed to be a GW student – that said if he were to send the student $30 he would receive $40 in the future. UPD tracked down a GW-associated email address and spoke to that student. The student claims to be a victim of identity theft.
– Open case.
Theft
Rice Hall
1/26/2017 – 3:33 p.m.
Case closed
A staff member reported to UPD that a personal laptop was taken from his office.
– No identifiable suspect.
Theft
Rice Hall
01/26/2017 – Unknown
Case closed
A staff member reported to UPD that her iPad and case were both taken from her office.
– No identifiable suspect.
Traffic Accident/Hit and Run
Public Property on Campus (2100 Block of I Street)
01/28/2017 – 7:41 a.m.
Case open
A staff member reported to UPD that his parked car was struck by another vehicle. No information was left at the scene by the driver of the other vehicle.
– Open case.
Public Drunkenness
Smith Center
01/28/2017 – 5 p.m.
Case closed
UPD encountered an intoxicated individual inside the Smith Center during a men’s basketball game. The female subject, not affiliated with the University, was assessed by EMeRG and transported to GW Hospital.
– No further action.
– Compiled by James Levinson”

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Importance
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Metro Monopoly: D.C. universities' student centers
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 06, 2017
“Renovations to the Marvin Center that will be in the works for five years began last month. While that space is in flux and likely to get noisy with construction, you may find yourself dreaming of a traditional campus with a bustling student center.
Put away your buff and blue for the day and check out these student centers at universities across the District if you need to get work done but also feel like getting away from Foggy Bottom.
Georgetown University – Healey Family Student Center
Photo by Elizabeth Rickert | Hatchet Photographer
Georgetown University’s recently renovated Healey Family Student Center has a pub and salad shop inside.
Our hilltop neighbor just got a brand new student hangout – complete with all the bells and whistles.
The Healey Family Student Center is furnished with floor-to-ceiling windows that showcase some of D.C.’s finest views, like the expansive Potomac River framed by the D.C. skyline. You have two options to enjoy the view, even in the winter: a seat in front of a cozy, modern fireplace inside or outdoors by a fire pit on slightly warmer days.
Georgetown students use the Healey Center for studying at the various private cubicles and group study rooms, just like at the Marvin Center. Students relax on large chaise couches across from the living green wall, which is a similar but slightly larger version of the one in the basement of the Science and Engineering Hall.
The Healey Center houses two student-owned and operated food options that are slightly more appetizing than now-defunct J Street’s options. The Bulldog Tavern serves up traditional pub fare and Hilltoss is a hot-spot for salads and smoothies.
What really gives Georgetown’s Healey Center a leg up on the competition is its mini-movie theater. The theater holds about 50 people and shows movies that aren’t even out of theaters for free Friday and Saturday nights.
Catholic University – Edward J. Pryzbyla University Center
Brooke Migdon | Hatchet Photographer
“The Pryz” at Catholic University is filled with windows for lots of natural light.
Catholic University is just a short Metro ride away on the Red Line and its student center, which students dub “the Pryz,” takes you out of the District for a moment and feels like a student center you would see on a traditional college campus.
The Pryz sits right at the center of campus and houses all of the campus’ dining options. It has ample study space, for both individuals and groups, as well as places to relax.
In a sea of old stone structures, the Pryz immediately stands out as one of the only glass and stucco buildings. Inside, the rooms are filled with natural light streaming through the windows.
The Pryz has a wide array of unique dining options. The space has independent vendors – like Chick-Fil-a and Starbucks – as well as a cafeteria-style dining hall.
The warm walls, oversized chairs and tables throughout the different rooms provide space for people to spread out while they work. Some of the rooms are solely dedicated to studying, which is a nice option for people who want to work in peace and not be disturbed by chatter and people eating. For anyone who has struggled to find the perfect study spot that is both subdued and social, the Pryz is the perfect option.
Howard University – Armour J. Blackburn University Center
Sam Hardgrove | Assistant Photo Editor
Howard University’s Armour J. Blackburn University Center overlooks the MacMillan Resevoir.
Howard University’s Armour J. Blackburn University Center has different floors for students’ varying interests and needs. But it lacks the access to study space and a quiet place to relax that can be found in the Marvin Center.
The brick exterior of this three-story building gives it an old feel, while the huge window panes and art on the second floor give off a modern vibe. The lower level is well-lit, and the ground and second floors utilize large windows for natural light in the open spaces.
The main floor consists of long hallways with bathrooms, offices and meeting rooms that are available for students and faculty. The end of the hallway leads out to a beautiful balcony with tables that look out over the McMillan Reservoir. This relaxing space takes students out of the hustle and bustle of D.C. for a while.
On the lower level, the Blackburn Center is reminiscent of GW’s former J Street dining hall. The dining options include Mein Bowl, Wow Cafe and other eateries by Sodexo – GW’s former dining provider.
Upstairs on the second floor, students were more focused and could be found doing homework, but seating was limited and the Blackburn Center’s overall energy was loud and rambunctious. From this floor, the Blackburn Center offers a picturesque balcony that stretches in three directions, so students can see a bird’s eye view of The Yard or look out at McMillan Reservoir.
American University – Mary Graydon Center
Max Wang | Hatchet Photographer
American University’s Mary Graydon Center has a joint dining and study space.
American University’s Mary Graydon Center – which students call the MGC – looks like an old-fashioned academic building from the outside. Behind the pillars and concrete exterior, however, the student center features modern seating and study spaces.
Much like the Marvin Center, the Graydon Center offers a joint dining and study space for students. The student center occupies the first two floors of the building, while the third is home to classrooms and a theater.
Food vendors at the Graydon Center include Pi & Fry, Einstein Bros. Bagels, a mini mart and a buffet-style dining hall.
When I visited around 9:30 a.m., the center was sparsely filled. AU students said the center tends to get crowded around 10 p.m., usually because sororities and fraternities have tables reserved for study hours.
The Graydon Center has no lack of seating, which makes it an appealing place for solo studying or group projects.”

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Importance
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We can change GW's 'rich kid' school stereotype
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 06, 2017
“Students are well aware that most people think of GW as a “rich kid” school. The University has a sticker price of more than $60,000 a year, including room and board. And Foggy Bottom has become a pretty pricey neighborhood to live in – our main grocery store and eatery is Whole Foods, after all.
So perhaps it isn’t a surprise that 14 percent of our student body falls into the top 1 percent of median family incomes, and 70 percent of our student body falls into the top 20 percent of incomes. But this rich kid stereotype and culture is something we, as students, should want and try to change.
Economic diversity at GW is lacking, and although the University has taken steps to increase this diversity, low income students still may not feel welcome here because of our campus culture. As students, we should actively make an effort to make students from all income brackets feel included on campus.
Cartoon by Annan Chen
The economic disparity between students unfairly affects the 30 percent of students that don’t fall in the top 20 percent of incomes. For many students, the ability to go to brunch each weekend or to eat at expensive restaurants on campus for lunch every day is not a reality. Once families or students pay for tuition, they shouldn’t have to worry about paying more just to fit in.
Officials know that GW is pricey and have taken steps to diversify the student body’s economics. The food pantry and the Knowledge in Action Internship Fund are steps that should be applauded. But they only scratch the surface for students who are barely able to afford GW in the first place. When GW went test-optional last year to help lower income students have a fair chance at GW, officials didn’t take into consideration that just because a person can afford to apply to GW doesn’t mean they can afford to attend. Even if students receive generous financial aid packages to help offset the cost of tuition, they may not be able to afford things on a daily basis – like buying three meals a day or their textbooks.
And our economic diversity isn’t likely to change while GW still has a need-aware admissions process – meaning that officials take into consideration if a student will require grants and other forms of financial aid before the student is accepted or rejected. It makes sense that the admissions office functions that way because the University’s operating budget is 60 percent dependent on tuition dollars. Even though this editorial board does not endorse GW’s need-aware status, it’s a financial reality that the University won’t be able to change any time soon. So while the University has increased the amount of financial aid they give out, it falls on students and student organizations to make daily life more affordable.
Student organizations should follow the example of some of the Student Association’s efforts in improving affordability. Former Student Association Executive Vice President Casey Syron led the effort to transition the University into an open dining plan, rather than forcing students to spend a certain amount of money at J Street. Before resigning, Syron also advocated for a Metro card discount program. And the SA has shown a long-standing effort to follow up on affordability concerns. Earlier this month, the SA sent out an affordability survey to determine students’ top financial concerns by asking students about their most burdensome daily expenses. More student-led efforts like this can help reduce the stigma that you have to be wealthy to enjoy the student experience.
These efforts can extend beyond figuring out how expensive daily costs are on campus. There should be more student advocacy to limit how many textbooks a professor can assign for a class. Students shouldn’t have to choose between career experience and passing a class, and professors that assign multiple books should be more understanding that not every student can easily afford books.
GW’s costs don’t end at paying tuition or getting into the school, so it’s not surprising that going test-optional or creating on-campus programs for low-income students hasn’t changed our economic diversity. But that doesn’t mean that GW always has to be a rich kids’ school – it’s a stereotype that students and officials should actively fight against.
The editorial board is composed of Hatchet staff members and operates separately from the newsroom. This week’s piece was written by opinions editor Melissa Holzberg and contributing opinions editor Irene Ly, based on discussions with managing director Eva Palmer, homepage editor Tyler Loveless, contributing sports editor Matt Cullen and copy editor Melissa Schapiro.”

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Importance
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UPD to keep its current policies for protesters on campus
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 05, 2017
“University Police Department leaders have no plans adjust their policies related to protesters, GW’s top security official said last week.
Darrell Darnell, the senior associate vice president for safety and security, said the department will continue its normal operations and respect students’ First Amendment rights but will make changes to their protesting policies, if needed.
We’re going to continue to be a university that allows a free expression of speech from different points of view.
Darnell said recent on-campus events, like White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer’s and co-founder Black Lives Matter DeRay Mckesson’s separate visits , did not require any more security than usual events, even though tension among students since the election has been high.
“We’re going to continue to be a university that allows a free expression of speech from different points of view,” he said.
This statement comes as protests have gained attention around the District since President Donald Trump’s inauguration, including the Women’s March and an opposition to the presidential administration’s immigration ban.
Students can peacefully exercise their First Amendment rights both on and off campus, but off campus, they should especially be aware of the situation around them, Darnell said. He advised that if students see protesters breaking the law, they should leave the area.
Students who aim to get arrested are allowed to do so but should understand the consequences, he added.
Darnell said he worked with organizers during a student walkout protest in November to ensure the protest did not disrupt the University’s functioning.
As an African American male, I would not be in the position I am without protests.
Darnell respects students’ right to protest, as long as they are peaceful, he said.
“As an African American male, I would not be in the position I am without protests,” Darnell said. “I understand the importance of it, and I will do everything I can to allow students to do that as long as it’s done peaceably.”
Margarita Mikhaylova, a Metropolitan Police Department spokeswoman, said MPD’s standard operating procedures document is up-to-date with protester information.
All people and groups are allowed to organize and assemble in public to be seen and heard, but MPD can still arrest them if they endanger the public or attempt to damage property, according to the MPD’s current standard operating procedures .
Mikhaylova declined to say if the MPD policy had been changed in the wake of recent protests surrounding President Donald Trump’s election and inauguration.
Student Association Sen. Logan Malik, U-At large, said Darnell and UPD officers were supportive and communicated well while he and other organizers planned for the walkout. In another protest against University President Steven Knapp’s Earth Day address last year, UPD officers allowed a protest to continue, he said.
Malik said ensuring students’ freedom to protest on campus is essential to protecting their freedom of speech.
“As far as the policy is concerned now, I haven’t experienced any personal issue with it, and as far as specifically, the security part, GWPD, they have been quite good,” he said.
Progressive Student Union coordinating committee member Alexa Zogopoulos said although PSU does not normally start large movements that require UPD supervision, UPD has been easy to work with when the group has needed to.
“As far as I know, from my experiences and from what I’ve witnessed, every interaction between students and campus police have been very civil, very calm,” she said.
Earlier in January, the Georgetown University Police Department escorted six or seven non-student protesters from RefuseFascism.org off campus after the protesters distributed flyers on campus and entered classrooms, the Georgetown Voice reported .
This Wednesday, protests against visiting conservative speaker Milo Yiannopoulos at the University of California Berkeley resulted in the cancellation of the event and $100,000 worth of damage, according to a university statement .
Nicolas Hernandez, a University of California Police Department sergeant, said masked individuals who were not students instigated the protests.
“I would say there were two different events,” Hernandez said. “There was the protest, and there was the people that came in to riot, so those are two distinctly different things.”
Hernandez said his department often handles those protests, and he is not yet sure if the department will change their protest policy.
“It’s like any other profession,” he said. “We learn from each event and see what works, what doesn’t work, what we could do better.”
Justine Coleman contributed reporting.”

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Importance
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The phone eats first for viral food Instagram accounts
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 05, 2017
“Even if you follow hundreds of Instagram accounts dedicated to food photos, you may never know that some of the people behind these viral accounts are sitting next to you in class.
At least five students run food-dedicated accounts – each with at least 34,000 followers – where they post multiple drool-worthy photos every day. Creating a brand on social media can be a full-time job, so we sat down with these students to see how they do it.
Photo courtesy of District Eats. District Eats featured a Union Kitchen ice cream sandwich in a photo on the Instagram account.
Sydney Fleisher, @foodporndaily1
Sydney Fleisher, a sophomore majoring in communications, runs the account @foodporndaily1 with three friends who live around the country. Fleisher said the account started when she was in high school as a “joke” – she and her friends would take turns posting pictures of their meals for their own enjoyment.
“We didn’t think anybody would follow it,” Fleisher said. “Then we started getting more and more followers. But it was all random. We really didn’t plan it.”
Now, with more than 3,500 posts, @foodporndaily1 has racked up more than 104,000 followers.
Restaurants will occasionally send Fleisher an email offering a free meal for a post featuring their establishment, she said.
Fleisher said her favorite posts – and those that get the most likes – feature burgers and other greasy finger foods. Those meals fulfill the “food porn” theme because followers wouldn’t eat them every day, she said.
“I always like pictures of really greasy things,” Fleisher said. “They always get a lot of likes.”
Devon Rushton, @food_ilysm
When Devon Rushton, a junior majoring in business administration, came to campus for Colonial Inauguration in 2014, she decided to start an Instagram account dedicated to food because she wanted a way to record all of her dining experiences in the District.
“I wanted to post them all on my personal Instagram, but didn’t want to flood my personal account with too many food pictures,” Rushton said.
A few short months after creating the account, she passed 1,000 followers and now has around 178,000 – a number that grows every day, she said.
Rushton said she often receives complimentary meals from restaurants and has collaborated with several national businesses, like Hellman’s Mayonnaise, Baked by Melissa and ZICO Coconut Water.
Just like any other company, having an Instagram presence attracts business. Several people have proven that by offering to purchase the account from Rushton – the highest offer for $7,000 – but she turned them all down, she said.
“It really has become a part of my life,” Rushton said. “I can’t imagine not having it.”
Victoria Skrivanos and Alex Babkowski @district_foodies
Sophomores Victoria Skrivanos and Alex Babkowski started their food Instagram account the fall of their freshman year. Initially, they didn’t take the project very seriously, they said.
“The account originally had maybe 20 followers,” Skrivanos said. “It was really just something fun for us to do.”
Today, @district_foodies has more than 36,000 followers, and the pair co-run GW’s chapter of Spoon University – a national publication about food on college campuses.
Skrivanos said running the account has helped her find a “foodie community” on social media where people can look through photos to find out about new restaurants.
“I feel like now when you visit a new city, or at least I know this is what Alex and I do, we look on Instagram to find out where to eat.” she said.
Skrivanos said they recently posted a video taken at RPM Italian in CityCenterDC that features gelato set on fire and covered in chocolate sauce. Video has become more popular on Instagram recently, so the two have been testing out posting videos, she said.
Mia Svirsky and Sydney Tretter, @districteats
At the beginning of their freshman year, Mia Svirsky and Sydney Tretter, now juniors, created the account @districteats as a way to explore D.C.
Both said that through their “foodstagram,” they have formed relationships with hospitality firms around the District.
Svirsky and Tretter said when crafting a like-worthy post, they use VSCO and Afterlight to edit the exposure, contrast and saturation of their photos but never use Instagram’s own filters.
With 1,000 posts and more than 34,000 followers, Tretter said running an Instagram account dedicated to food photos can be like a second job.
“Understand your semester budget will all go toward food,” Svirsky said. “Sometimes you’ll have to order something you don’t necessarily want but know will photograph well.”
Tretter said despite the money and time they both give up to run the account, their passion makes it worth it.
“You always have to remember that the phone eats first,” Tretter said.”

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Importance
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Faculty Association gathers nearly 600 signatures opposing Trump's immigration ban
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 03, 2017
“Nearly 600 GW faculty and staff members have signed a petition affirming their support for students, faculty and staff from the seven Muslim-majority countries listed on President Donald Trump’s immigration ban.
The Faculty Association gathered 596 signatures from faculty members in support of those on campus who are targeted by the executive order. The order, signed by Trump last week, bans Syrian refugees from entering the country indefinitely as well as any person from Sudan, Yemen, Somalia, Libya, Iran and Iraq, including those with a valid U.S. visa, from entering the country for 90 days.
“We, the undersigned faculty and staff, stand with all GW students and colleagues regardless of nationality, religion, or immigration status,” the petition reads.
There are currently 73 GW students, faculty and alumni directly affected by the ban.
Katrin Schultheiss, the chair of the history department, said she felt it was important to formally state support for those on campus who are frightened or unsure of what a future in the U.S. holds for them.
Schultheiss added that Faculty Association leaders will be posting large format copies of the statement and all signatures around campus next week.  
This GW-specific petition comes in addition to a national academic petition with signatures from more than 14,800 university administrators, faculty and staff members, including 27 GW faculty members.”

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Importance
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Mental Health Services offers special hours for international students
by The GW Hatchet
Feb 03, 2017
“International students struggling to deal with the realities of new immigration policies can attend walk-in hours at Mental Health Services.
After a divisive two weeks in the new presidential administration, MHS developed walk-in hours and specific group counseling to accommodate for marginalized students’ needs, according to the center’s website . Gillian Berry, interim director of Mental Health Services, said MHS decided to offer special hours for students who want to discuss immigration ban concerns.
“We are aware of the varying reactions students may have in response to the recent immigration executive order and have developed daily walk-in hours specifically for students who would specifically like to discuss the immigration executive order or related concerns,” Berry said.
MHS is now offering student walk-in hours for international students from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Wednesday, students of color walk in hours from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Tuesday and LGBTQ students walk-in hours from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursdays. The center is also offering group sessions for international students on Thursdays from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.
President Donald Trump issued an executive order last Friday banning citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S., and placed an indefinite ban on Syrian refugees. Since then, University President Steven Knapp released a statement of support saying that the ban “directly threatens the well-being of students” and signed a letter in support of international students. Faculty have also shown their disapproval for the ban, with nearly 600 signing onto a Faculty Association petition opposing the ban and 27 faculty members signing a national petition that states their disapproval of the ban and calls for its repeal.
There are 73 GW students, faculty and alumni directly affected by the immigration ban.
Berry said MHS has offered a variety of resources for previous world and domestic events that affected the GW community. After the presidential election, MHS offered specialized counselors for walk-in hours for students who were interested in discussing the election results.
Berry declined to comment on how this specific kind of counseling is being funded or supported and how long will they will continue to offer these services for international students.
The Colonial Health Center outreach team is also available to come out to different campus locations, including schools and student organization meetings, to support the diverse members of the GW community who may need support, Berry said. She said MHS also regularly provides walk-in hours to students.
“In the last week we have hosted group discussions on coping with the current political climate,” she said.”

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University decisions shouldn't be based on George Washington's legacy
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 29, 2017
“Most students’ experiences at GW probably have nothing to do with America’s founding father and our university’s namesake, George Washington. But recently, some critics denounced the University for not following what they think would have been Washington’s desires.
Two months ago, the history department changed the history major requirements: Majors no longer have to take foreign language classes – or classes on European, North American and U.S. history – so that students have more flexibility to specialize in specific topics or regions. And while the move isn’t groundbreaking, taking away the U.S. history requirement led to an outcry from right-wing media outlets and social media users.
It’s common for universities to change the requirements of majors over time, and less than one-third of highly ranked colleges require history majors to take U.S. history. In fact, neither Yale University or Harvard University require their history majors to take U.S. history . But GW’s curriculum change drew continued controversy until it made national news, largely because GW is named after our most famous founding father. Conservative sites like the The Blaze , Breitbart and National Review all commented on the change.
But modern-day decisions should not be made based on what we think our namesake would have wanted, and history majors won’t be “under- and ill-informed” workers, like The Blaze claimed. Rather, University decisions should be made and adapted based on the time period and on what students need. Furthermore, decisions should be inspired by what Washington really wanted for students – a well-rounded education in the nation’s capital.
It seems like the backlash had more to do with timing than it did with people’s legitimate issues with the history department. The new U.S. presidential administration has been focused on nationalism, so it may seem like not forcing students to take an introductory or higher level U.S. history course at a school named after our nation’s founder is unpatriotic. But if anything, GW is joining the ranks of other universities that realize a history major is not just for people hoping to go into U.S. history. Students should be able to study what they are interested in, and it’s OK if that’s not American history.
It’s inappropriate to expect that a university either founded by or named after a historical figure should make modern day decisions based on the unknown thoughts that figure may have had. If a university were to follow a founder’s desires to the letter, then there are groups of students – like women and minorities – who might not be allowed to attend the institutions. Our country’s founders were pioneers, and universities should be too. GW and schools in similar situations should focus on being inspired by what our founders or namesakes did in the face of adversity – not stick to what they’ve always done because it’s easier.
GW isn’t the only university to deal with the pressures associated with founding fathers. The University of Virginia has had to deal with negative realities of being associated with Thomas Jefferson. While Jefferson founded the university in 1819, students today have pushed back against using Jefferson’s quotes or symbols in official university announcements. Earlier this year, students argued that the university’s president, Teresa Sullivan, should stop quoting Jefferson in emails because Jefferson was a slave owner.
But one of the benefits of being associated with a historical figure is that a university can align itself with the figure for positive things, while distancing the university from negative realities. The University of Pennsylvania has been able to do this with Benjamin Franklin. Franklin founded the school in 1749 on the principles of an interdisciplinary education. Because UPenn continues to focus on this principle today, the university can balance what Franklin made clear he intended for the school, while also making autonomous decisions for particular classes or departments.
Being named after George Washington is something GW can be proud of without it affecting the daily lives of students. Changing the history curriculum is a progressive step to teach students the importance of living in a globalized world – and these decisions don’t include founders or namesakes of universities.
The editorial board is composed of Hatchet staff members and operates separately from the newsroom. This week’s piece was written by opinions editor Melissa Holzberg and contributing opinions editor Irene Ly, based on discussions with managing director Eva Palmer, homepage editor Tyler Loveless, contributing sports editor Matt Cullen and copy editor Melissa Schapiro.”

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New computer science chair plans to grow department
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 29, 2017
“After three years of searching, GW has a permanent computer science department chair who said he plans to expand the department to meet growing national interest in the field.
Robert Pless, who left Washington University in St. Louis to become chair of the department this semester, said he wants to develop the department with both more faculty and students. He said he came to GW because of the department’s strength and unique D.C. location, and that he plans to use both to support and grow programs.
“Part of the reason I am so excited about being in the computer science field is because computing is so integrated into all parts of society and, from a personal research perspective, that’s why I was so excited to come to GW,” he said. “I’d love to figure out directions where the educational and research mission of the department can best support and work in the context of GW and D.C.”
Though Pless has been at the University for less than month, he said he wants to make sure that the dual missions of research and teaching are both supported. The department has already been successful in producing programs that combine learning and research with real-world applications, and those programs should serve as templates for future ones, he said.
“There are a lot of programs here that already are high-impact. The cybersecurity program here is nationally known, and it’s exciting to be here and part of that,” he said. “I am excited to understand any directions that are missing or have the highest impact.”
Before his arrival at GW this year, Pless founded and directed a center for the teaching and research of machine learning, robotics, human computer interaction, graphics and vision at Washington University in St. Louis.
Pless said interest in computer science is growing nationally and that computer science departments are often hard-pressed to meet the teaching demands of increasing enrollment. There are currently 187 undergraduate computer science students at GW, compared to 118 in 2012, according to University enrollment data.
Pless plans to also hire more faculty to meet student demand, he said.
“We are hoping to grow the department to better focus on the education and research missions of the University,” he said. “We have a current search for faculty and expect to have searches in coming years as well.”
There are currently three open faculty positions in the computer science department, two of which are tenure-track positions. The other open position is for a visiting computer science professor, according to GW’s jobs website. There are currently 16 full-time faculty in the computer science department, according to the department’s website.
Pless said he applied for the position last spring and, after an interview, came to D.C. in the winter. Specific plans for the computer science program will come after he spends more time getting to know and working with other professors in the department, but Pless said he hopes the department can attract students who are interested in computer science as well as other disciplines.
“I think computer science should be a field that accepts people from many different backgrounds,” Pless said. “On the flip side, the technical work of computer science has its own challenges, but I think that those two principles are the ones we have to balance.”
Rahul Simha, a professor of computer science, said it is not uncommon for there to be a three-year vacancy for a chair position or for a department chair to be hired outside of the University.
Pless is uniquely fit for the job because he is young and his research in computer vision, which is how technology captures and presents the visual world, with applications to environmental science, medical imaging, robotics and virtual reality will be helpful, Simha said.
“Recently there’s been much discussion about artificial intelligence and robotics as part of our future,” Simha said. “This is a great time to welcome a new chair who is energetic, has lots of ideas and is a first-rate researcher.”
Ron Cytron, a professor of computer science and engineering at Washington University and Pless’ former colleague, said attracting high-quality doctoral students is difficult given the strong and lucrative hiring climate in computer science. Cytron added that the lab Pless directed at Washington University encouraged innovation in computer science students.
“His lab has produced a continuous stream of our most creative students, and I believe that is attributable to Robert’s open mind about new problems suggested by his students,” Cytron said.
Cytron added that Pless does not shy away from challenges in computer science education.
“Robert is also keen on getting to the center of issues that deserve attention, and I and others could count on him in numerous ways for that kind of leadership in our department,” he said.”

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Billikens best women’s basketball, snap Colonials’ three-game win streak
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 27, 2017
“It wasn’t always pretty, but despite playing without one of its most valuable players in senior center Caira Washington for the last two weeks, women’s basketball had been able to grit and grind its way to two straight wins in conference play.
But without Washington once again Thursday night in Saint Louis, the Colonials (13-7, 6-2 A-10) went cold against the Billikens (16-5, 6-2 A-10), owners of the top offense in the league.
Behind an explosive attack, the Billikens defeated the Colonials, 67-59, snapping GW’s three-game win streak.
“I think that our execution for most of the game was pretty poor…we just didn’t really click on the offensive end with our decision making,” head coach Jennifer Rizzotti said. “That’s frustrating, and at the end of the game we ended up giving up a few buckets when we needed stops. We need to have better mental toughness there.”
The Colonials were led by graduate student forward Lexi Martins, who notched her seventh consecutive double-digit scoring effort with 22 points on 9-of-16 shooting to go along with eight rebounds. It was Martins’ first game without a double-double in over a month.
“I think that’s just a matter of chance, sometimes the ball bounces your way and other nights it doesn’t,” Martins said. “I’m just a little bit frustrated about the loss tonight, because I feel like we could have competed a little bit harder in certain stretches.”
Despite Martins’ efficiency from the field, it was the GW’s poor shooting that once again found the road team in need of a comeback in the fourth quarter. After shooting just 20.5 percent from beyond the arc in their last contest, the Colonials converted just 5 of 22 three-point attempts (22.7 percent) against the Billikens.
The Colonials found themselves in an early 7-1 hole, but both teams quickly picked up their scoring, shooting 62.5 percent from the field before the first media timeout.
Lexi Martins started where she left off against Massachusetts as the focal point of the offense without Washington. She answered the bell with 15 first-half points as GW took a 32-29 lead into the break.
The Colonials kept it close until the fourth quarter thanks to a 2-3 zone defense that did an effective job limiting the Saint Louis offense in the paint. GW also held Billikens point guard Jackie Kemph, the A-10’s leader in assist-to-turnover ratio, to six assists and six turnovers in the game.
However, a lack of offensive execution down the stretch crippled GW. The team struggled to run plays and missed wide-open looks, missing Washington’s presence on both ends of the floor. Forwards Kelli Prange and Kelsi Mahoney shot just 3-for-18 despite seeing substantial minutes.
“I think we kind of struggled running our offense the whole entire game. Coach [Rizzotti] was writing up the right plays for us but we just struggled executing them,” freshman Kendall Bresee said. “Hopefully with more practice we’ll just continue to execute them better because we have good plays that they can run for us but we just didn’t execute them tonight.”
Meanwhile, Kemph picked up the scoring for the Billikens in the second half, recording 16 second-half points, seven of them at the charity stripe. As a whole, the Billikens shot a sturdy 15-20 from the line to prevent a Colonials comeback. Kemph finished with a game-high 24 points, one away from her season-high.
In a lone bright spot, Bresee – last week’s Co-A-10 Rookie of the Week- put on another excellent display on the offensive side. The rookie point guard from Frederick, Md. recorded her second consecutive game with double-digit rebounds (11) while also chipping in 8 points and 5 assists.
 
“She’s been aggressive, she’s been tough, and she’s really understanding how to play at the college level, so that’s certainly a bonus for us in the last week to see her playing well,” Rizzotti said.  “As a team we need to start playing better, but certainly her individual effort has been a bright spot in this stretch.”
The Colonials will return home to face the Duquesne Dukes on Sunday at the Smith Center. Tip-off is set for 5 p.m.”

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Former extremist, GW researcher arrested on drugs and prostitution charges
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 27, 2017
“A reformed extremist who joined GW’s Program on Extremism earlier this year was arrested on drug, prostitution charges, The Washington Post reported Wednesday.
Jesse Morton, a former and de-radicalized al-Qaeda recruiter whose hiring in August made national headlines, allegedly had cocaine in his possession when he went to meet a sex worker last month.
University spokeswoman Candace Smith said that Morton is no longer affiliated with GW’s Program on Extremism.
Morton was arrested on Dec. 28 in a sting operation by Fairfax, Va. police, according to court documents cited by the Post. He allegedly answered an ad for a prostitute on the website Backpage.com and was arrested when he arrived at the Governor House Inn & Suites in Falls Church. Police said they found cocaine and a glass pipe in his pack of Marlboro cigarettes, according to The Post.
Morton was charged with possession for manufacturing a controlled substance and residing in a bawdy place, the Post reported.
Morton joined the extremism program as a research fellow after being imprisoned for using his Revolution Muslim website to encourage attacks against the creators of South Park.
Morton was incarcerated on charges related to these threats and released in 2015 after serving less than a third of an 11-and-a-half year sentence for cooperating with government intelligence to identify and investigate other extremists. Morton disavowed extremism, but now faces renewed legal troubles.
“I have deep regret and remorse from my time as an extremist. I cannot change the past, and I can only work to rectify what I’ve done,” Morton told the Hatchet in September.”

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GW, Vector reach agreement to lease professor’s satellite technology
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 25, 2017
“An engineering professor’s new technology could soon be used to blast satellites around Earth’s orbit.
Michael Keidar, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, and his research team figured out how to use plasma thrusting technology to direct small satellites that are usually very difficult to control in space and keep them in orbit, according to a University release .
GW leaders reached an agreement last month to lease the technology to Vector, a company that connects space start-up companies with projects launching into space, according to the release
“This will be real step forward to commercialization,” Keidar said in the release. “Our technology will be used in dedicated small rocket launches by Vector, a recognized leader in this field.”
As part of the agreement, Vector will develop the thrusters for use on satellites, while GW researchers will work on creating the next generation of the technology, the release states.
The new technology will be used in miniature satellites that are about 10 centimeters long on each side. The smaller satellites have gained popularity in recent years because they enable space exploration at a lower price tag than traditional satellites, the release said.
The thrusters convert titanium into plasma to propel the satellite. The plasma then moves and expands into a vacuum at high speeds to produce the thrust that helps the satellite stay in orbit, according to the release.
“Electric propulsion allows a very high degree of fuel efficiency for placing satellites into higher orbits or for maintaining satellite orbits from decaying due to atmospheric drag,” Vector CEO Jim Cantrell said in the release. “George Washington University’s technology is extremely flexible in its implementation and can be used in a variety of applications important to Vector.””

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It's OK to not have an internship at GW
by The GW Hatchet
Jan 25, 2017
“It seems like just about every GW student has an internship.
Most students know someone who was an intern on Capitol Hill, worked at a big-name corporation or even walked the dogs at the White House. And there’s nothing surprising about the multitude of internships students here seem to have – internships are great ways to network, pad students’ resumes and are abundant in D.C. And GW prides itself on how many students have internships.
But interning isn’t possible for every student. For students with full academic schedules, necessary part-time jobs and little financial freedom, accepting an internship during the academic year would be overwhelmingly stressful. And when it comes to the summer internship search, it’s harder for those who live in rural areas where there is little likelihood of finding an internship in a specific field. Students who fall into either of these categories should focus on building relationships with professors and excelling in their courses, which doesn’t seem like something officials and peers usually encourage as much as they do scoring internships.
As a student majoring in political science, finding a summer internship anywhere near my hometown of Omaha, Neb. is tough. Though my community might be rich in internships or job openings in business and agriculture, finding an impactful summer internship in politics or journalism isn’t easy.
To the University’s credit, there are opportunities to receive grants that fund unpaid internships.  The Knowledge in Action Career Internship Fund allows students with unpaid internships to receive up to $3,000 funded by alumni donations. But these grants are only available for students who have “necessarily unpaid” internships – meaning that the employers or organizations do not have the funds to pay interns.
Though it is great that GW has created programs to make accepting unpaid internships easier for students, the pressure for students to take internships regardless of whether they’re paid or unpaid is far too great that even organizations around D.C. have noticed. Pay Our Interns, a nonpartisan group, has made a call for internship programs in D.C., especially ones on Capitol Hill, to start paying interns. Hopefully, this will cause paid internships to eventually replace unpaid ones, but for now some students still cannot afford to accept unpaid internships.
But acknowledging the obstacles in getting an internship, like geography when I’m at home, or my budget, due to the increasing amount of unpaid internships, has made it easier for me to find other ways to succeed. There are multiple events throughout the school year, hosted by either the University or by a student organization, that are open to all students and allow for both learning and networking. These opportunities, though not as long-term as internships, still allow students to build on their knowledge and meet people in their fields. GW is also full of fraternities, sororities and professional Greek organizations with strong networking circles. Students should take advantage of the variety of organizations and programs that the University has to offer, whether it’s joining a multicultural organization or becoming involved in student government.
And it doesn’t hurt to spend some extra time at your professors’ office hours to build relationships with experts in your desired field. In fact, professors should be one of the first resources for students who need career advice or academic tips, or who want to find networking events. You never know when a paid research opportunity will come up or when you’ll need a strong recommendation letter, so building relationships with professors is advantageous and comes at no extra cost.
GW students are in the prime location to explore all the opportunities that D.C. has to offer. But students that may not have the time or money to take those chances should not feel limited or ashamed. Instead, they must push to make the University, and all that it offers, work with and for them during school and past graduation.
Renee Pineda, a sophomore majoring in political science, is a Hatchet opinions writer. Want to respond to this piece? Submit a letter to the editor.
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Carnegie Mellon receives a joint $16.5 million donation
by The Tartan
Feb 07, 2017
“Rose Pagano
Feb 5, 2017
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Carnegie Mellon recently received a joint $16.5 million donation from Professor José Moura, Professor Manuela Veloso, Adjunct Professor Aleksandar Kavcic, and Dr. Sofija Kavcic in the hopes of helping the University with research and education in engineering and data science.
All of the donors have extremely strong ties to the Carnegie Mellon community. Moura works in Carnegie Mellon’s Electrical and Computer Engineering Department as the Philip L. and Marsha Dowd University Professor. Veloso is associated with the Machine Learning Department as the Herbert A. Simon University Professor in Computer Science and Robotics. Alek Kavcic was once a doctoral student at Carnegie Mellon and recently agreed to an adjunct position in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Sofija Kavcic worked with an architectural firm in Hawaii.
Moura and Alek Kavcic made the money for this donation through their own research and study. While Kavcic was a Ph.D. student under Moura’s sup...
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Mike Rozenvasser ready to finish rookie season strong
by The Tartan
Feb 07, 2017
“Marika Yang
Feb 5, 2017
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After placing fourth in the national Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) Oracle Cup last fall as the first first-year from Carnegie Mellon to play in the tournament, Mike Rozenvasser is gearing up for the second half of his impressive rookie season.
From Haworth, N.J., Rozenvasser’s tennis career began at a young age, when his grandfather put a racket in his hand and taught him how to play. He also followed his brother’s footsteps and played soccer up until his first year of high school, when he had to choose between tennis and soccer.
“You don’t depend on your team – it’s an individual sport,” he said about why he chose tennis over soccer. “When you win, it’s the best feeling because you did it all by yourself, but when you lose, you did it all by yourself too. It’s all based on yourself and depends on how hard you want to work to succeed.”
Playing tennis at a collegiate level was never in question. “Giving it up in college would not even be plausible,” he said. Carnegi...
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The next steps after EncompassCMU
by The Tartan
Feb 07, 2017
“Jade Crockem
Feb 6, 2017
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EncompassCMU is finally here. For some, it’s the first of many job fairs in their college career, and for others, it’s their fourth or fifth job fair this semester alone. This is the time for you to get your foot in the door and get your résumé into the hands of an actual person instead of just blindly submitting it on Handshake. EncompassCMU may be where your work begins, but your job is far from over if you hope to land an internship from any of the companies present.
Follow Up Interviews
Some of you may end up leaving EncompassCMU with an interview from a company you spoke to. It is important that you find out as much information as possible about a company before interviewing with them. You may have gotten away with only knowing the name of the company and what their main business is at the job fair, but that is not enough information for you to make a lasting impression at an interview. Companies want to see that you’re interested and knowledgeable about their company...
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Make the most of your EncompassCMU visit this week with these tips
by The Tartan
Feb 07, 2017
“Braden Kelner
Feb 6, 2017
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University career fairs can sometimes seem like madhouses, with hundreds of employers visiting each day and an even greater number of students passing through. Nevertheless, it’s important to remain collected and professional when presenting yourself to the people who will hopefully soon be hiring you for a full-time position or summer internship. Here are five things you should be sure to bring to EncompassCMU to make sure you strike the perfect first impression.
The right attire
Looking like you know what you’re doing is half the battle at a career fair. To make your attire reflect the confidence employers want to see in candidates, stick to a formal dress code. For men, wear a business suit with a solid shirt or one that has a clean pattern. Tuck in your shirt, and wear a belt even if you don’t need one. Don’t forget a tie and a pair of black or brown shoes to finish off your look.
For women, wear a suit or a skirt with a suit jacket. Pair neutral colors with black ...
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Editor’s Note: This article appeared in a previous special career fairs edition of The Tartan.”

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Crime and Incident
by The Tartan
Feb 07, 2017
“Rachel Frame
Feb 5, 2017
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Harassment
Jan. 27, 2017
A Carnegie Mellon staff member reported that he received a threatening email from an unknown source. An investigation is ongoing.
Defiant Trespass
Jan. 27, 2017
A University Police Officer located an unknown female in Warner Hall who was not permitted to be on university property. The female was arrested and charged with Defiant Trespass.
Disorderly Conduct
Jan. 27, 2017
University Police responded to Mudge House in response to reports of an odor of marijuana. University Police seized all drug paraphernalia and three Carnegie Mellon students were issued citations for disorderly conduct.
Underage Drinking
Jan. 28, 2017
A University Security Officer discovered two males in Shady Oak Apartments in possession of alcohol. After a thorough investigation, the Officer was able to determine that the males in question were under the legal drinking age. The students were issued citations for underage drinking.
**Public Intox...
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John Fabian Witt looks at America's history with democracy
by The Tartan
Feb 07, 2017
“James Wheaton
Feb 5, 2017
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On Thursday Feb. 2, John Fabian Witt, the speaker at the sixth annual Thomas M. Kerr Jr. lecture, discussed the subject of American Freedom. Witt is the Duffy Class of 1960 Professor of Law at Yale Law School and author of award-winning book, Lincoln’s Code: The Laws of War in American History and has worked at Columbia University, the University of Texas at Austin, and also received his education at Yale University, where he currently works.
Witt visited Carnegie Mellon University as part of the Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholars program. Phi Beta Kappa, founded in 1776, is the nation’s most prestigious academic honor society. Its goal is to support education in the liberal arts and sciences, recognize academic excellence, and engender freedom of thought.
The title of Witt’s lecture was “The Switch: The Twentieth-Century Reinvention of American Freedom.” Over the course of his speech, he took the audience back in time to the early 20th century, to a time where the First Amend...
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Dr. John Silvanus Wilson Jr. highlights key lessons we could learn from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
by The Tartan
Feb 07, 2017
“Chris Sheng
Feb 5, 2017
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On Tuesday, Jan. 31, Dr. John Silvanus Wilson Jr., president of Morehouse College, the first privately-established liberal arts college dedicated to the education of African-American males in the country, gave a lecture titled “Toward the Beloved Community.”
Wilson has dedicated more than 25 years to achieving a more socially conscious education. He started his education career serving at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and George Washington University. He also served as the president of the Greater Boston Morehouse College Alumni Association (GBMCAA).
An educator, scholar, consultant, and strategist, Wilson has served in many other organizations such as Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and United Negro College Fund’s Institute for Capacity Building. Prior to being the president for Morehouse College, President Barack ...
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Scott Institute to host event about energy, water, smart cities
by The Tartan
Feb 07, 2017
“Josh Andah
Feb 6, 2017
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The relationship between sustainable urbanization, energy and water runs deep, and one cannot be discussed without invoking the others. A sustainable city is one that considers its intake of resources and expulsion of waste with respect to the environment; a smart city is one that uses technology to achieve this description. At the forefront of energy and sustainability research is the Wilton E. Scott Institute of Energy at Carnegie Mellon, which will be hosting an event on Feb. 16 called Building a Smart and Resilient City: The Energy-Water Nexus. A part of a larger program called Resilient Pittsburgh, this event aims to highlight the interconnection between energy and water.
The keynote speaker is the deputy director of the Energy Institute and professor at the University of Texas, Dr. Michael Webber. Webber has been instrumental in promoting the energy-water discussion. His book “Thirst for Power: Energy, Water, and Human Survival” highlights the intimate relationship between ...
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Sports Briefs
by The Tartan
Feb 07, 2017
“Xinya Li
Feb 5, 2017
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Women’s Tennis
The Carnegie Mellon women’s tennis team, ranked 12th in Division III, hosted Division I Saint Joseph’s University and Division II Slippery Rock University on Saturday, Feb. 4 and won both.
The Tartans started the day with a 5–2 win over Saint Joseph’s before topping Slippery Rock by a resounding 9–0 margin. Carnegie Mellon is now 4–0 overall.
In the Tartans’ 5–2 win over the Hawks, the Tartans earned the doubles point before winning the first four singles matches.
Senior Nicholle Torres and junior Cori Sidell won 6–3 at first doubles while junior Katie Lai and sophomore Jamie Vizelman won 7–5 at third doubles.
Vizelman was the first to finish singles when she won 6–0, 6–3 in the third slot. Torres, playing first singles, then won in straight sets, 6–3, 6–3, before Sidell clinched the match with a 7–5, 6–2 straight set victory at second singles. Lai also recorded a straight set win at six doubles with scores of 6–2, 6–1.
Against Slippery Rock, The...
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Breitbart editor creates scholarship fund exclusively for white males
Feb 03, 2017
“According to the grant's website, "The Privilege Grant was founded based on the idea that white males deserve as much assistance in achieving college education as minorities do."”
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For some Penn students, extreme vetting to get into the U.S. is not a new phenomenon
Feb 03, 2017
“When leaving the U.S. to go to Turkey during spring break in 2015, Osama Ahmed, a 2016 College and Wharton graduate, was approached by two men in muscle t-shirts. They demanded that he follow them, and they opened their jackets to reveal guns and police badges.”
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Nursing at Penn helps lead healthcare innovation through new fellowship
Feb 03, 2017
““The purpose of [the Penn Nurse Innovation Fellowship] is really to help develop a different kind of thinking that can be applied to the challenges we see in healthcare,” Chief Nursing Executive and Associate Executive Director of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) Regina Cunningham said.”
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Steinman ’19: Rescue the Urban Environmental Lab
by Brown Daily Herald
Feb 17, 2017
“Brown announced potential plans Saturday to destroy what has become a second home to me and many others on campus — but you have to read between the lines to notice it . In an enthusiastic statement, the University publicized a new performing arts center that was approved last week at the Corporation’s yearly winter meeting. But in the statement, administrators gave short shrift to the planned location of the center between Angell St. and Waterman St., which is “currently occupied by a parking lot, three residential structures and two academic buildings.” One of those academic buildings is the Urban Environmental Lab, which passersby might know as the farmhouse-style building with a community garden. The UEL serves as home to the environmental studies department, the Native American and Indigenous Studies at Brown initiative, Bikes at Brown, Brown Market Shares, emPOWER and its associated organizations — invaluable members of the Brown and Providence communities.      
This is not the first time the UEL has come under threat. Plans were drawn up to demolish the building in 2006 to make way for a Mind Brain Behavior building. At the time, students and faculty mobilized to preserve the space, and it was listed as the most endangered building in Providence by the Providence Preservation Society. By early 2009, the University had abandoned its plans due to finan cial concerns. But nearly a decade later, we have come full circle.
The UEL’s storied life traces the history of Brown and of the environmental movement itself. Built in 1884 as a carriage house designed by the architect of Sayles Hall, the building was later used as a home, a Pembroke dorm and a garage before it was purchased by Brown in 1966 and given to the environmental studies department’s founding in 1978. The building was renovated by students into one of the very first “green” buildings in the world, heated almost entirely by convection from the greenhouse. Far from being an inefficient use of space, the UEL is designed to “showcase the maximum of what can be done in an urban environment,” in the words of a student involved in its founding .
The UEL is a home in the way that a newly constructed building never will be — certainly not in the way that the sleek, chilly Building for Environmental Research and Teaching lounge would be as a replacement. The residential feel of the UEL allows for an intermixing of professors and students that has come to define the department. I have a closer relationship with my advisor, Senior Lecturer in Environmental Studies Kurt Teichert, than almost any of my non-environmental studies friends do with theirs, and I attribute at least part of this to the fact that our meetings take place inside the UEL. Losing the familiarity of this community center would change what it means to be an environmental studies student at Brown. This is not sentimentality: The UEL is the type of synergistic, interdisciplinary space that architects try to create. Nor is it a niche issue. Already, a Facebook page dedicated to saving the UEL has garnered almost 200 likes, and a petition for sharing memories of the space has over 170 responses, 59 percent of which are from current students outside the environmental studies department. Many of the responses came from music and performing arts students who feel a real need for a performing arts center but object to losing the UEL first and foremost.
This decision comes at perhaps the most inopportune time for Brown’s environmental studies program to lose its heart and soul. Students signing a petition to save the UEL recall seeking solace in the space the morning after the election, watching Hillary Clinton’s concession speech and literally leaning on professors’ shoulders for support. It is the incubator for student activism and organizing around one of the most important political and social justice issues of our time. When I was a prospective student, the sight of the UEL in the center of campus was, to me, a symbol of Brown’s commitment to sustainability. As the lowest energy density building on campus by a long shot, outperforming even new “green” buildings like the Granoff Center for the Creative Arts and BERT, the UEL is more than just a symbol of that commitment — it is its most successful manifestation.
The performing arts are a valuable part of Brown, and I don’t want to discredit them. But even Brown’s own promotional material makes it unclear what distinguishes this new, state-of-the-art, interdisciplinary performing arts center from our other new, state-of-the-art, interdisciplinary performing arts center just across the street from the UEL: the Granoff Center, which opened just six years ago. Professor of Music Joseph Butch Rovan, who directs the Brown Arts Initiative and sees the hypothetical new center as “central” to the initiative’s mission, envisions the new space as a place to “advance new forms of knowledge and new methods of creative expression across all departments and art forms.” Meanwhile, the Granoff Center, according to its own website, is a place where “creative thinkers from across disciplines can come together to work collaboratively, exchange ideas and create new art forms.” The lesson to learn here is that though the need for a full-sized theater is real, the need for an entire new arts center may not be — particularly not one placed 10 feet over the bus tunnel on Thayer St.
The UEL is irreplaceable. Yes, professors’ offices and classes could be relocated. Clubs could find other meeting rooms. But the UEL’s destruction goes beyond what would be the tragic loss of a historic building with a truly extraordinary second life as a model sustainable home. Rather, the demise of the UEL would represent nothing less than the gutting of a tight-knit, often-overlooked activist community. If the University wants to demonstrate a commitment to environmentalism — and indeed, “Sustaining Life on Earth,” which is one of the seven pillars in the 2014 strategic plan “Building on Distinction” — it will have to come to terms with the fact that the UEL’s demolition will be a serious setback to the student environmental community and will hinder that commitment going forward.
Clare Steinman ’19 can be reached at clare_steinman@brown.edu.  Please send responses to this opinion to letters@browndailyherald.com and other op-eds to opinions@browndailyherald.com.”

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Ken Miller ’70 talks politics of science denial
by Brown Daily Herald
Feb 17, 2017
“As part of the “Reaffirming University Values: Campus Dialogue and Discourse” series, Professor of Biology Ken Miller ’70 examined science denial Thursday, discussing the scientific facts and theories people often disagree with despite overwhelming supporting evidence, such as climate change, vaccinations, genetically modified organisms and evolution.
Miller highlighted the political aspect of science denial throughout his talk, noting that people deny scientific facts on both sides of the political spectrum.“Why is it (that) depicting yourself as anti-science has become a viable political strategy?” Miller asked the audience. “Science is powerful. Science can be misused by people on the right and people on the left.”
Miller argued that on the left, some politicians use scientific denial to impose regulation, while on the right, some use it to oppose regulation. For example, despite overwhelming evidence that GMOs are not harmful to humans, those to the left of the political spectrum call for a ban or regulation of them. Those on the right use a similar denial tactic regarding climate change, despite extensive evidence proving its existence.
In order to fight science denial, Miller proposed a number of solutions. “The reflexive way that most of us in science want to overcome science denial is with a torrent of facts,” he said. But Miller argued against this path, citing studies that show people often become more firm in their opinions when flooded with evidence that contradicts their beliefs.
“Winning people over to science isn’t a matter of facts — it’s a matter of identity,” Miller said. High school teachers, he suggested, should be used as a model for getting people to feel like they are part of the scientific community.
Miller also promoted integrating science into popular culture. He cited the Big Bang Theory and Neil deGrasse Tyson as effective communicators of science and enthusiastic promoters of the scientific pursuit of knowledge.
Miller discussed a number of values that universities should promote as well, such as embracing an “open intellectual culture under which science thrives” and presenting science not just as “a technology but as a genuine liberal art.” A university should also encourage both STEM and humanities students to reach outside of their discipline and expand their breadth of knowledge, he said. “To be ignorant of science is as profound of an intellectual gap as to be ignorant of the literature or the history of our country and its people,” he added.
The event was open to the public and attended by a number of students and professors. Attendee Willoughby Britton, assistant professor of psychiatry and human behavior, said she felt that Miller’s speech ran counter to the other “Reaffirming University Values” lectures because he promoted science as an existing power structure while other lectures have sought to fight existing power structures. “People think that science is an incumbent power structure and feel oppressed by it. (The lecture gave the) complete opposite message than we’re getting from all of the other talks.”
Kristina Eichel GS noted that educational strategies from Germany, where she received her education, allow students to personally interact with scientists more often and could help build relationships with the scientific community.
After the event, Miller described his desire to speak to the Brown community. Speaking to the community is “important because you really want to motivate people to … stand up for science in the university community and also in the real world,” he told The Herald.
To summarize his points, Miller concluded, “The key to winning acceptance of science in the political and economic sphere … is to let people know this is the most exciting time in the history of science and all of us, whether we are professional scientists or not, are and can be a part of it.””

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Mike Daly brings winning history to Brown lacrosse
by Brown Daily Herald
Feb 17, 2017
“After building a Division III dynasty from the ground up, Head Coach Mike Daly faces a different sort of challenge — taking over a men’s lacrosse program coming off its best season in school history.
Daly was introduced as head lacrosse coach July 1, just weeks after Lars Tiffany ’90 announced he was leaving Brown to take the head coaching position at the University of Virginia. In many ways, 2016 was a banner year for Brown lacrosse as the team posted a school-record 16 wins, earning the Ivy League regular season title and winning two games in the NCAA tournament before falling to University of Maryland in the national semifinals.
Along with Tiffany and the rest of his coaching staff, a decorated class of seniors departed from last year’s team. But if Daly’s past credentials — a 244-83 record and three Division III national titles over 18 years at Tufts University — are any indication, Brown lacrosse’s winning ways are not likely to fade away with the cast of last year’s squad.
Brown was not the first Division I program to reach out to the decorated coach. But in Daly’s eyes, Brown was the right choice.
“There were a couple of other opportunities, but this felt like the right fit from the beginning,” Daly said. There was a “real apparent commitment from (Director of Athletics) Jack Hayes and the University. The entire place has been wonderfully supportive. It’s a great fit for our family. It’s been everything we hoped for and more.”
“The search for a new head coach was a positive one,” Hayes wrote in an e-mail to The Herald. “Mike Daly was the ideal candidate because he had tremendous success at an excellent school. He developed a model program for success” at Tufts.
Daly brings a few significant connections to the new position. Ryan Molloy, the older brother of Dylan Molloy ’17 — the defending Tewaaraton Award winner as college lacrosse’s top player and the anchor of Brown’s attack— was a captain on Daly’s 2011 team at Tufts and won a National Championship on the 2010 squad.
But Daly will also take over a team that has been primed for his own distinct style of play — a frenzied, high-paced approach to the game that has proven wildly successful at both Tufts and Brown. Sean Kirwan worked as an assistant coach under Daly at Tufts before coming to Brown in 2014 as offensive coordinator under Tiffany, bringing Daly’s style with him.
In 2016, with Kirwan pulling the strings, Brown had Division I’s most potent scoring offense at 16.32 goals per game. The Division III leader? Daly’s Tufts team, which scored 17.32 goals per game and won its seventh consecutive NESCAC title before falling in the national title game.
“We certainly didn’t invent any of this,” Daly said. “We won with it, so that’s why some of the attention came to it.”
Watching Syracuse and Virginia play a similar style in the ’90s was highly influential for Daly. “That game every year was 22-21 or 19-18, so it just was one of my earlier imprints of what the game should look like,” he said. “That’s really what we were emulating.”
Kirwan has since moved on to Virginia with Tiffany, but the similarities of Daly’s scheme have helped with the team’s adjustment to the new staff, said defenseman Alec Tulett ’17, one of three returning All-Americans from last year’s team.
But Tulett also said the team is not content with the speed of last year’s team, a point which Daly reiterated himself.
“We want to play just as fast, if not faster,” Tulett said.
“The guys had a taste of playing that way and they did not want to go back to a regimented, slowed-down kind of style,” Daly said. “The guys have really just embraced it. It’s fun, and it’s definitely the way we think the game should be played.”
Despite a different recruiting timeline between Division I and Division III, the academic prestige and location of Tufts seem to present a near-identical challenge for Daly at Brown.
“Our goal in the recruiting process is always to get the right guy, at the right place, for the right reasons — and they’re out there,” Daly said. “It’s about finding the right guys and the guys who embrace what we’re doing to work their tails off and improve.”
All similarities aside, Daly has not hesitated to shake things up for his new team. For example, players are now required to keep their individual lockers neatly organized and in order, Tulett said.
“It used to be a mess,” he added. “It’s more of a metaphorical thing, but perfection starts at home.”
“There were some personality changes and some cultural changes,” Daly said. “The guys have been great. They’ve been unbelievably receptive — they just needed to adjust to (the new staff) and vice versa.”
Daly was able to bring his assistant coaches from Tufts, but he worries little about managing a locker room full of players brought in by the previous staff. While such a dynamic might divide some teams, Bruno’s run to the final four has the team hungry for more, embracing Daly and his staff in the process.          
“Everybody around here had a great taste of success last year and they want more; they’ll do whatever it takes,” Daly said. “If that includes adjusting to a new coaching staff, they’re doing it. They’re doing everything we ask.””

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Panel discusses diversity in STEM fields
by Brown Daily Herald
Feb 17, 2017
““How can you create black scientists if there’s no black scientific community?” asked William Massey, professor of operations research and financial engineering at Princeton, during this week’s “Celebrating Excellence in Science” event.
Hosted by the Science Center, this two-day lecture event aimed to foster greater representation for minorities in STEM fields as part of the University’s recognition of Black History Month. Consisting of a lecture from engineer and inventor Dr. James West and a panel of scientists from research institutions across the country, the event was a continuation of the “Seeing Myself in Science” speaker series.
Director of the Science Center Gelonia Dent said in her introduction, “The idea is that we want to bring a diverse set of scientists to Brown to share their expertise and advice about diversity, inclusion and excellence.”
West, a member of the National Inventors Hall of Fame and professor of electrical and computer engineering at Johns Hopkins University, gave a lecture Tuesday on his work in acoustical science, which led to the development of technology now used in 90 percent of all contemporary microphones.
Beyond his scientific discoveries, West is perhaps equally renowned for his work in supporting minorities in science, technology and engineering. During his forty-year career at Bell Laboratories, West co-founded several programs aimed at providing mentoring and funding for underrepresented minorities studying science, including the Association of Black Laboratory Employees.
Wednesday, the Science Center hosted “How to Grow a Scientist” — a panel of scientists from top research centers across the United States — to discuss mentorship, diversity and inclusion in STEM. All of the panelists had worked at Bell Labs during their respective careers and cited the laboratory as a catalyst to their success as minorities in STEM.
The panelists included Benjamin Askew, vice president of research at SciFluor Life Sciences, LLC; Kaye Fealing, chair of the School of Public Policy at the Georgia Institute of Technology; and William Wilson, executive director of the Center for Nanoscale Systems at Harvard.
Fealing prefaced her discussion of “How to Grow a Scientist” by distancing herself from the pipeline model for including more minorities in STEM, which emphasizes early involvement in science for minorities.
“I don’t like the pipeline metaphor,” she said. “It sounds like there are no other ways of ‘getting in’ unless you get on the train early in life.” While Fealing herself had participated in a diversity-focused program like some in Bell Labs, she highlighted multiple pathways to STEM involvement.
Rather than identifying a program in which students should participate or a specific timeline for students to follow, Fealing pinpointed the broader needs for information, communication, scalability, sustainability and leadership. She cited mentorship and support from her family as instrumental to her personal success.
Likewise, Massey emphasized mentoring as key to expanding representation for minorities. “This is where it starts — bringing in the next generation,” he said.
“Everyone’s talking about pipelines, and no one’s talking about plumbing,” Massey said. “How do you connect those people who’ve gone through the pipeline?”
Instead, Massey said that scientists should focus on building community. Wilson also spoke to creating an environment where young scientists can make connections and collaborate.
Wilson said that he strives to achieve that kind of community at the Center of Nanoscale Systems, where he encourages his students to build upon a diverse and versatile array of research resources to tackle cutting-edge nanoscience research questions.
Echoing the words of William Baker, former president of Bell Labs, Wilson described his vision for his lab: “I’m going to build an ecosystem for doing science. We’re going to let people build science from within.””

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Scientists measure well-being through words
by Brown Daily Herald
Feb 10, 2017
“Ever wonder how much happiness a word contains? Data can be used to study aspects of our lives that people may have not previously thought possible — even the type of emotion that our words convey. Such applications are the focus of the conference sponsored by the University’s new Data Science Initiative.
Chris Danforth and Peter Dodds, professors at the University of Vermont, discussed the research and goals of their work at the University of Vermont’s Computational Story Lab in two of the University’s data science colloquia Feb. 2. The first lecture was given by Danforth and centered around the team’s flagship program, which they call “Hedonometrics.” The team gathered the 10,000 most frequently used words from scans of Google’s books project, tweets , lyrics and the New York Times, Danforth said. Then, using Amazon’s Mechanical Turk Project, people rated the words on a “happy-to-sad” scale.
The inspiration for the project came from Danforth’s desire to develop a more holistic approach to measuring people’s well-being. “Scientists tend to focus on measuring things that are easier. It’s hard to measure how well people are doing,” Danforth said. “Because it’s hard, (research on well-being) sort of diminished over time, and the focus tends to be put on these economic indicators.”
“Originally, our goal was to develop instruments that could quantify how well people were doing on a population scale so that investments could be made by the government in the right things,” Danforth said. There are not enough investments in research of mental health conditions, and data like this will allow people to develop software that can help in many ways, such as in diagnosis and medical treatment, he added.
Dodds, the other main researcher for the project, discussed the efforts of the Computational Story Lab to study the data of people’s stories — to algorithmically measure different aspects of these narratives through different systems like the Hedonometer, a tool that measures people’s happiness. He discussed the potential for lexical analysis to develop even more scales, such as the “Lexicocalorimeter,” which measures the number of calories people burned or consumed in an area by tracking the use of words that have been assigned caloric values, like “eating” or “butter.”
The lab wants to take this data and apply it to everyday life, Dodds said. For example, they are able to geographically map happiness by examining the locations from which words are sent. They can also chronologically view fluctuations in happiness through social media through methods like looking at a spike in negative words used during a tragedy.
Dodds also noted the ability of their methods to analyze literature. Using the Hedonometer, the researchers were able to track the mood of the text as the narrative progresses in various novels and movie scripts.
Danforth said that developing apps is a main priority for the future of the lab, adding that the researchers will pursue funding to build these tools that will be helpful in daily life. “Part of our goal is to show what is possible using this type of data and make the code available so that individuals can try and build tools that will be useful for public health applications,” he said. “We want to try and make technology that helps people be aware of what their phone knows about them.”
Brown’s Data Science Initiative, which offers a one-year master’s program, strives to create opportunities for students to engage with data science and learn about its applications in projects like those underway at the Computational Story Lab. “We’re trying to ramp up the different kinds of activities that we’re sponsoring on campus,” said Professor Jeffrey Brock, the director of the Data Science Initiative. “We’re using the colloquia as a kind of seminar series to build community across these departments … and engage local and nearby researchers in similar areas to come speak on campus.”
The four departments central to the Data Science Initiative ­— mathematics, applied mathematics, computer science and biostatistics — are trying to reach out to involve even more departments, Brock said. “We’ve been working maybe more in isolation than is appropriate, so we saw an opportunity … to build across these different units,” he said. Brock sees potential for Brown in the theoretical aspects of data science as well as the applied ones and hopes to emphasize applications in public health, neuroscience and physics.
Brock encourages interested students to take relevant courses, which include ECON 1660: “Big Data,” data fluency courses and APMA 0110: “What’s the big deal with Data Science?” The department is also planning to host a Hackathon and a Music Hack Day.
Brock emphasized the variety of companies moving to Rhode Island that may create opportunities for Brown students interested in data science. “It’s a very broad spectrum of career opportunities for students now if you’ve got just a little bit of technical know-how and an interest in a particular domain area,” Brock said. “It’s hard to find a field where (data analysis) doesn’t have some sort of impact.””

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UCS briefed on proposed DIAP course designation
by Brown Daily Herald
Feb 10, 2017
“The University may soon abandon its Diverse Perspectives in Liberal Learning course designation in favor of a new “Diversity and Inclusion Action Plan” designation, announced Dean of the College Maud Mandel and Senior Associate Dean for Curriculum Besenia Rodriguez ’00 at the Undergraduate Council of Student’s meeting Wednesday night. Mandel and Rodriguez, along with five members of the College Curriculum Council, put forth the idea that the DIAP designation would have more stringent and specific standards than the current DPLL designation.
The CCC, which is chaired by Mandel and oversees the undergraduate curriculum, will vote on the changes Feb. 28. If the CCC approves the proposals offered by the Task Force on Diversity in the Curriculum, then the DIAP designation will appear in courses for the 2018-19 academic year. Faculty would have to submit courses for a DIAP designation regardless of whether the course is already DPLL designated.
Mandel began her presentation by describing growing concerns raised by the Task Force that the DPLL designation had become watered-down. The Task Force released a report in August 2016 that reviewed how the University could ensure “sufficient educational offerings on issues of race, ethnicity, inequality and social justice.” The Task Force found that the DPLL designation had failed to appropriately label courses that focused those topics, Mandel said.
According to the report, the guidelines to label DPLL courses are too broad. The current definition for the DPLL designation comprises three vague tenets, two of which speak to broad critical learning skills and only the third addressing power and privilege, Mandel said.
The lack of specificity led the Task Force to conclude that the current standards had become “too expansive to be truly meaningful” and that “it could be difficult to find a Brown course, regardless of topic or discipline, which would not meet the definition,” according to the report.
In response to these findings, the Task Force suggested replacing the DPLL label with a DIAP designation that will better reflect the University’s goal of educating undergraduates about diversity, Mandel said. DIAP-designated courses should go through a more rigorous review process in order to receive the designation, and larger DIAP survey courses should be created and marketed to incoming students, according to the report.
Rodriguez spoke to the importance of a DIAP designation in helping students find classes “across the curriculum.”
“We’ve seen a few courses that have received so much interest that students were lined up outside of the room during shopping period, (students) who (were) really interested in learning about racism, about inequality and about structures of power,” Rodriguez said.
The committee to review the designation would include the CCC, Senior Associate Dean of the College for Diversity and Inclusion Maitrayee Bhattacharyya and two faculty members with expertise in DIAP topics, Mandel said. Each approved class would be reviewed every five years to ensure that courses truly reflect the designation.
UCS members suggested using Meiklejohns to promote DIAP courses and asked specific questions about how to encourage departments to develop more DIAP courses, especially departments that have more difficulty integrating courses about DIAP topics.
Some in UCS argued that the University should create a DIAP requirement similar to the WRIT requirement rather than just a designation. Mandel responded by reaffirming the University’s belief that the most effective way to encourage students to delve into a subject is to create interest in the topic, not require the study of it. The creation of a DIAP requirement might also create a precedent and potentially lead to the creation of other requirements, which conflicts with the freedom of the open curriculum, she said.”

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Letter: Response to Geoffrey Stone’s “Free Speech on Campus” Lecture
by Brown Daily Herald
Feb 07, 2017
“To the Editor:
Though I was not able to attend “Free Speech on Campus,” the lecture given by Geoffrey Stone, professor of law at the University of Chicago, I looked forward to reading about the community’s response in The Herald. To my dismay, I learned that yet another highly educated white man used the power he had at the podium to mock a student who respectfully asked him to stop using racial epithets. Before you jump to the conclusion that I wasn’t there and that I missed the context, let me assure you that the lecture was recorded and I watched it.
After Stone told the student that he would not refrain from using racial epithets, he used some curse words and asked that student — mid sentence — if the use of those curses was acceptable. I am outraged that this eminent speaker dared to make the joke that his use of the word “jackass” is just as insulting as his use of the “n-word.”
The English language is not equal for all of its users. There is no word I can conjure from the dictionary that demeans a wealthy, educated white man the way I might conjure slurs that demean a black person, a woman or a Jew for being born the way they are.
What I saw in the way Stone treated one of my fellow community members was more than a lecturer being a jackass. I saw a man who chooses to be willfully ignorant about the hatred wrapped into the very phonemes of the words he utters. No amount of hand waving, quotation marks and legal scholarship can hide the fact that he has the power to use racial epithets without recourse. I call on Stone to apologize to that student.
We did not invite him here to talk about free speech as interpreted in the Constitution — we invited him to talk about the more imprecise and debatable notion of free speech on campus. Stone failed to consider the nuances he was charged to address when he mocked that student. To me, supporting free speech without acknowledging how acts of speech can threaten the marginalized members of our campus is not a position I will be cultivating at Brown.
Joey DiZoglio Jr. ’15 MD’20”

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Brown football to play at Fenway Park
by Brown Daily Herald
Feb 03, 2017
“As it has every year for the past decade, the football team will face off against Dartmouth for its penultimate game of the 2017 season. But this year, Bruno’s final home game is no ordinary matchup for the Bears. Instead of senior day at Brown Stadium, Bruno will play under the lights of Fenway Park, the iconic home of the Boston Red Sox.
The athletic department released the news to the Brown community Jan. 12 over social media.
“Everyone was extremely excited about it,” said quarterback TJ Linta ’18. “The opportunity to play at such a historic place like that is crazy. I remember going to games at Fenway when I was a kid, but I never thought I’d actually play a game there, let alone football. It’s just a dream come true for a lot of guys.”
According to Director of Athletics Jack Hayes, the opportunity arose through an alum connected with the Red Sox organization. Last September, Hayes and the alum met with front office personnel at Fenway, who were “fantastic to work with” and very interested in the prospect of hosting the Bears following the success of the Boston College versus Notre Dame matchup held there in 2015, Hayes said.
“We’re always trying to find ways to differentiate our program from others,” Hayes said. “You do that by winning, you do that by having the best coaches, you do that by having the best students and you do that by finding unique locations to play in.”
Because the Red Sox would not host a baseball game that late into the calendar year, and the Big Green traditionally faces off with Brown in November, Dartmouth was a natural fit to be Brown’s opponent.
But as Head Coach Phil Estes P’18 remarked, the unique history between the Bears and the Big Green also helped seal the deal: Brown played Dartmouth at Fenway in 1923. Dartmouth is also a local, New England team, and both programs have “a very good alumni base in Boston,” Estes said.
According to Estes, the Ivy League is already excited about making the event one of its premiere televised games. “If it is on TV,” Estes said, “it will be an attraction to our alumni base around the country.”
Not only do numerous alums from both schools come from the Boston area, many current players on the teams are from the region.
“As a Red Sox fan growing up, to play at Fenway would be an honor,” said tight end Anton Casey ’19 “A lot of the guys on the football team are from the Northeast, so it’s really a once-in-a-lifetime deal.”
As the winter cold beckons and the long off-season takes its toll, Estes also hopes that the opportunity will provide extra motivation for the players.
“I’d watch our guys when we’d practice at MetLife (stadium),” Estes said, referring to the home of the New York Jets and Giants. “Being at a pro venue gets them excited. To be in a place like Fenway, their eyes are going to open up and it’s going to be a fun time.” Either way, Estes remarked that the game’s location “does give a little extra motivation for some of the guys to make sure they get on that bus.”
For recruiting, as well as for cultivating Brown grads, the news has become a strongly promoted focal point for Estes and Hayes.
“It’s been great,” Estes said. “We were able to tweet that out to all our incoming recruits and our alumni base to say we’re going to play at this iconic venue. It’s very good for recruiting.” Brown just announced its recruiting class for the class of 2021 Wednesday, which features future players from 17 different states, including Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Connecticut.
Hayes emphasized the event as more than just a game, but as a “University event.”
“It is an opportunity for Brown to extend its reach to Boston,” Hayes said. “That will help us build a large crowd for the game, and it will be a good opportunity for alums to stay connected with Brown in a very unique way. I was at a Brown football event in New York City, and they were all talking about it.”
Amid all of the excitement, Estes stressed that playing at Fenway Park will also present special challenges. “What we can’t do is let the team get too focused on the venue and not what they have to do,” he said.
Several “unique quirks” include both teams sharing the same sideline, which can make substitutions more difficult and could create unforeseen advantages and disadvantages for both teams, Estes said. The placement of the communications box and its sight line to the field has not yet been specified. Estes noted that the coaches will likely consult the Boston College staff — who have experience playing at Fenway before — to learn more of the stadium’s nuances.
Regarding the financial nature of the deal, Hayes said the team will incur certain special costs, such as team traveling expenses and shuttling students. Because of this, the University does not have to guarantee a certain number of people in attendance or tickets sold. Still, Hayes emphasized a push from Brown and Dartmouth to “get as many people there as possible” and “make it a great event.”
Moving forward, Hayes remained optimistic about the opportunity for Brown to continue its relationship with Fenway.
“I’d image they’d want to continue to do it. I know the Brown folks are excited, and hopefully it’s something we can look to continue if it’s successful.””

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