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Noose found at University of Michigan employee's desk
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jun 23, 2019
“University of Michigan police are investigating after a noose was found on an employee's desk at a university hospital.”
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Jane Sanders and the Messy Demise of a Vermont College
by NYT > Education
Jun 22, 2019
“The wife of Bernie Sanders had a bold plan to save Burlington College. Within six years, it was defunct, and federal prosecutors were on the case.”
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Tel Aviv Journal
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 20, 2019
“When we land in Tel Aviv from Bucharest, some people on the plane -- women! -- are very, very rude: pushing, shoving, and yelling. I’m about to put my dukes up and the F-word hangs on my lips -- and then I remember: “Ah, right: They’re Israelis. They’re supposed to be this way.”And the same women who are trying to run you over to get to the overhead bins they want would probably cook you a meal and tuck you in at night.And take up arms to defend you.Culture, culture …• Inside the airport, there is a sign -- a tourism poster: Follow Your Sunshine, Visit Florida. Huh. Yet there’s plenty of sunshine here, isn’t there? Regardless, I should not overthink a tourism poster …• The immigration official looks at my passport very, very skeptically. There is a sour look on his face. “What do you do?” he asks. I say that I’m a journalist. If possible, his expression gets more sour. “Do you have a journalist’s ID card?” he asks. No. I’m not from a Communist country.“Where do you work?” he asks. “National Review magazine in New York,” I answer. “What kind of magazine is that?” he asks. I say that it’s a magazine of politics and culture.With an air of both annoyance and boredom, he turns to his smartphone and fiddles with it for a while. Suddenly, his face is wreathed in smiles. He grins at me almost goofily, like a girl. I have never seen such a sudden change of countenance. He immediately hands me back my passport and sends me on my way.Did he Google me? Had he received a billet doux from his girlfriend? I don’t know …• Israeli cabbies are legendary -- legendary for trying to rip you off. There is a reason for the legend; it is grounded in fact -- and really too bad. Because a cabbie is often a person’s introduction to Israel. What a first impression, you know?This is a matter of national honor …• All the clichés about Tel Aviv are true: young, vibrant, hip, sensual. I am reminded of Miami. The beachtown sensuousness of Miami and the hipster vibe of Brooklyn (certain neighborhoods of).It is humid as hell, by the way. The temperature is not high -- only about 80 -- but the humidity is very high.Is it worth mentioning that the girls and women are beautiful, and often exotically so? That’s a little like mentioning that the bread in France is good, I know. But it’s still true.Of course, the climate and the general beachtownness helps. Sundresses and all that.A middle-aged Israeli man tells me, “The nation got seriously prettier once the Russians started coming.”As the U.S. is a nation of immigrants, so is Israel. It is a Jewish state, yes -- but a nation of immigrants at the same time. There are so many skin tones, so many hair types. Years ago, I had a visit here, and a colleague -- a young Jewish American -- said, “My Jewdar is all screwed up here.”It ain’t Scarsdale.• I am happy to see young mothers (and fathers, I guess) -- young people with children. Sign of hope, some people think. Sign of a willingness to press onward.Once, I asked Charles Krauthammer whether he thought Israel would survive. He said, “It depends on two things: the willingness of Israelis themselves to survive and the support of the United States.”• Given the general looseness of Tel Aviv, I’m surprised to see pedestrians waiting for the light to change at intersections -- even when there are no cars coming. Where are we, Salzburg? My Ann Arbor feet want to get moving …• At a restaurant, a waitress approaches a table and talks to the couple seated at it. She says, “Are you from South Africa?” Yes, they are. “I’m from South Africa,” she says. Then they talk about places, etc., they know in common.This is very Israel.• Needless to say, one should go to various restaurants and order various dishes. Personally, I can’t stop returning to one restaurant, for one dish: spicy ground lamb on Yemeni bread (with a fresh salad, of course).• Here is a Vietnamese joint -- and I got a kick out of the sign, somehow:• A jaunt to Jerusalem with friends, to see the Sharanskys -- Natan and Avital. To read a little about it, go here. I did an article.(After this article appeared, more than one person said, “He [Sharansky] is the greatest Jew alive.” And one of the greatest people, no question.)• Bad news, and common news: There has been a stabbing this morning. More than one stabbing, by one terrorist, a young Palestinian. He carried out his attacks at the Damascus Gate, which is a main entrance to the Old City (Jerusalem).Let me quote from a news report, published later on:> An Israeli man who sustained life-threatening stab wounds … was released from a Jerusalem hospital on Wednesday, vowing to reporters, “We will not be afraid.”> > Gavriel Lavi, 47, said he struggled to remember the details of the stabbing attack … but believed he had been saved from death by prayers and charity given by fellow students at his yeshiva, or Jewish religious seminary.• I attend a wedding, outside Tel Aviv. It’s a lovely evening, but not un-humid. Many of the men are in jackets and ties; many of them are not. One in the latter category tells me, “You can tell who was born here and who wasn’t. We sabras don’t wear jackets and ties to weddings.”Happily, I shed my jacket, though keep the tie in place.• Have I mentioned that the wedding is outdoors? Let me offer a quick shot of the scene:• The father of the bride gives a warm, elegant toast. He is from Iraq. (What a story the Iraqi Jews have.) In his toast, he quotes a Turkish saying, and a Persian one. He is a worldly man, a worldly Middle Easterner -- cosmopolitan, you might say. This is a bad word in some quarters, but not to me, it isn’t. The father of the bride is an Israeli patriot. He has also had a broad, rich experience of life.So, sue ’im …• It’s not like me to shoot food porn, but get a load of this spaghetti:Where’s the beef? (Remember that slogan? It made its way into the 1984 presidential campaign.)Put it on simmer, baby:I could go on …• At my table, there is a man named Moishe. “Oh, like ‘Moses,’” I say. “No,” he replies. “‘Moses’ is like ‘Moishe.’”That is one of the greatest replies I have ever heard …• In Tel Aviv, Ben-Gurion Boulevard is a major thoroughfare. Well, it should be. So is Begin Road. Ditto. (“Begin” as in “Menachem,” by the way, not as in “commence.”) I also see Levi Eshkol Street. Do you know about him? The third prime minister of Israel, serving from 1963 until his death in 1969.(By the way, if you have any interest in Israeli politics at all, you will love -- devour -- Yehuda Avner’s memoirs, The Prime Ministers. The book is like candy.)There is also Rabin Square -- where Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was murdered in 1995. The square used to be called “Kings of Israel Square.” (Some people still call it that.)• Ah, the beach, the Med -- which makes me think of another late prime minister, Shimon Peres. He met with a group of us journalists in 2005. The location was Davos. Let me fish out, and quote from, my journal:> The Labor head speaks first about the need for the economic betterment of the PA [Palestinian Authority]: Europeans, and others, should invest there. In Gaza, for example, unemployment is over 45 percent. Someone asks, “What kinds of business would you like to see in the PA?” He answers -- I like this phrase -- “Everything that life calls for.” He then elaborates: “high tech, low tech, no tech.” He points out that Gaza, someday, should be ripe for tourism: It has “43 kilometers of the most beautiful beaches in the Mediterranean.” He wonders whether (abandoned) settlements can be converted to resorts.Yeah, well …• Tel Aviv’s waterfront is very, very friendly to people who want to walk. You can walk alongside the beach forever (though the surfaces change, not unpleasantly).Care for a quick shot?• One of the sequence of beaches here is (officially) “dog-friendly” -- meaning that Fido can frolic unleashed, as his owners look on, grinning.• Speaking of animals: I see five horses -- beautiful thoroughbreds (I believe) -- being walked by handlers on grassy areas (not knolls) just beyond a beach. Where are we, Kentucky?• On the beach, a mother in a bikini throws a football to her two young receiver sons. She has a good arm. A native Israeli, too (as her Hebrew indicates). I’m impressed. I wonder if the boys appreciate that this is not entirely normal.• Want to get some reading done?And the other side:• You can hear cries of muezzins all over the world, including here in Tel Aviv. One rises from the Great Mahmoudiya Mosque, near the beach …• Speaking of religion: I see some Jehovah’s Witnesses, and their booth. I’m reminded that these people are banned and persecuted in Putin’s Russia, which burns me.• Amid the buildings in Tel Aviv, the Trade Tower gleams, which makes me think, contentedly, “Up from the socialist past?”• Have another beach scene:And spot the cat? On the rocks, at about 5 o’clock?• I appreciate a blunt sign. Hard to get blunter than “Danger of Death!”• In my experience -- limited, to be sure -- Israelis are not great standers in line …• You know where they learn to stand in line? The Zarkor School. It is my favorite school in Israel, and possibly in the world. It has just three grades, so far: pre-school, kindergarten, and first grade. I bet it will grow. Zarkor was founded by my friend Michael Friedman, and it is a pioneering effort. Learn about it here.Michael -- who is a phenomenal story all by himself -- is married to another phenom, Rachel Zabarkes Friedman, a scholar who has three degrees from Harvard, but the pinnacle of whose life, surely, was her internship at National Review …(When I interviewed her, on the phone, I sat up a little straighter, because she was so authoritative, interesting, and compelling. She was just in college, mind you.)• You are familiar with the pop song “Saturday in the Park”: “People dancing, people laughing, a man selling ice cream, singing Italian songs.” Well, Saturday, it seems to me, is a deader, or emptier, or quieter day in Tel Aviv -- yes, even in Tel Aviv, to say nothing of Jerusalem and elsewhere. (Tel Aviv is regarded as a secular city.) Friday is probably more like “Saturday in the Park.”• See the British embassy, here in Tel Aviv?It reminds me that ours is now in Jerusalem. I wrote about this issue for years and years: from the point of view of U.S. foreign policy; from the point of view of the Arab–Israeli conflict; and from the point of view of U.S. politics. I should not repeat myself, as I’m trying to breeze through a journal. Maybe I could provide a link.Hmmm -- here’s a dollop.• I meet a woman who has a daughter in the third grade. She sings in a chorus (the daughter). One of the songs they sing is a patriotic one, saying that, surely, some of the little boys in their midst will grow up to die in Israeli wars.This is not a country bereft of realism, you might say (putting it mildly).• It is also not a country bereft of stress. The difficulty of life in Israel is famous, or infamous. I meet a man who is hoping to emigrate to Canada. He is native-born (in Israel, I mean). After his military service, he went to Japan, where he worked for seven years. It is not uncommon for Israelis to do this kind of thing, he says. He loved Japan: its orderliness, its peacefulness. When he returned to Israel, he found the stress -- the noise, the pressure, the tumult -- almost unbearable.Look, this is just one testimony, one story, one guy. But no Israeli would be surprised to hear him.• I have not said anything about Prime Minister Netanyahu -- and there is a lot of talk about him, among the people I meet. There was an election in April; there will be another in September. I’m just breezin’ along here, coming to a close. But let me say: Netanyahu is an interesting, impressive, and historic figure, with legions of admirers (including me). But even some of them say, or fear, that he has stayed too long.This is an age-old problem. Leaders begin to equate their personal interests or desires with the national interest, you know?  L’état, c’est eux.Anyway, a big, big subject. (I used to call Netanyahu “the Leader of the West.”  I also applied the phrase to Stephen Harper, the prime minister of Canada.)• You want to see a funny sign? I don’t have a picture, but I can quote it for you: Please Avoid Unpleasantness Involved in Towing Vehicles.Amen.• An Israeli tells me that shalom is used for goodbye in only one, special instance: when you are going away for a long, long time. Then it’s an adieu (rather than au revoir); an addio (rather than arrivederci).• It still amazes me, after all these years, that people -- modern people -- call their dad “Abba,” just as in the Bible …• One last shot of funkilicious Tel Aviv?• When I get back to New York, an airport official is jawing at a man who is hawking a car service, and he responds, “I know my rights!”Ah, America. See you, dear ones, and thanks for going to Israel with me.One more thing, maybe. Four years ago, I wrote an essay called “Hung Up on Israel”: here. It answered the question, “Why do you care about Israel so much?” At least, it answered it as well as I can.Thanks again, and see you.”
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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez hits back at Trump after he misquotes her in tweet defending him against impeachment
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 19, 2019
“Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez called Donald Trump’s “bluff” after he misquoted her in a tweet defending himself against growing calls for his impeachment.The Democratic congresswoman told broadcaster ABC that the Democrats have “a very real risk of losing the presidency to Donald Trump” if the party does not have a candidate in 2020 who will fight for “true transformational change” in people's lives.In a tweet posted on Sunday, Mr Trump used an edited version of Ms Ocasio-Cortez’s quote to hit back at those calling for his impeachment.“'I think we have a very real risk of losing the Presidency to Donald Trump,'" tweeted Trump, citing Ms Ocasio-Cortez's quote. “I agree, and that is the only reason they play the impeach card, which cannot be legally used!”In response, the New York congresswoman tweeted: “Mr. President, you’re from Queens. You may fool the rest of the country, but I'll call your bluff any day of the week.“Opening an impeachment inquiry is exactly what we must do when the President obstructs justice, advises witnesses to ignore legal subpoenas & more.”She concluded her response with “Bye” and a waving-hand emoji.The back-and-forth between Mr Trump and Ms Ocasio-Cortez on Twitter comes as dozens of Democrats call to impeach the president, even as House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has quashed the prospect of impeachment for now.In her interview with ABC's Jonathan Karl, Ms Ocasio-Cortez said Mr Trump's recent Oval Office meeting with George Stephanopoulos was the latest indication of why Mr Trump should be held accountable to “the rule of law.” During the meeting, the US president acknowledged he would consider accepting information on his political opponents from a foreign government.“I think every day that passes, the pressure to impeach grows and I think that it's justifiable, I think the evidence continues to come in,” she said.“I believe that with the president now saying he is willing to break the law to win re-election, that transcends partisanship, it transcends party lines, and this is now about the rule of law in the United States of America.”Her sentiment is reflective of a recent spike among Democratic voters pushing for impeachment. A poll released on Sunday from NBC News and the Wall Street Journal found that 48 per cent of Democratic voters back impeachment, up from 30 per cent last month. But the poll found that the nation remains largely divided on the issue, with Republican and independent voters opposing impeachment hearings.Mr Trump's tweet quoting the New York congresswoman came towards the end of a busy Sunday for him on Twitter. This saw him sending Father's Day wishes even to his “worst and most vicious critics, of which there are fewer and fewer”, sharing a video of lawmakers and pundits doubting his 2016 campaign and congratulating golfer Gary Woodland for winning the US Open.The US president also thanked Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu for inaugurating Trump Heights, Israel's newest town on the Golan Heights. The town is located in the same area that Trump recognised in March as being part of sovereign Israel.Ms Ocasio-Cortez also commented on the candidacy of former vice president Joe Biden on Sunday, saying that he still has some work to do to change his behaviour towards women.Asked whether she believes Mr Biden understands some of the concerns that have been raised regarding his behaviour, she said: “I think that's something that he has to kind of show the electorate."You know, I think that it is an issue where there is a struggle; I'll be completely honest.”When asked whether Mr Trump would be re-elected if the Democrats do not nominate someone who identifies as a true progressive, Ms Ocasio-Cortez warned against electing a president who advocated for “half-measures”, such as someone who would not fight for a $15 minimum wage, a tuition-free college initiative or advancing women's rights. She reiterated her concern of what that would mean for 2020.“I think we have a very real risk of losing the presidency,” she said.Washington Post”
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People are sharing their worst depression meals and I'm gagging
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 19, 2019
“We've all got that one, go-to heinous "meal" we eat at the kitchen counter illuminated only by the light of the fridge. Twitter user @hayley_hud asked her followers to share "the worst depression meal you've ever made." She then proceeded to post her own, which is "toast with a chick fil a sauce," a dish she labels an "abomination." I can't say I disagree.> Hey y'all please reply with the worst depression meal you've ever made...here is my abomination, toast with chick fil a sauce pic.twitter.com/9qIM8aQZ2T> > -- Saddington 2 ✈️ (@hayley_hud) June 18, 2019Looking through the thread of what people consider to be their saddest food attempts is like having vague war flashbacks to all of the bizarre things I've consumed at 3 a.m. in a sleepy haze. Although, eating slightly stale pretzel rods dipped in sriracha pales in comparison to some of these, er, melancholic hors d'oeuvres. Here's what the people have been eating in their darkest moments. You can look and even empathize, but please, don't get any ideas.  Quesadilla con cry-so> microwaved cheese on a tortilla and seasoned it with my tears> > -- jakey wakey (@parttimewinner) June 18, 2019 From the Wendy's Sad Hours menu> I ate a baked potato from Wendy's like a burrito unwrapping the foil as I ate> > -- Cai (@caileighwenner) June 18, 2019 It all goes to the same place, I guess> I couldn't sleep so i got fed up and ate 2 large cans of sour cream and onion pringles, a bottle of chocolate milk, and a bottle of beer. > > This was 3 years ago and i'm still nauseous.> > -- the average joe (@jazz_inmypants) June 18, 2019 Look ma, no bagel!> taking bites out of the plain philadelphia cream cheese (the one that comes in a box) like it was a giant cheese stick> > -- ACID TONGUE (@autuuumn) June 18, 2019 I'm pretty sure this is illegal but I'm not a narc, so don't worry. Just please don't do it again.(I realize now that that's exactly what a narc would say.)> peanut cereal, 4th night in a row :( pic.twitter.com/qoPJtTUyMG> > -- having fun online. (@factcheckingcuz) June 18, 2019 My tastebuds will never forgive this> i dipped my salt and vinegar chips in peanut butter and washed it down with a pear redbull> > -- the holly grail (@holly_catherine) June 18, 2019 Reverse hot dog-- sounds like a sex position but is actually, quite literally, just that> pic.twitter.com/6pKHNJSpqy> > -- Gus (@GHuerta98) June 18, 2019 Sometimes it lasts in love but sometimes it hurts instead> One time I cooked frozen pizza rolls in the microwave but I put too much time on the microwave and they became crusty little depression bricks. I ate them anyway because at the time I thought I deserved nothing but depression bricks> > -- Alisha Ashley (@AlishaLishy) June 18, 2019 SEE ALSO: Whole Foods to eliminate plastic straws in all stores Ah yes, the three food groups: cheese, sugar, and sport> Cheese stick with Nutella and Gatorade. I got all the major food groups in. Cheese, sugar and sport> > -- sage parsley (@sisyphussage) June 18, 2019 Please tell me you burned the Tupperware after> one time in college I just kept dumping pasta, tuna, canned beans, mayo, and various hot sauce/spices into a big Tupperware until it almost tasted like a reasonable tuna salad but mostly tasted like my own failures> > -- Patricia Wallinga ⛵ (@pwallinga) June 18, 2019 It's my birthday and I'll eat spaghetti out of a ziplock bag if I want to> from my bday last year pic.twitter.com/mi5irJgOVz> > -- lilac (@cantrunforever_) June 18, 2019 I'm 100 perfect definitely not going to ever try this, like at all. Like, I have zero desire to go get a box of push pops and a bowl right this very second. > I got a box of push pops and ate em all... efficiently. pic.twitter.com/4fgcJO1GkP> > -- Hadrian McQuaig (@TheHadrianShow) June 18, 2019 Eating ramen noodles with the back end of a floss stick? "Talented, brilliant, incredible, amazing, show stopping, spectacular, never the same, totally unique, completely not ever been done before..."  > i didn't have any utensils so i used the pick end of a clean floss stick to eat soup pic.twitter.com/6Vo7x9yOyO> > -- nicki (@yeeterskeeterr) June 18, 2019Alright folks, that's enough of that. I can honestly say this thread is the most gag-inducing I've witnessed on Twitter. Which is a feat, considering, um, it's Twitter. Next time I find myself being beckoned to the fridge at an odd hour, I'll remember this thread and know that someone, somewhere, is eating peanuts submerged in a bowl of milk.  WATCH: Autonomous car company Nuro announces partnership with Domino's Pizza in Houston”
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Mars has a brand new crater, and it sure is pretty
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 18, 2019
“Mars, like any other rocky world, has its fair share of craters. These scars of ancient impacts give the dusty surface of the planet some serious personality, and sometimes it's easy to forget that new craters can happen right before our eyes. That's exactly what seems to have occurred, and a new image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveals a brand new impact site that might only be a few months old.The image, which was captured by the HiRISE camera built into the orbiter, shows a bold dark patch of material surrounding a circular crater on the Martian surface. Researchers believe it might have been created as recently as February 2019.The University of Arizona posted the photo, along with the following caption:> An impressionist painting? No, it's a new impact crater that has appeared on the surface of Mars, formed at most between September 2016 and February 2019. What makes this stand out is the darker material exposed beneath the reddish dust.The photo itself was captured in April and is only just now getting the attention it deserves. However, because the orbiter can't be looking at the entire planet at all times, it's unclear when exactly the crater formed, and researchers can only narrow it down to sometime between September 2016 and February 2019.This is yet another great reminder of the fantastic work NASA's Mars orbiter has been doing for years now. The spacecraft originally launched way back in 2005 and arrived at Mars in March of the following year. When it did, its primary mission was only scheduled to last for two years, but it has since put in over 13 years of faithful service for scientists. As long as it keeps producing images like this one, we hope it keeps going for a long time to come.”
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Analysis: About that poll that shows Biden crushing Trump ...
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jun 18, 2019
“Just as Donald Trump prepared to jet to Orlando to formally kick off his bid for a second term in 2020, a new Quinnipiac University poll was released that showed the President trailing former Vice President Joe Biden in the Sunshine State by 9 percentage points.”
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D.C. Council moves to add money to schools that faced budget cuts
by Local Education
Jun 18, 2019
“Many of the campuses are in low-income neighborhoods where students have significant needs.”
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Parkland shooting survivor says Harvard rescinded his admission over racial slurs
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jun 18, 2019
“A Parkland shooting survivor and pro-Second Amendment activist said Harvard University rescinded his acceptance as a result of racist remarks he made before the 2018 massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida.”
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Far-right UK student jailed over Prince Harry online posts
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 18, 2019
“A far-right university student who called Prince Harry a race traitor and created an image of him with a pistol to his head was on Tuesday jailed in Britain for more than four years. Michal Szewczuk, 19, posted the image, which also featured a blood-splattered swastika, on microblogging platform Gab in August last year, months after the prince married mixed-race actress Meghan Markle. Szewczuk, who was jailed for four years and three months, pleaded guilty to two counts of encouraging terrorism and five counts of possession of terrorist material, including the White Resistance Manual and an Al-Qaeda manual.”
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Venezuela's misery doesn't even spare the dead in Maracaibo
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 18, 2019
“Thieves have broken into some of the vaults and coffins in El Cuadrado cemetery since late last year, stealing ornaments and sometimes items from corpses as the country sinks to new depths of deprivation. "Starting eight months ago, they even took the gold teeth of the dead," said José Antonio Ferrer, who is in charge of the cemetery, where a prominent doctor, a university director and other local luminaries are buried. Much of Venezuela is in a state of decay and abandonment, brought on by shortages of things that people need the most: cash, food, water, medicine, power, gasoline.”
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What Chinese Citizens Have Learned About Hong Kong’s Protests
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 18, 2019
“(Bloomberg) -- While the world has focused on Hong Kong over the past week, most of the 1.4 billion people right across the border in China have not.As hundreds of thousands of protesters march in Hong Kong’s streets against unpopular China-backed extradition legislation, another battle is unfolding across Beijing’s Great Firewall. Photos and information about the biggest protests since the handover of the former British colony are being systematically wiped from China’s internet. Meanwhile, Chinese state media is pushing a narrative blaming the protest movement on U.S. interference.On Weibo, China’s Twitter-like social media platform, posts voicing support for Hong Kong protesters have been removed since the demonstrations kicked off last weekend -- leaving mostly Chinese media editorials on hostile foreign players trying to meddle in Chinese affairs. While WeChat users outside the mainland could share photos and comments about the protests on the popular messaging app, their contacts within the Firewall of China generally failed to see the posts.Typing “Hong Kong” into China’s largest search engine, Baidu, fails to produce news on protests that brought hundreds of thousands of people onto the streets. Censors have even taken note of the songs sung by demonstrators: “Do you Hear The People Sing,” a protest anthem from the musical “Les Miserables,” has been wiped from Tencent’s QQ Music streaming service.Read more: Hong Kong’s Future Remains Unsettled Despite a Win by ProtestersThe terms “Hong Kong,” “in extradition” and “protests” are among the most-searched terms on Freeweibo.com, a site monitoring posts that have been deleted from the site.Baidu declined to comment in an emailed statement. Representatives for Tencent and Weibo didn’t immediately respond to emailed requests for comment.Media NarrativeThe English-language China Daily reported Monday that Hong Kong parents took to the streets on Sunday in order to urge U.S. politicians against interference in the city’s extradition amendments -- raising the eyebrows of China watchers after posting the story to its official Twitter account.The nationalistic Global Times has run commentaries accusing the U.S. of interference. On Monday, it went further, connecting a week of protest in the city with ongoing trade negotiations between America and China -- a step China’s government had avoided through the week.If Washington thinks “playing the ‘Hong Kong card’ can force China to make compromises in trade negotiations with the U.S., it had better think twice,” the paper warned. “The riots in Hong Kong will only consolidate Beijing’s tough stance against Washington.”Read more: Carrie Lam Clings to Hong Kong’s ‘Impossible Job’ After ProtestsChina’s Communist Party tightly controls the flow of information into its public sphere. As its media diverts attention to the trade war and warnings of sabotage by outside forces, mainland readers are largely oblivious to the aims of the mass protests -- the withdrawal of contentious legislation that would, for the first time, allow extradition to China.“The reports are mostly intended for domestic readers,” said Cheung Siu Wai, a senior lecturer at Hong Kong Baptist University. “It’s impossible to completely to censor all information, so they still need an official interpretation of the events for Chinese readers.”Chinese authorities haven’t shied away from protesting recent U.S. action in support of Hong Kong’s autonomy. In response to American lawmakers’ push to reintroduce the The Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, Chinese Vice Foreign Minister Le Yucheng summoned Robert W. Forden, Deputy Chief of Mission at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing, to lodge a complaint over the U.S.’s “irresponsible” comments regarding the extradition bill.\--With assistance from Selina Wang.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Lulu Yilun Chen in Hong Kong at ychen447@bloomberg.net;Dandan Li in Beijing at dli395@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Peter Elstrom at pelstrom@bloomberg.net, ;Brendan Scott at bscott66@bloomberg.net, Karen LeighFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.”
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Duterte Stands by China, Doubts Own Fishermen in Sea Collision
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 18, 2019
“(Bloomberg) -- Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte is standing by China over a collision involving the two nations’ boats in the South China Sea, with his spokesman casting doubts on local fishermen’s accounts of the incident.In his first public statement about what he described as a “maritime incident,” Duterte said China’s side should be heard on the collision that resulted in a Philippine vessel carrying 22 fishermen sinking in disputed waters on June 9. The crew were rescued by a Vietnamese fishing boat and a Philippine Navy ship.“It is best investigated. I don’t issue a statement now because there’s no investigation and no result," Duterte said in speech at a Philippine Navy event on Monday night. "The only thing we can do is wait and give the other party the right to be heard.”The Philippines will not escalate tensions with China by sending military ships to the South China Sea following the collision, he added, reiterating his nation isn’t ready to go to war with Beijing.At a briefing Tuesday, Duterte’s spokesman Salvador Panelo said there are "circumstances that give doubt to the version" of the Filipino fishermen, including how most of them were asleep when the collision happened.“The President doesn’t want this to be blown into an international crisis,” Panelo said. “We are being careful because there will be repercussions if we make the wrong move.”‘Passive’ PolicyDuterte stuck to his pro-China stance despite calls from the opposition, led by Vice President Leni Robredo, to change his “passive” China policy by actively asserting the nation’s rights in the disputed waters. Robredo, in a Facebook post Sunday, also called on Duterte’s government to demand the Chinese fishermen’s trial in the Philippines.Duterte now has to convince the public that friendly ties with China is still the way to go, said Jay Batongbacal, director of the University of the Philippines’ Institute for Maritime Affairs and Law of the Sea.“Between the Philippine government and the Chinese government the friendship policy has been set, but this incident has happened and casts doubt on the sincerity and wisdom of it to the Filipino people,” Batongbacal said.The Philippines’ long-term position in the South China Sea dispute may be weakened if Duterte maintains his pro-Beijing stance after the incident, said Professor Jeffrey Ordaniel, a fellow at Hawaii-based foreign policy research institute Pacific Forum. “The Duterte administration’s China policy is unfortunately helping the Chinese pursue their maritime ambitions.”Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang described the incident as an “accidental collision" at briefing on Monday, adding that politicizing the collision “is not appropriate.” Beijing’s embassy in Manila earlier said the Chinese vessel’s captain tried to rescue the Philippine fishermen after bumping into their boat, but was afraid of being "besieged" by other Filipino fishing boats.The incident took place near Reed Bank, an area claimed by both Manila and Beijing where there’s a pending oil exploration plan by Philippines company PXP Energy Corp.\--With assistance from Dandan Li and Philip J. Heijmans.To contact the reporter on this story: Andreo Calonzo in Manila at acalonzo1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Cecilia Yap at cyap19@bloomberg.net, Ruth Pollard, Caroline AlexanderFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.”
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North Korea talks designed to give Xi Jinping and Kim  Jong-un new leverage over US
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 18, 2019
“Xi Jinping, the Chinese president, is to travel to Pyongyang on Thursday at the invitation of Kim Jong-un, his North Korean counterpart, for two days of discussions about regional issues.  Mr Xi will be the first Chinese leader to visit North Korea for 14 years and analysts suggest that the talks will serve to reinforce the ties between the two long-standing allies as well as send a message to Washington.  Announcing the visit on Monday, Chinese state-run CCTV said: “Both sides will exchange views on the peninsula situation and push for new progress in the political resolution of the issue”.  Media in China and North Korea have reported that the visit coincides with the 70th anniversary of diplomatic ties between the two governments, although it also comes conveniently close to Mr Xi’s visit to Japan later this month to take part in the G-20 summit. The Chinese leader is scheduled to meet US President Donald Trump at the event, with trade relations and security issues high on the agenda.  “Ahead of the G-20 summit, both Mr Xi and Mr Kim are looking to hold more cards”, said Ahn Yinhay, a professor of international relations at Korea University in Seoul.  Inside North Korea: Everyday life in the secretive state, in pictures “By holding a summit with Mr Kim, the Chinese will be indicating to the US and South Korea that they can act as a coordinator for the denuclearisation talks and that they are able to lead Mr Kim back to the negotiating table”, she told The Telegraph.  In return, she said, Mr Xi is likely to seek progress in ending the worsening trade war with the US. Influence over the North may also give Beijing leverage on issues such as the territorial dispute in the South China Sea and US support for Taiwan, which Beijing insists is a renegade province that will eventually come under its direct control.  The Chinese leader is also expected to announce food aid to North Korea, which is struggling to feed its people after bad weather and a shortage of fertilisers affected its agriculture sector.  “I also expect the two leaders to say that they are strengthening their military alliance, which is important to Mr Kim”, Professor Ahn said. “He wants to show the US that China is behind his country and if the US tried to use the military option then the Chinese would come to his assistance”.  In a statement, the White House said it welcomed Mr Xi’s first official visit to Pyongyang as president and stated that the international community is still working towards the “final, fully verified denuclearisation of the DPRK, as agreed to by Chairman Kim”.  Mr Xi and Mr Kim last met in January, when the North Korean leader travelled to China ahead of his abortive summit in Hanoi with Mr Trump. Those talks broke down when the US refused to accept limited decommissioning of the North’s nuclear capabilities in return for the lifting of international sanctions on the regime.”
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LA Times executive editor says he helped his college girlfriend get an illegal abortion
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jun 17, 2019
“• House Democrats set to approve bill that includes the Hyde amendment”
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US Naval War College gets its 1st woman president
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jun 15, 2019
“A rear admiral who began her career as a helicopter pilot has been named the next president of the US Naval War College, the first woman to fill that role, the secretary of the Navy announced Friday.”
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Jury Finds Oberlin College Libeled a Bakery and Awards $11 Million in Damages
by NYT > Education
Jun 14, 2019
“The verdict raised questions about the responsibility of colleges to police students’ speech and behavior, as well as broader First Amendment issues.”
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Prosecutors say he killed a Chinese college student. His lawyer agreed
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jun 14, 2019
“The attorney for Brendt Christensen, the man accused of killing a University of Illinois student from China, admitted Wednesday that his client did it, according to CNN affiliate WTTW.”
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First sentence in college admission scandal seen as a setback for prosecutors
by Local Education
Jun 13, 2019
“Analysts say each of 50 Varsity Blues defendants has unique circumstances.”
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Bribery scandal points to the athletic factor: A major force in college admissions
by Local Education
Jun 13, 2019
“From baseball to water polo, recruiting offers wide pipeline into prestigious private schools.”
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Former MSU dean guilty of misconduct in office
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jun 13, 2019
“William Strampel, a former Michigan State University dean and the former boss of disgraced doctor Larry Nassar, was found guilty Wednesday of misconduct in office and two counts of willful neglect of duty.”
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Engineer ignored warning signs hours before deadly FIU footbridge collapse, report says
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jun 13, 2019
“Hours before a pedestrian bridge collapsed at Florida International University last year, engineers said cracks in the structure didn't pose a safety concern, according to an Occupational Safety and Health Administration report.”
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Former Stanford sailing coach avoids prison in first sentence of college admissions scandal
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 13, 2019
“John Vandemoer is the first of the 22 defendants who pleaded guilty in the nation's sweeping college admissions scandal to be sentenced.”
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Here's the first person to be sentenced in college admissions scam
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jun 12, 2019
“Former Stanford sailing coach John Vandemoer will be the first person to be sentenced in connection with the college entrance scam when he goes in front of a judge Wednesday.”
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Pelosi, Fellow Democrats Poised to Counter Trump’s Subpoena Defiance
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 10, 2019
“Despite pressure from inside their caucus to open a formal presidential impeachment inquiry, they will maintain a middle ground instead with a vote on the House floor Tuesday to further empower committee oversight of Trump and his administration. “It’s a resolution that reflects the middle of the caucus, who appear to have grown frustrated over the president’s obstruction,” said Joshua Huder, a senior fellow with the Government Affairs Institute at Georgetown University.”
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Bakery awarded $11 million in libel lawsuit
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jun 09, 2019
“An Ohio jury has ordered Oberlin College to pay $11 million to a bakery which said it was libeled and wrongfully accused of racially profiling students.”
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Joe Biden’s lead slips as Elizabeth Warren surges, Iowa poll shows
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 09, 2019
“Former VP at 24% and Sanders second on 16%, but Massachusetts senator and Buttigieg close behind as race tightens Presidential Democratic frontrunner Joe Biden. Photograph: Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images On the heels of a major Iowa poll which showed a big slip in his big lead over the Democratic field, Joe Biden was conspicuous by his absence from the guest list for a big party event in the state on Sunday. Nineteen candidates for the presidential nomination were due to give five-minute speeches at the Democratic Party Hall of Fame dinner in Cedar Rapids – among them leading contenders Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, Pete Buttigieg and Kamala Harris. Biden, who was attending his granddaughter’s graduation, was not among them. He is due to visit Ottumwa, Iowa, on Tuesday – the same day Donald Trump will visit Council Bluffs and Des Moines. In the poll released by CNN and the Des Moines Register on Saturday night, Biden led the 23-strong field in the early voting state by eight clear points. But he only polled at 24%, down from his usual 30%-plus. Sanders was second with 16%, ahead of Warren with 15% and Buttigieg with 14%. Harris was the only other candidate above 5%, with half as much support as Buttigieg. That’s a strong showing for Elizabeth Warren … there are people who are paying attention and that’s step one Ann Selzer The former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke and the Minnesota senator Amy Klobuchar were the only other candidates to get more than 1% support among likely caucus participants. Both attracted 2%. Higher-profile candidates attracting no support included New York senator Kirsten Gillibrand and New York City mayor Bill de Blasio. The poll also showed that voters who identify as liberal now favour Warren, and that the primary concern among respondents is who is best placed to beat Trump. “That’s a strong showing for Elizabeth Warren,” Ann Selzer, president of the eponymous company which conducted the poll, told the Register. “I think that all of the publicity lately and all of the polls lately are so Biden-heavy that for her to have any metric that shows her on par [with him] … it says to me there are people who are paying attention [and] in a field this big, that’s step one. First, you have to get people to pay attention.” On Sunday, Sanders sought to deflect questions about his disagreements with Biden or the importance of any poll so far out from the caucuses, which will be held on 3 February next year. “We’re not going to get 50% of the vote in Iowa,” Sanders told CNN’s State of the Union, comparing the contest to 2016, when he went toe-to-toe with the narrow winner, Hillary Clinton. “I don’t think anybody will. I think we have an excellent chance to win here, we’re going to win in New Hampshire, and I think we have a very strong chance of being the candidate who will defeat the worst president in the modern history of this country, Donald Trump.” The fact we can bring Texas and its 38 electoral votes with us shows that we are best prepared to take on Donald Trump Beto O'Rourke One of the candidates with 2% in Iowa, Klobuchar, told CBS she could build support by being a midwestern senator “running on a track record of getting things done”. “I’m clearly on the debate stage and expect to be there in the fall,” she said. “And I think that’s going to give opportunity to voters in Iowa and all across the country to really narrow it down.” Her fellow two-percenter, O’Rourke, a charismatic candidate whose polling numbers have nonetheless gone into reverse, also played down the Iowa poll. “If I relied on polls in any race that I’d run,” he told ABC’s This Week, “I never would have been able to serve in the United States Congress. We never would have tried to take on Ted Cruz.” Beto O’Rourke stretches before the Pride Fest Fun Run 5K in Des Moines, Iowa on Saturday. Photograph: Scott Olson/Getty Images That was a reference to the 2018 Texas Senate race which O’Rourke lost to a Republican incumbent. Asked why he thought he was the man to beat Trump, the former congressman focused on his roots in a strongly Republican state and his stance against the president on the hot-button issue of immigration. Biden has so far focused on states where he polls strongly against Trump, including his native Pennsylvania and the post-industrial “rust belt”, where the president beat Clinton on his way to victory in the electoral college despite a near-3-million-ballot defeat in the popular vote. In an interview with the Guardian published on Sunday, Bruce Haines, a former steel executive and Trump supporter from Northampton county, Pennsylvania, pointed to a main issue of contention in Democratic ranks nationwide. Should the party pick a progressive with bold policy ideas, such as Sanders or Warren, or should it opt for Biden or O’Rourke, centrists with high name recognition in blue-collar or Republican-leaning states away from the liberal coasts?
“ So I think support [for Trump] is going to strengthen as we get closer to the election,” Haines said. “And as we sort out who he’s going to run against – will it be a socialist, or will it be Biden?””

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To deter shootings, Americans shun naming suspects, weigh demolishing sites
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 08, 2019
“As the superintendent of Jefferson County School District in Colorado, Jason Glass oversees one of the most troubled pieces of property in the United States: Columbine High School. The site of the one of the first -- and still among the deadliest -- school shootings in the country, Columbine has proved an enduring headache for the school district ever since two students killed 12 of their classmates, a teacher and themselves in 1999. In an open letter published this week, Glass detailed how every year hundreds of people try to get on campus to "reconnect with the 1999 murders," while in the years that followed, many other school shooters took inspiration from the Columbine attack.”
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Short-Term Programs for Long-Term Success
by NYT > Education
Jun 08, 2019
“A growing number of intensive programs offered online, or on campuses around the world, can help workers at all stages become more globally minded.”
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A Financial Checklist for Your Newly Minted High School Graduate
by NYT > Education
Jun 07, 2019
“We’ve got budget, retirement account, credit, information security and insurance advice for your independent adult, college student, gap-year taker or future soldier.”
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Leadership of troubled D.C. public boarding school votes to close campus
by Local Education
Jun 06, 2019
“Students at Monument Academy will have to find a new school.”
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F.B.I. Is Said to Be Investigating College Admissions Practices at T.M. Landry
by NYT > Education
Jun 04, 2019
“The private school in Louisiana, once celebrated for helping underprivileged and minority students attend elite colleges, is now under federal investigation over its college applications.”
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Jared Kushner interview triggers new security fears over Russia approach
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 03, 2019
“Trump son-in-law said he might not alert FBI to new contact‘Kushner basically just put a for-sale sign on his forehead’ Jared Kushner seemed unprepared for a range of questions in an interview with Axios on HBO, including about whether his father-in-law was a racist. Photograph: Joshua Roberts/Reuters Jared Kushner’s interview over the weekend, in which he said he did not know if he would alert the FBI if approached privately again by Russia, has revived questions about his White House security clearance. The admission came in an interview with Axios on HBO in which Kushner seemed unprepared for a range of questions – including several on whether his father-in-law, Donald Trump, is a racist. The answers which drew the most attention, however, were in a section of the interview devoted to his role in a June 2016 meeting between Trump campaign officials and a Russian Kremlin-linked lawyer promising to bring damaging information about Hillary Clinton. Asked why an approach by a hostile power did not immediately lead him to call the FBI, Kushner became defensive and suggested the question was “self-righteous”. “Let me put you in my shoes at that time. OK, I’m running three companies, I’m helping run the campaign. I get an email that says show up at 4 instead of 3 to a meeting that I had been told about earlier that I didn’t know what the hell it was about,” Kushner said. He claimed not to know the meeting was set up in Trump Tower in order to receive Russian-sourced information, even after it was pointed out to him that the email telling him about the meeting had the subject line: “Russia – Clinton – private and confidential.” “Again, I would get about 250 emails a day, and so I literally saw show up at 4,” Kushner said. “I showed up at 4.” Kushner also failed to explain why such a busy executive would attend a meeting in the middle of the afternoon without knowing what it was about. In the Axios interview, Kushner was also asked: “Would you call the FBI if it happened again?” “I don’t know,” he replied. “It’s hard to do hypotheticals, but the reality is, is that we were not given anything that was salacious.” The suggestion that he might not report an approach, even though he now has (controversial) top security clearance, astonished former officials who have had to go through the stringent vetting procedures. “This shows a lack of understanding of our legal system when it comes to Russia,” said Brett Bruen, global engagement director in the Obama White House. “Failing to report it is a clear security violation.” Sam Vinograd, who also worked in the Obama national security council, told CNN: “Jared Kushner basically just put a for sale sign on his forehead during this interview saying on national television he may not contact the FBI if a hostile foreign power contacts him. That really sends a message to Russia and any other foreign actor that Jared Kushner may be open for business during this 2020 campaign cycle.” Trump reportedly ordered Kushner to be provided top secret security clearance, overruling the judgment of administration officials concerned about undeclared foreign entanglements from Kushner’s business meetings. Kushner staunchly defended the president, particularly on the charge of racism. But when asked whether “birtherism” – a groundless conspiracy theory Trump helped propagate suggesting that Obama had been born abroad – was racist, Kushner was evasive, simply repeating: “I wasn’t involved in that.” “In retrospect, it’s clear why Jared Kushner rarely does interviews,” Daniel Drezner, professor of international politics at the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, said “Politically it was a disaster. He seemed unprepared … and the answers are laughable.” At one point towards the end of the interview, Kushner said that one of the best facets of his father-in-law was his readiness to hire people who were not “qualified” making air quotes when he said the word. Kushner, whose experience before the White House was working in his family’s property business, has been given some of the most important and complex portfolios, including Middle East peace and immigration. “What is astonishing is that he was put in charge of an awful lot of policy, when he was not remotely qualified,” Drezner said. “Two years on, it’s not obvious he has learnt anything.””
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Student bus targeted amid deadly wave of Kabul bombings
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
Jun 02, 2019
“Two people were killed and dozens more wounded in Kabul on Sunday as a wave of bombings hit civilian targets -- including a university school bus -- across the Afghan capital. The yellow bus had been heading to Kabul Education University in the western part of the city Sunday morning when it was hit by a sticky bomb -- a growing menace in Kabul, where insurgents and criminals use magnets to slap explosives on vehicles. The device had been placed under the bus, interior ministry spokesman Nasrat Rahimi said.”
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Maryland university board leader pledges review of adenovirus response at College Park campus
by Local Education
Jun 01, 2019
“Board of Regents Chair Linda T. Gooden expressed sorrow over the death of a student.”
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Eric Swalwell: It's time to restore the American dream
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
Jun 01, 2019
“The next president of the United States must understand how Americans live, struggle and seek to flourish. I've been learning about this all my life -- as the first person in my family to go to college, as a father of two young children and especially on the road as a member of Congress.”
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Colleges Challenge a Common Protection in Sexual Assault Lawsuits: Anonymity
by NYT > Education
May 29, 2019
“Efforts to publicly disclose the identities of women suing universities represent a more aggressive approach toward students, lawyers said.”
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Brazil's mangroves on the front line of climate change
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
May 29, 2019
“Instead he parks his two-foot-wide boat at the shore of the Caratingui river and wends his way on foot through the tangle of mangroves to dig out crabs with his hands from the dark muck. Water levels have risen 20-30 centimeters over the past 100 years in coastal Bahia state, where Cairu is located, according to climate researcher Carlos Nobre at the University of Sao Paulo.”
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Tornadoes tear across US in record numbers, leaving trail of devastation
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
May 28, 2019
“A vicious storm tore through the Kansas City area, spawning tornadoes that left a trail of devastation, as the US reeled from a record run of twisters.  The tornadoes downed trees and power lines, damaged homes and injured at least a dozen people in the latest barrage of severe weather that saw warnings as far east as New York City. Parts of Pennsylvania and New Jersey were also under tornado warnings hours after a swarm of tightly packed twisters swept through Indiana and Ohio overnight, smashing homes, blowing out windows and ending the school year early for some students because of damage to buildings. One person was killed and at least 130 were injured. The storms in Kansas City on Tuesday were the 12th straight day that at least eight tornadoes were reported to the National Weather Service. After several quiet years, the past couple of weeks have seen an explosion of tornado activity with no end to the pattern in sight. The previous 11-day stretch of at least eight tornadoes per day ended on June 7, 1980. .@kmbc in Kansas City showing the tornado moving through Lawrence, KS on its way to Linwood. That is a massive tornado. Chopper pilot estimated it was a mile wide. KSwxpic.twitter.com/921tewWl9N— Drew Tuma (@DrewTumaABC7) May 28, 2019 "We're getting big counts on a lot of these days and that is certainly unusual," Patrick Marsh, warning coordination meteorologist for the federal Storm Prediction Centre, said. The National Weather Service had already received at least 27 more reports of tornadoes on Tuesday, suggesting that the record for consecutive days would be broken once the official totals are in. A large and dangerous tornado touched down on the western edge of Kansas City, Kansas, late on Tuesday, the National Weather Service office reported. At least a dozen people were admitted to the hospital in Lawrence, 40 miles west of downtown Kansas City, Missouri, and home to the University of Kansas, hospital spokesman Janice Early said. Damage also was reported in the towns of Bonner Springs, Linwood and Pleasant Grove in Kansas. But the Kansas City metropolitan area of about 2.1 million people appeared to have been spared the direct hit that was feared earlier in the evening when the weather service announced a tornado emergency. Assisting with search and rescue near linwood Kansas pic.twitter.com/mdSTiowT1O— Jesse Risley ������️‍�� (@Jesse_Risley) May 29, 2019 Mark Duffin, 48, learned from his wife and a television report that the large tornado was headed toward his home in Linwood, about 30 miles west of Kansas City. The next thing he knew, the walls of his house were coming down. Mr Duffin told the Kansas City Star that he grabbed a mattress, followed his 13-year-old to the basement and protected the two of them with the mattress as the home crashed down around them. "I’m just glad I found my two dogs alive," he said. "Wife’s alive, family’s alive, I’m alive. So, that’s it." The severe weather wasn’t limited to the Midwest. Tornadoes were confirmed in eastern Pennsylvania and the National Weather Service issued a tornado warning for parts of New York City and northern New Jersey. The winds peeled away roofs - leaving homes looking like giant dollhouses - knocked houses off their foundations, toppled trees, brought down power lines and churned up so much debris that it was visible on radar. Highway crews had to use snowplows to clear an Ohio interstate. People look on as they examine the damaged remains of school in Dayton, Ohio Credit: AFP Some of the heaviest damage was reported just outside Dayton, Ohio. "I just got down on all fours and covered my head with my hands," said Francis Dutmers, who with his wife headed for the basement of their home in Vandalia, about 10 miles outside Dayton, when the storm hit with a "very loud roar" on Monday night. The winds blew out windows around his house, filled rooms with debris and took down most of his trees. Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine declared a state of emergency in three hard-hit counties, allowing the state to suspend normal purchasing procedures and quickly provide supplies like water and generators. Outbreaks of 50 or more tornadoes are not uncommon, having happened 63 times in US history, with three instances of more than 100 twisters, Mr Marsh said. But Monday’s swarm was unusual because it happened over a particularly wide geographic area and came amid an especially active stretch, he said. An aerial photo shows damaged homes and debris marking the path of a tornado in Celina Credit: AP As for why it’s happening, Mr Marsh said high pressure over the Southeast and an unusually cold trough over the Rockies are forcing warm, moist air into the central US, triggering repeated severe thunderstorms and tornadoes. And neither system is showing signs of moving, he said. Scientists say climate change is responsible for more intense and more frequent extreme weather such as storms, droughts, floods and fires, but without extensive study they cannot directly link a single weather event to the changing climate. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily Front Page newsletter and new audio briefings.”
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Do we owe our children our presence more than presents?
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 28, 2019
“The hardest decision I ever made as a father was leaving the city where my then-5-year-old son lived with his mother (my ex-wife) so I could take a better-paying job. I did so with one singular goal in mind: to be in a better position to pay for his college tuition.”
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4 Years of College, $0 in Debt: How Some Countries Make Higher Education Affordable
by NYT > Education
May 28, 2019
“When we asked people around the world what sort of financial burden they bore for their higher education, we heard how much it varies from country to country.”
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Auburn football announcer from famed 'Kick Six' play dies in car crash
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 27, 2019
“The decorated Auburn University football announcer who narrated the team's stunning last-second win over Alabama known as the "Kick Six" died in a car crash Saturday night, the university said.”
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Brexit Is Sending Students Packing, Straining Private Schools on Both Ends
by NYT > Education
May 26, 2019
“While campuses in Britain look toward Asia in their struggle to refill seats, those on the Continent are scrambling to prepare for a crush of new pupils.”
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Five new charter schools approved in D.C. despite concerns about vacant seats on existing campuses
by Local Education
May 26, 2019
“They include a Montessori campus, an all-girls high school and a social-justice-themed school.”
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Opinion: How my son's college graduation changed my life forever
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 25, 2019
“The hardest decision I ever made as a father was leaving my then-5-year-old son in Atlanta with his mother (my ex-wife) so I could take a better-paying job in New York. I did so with one singular goal in mind: to be in a better position to pay for his college tuition.”
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College softball player hospitalized after teammate's throw hit her in the face
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 25, 2019
“A pitcher for the University of Texas softball team was taken to a hospital Friday after a ball thrown by her own teammate struck her in the face, the team said on Twitter.”
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Diagnosed with autism at 3, this young man became high school valedictorian. Today he graduated from college.
by Local Education
May 25, 2019
“Montel Medley, of Prince George’s County, Md., majored in math and computer science at Towson University.”
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Kids need our presence more than presents
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 24, 2019
“The hardest decision I ever made as a father was leaving my then-5-year-old son in Atlanta with his mother (my ex-wife) so I could take a better-paying job in New York. I did so with one singular goal in mind: to be in a better position to pay for his college tuition.”
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Can Data Ward Off College Debt? There’s a Push to Show Which Majors Pay Off
by NYT > Education
May 24, 2019
“Knowing how much money students borrow (and later earn) based on their program could shake up the higher education market.”
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Disney workers can enroll at a Florida college. And Disney will pay for it
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 24, 2019
“Disney is going to pick up the tab for workers who attend the University of Central Florida.”
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When it comes to tuition-free college, it’s not all about the money
by Local Education
May 24, 2019
“As presidential candidates talk about affordability, they should also talk about graduation.”
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College student dies after trying to snap picture from a scenic lookout on the Oregon coast
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
May 24, 2019
“A student at Oregon State University died on Sunday after falling 100 feet from a scenic lookout on the Oregon coast, authorities said.”
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Narendra Modi wins landslide victory in Indian election
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
May 24, 2019
“Narendra Modi swept back into power on Thursday as his Hindu nationalist party made unexpected gains in a landslide victory. After a mammoth six-week election in which over 600 million people voted, all the results were tallied on Thursday and within hours the TV networks predicted a win for Mr Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP). Official data from the Election Commission showed Modi's Bharatiya Janata Party ahead in 300 of the 542 seats up for grabs, up from the 282 it won in 2014 and more than the 272 seats needed for a majority in the lower house of parliament. That would give his party the first back-to-back majority for a single party since 1984. "Together we grow," Mr Modi said on Twitter. "Together we prosper. Together we will build a strong and inclusive India. India wins yet again!" Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi arrives at BJP headquarters to attend a ceremony to thank the Union Council of Ministers for their contribution in India's general election, in New Delhi Credit: AFP The win by Modi and the BJP has surprised even the most hardened political analysts, with the consensus being that they would be returned to power but with a reduced majority. His re-election reinforces a global trend of right-wing populists sweeping to victory, from the United States to Brazil and Italy, often after adopting harsh positions on protectionism, immigration and defence. The result reinforces Mr Modi's immense popularity and vindicated what at times was a belligerent campaign by several parties, with the focus heavily on the economy, national security, and from the BJP's perspective, an affirmation of its underlying ideology of Hindu nationalism. Nalin Kohli, a senior BJP official, claimed his party had picked up votes from Muslims, especially Muslim women. “We are the party of power, we are the flavour of the season. It is the aspirations of 1 billion-plus people that have elected us." The main opposition Congress party was heading for a better performance than its nadir in 2014, but early results suggested it would get at least 52 seats. With its partners it makes up the United Progressive Alliance, which was predicted to hit the 110 mark. With some of the BJP's critics accusing it of making India a more divisive country, particularly for Muslims and other minorities, many are asking what happens next for India. सबका साथ + सबका विकास + सबका विश्वास = विजयी भारत Together we grow. Together we prosper. Together we will build a strong and inclusive India. India wins yet again! VijayiBharat— Chowkidar Narendra Modi (@narendramodi) May 23, 2019 Professor Santosh Kumar Rai, of Delhi University, said: “Certainly a second term means an ideological victory, even if it is more a personality cult. With a [BJP] majority, a rightist agenda with all the institutions of the state under its control, the party will be more likely to convert India into a majoritarian state. “Law, education and culture will be the major areas expecting paradigm shift. Foreign and Finance policies will continue as they are going on now.” The election has been the biggest democratic exercise in history with an electorate of 900million, more than 1 million polling booths, seen phases of polling, seven national parties and dozens more regional parties vying for seats in the New Delhi parliament. Commentators have said Mr Modi put himself at the centre of a more presidential style of campaign, often making himself and his party interchangeable. At a packed victory rally at the BJP headquarters in Delhi, Mr Modi said: "This victory will be an inspiration for generations in the country. Crores [tens of millions] of Indians have blessed us, my gratitude to the people. "This is the highest voter turnout since Independence, even in adverse weather conditions. I congratulate the Election Commission for conducting smooth elections in such a big democracy. "I have been saying that no party or candidate is fighting the polls but the people of India are. If anybody has won, it is the people of India. This is the biggest event in any democracy in the world." Referring to his rivals in the Congress Party, he said: "They used a fake tag of Secularism that they thought would wash all sins; today these people have been completely unmasked. Today, India has only two castes - those who are poor and those who want to eradicate poverty. "This is not Modi’s victory. This is victory of honest people’s hope, this is a victory of youths who have walked on the path of 21st century with dreams.””
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Opinion: Why I'm boycotting my Harvard reunion
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 22, 2019
“Shortly before my 25th reunion at Harvard University, I wrote op-eds opposing legacy preferences, the troubling practice of colleges and universities giving a leg up in admissions to their own alumni. I knew from experience to expect blowback, but I was shocked by the intensity of my classmates' reaction. Many called me a traitor.”
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Family of U-Md. student who died of adenovirus takes step toward suing school
by Local Education
May 22, 2019
“Olivia Paregol’s parents say action by the university could have prevented her death.”
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Morehouse College Graduates’ Student Loans to Be Paid Off by Billionaire
by NYT > Education
May 22, 2019
“Robert F. Smith, who founded Vista Equity Partners and became the richest black man in America, said that he and his family would pay the Class of 2019’s debt.”
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Can Data Ward Off College Debt? New Strategy Focuses on Results
by NYT > Education
May 21, 2019
“Knowing by major and by program how much money students borrow (and later earn) could shake up the higher education market.”
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Latest Sign of Beto O’Rourke’s Flameout: Opposition Research Requests Have ‘Died Off’
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
May 21, 2019
“Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/GettyIn the days leading up to Beto O’Rourke’s presidential campaign, a top Republican opposition research firm was brimming with requests from political reporters angling for dirt. America Rising, a political action committee that shared details of its internal inquiries with The Daily Beast, said the asks came from a dozen or more reporters and ranged from broad questions to more tailored points of interest. But 10 weeks after O’Rourke’s official launch, those requests are virtually nonexistent.“The requests for oppo on him have completely died off,” a staffer at the oppo group said.The lack of oppo requests suggests a larger problem looming over O’Rourke’s campaign: a visible decline in public interest. Once elevated to the top of Democratic watch-lists, the former congressman is now registering in single digits in several national polls, nosediving from 12 percent in a Quinnipiac poll conducted in March to just 5 percent in the same survey in April. And while he’s beginning to roll out new hires in key voting states, some say he’s already fallen behind other candidates whose field operations have been interfacing with voters for months. Beto O’Rourke Blew ItAmerica Rising, which has cornered the market on opposition research on the nearly two dozen presidential contenders, has tracked what it considers a steady decline in the public’s interest in O’Rourke. The Republican National Committee, known for slinging insults about Democrats into mainstream consciousness, has not received any requests from reporters for O’Rourke information in recent weeks, according to a senior official. Typically, a high level of curiosity in revealing a candidate’s political past is one indicator of their perceived viability. And a noticeable downtick in interest could signal an enthusiasm gap between where O’Rourke started and where he’s ended up in two months. O’Rourke, himself, seemed to acknowledge the flagging interest in a recent  interview with MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow. “I recognize I can do a better job also of talking to a national audience,” O'Rourke said. “I hope that I’m continuing to do better over time, but we’ve been extraordinarily fortunate with the campaign that we’ve run so far.” His next big chance will be Tuesday night, when he’ll appear in his first CNN town hall at 10 p.m. from Drake University in Des Moines. The network has previously hosted such events for several of his rivals, giving a boost to some lesser-known candidates early into their campaigns. On Monday, O’Rourke told reporters he would participate in a Fox News town hall, a general-election strategy favored by some 2020 hopefuls as an attempt to reach voters beyond the traditional Democratic base. But according to an analysis shared with The Daily Beast by Media Matters, a nonprofit that tracks right-wing coverage, even Fox News’ daily mentions of O’Rourke online have visibly declined since he announced his bid, indicating that he may no longer be considered a serious threat as a Democratic contender. O’Rourke’s campaign sees it differently: “From my perspective there’s been no decline of oppo to respond to,” a source within the campaign said. Press requests from print and television outlets, including bookers in charge of getting candidates on the air, have not declined since the launch, the campaign source added. While it’s still early to plot ad buys—the Iowa caucuses are nine months away—a source who tracks ad information for multiple political campaigns says that O’Rourke’s failure to get into that world early coincides with a frenzied campaign that’s no longer top-of-mind for voters. “It fits with an overall theme of his campaign being a little disorganized,” the source who analyzes political ads said. “He had such a moment in 2018 but it seems to have fizzled out.”While no pollsters or ad makers have been hired, a source within O’Rourke’s campaign first told The Daily Beast that they have been in initial discussions with various polling, data, and analytics firms, as well as outfits who do campaign ads. Bringing on a pollster had not previously been a top priority, the source said, adding that the campaign has been focused on talking to voters in 154 town halls and traveling to 116 cities.O’Rourke has made recent inroads on the political staffing front, bringing on Jen O’Malley Dillon, Jeff Berman, and Rob Flaherty, top talent from Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama’s campaigns, among other recent national and state hires. But he has missed out on other high-level talent who wandered to other campaigns, multiple sources said.Meanwhile, other presidential campaigns have already hired staffers who previously worked with or expressed interest in O’Rourke. Shelby Cole, a top O’Rourke aide who helped him raise an eye-popping $80 million during his Senate campaign, joined California Sen. Kamala Harris’ team as its digital fundraising director. Emmy Ruiz, who served as Clinton’s state director in Nevada and Colorado in 2016, was thought to be seriously weighing joining O’Rourke before he announced, according to multiple Democratic sources unaffiliated with current campaigns. She later joined Harris as a senior adviser. One top Democratic operative admitted to eyeing O’Rourke for months, but changed candidate loyalty after reading his announcement article in Vanity Fair. “I was definitely interested in him back in January and February,” the veteran operative said, who has since joined another presidential campaign in a top position.   “The Vanity Fair story fed a fear I had, which was that he was a little too fly-by-the-seat-of-his-pants,” the veteran operative said. “I just felt that he hadn’t totally thought this through. So that kind of soured me on him.”—Asawin Suebsaeng contributed reporting for this article.Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast hereGet our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.”
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Morehouse Graduates’ Student Loans to Be Paid Off by Billionaire
by NYT > Education
May 20, 2019
“The richest black man in America bestowed a graduation gift on the Class of 2019 at Morehouse College: the promise to pay off all their student debt.”
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He spoke at their graduation. Then he said he'd pay their loans
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 20, 2019
“• Morehouse College grad shares plans after loan debt paid”
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Huge donation to college grads could start a new trend
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 20, 2019
“During Morehouse College's commencement exercises, billionaire Robert F. Smith changed the course of 396 students' lives in the span of a few seconds. His promise to pay off the entire student debt burden of the Class of 2019 sparked a wave of admiration and gratitude, as well as questions about what such a generous gift means in the age of mounting student loan debt.”
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Let's praise billionaire Robert F. Smith
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 20, 2019
“While considering the incredible generosity of billionaire philanthropist Robert F. Smith, who announced during a commencement speech that he'd be creating a program to pay off the student loans for every student in Morehouse College's class of 2019, you should also think about this: according to statistics from the Department of Education, 99% of borrowers have been rejected by a federal student loan forgiveness program designed to spur public service and reduce the nation's mountain of student loan debt.”
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Thousands of US migrants move south to Mexico as Trump attacks immigration
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
May 20, 2019
“Spanish friars brought the faith to this colonial city in Mexico's central highlands. The silver barons of the 18th century built its mansions. Now comes the pickleball invasion.It started with just a few American retirees. These days, two dozen players fill the courts at the municipal sports centre most mornings, swinging paddles at plastic balls. There are so many clubs in Mexico dedicated to the US sport that a tournament was held here last year."It was a madhouse," said Victor Guzmán, a 67-year-old entrepreneur from Charlotte who helped pull the event together.Donald Trump regularly assails the flow of migrants crossing the Mexican border into the United States. Less noticed has been the surge of people heading in the opposite direction.Mexico's statistics institute estimated this month that the US-born population in this country has reached 799,000 – a roughly fourfold increase since 1990. And that is probably an undercount. The US Embassy in Mexico City estimates the real number at 1.5 million or more.[[gallery-0]] They are a mixed group. They are digital natives who can work just as easily from Puerto Vallarta as Palo Alto. They are US-born kids – nearly 600,000 of them – who have returned with their Mexican-born parents. And they are retirees like Mr Guzmán, who settled in this city five years ago and is now basically the pickleball king of San Miguel.If the thousands of Mexicans moving home are taken into account, the flow of migrants from the United States to Mexico is probably larger than the flow of Mexicans to the United States.The American immigrants are pouring money into local economies, renovating historic homes and changing the dynamics of Mexican classrooms."It's beginning to become a very important cultural phenomenon," Marcelo Ebrard, Mexico's foreign minister, said in an interview. "Like the Mexican community in the United States."And yet, he said, Mexican authorities know little about the size or needs of their largest immigrant group. He has been tasked by President Andrés Manuel López Obrador with changing that.While the United States is deeply divided over immigration, American immigrants here have largely been welcomed. In San Miguel – where about 10 per cent of the city's 100,000 residents are US citizens – Mayor Luis Alberto Villareal delivers his annual State of the Municipality address in English and Spanish.Thanksgiving is celebrated a few weeks after Mexico's Day of the Dead. Restaurants have adopted "American timing" – serving dinner at the ungodly hour of 6pm – the mayor reports."Despite the fact that Donald Trump insults my country every day, here we receive the entire international community, beginning with Americans, with open arms and hearts," Mr Villareal said.Mexican authorities say that many of the Americans are probably undocumented – typically, they have overstayed their six-month visas. But the government has shown little concern."We have never pressured them to have their documents in order," Mr Ebrard said.Typically, violators pay a small fine.Mr Villereal shrugged."We like people who come to work and help the economy of the city – like Mexicans do in the United States."San Miguel de Allende is about 170 miles northwest of Mexico City on a mile-high plateau where the sunshine coaxes bougainvillea to erupt in blazing colours and spill over walls. US veterans began moving here after World War II to study at the local art institute on the GI Bill. Over the past 30 years, expatriates flooded in, enchanted by the city's hilly cobblestone streets, soaring Gothic church, and houses painted in sunset colours: dusky rose, peach, yellow, orange.The scenery is not the only draw. Given the dollar's strength against the Mexican peso, even an American getting by on Social Security and a modest pension can rent a high-ceilinged apartment, hire a maid and eat out most nights."You can live here on $2,000 or $3,000 a month – and live well," Mr Guzmán said.Technology has shrunk the distance between the countries. In the 1980s, expat author Tony Cohan would contact his daughter in New York by trekking to the "larga distancia" office, where an operator would put a call through, as he recounted in his popular memoir On Mexican Time.These days, Bill Slusser, 66, from Los Angeles, does part-time marketing work for American clients without leaving his home here: "The internet allows that to happen."Since Nafta took effect, Mexico has gotten big-box outlets such as Walmart and Office Depot."For the things you can't find," Mr Slusser said, "you just buy them off Amazon."So many Americans live here that it is not necessary to speak Spanish. There is a dazzling array of activities for English-speakers: the Rotary Club, the quilters' circle, dancing clubs, Alcoholics Anonymous. Expats run dozens of charitable groups, mentoring Mexican students, helping provide clean drinking water, serving meals to poor abuelitas."Because it's a relatively small town, it's very easy to meet people and do whatever you want to do," Mr Slusser said one recent Friday at a tiny cafe. It was karaoke night."Por favor, tortilla chips!" a New York lawyer yelled.The US population in Mexico is still much smaller than the Mexican immigrant population north of the border, which is estimated at around 11 million. But quietly, Americans are putting their imprint on Mexican towns.About 35,000 Americans live in the beach resort of Puerto Vallarta (the destination for the Love Boat in the old television series). About 20,000 Americans reside near Lake Chapala, in central Mexico, according to the US Embassy.Americans are renovating homes in the historic centre of Merida, the Yucatecan capital. They are savouring Pacific Ocean views from homes on Gringo Hill in Sayulita. There are so many Americans in Mexico City's trendy Condesa neighbourhood that the guitarists who stroll outside the cafes ask for tips in English.For all the images of worn-down Central Americans crossing Mexico in caravans, the vast majority of immigrants to this country – around 75 per cent – are from the United States.Driving around San Miguel, you can see the foreigners' influence: million-dollar homes with chefs' kitchens and sunken tubs not far from local dwellings of battered, unpainted brick.But there seems to be little resentment of the Americans.On the annual Day of the Construction Worker this month, about 20 labourers crowded around folding tables set up on the patio of a half-finished house in a gated community in San Miguel. Following Mexican tradition, the owners of the house treated them to a party, complete with a lunch of pork, chicken tinga, beans, tortillas and beer, and a Norteno band."Eighty per cent of our clients are foreign," said Luis Camarena, a Mexican architect working on the house. "Of that 80 per cent, 90 per cent are American."For them" – Camerena gestured at the labourers – "it means work."Mr Trump is not wrong about the rising numbers of migrants reaching the southern US border. But they are more likely to be Central American than Mexican.Since 2015, census data shows, more Mexicans have returned home each year than moved to the United States. Data from 2017, the most recent year for which numbers are available, showed a net decrease of 300,000 Mexican immigrants in the United States.Some of the Mexicans heading south were deported or felt increasingly unwelcome in the United States. Others were drawn back home by improved opportunities. Mexico's population growth has slowed as education levels have risen, reducing the local competition for jobs.Many of the returning Mexicans brought little Americans with them.They are children like 3-year-old Sedona Barron and her 6-year-old brother, Adero. The siblings came to San Miguel two years ago after their father, Jesús, was deported. He, too, was a stranger to this country; he had moved to the United States with his family illegally when he was just 5. He had married an American, but a drunken-driving conviction kept him from legalising his status.The move from Arizona was especially hard for Adero."He started kindergarten in Mexico with no Spanish," said his mother, Katerina. "He was just terrified of speaking Spanish. He felt very lost at the beginning."She, too, barely spoke the language.In some towns that have traditionally sent migrants to the United States, the American-born children of returnees now make up 10 per cent or 15 per cent of the student body, according to Andrew Selee, head of the Migration Policy Institute in Washington."It's like East LA," he said.In the past, when waves of Mexicans returned from the United States, they were typically men, like the guest workers known as "braceros" who were employed on American farms from the 1940s to the 1960s.Now many of those returning are families."One of the biggest challenges is that Mexican schools are not ready to receive kids who began their education in the US in English," said Silvia Giorguli, a demographer and president of the College of Mexico in the capital.Unlike the United States, Mexico has not traditionally had many immigrants. Less than 1 per cent of the population is foreign-born. After a decades-long wave of Mexican migration transformed the United States, she said, it is now Mexico that faces a dilemma."How do you integrate Americans?"The Washington Post”
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Tim Cook to graduates: My generation failed you
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 19, 2019
“"We spent too much time debating," Cook told Tulane University graduates during a commencement speech in New Orleans.”
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Republican congressman apologises for referring to ‘consensual rape’ in debate over Missouri abortion bill
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
May 19, 2019
“A Republican Missouri legislator apologised on Friday for saying that some sexual assaults are "consensual rapes" during a debate over a new, restrictive antiabortion bill."I'm not trying to make excuses," said representative Barry Hovis, who represents the city of Jackson in southeastern Missouri. "Sometimes you make a mistake and you own up to it."The lawmaker, who was elected in 2018, made the remark while speaking on the State House floor, arguing that the measure's eight-week window for abortions "gives [rape survivors] ample time" for the procedure.Critics say many women do not know they are pregnant until after eight weeks, and the bill provides no exceptions for rape or incest.The 30-year veteran of the Cape Girardeau Police Department then touched on his experience handling rape cases."Let's just say someone goes out and they're raped or they're sexually assaulted one night after a college party – because most of my rapes were not the gentleman jumping out of the bushes that nobody had ever met," Mr Hovis said."That was one or two times out of a hundred. Most of them were date rapes or consensual rapes, which were all terrible."Representative Raychel Proudie, a Democrat, quickly rebuked him."There is no such thing, no such thing as consensual rape," she said to applause from the chamber.Mr Hovis later told The Washington Post that he misspoke and said he believes "there was no such thing as consensual rape."He added that, in all his years in law enforcement, he took the testimony of rape victims seriously."When a rape is reported, and I'll speak for myself, you always take the word of the victim," he said.Missouri's GOP-controlled House passed the antiabortion bill on Friday, which prohibits abortions after eight weeks of pregnancy.The bill comes as lawmakers in multiple states have passed restrictive abortion laws that advocates on both sides say are aimed at getting the Supreme Court to consider overturning Roe v Wade, the landmark Supreme Court decision that legalised abortion nationwide.Mr Hovis' remarks recalled a controversial comment made in 2012 by Todd Akin, a former Missouri congressman, that "legitimate rape" rarely causes pregnancy.After losing a 2012 race for US Senate, Mr Akin tried to clarify his words, saying he should have said "legitimate case of rape."The Washington Post”
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The dangers of the new SAT 'adversity score'
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 18, 2019
“The College Board, the nonprofit that administers the SAT (originally called the Scholastic Aptitude Test) taken by many university applicants as a part of their admissions packages, just announced that it was introducing a new "adversity score" that measures how challenging the test-taker's environment was growing up -- incorporating metrics like the average poverty and crime levels of the applicant's home neighborhood and the quality of the high school they attend.”
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SAT Adversity Index: A Drive Toward Diversity Without Discussing Race
by NYT > Education
May 17, 2019
“The College Board, which administers the SAT, is joining a broadening movement toward using race-neutral alternatives to affirmative action.”
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Michael Jackson's sons launch YouTube movie review show
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 17, 2019
“Fresh off of graduating from college, Prince Jackson has joined his brother in launching a YouTube show.”
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‘Far too many are still being left behind’: Getting into college isn’t enough
by Local Education
May 17, 2019
“A major charter school operator tracks graduates and make some unsettling discoveries.”
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Swarthmore bans fraternities and sororities
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 10, 2019
“Fraternities and sororities "will no longer exist" on the campus of Swarthmore College, President Valerie Smith announced Friday.”
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Harvard sanctions retired professor after finding he engaged in ‘unwelcome sexual conduct’ toward several people
by Local Education
May 10, 2019
“Jorge I. Domínguez will lose emeritus faculty privileges and is barred from campus.”
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Your Money: Trash, the Library and a Worn, Brown Table: The 2019 College Essays on Money
by NYT > Education
May 10, 2019
“Each year, we ask high school seniors to submit college application essays they’ve written about work, money, social class and related topics. Here are five that moved us.”
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Alabama removed its first black college student because of riots. 63 years later, she's being honored
by CNN.com - RSS Channel - HP Hero
May 10, 2019
“Autherine Lucy Foster's latest trip to the University of Alabama went a lot better than her first.”
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Our Own Private Singapore
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
May 10, 2019
“The rap on Singapore is that it has fertile capital but a sterile culture -- a great place to do business, but a stultifying place to live.It is the Facebook of countries.The authorities there are sensitive to that kind of criticism. In a 2017 interview with the Straits Times, Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong emphasized the diversity of the country and the distinctiveness of its individual cultural components. Singapore, he said, is oriented not toward assimilation but integration.“The result has been distinctive Singaporean variants of Chinese, Malay, Indian, and Eurasian cultures, and a growing Singaporean identity that we all share, suffusing and linking up our distinct individual identities and ethnic cultures,” Lee said. “We certainly don’t wish Singapore to be a first-world economy but a third-rate society, with a people who are well off but uncouth. We want to be a society rich in spirit, a gracious society where people are considerate and kind to one another, and as Mencius said, where we treat all elders as we treat our own parents, and other children as our own.”That is a very nice vision, which the government of Singapore pursues energetically through authoritarianism, bullying, and intimidation. Singapore is an innovator in many fields, and one of the activities toward which it has turned a great deal of attention is one that is of increasing global and domestic significance: censorship.Singapore has just passed a law that would require Facebook, Twitter, and other social-media companies to publish corrections on their sites in response to content that is ruled untrue by the government of Singapore. Facebook executives say they have been looking to governments for guidance in their attempt to suppress certain kinds of speech on their platforms -- and here it is, from the world-beating experts.The government of Singapore is, in fact, not so different in its thinking from Facebook. It is just a little ahead of the curve. Facebook insists (sometimes laughably) that its speech restrictions are not directed at unpopular political ideas but exist to serve the “safety” of the public. Singapore, too, cites safety as it prohibits certain unwelcome political activism and cultural innovation. “Public safety” is, like “national security,” an almost infinitely plastic criterion in the hands of an entrepreneurial politician: In March, President Donald Trump blocked the acquisition of Qualcomm by Singapore-based Broadcom, offering only the vague explanation that the company “might take action that threatens to impair the national security of the United States.” Senator Marco Rubio has argued that corporate welfare for Florida sugar barons is a matter of national security, while others make the same argument for their favorite commodities; Democratic party officials have suggested that Second Amendment activists be investigated or suppressed as terrorists; the sniveling cowards who run the University of California at Berkeley cited “public safety” when they forbade conservative polemicist Ann Coulter to speak on campus. Et cetera ad nauseam.In Singapore, “public safety” is the rationale for a remarkably thorough program of official censorship, much of which is directed at the worthy goal of keeping the peace among the city-state’s unamalgamated ethnic and religious groups. For example, if a crime has a potentially inflammatory ethnic or religious component, that fact generally will be omitted from media coverage as part of an unspoken agreement between the state and the newspapers. Films or books that are deemed to denigrate an ethnic or religious group are prohibited. The sale of Malaysian newspapers is prohibited. And in the same way that U.S. progressives seek to suppress political speech as a matter of “campaign finance,” the authorities in Singapore have prohibited the unlicensed showing of “party political films,” which may be the of “any person and directed towards any political end in Singapore.” Such films are permitted only if the government considers them objective; the irony of demanding a subjective ruling about objectivity seems to have been lost on Singapore’s rulers, who are not famous for their sense of humor.Singapore’s censors make the same argument as do Facebook’s: that the suppression of certain kinds of unwelcome political speech is necessary for “public safety.” Singapore’s is a genuinely multiethnic and multireligious society -- and, as it turns out, such societies do not have a very good record for long-term stability and domestic tranquility. If anything, Singapore has a more convincing argument that fanning the flames of communal politics in such a country is likely to actually endanger people than Facebook does that Milo Yiannapoulos is whatever kind of danger it is that he is supposed to be. Singapore’s position is more convincing than the jactitations of those ignorant little twerps at Philadelphia’s University of the Arts who protested that the presence of Professor Camille Paglia on their campus left them “unsafe.” (They should feel grateful. I wonder who is the second-most distinguished intellectual associated with that school.) You will not be surprised to learn that the burdens here fall more heavily on dissidents and critics of the government.But let us give Singapore and Facebook the benefit of the doubt and assume that they are motivated by concerns that are in the main to be admired. The end results are no less risible: If American society is really so fragile that Alex Jones presents an existential threat to the republic, then we should send our British cousins a letter of apology and ask to be readmitted as a colony, if they’ll have us. Likewise, if Singapore truly is going to be rocked, and not in a good way, by a Katy Perry song (“I Kissed a Girl” was prohibited as homosexual propaganda) then it is a pitiable little island indeed, to quaver at such a colossus as that.But, of course, almost no one takes seriously these claims, just as no one seriously thinks that Ann Coulter is a “danger” to anybody or that the NRA shares a genre with the Islamic State. These are pretexts, and flimsy ones. They are fig leaves for ochlocracy.But once censorship has been established in principle and accepted in practice, then officiousness, triviality, and vindictiveness are the inevitable outcomes. Bureaucracies -- Singapore’s government, Facebook’s management -- have interests of their own, and agendas of their own, and tastes of their own, and to take seriously the proposition that Facebook’s speech-policing or U.S. “campaign finance” restrictions will be managed with any more objectivity or neutrality than Singapore’s official state censorship is to ignore almost everything we know about how bureaucracies actually work. The powers that be at Facebook and Twitter may or may not be acting in good faith, but the more important fact is that they could not be fair and neutral even if they sincerely wished to be. This is a fact of organizational life, one that must be dealt with seriously. The bland little caudillos down in Human Resources are creatures of an insipid little culture all their own.And that is the one that Facebook et al. propose we live under.Facebook is a private company, and it may of course as a legal matter do whatever it pleases with its own platform, and Singapore’s censorship is perfectly legal, too, for what that’s worth -- which is not very much: Some of the worst crimes against humanity in modern history were carried out under the color of law. The question of what may be done is distinct from the question of what should be done.Singapore’s censorship is quite defensible in principle -- if you accept censorship in principle -- and the consequences of its policies have been perfectly predictable. When the prime minister feels himself obliged to go public with his insistence that local cultural conditions are not “third rate,” it is an excellent indicator that they are obviously third-rate. Some lies are accidental advertisements for the truth. There is much that is admirable about Singapore, but at its worst it is a kind of splendidly air-conditioned fascist shopping mall. Public safety is one of those good things it is possible to have too much of, and “graciousness” enforced at the point of a bayonet is not graciousness at all.Facebook, Twitter, et al. are houses divided: As businesses they are one thing, as institutions they are another. Facebook cofounder Chris Hughes argued in the pages of the New York Times on Thursday that Facebook should be broken up, in part because of its failure to contain “violent rhetoric and fake news.” Facebook and other “gargantuan companies,” he argued, are a threat to democracy. That is hysteria, but it contains a measure of truth. Democracy relies on discourse, and healthy discourse relies on a culture of open exchange, which in turn requires a measure of confidence that Facebook’s executives lack. Ironically, the problems of Facebook and, especially, of Twitter are not so much threats to democracy but useful illustrations of the shortcomings of unmediated democracy, in which the mob bullies the institutions into submission. In a healthy democratic system, things work in roughly the opposite way, with institutions helping to contain and redirect the excesses of democratic passion. And that is where Facebook and Singapore differ: The government of Singapore -- which, whatever its shortcomings, seems to be run by men who genuinely believe in their own precepts -- serves no mob, but Facebook, lacking the real conviction that can be rooted only in the permanent things, is abject and quickly prone before whatever mob happens to show up at its door.The American settlement under the First Amendment is unusual to the point of being nearly unique. Censorship of different kinds is the norm in civilized countries from Singapore to Germany, where certain political parties, symbols, and ideas are strictly prohibited. The American arrangement is different because it is the product of men who as individuals and as a civilization believed in something, which gave them the confidence to live in a world in which they are likely to hear and read things they did not like from time to time, things that might even be wicked, scurrilous, or wrong. Some men endure winter at Valley Forge, and some tremble at the menace of Katy Perry or poor daft Laura Loomer.There is a wonderful scene in Serenity, a science-fiction film that is something of a libertarian manifesto, in which a fragile, psychologically damaged girl is taken along on what amounts to an Old West-style bank robbery, after which she and her friends are chased and nearly captured by mutant space cannibals who mean to eat them raw on the spot. At the end of a wild ride dodging fire in an open-air conveyance while speeding across a Sergio Leone landscape, she returns to her overprotective older brother, who asks if she is injured. She looks at him, wide-eyed, and says: “I swallowed a bug.” Freedom tastes like that, sometimes.”
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Trash, the Library and a Worn, Brown Table: The 2019 College Essays on Money
by NYT > Education
May 09, 2019
“Each year, we ask high school seniors to submit college application essays they’ve written about work, money, social class and related topics. Here are five that moved us.”
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Washington State Moves Toward Free and Reduced College Tuition, With Businesses Footing the Bill
by NYT > Education
May 09, 2019
“The legislation, which is on the governor’s desk, would surcharge businesses like Microsoft and Amazon that rely on highly skilled workers.”
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More charter schools want to open in D.C., but how many can the city handle?
by Local Education
May 06, 2019
“There’s a conundrum: Too many seats on some campuses, not enough on others.”
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Joe Biden Has to Do More Than Name-Drop Obama to Win Black Voters
by Yahoo News - Latest News & Headlines
May 06, 2019
“Sean Rayford/GettyFormer Vice President Joe Biden’s initial pitch to Democratic voters was aimed squarely at the Rust Belt working class, but on a weekend trip through South Carolina, the early frontrunner for the party’s presidential nomination pivoted to courting black voters in the Palmetto State, highlighting his role in the Obama administration and warning of voting restrictions that hark back to the days of Jim Crow.“Last year, 24 states introduced or enacted at least 70 bills to curtail the right the vote. And guess what—mostly directed at people of color,” Biden told the crowd at a community center in Columbia, South Carolina on Saturday. “We have Jim Crow sneaking back in.”“You know when everybody has an equal right to vote, guess what—they lose. They lose,” Biden continued, referring to Republicans, whose victories in statewide elections in nearby Georgia and Florida last year sparked accusations of systematic voter suppression. “Folks, it’s just absolutely wrong.”By highlighting the importance of expanding voter access, as well as his long relationship with President Barack Obama—in his speech, Biden referred to Obama as “my buddy” and “my friend” multiple times before joking that “I shouldn’t be so casual”—Biden pitched himself as a candidate with a broader coalition of supporters beyond the white working class. But the former vice president’s history as an architect of the modern criminal justice system has activists and academics concerned that Biden hasn’t sufficiently addressed the legacy of mass incarceration in marginalized communities.Biden, who served in the U.S. Senate for three decades, was a driving force behind the implementation of aggressive criminal justice policies in the 1980s and 1990s, culminating in the writing and passage of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, which he himself dubbed the “1994 Biden Crime Bill” in 2015. Now, 25 years after the passage of this landmark bill, criminal justice advocates say the policy led to mass incarceration that disproportionately affected black communities and are calling on him to undo that legacy in order to win their support.“He’s in a precarious situation,” said Dr. Keneshia Grant, a professor of political science at Howard University whose research focus is the political impact of black migration in the United States. “He absolutely has to be saying things like, ‘people’s attempts to disenfranchise you is like Jim Crow,’ but that creates a difficult situation for him.” “The ’94 crime bill helped shape crime policy for almost the next 20 years,” said Nicole D. Porter, director of advocacy at the Sentencing Project, a Washington-based nonprofit that seeks to address racial disparities in the criminal justice system. “It was adopted at a time when the approach to crime was very punitive—there was little resistance to adopting tougher penalties at the federal and at the state level, particularly in communities that were undergoing disinvestment.”The legislation, signed into law by President Bill Clinton, was the largest crime bill in American history, and included a (since expired) ban on assault weapons, the Violence Against Women Act, and created guidelines for states to track sex offenders. But the bill included controversial provisions, including a so-called “three strikes” provision, the elimination of Pell Grants for incarcerated inmates, and provided nearly $10 billion for the construction of new prisons. The bill also increased incentives for states to sentence criminals to longer sentences, leading to an era of mass incarceration: More than 2 million Americans are currently imprisoned.“It’s not that he was swept up on the tough on crime—he drove the train. He was chair of the Judiciary Committee, he wrote a lot of these bills,” Michael Collins, director of national affairs for Drug Policy Action, told The Daily Beast. “The ‘War on Drugs’ has always been a war on people of color—we knew that back in the 1990s, and it didn’t stop Joe Biden then, and this is why we have this mass incarceration mess right now.”Biden’s legacy on criminal justice may complicate efforts to capitalize on high initial approval ratings among black voters, who make up more than half of registered Democrats in South Carolina.“He’s going to have to run a very issue-oriented campaign if he’s going to win black voters in South Carolina. He can’t just show up and say, I was Barack Obama’s vice president, because that ain’t going to work,” former South Carolina state legislator Bakari Sellers, who has endorsed Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) for president, told The Daily Beast. “I find it ironic that Hillary [Clinton] got pure hell for the ’94 crime bill when Joe Biden actually wrote the ’94 crime bill,” Sellers said. “He’s going to have to answer those questions, and he’s going to have to answer with policy points… He has to reconcile with his record, and he’s not answering those questions now.”Advocates were quick to point out that as the Democratic consensus on criminal justice has changed, so too have Biden’s views—to a point.“Biden has followed the politics on this issue,” Porter said. “As vice president in 2010, he anchored a reform... to scale back the 100-to-one crack cocaine-to powder disparity.”The former vice president has indicated that there are certain positions he has taken on crime that he now disavows. At the National Action Network’s Martin Luther King Jr. breakfast in January, Biden said that on criminal justice reform, “I know we haven't always gotten things right, but I’ve always tried,” alluding to the crime bill as “a big mistake when it was made.”But undoing the legacy of “tough-on-crime” legislation, criminal justice reform advocates said, requires more than an apology.“A stopped clock can be right twice a day, but when you look at the totality of Biden’s career, he has been one of the top cheerleaders in the War on Drugs,” Collins said. “The only reason we’re seeing any contrition here is because he’s running for president—if he was retired, we wouldn’t be seeing apologies or any of these explanations.”If Biden is serious about mitigating his role in the modern carceral state, Sellers said, he’ll begin detailing concrete policy proposals to “unravel some of the damage that he’s done.”“Moving forward, when he does talk about criminal justice, he’s going to have to talk about it in ways that are first, apologetic, and two, super clear about policy proposals to mitigate the effects of his past positions,” Grant echoed.To “account for the harm done in this country during the era of mass incarceration,” Porter suggested the elimination of mandatory minimums across the board, redirecting resources to focus on crime prevention and helping people who exit the prison system successfully enter into society, and full sentencing parity in drug possession cases—as well as provisions making such changes retroactive.“It would take 75 years for the country to get back to the incarceration rates of the early ’80s” at current rates of release, Porter said, which means that undoing mass incarceration requires policies “as substantial and muscular as the politics that drove the punitive reforms in the ’80s and ’90s.”The Biden campaign did not respond to a request for comment on the former vice president’s views on such proposals by press time.There is historical precedent for a president undoing the damage caused by previous positions and policies, Grant said, citing the case of President Lyndon Johnson, who signed the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act into law.“Lyndon Johnson starts out as a legislator who is not particularly helpful in the civil rights movement,” Grant noted. “Now when you think about him and think about his evolution on race, you can point to the Civil Rights Act to say, this is something he did to make up for his past or change his trajectory.”Read more at The Daily Beast.Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast here”
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Dish of the Week: Fruitive's Maca Berry Bowl
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 20, 2019
“South Block may be closed for the summer, but you can still get your smoothie fix a short walk away from campus.
Fruitive, a smoothie bar located at 1330 Connecticut Ave. in Dupont Circle, serves up vegetable and fruit-based cuisine like avocado toast, soups and smoothies. The shop, which The Hatchet ​ chose ​ for best trendy health food restaurant in 2017, utilizes fresh ingredients that would appeal to any health nut.
The bar is decorated with a fruit-and-veggie-themed mural near the entrance that could be used as an Instagram backdrop for you and your dish. The alternating white and wooden walls, white-marbled tables and potted plants hanging on the walls are simple but give the bar a clean look that appeals to its healthy menu.
Fruitive serves anything from salad to quesadillas and wraps, but I picked its Maca Berry Bowl ($13.95) for a smoothie treat. The smoothie has one standout ingredient – maca – a broccoli-based powder used in smoothies and protein shakes. The superfood is known for its health benefits like improved energy, mental focus and hormonal balance, according ​ to Fruitive’s website.
In addition to its maca flavor, the smoothie bowl also includes notes of pitaya and strawberry for a sweeter tooth. The bowl is topped with bananas, blueberries, granola, chia seeds and coconut flakes, adding a crunch to the mix of ingredients.
The shop does not skimp on portions. I wasn’t able to finish the bowl, making the pricey purchase worth the expense because I could take home leftovers.
While the bowl was chock full of filling fruits and grains, I was wary of the 57 grams of sugar and seven grams of protein that made up the smoothie. But if you’re looking for a lighter option, I would go back for Fruitive’s Pro Bowl ($14.95), which offers half the sugar and nearly double the protein.
Fruitive has plenty of other options for those who are not refueling after a morning run. Customers can pick from nearly 18 different varieties of juice, including the Matcha Morning ($12.95) – a less sweet, protein-filled beverage. You can also choose from different types of waffles featuring toppings like almond butter and whipped coconut cream.
While it’s fairly easy to find smoothies served at other shops around the District, Fruitive guarantees your bowl will include entirely organic ingredients made right in its kitchen. Take a half mile walk from campus for a smoothie that will satisfy your health kick for the whole day.”

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GW alumnus tapped as acting defense secretary
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 19, 2019
“A GW alumnus was chosen to serve as the acting defense secretary Tuesday, USA Today reported.
Mark Esper, who earned a doctorate in public policy from GW in 2008, was appointed by President Donald Trump to the post after former acting Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan withdrew from the confirmation process following accusations of family violence. Esper has served as secretary of the Army since November 2017.
“I thank Pat for his outstanding service and will be naming secretary of the Army, Mark Esper, to be the new Acting Secretary of Defense,” Trump said in a Tweet. “I know Mark, and have no doubt he will do a fantastic job.”
Before finishing his dissertation at GW in 2008, Esper graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 1986 joined the Regular Army until 2007. He also graduated from Harvard University in 1995 and has held positions on Capitol Hill and the Pentagon before becoming secretary of the Army.”

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Officials discuss Thurston renovations, residence hall tap access at community meeting
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 19, 2019
“Updated: Wednesday, June 19 at 3:54 p.m.
Officials announced several changes to local residents in Corcoran Hall Monday night, including expanded tap access to residence halls and accommodations for students while Thurston Hall undergoes renovations.
At a GW Community Advisory Committee meeting, officials said they plan to adjust enrollment, expand study abroad programs and offer off- and on-campus housing options to accommodate the 1,080 students who would have lived in Thurston, which will undergo renovations beginning at the end of next academic year. Administrators also said they will grant on-campus students tap access to all residence halls this fall, expanding a pilot program that began in freshmen residence halls last semester.
The Board of Trustees approved renovations to Thurston last month, including the addition of an atrium, lounges and a penthouse community space. Second- and third-year students will live in off-campus locations like Aston Hall and One Washington Circle to accommodate displaced freshmen during the construction, which will be finished no later than fall 2022.
Alicia Knight, the senior associate vice president for operations, said officials will reduce first-year enrollment by 100 students for each of the next two years and admit 50 extra students to fall study abroad programs while renovations are underway.
She said 198 students will be moved to on-campus beds, 305 upperclassmen to rooms in One Washington Circle Hotel and 238 upperclassmen to Aston Hall. The remaining 89 beds will be accommodated by enrollment drops and an increased number of students studying abroad, Knight said.
Colette Coleman, the interim associate dean of students, said students living in One Washington Circle and Aston Hall during the renovations will be required to complete the “Being a Good Neighbor” online training, participate in monthly all-community meetings and abide by quiet hours. Local residents voiced concern last month that students living off-campus would disrupt neighbors.
She said hotel management will staff the front desk at One Washington Circle hotel around the clock while students live at the hotel. Five resident advisers and a staff member will live at both One Washington Circle and Aston Hall, and an RA will perform two rounds of the building nightly to address disruptive behavior, Coleman said.
“The majority of our students want to follow the rules, they want to be civil,” Coleman said. “You have a small population that tends to break that. I wouldn’t want that to be the narrative for all of our students, because I don’t think that’s fair to them.””

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Medical school partners with Hungarian university to share practices
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 14, 2019
“The School of Medicine and Health Sciences is working with a Hungarian university to collaborate on academic and research initiatives, according to a release Thursday.
The medical school entered into a five-year agreement with Semmelweis University to exchange teaching and research skills for faculty and students studying nursing and health sciences at the two institutions. Both schools aim to work together on research plans and submit joint grant proposals, the release states.
“It is vitally important to have an understanding of the processes and procedures used in health professions education and practice across the globe, and this partnership enables us to join forces and improve the health care system together,” School of Nursing Dean Pamela Jeffries said in the release.
GW lecturers will travel to Semmelweis to train professors in online teaching methods and clinical simulations. Semmelweis will also join the GW Collaboratory, a virtual resource for researchers, patients and health care professionals to communicate on health-related issues.
“We have a lot to learn from each other and through this partnership, unlimited opportunities exist to create high impact educational experiences for our students,” Reamer Bushardt, the senior associate dean for health sciences, said in the release.”

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Officials express frustration with GW Hospital operator
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 13, 2019
“Amid disagreement over a planned expansion of GW Hospital, officials may seek a new deal with the hospital’s operator, Universal Health Services.
University President Thomas LeBlanc said GW’s agreement with UHS, which owns an 80 percent stake in GW Hospital, “no longer provides for the needs of the community” despite “repeated attempts to make improvements,” according to an internal staff email obtained by the Washington City Paper. The decision follows backlash from officials and neighborhood residents over UHS’ plan to construct a 220-bed tower in Foggy Bottom to serve more patients.
The planned expansion was part of the East End Health Equity Act, a D.C. Council bill that permitted UHS to expedite the construction of a new hospital tower in exchange for opening a hospital east of the Anacostia River. D.C. Councilmembers repealed the bill last May following the adverse reaction from officials and residents.
University spokeswoman Crystal Nosal told Washington City Paper that the school originally reached its agreement with UHS to ensure faculty and students would have access to opportunities for research and teaching and “strong clinical programs.” She added that the hospital operator was not honoring its promises to the University, Washington City Paper reported Wednesday.
“After many conversations over many years, these undertakings simply aren’t being upheld by UHS,” Nosal said in a statement.
Nosal told the Washington City Paper that the University needs a new agreement that would empower physicians to “drive continuous improvement in quality of care in the hospital” and “positions us for long-term success as a nationally recognized academic health system in clinical, research and educational activities.””

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Best and worst from this week’s headlines
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 13, 2019
“D.C. Councilmember Jack Evans, who has been accused of corruption and unethical practices, is feeling the heat this summer as candidates continue to enter the race to unseat him. Although Ward 2 residents have more options to bump Evans out of office, Senior Vice Provost for Enrollment and the Student Experience Laurie Koehler tacked herself onto a growing list of departing administrators.
Here’s the best and worst from this week’s headlines:
Thumbs Up:
Long-time incumbent Evans represents the Foggy Bottom area but has recently come under fire for allegedly accepting benefits from private companies in exchange for favorable votes on legislation. Now, Evans is under federal investigation, is facing a recall effort and announced last week that he will not seek reelection to his Metro board chairmanship.
As his reelection to the D.C. Council rolls around, multiple challengers have entered the race to take his place for the first time in more than 10 years. Evans’ fresh competition is an opportunity for D.C. voters to vote for anyone but him for the first time in nearly a decade.
Evans’ opponents include Foggy Bottom and West End Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner Patrick Kennedy , former Barack Obama staffer Jordan Grossman , Logan Circle Advisory Neighborhood Commissioner John Fanning and Microsoft employee Daniel Hernandez . Kennedy, Grossman and Hernandez have said that Evan’s unethical conduct is one reason why they decided to run for his seat.
Evans has continuously worked against the wishes of District voters in his nearly three decades in office, and the growing pressure against him should signal to voters that reelecting him would be a mistake. Evans has supported the Washington Redskins’ racist moniker and prevented term limits for D.C. Council members. Now that there are representatives willing to step up and oppose Evans, Ward 2 residents should elect anyone but him.
Thumbs Down:
Here we go again.
Just two weeks ago, Dean of Admissions Costas Solomou announced he will resign in August. Shortly before Solomou it was Provost Forrest Maltzman, who said he would step down after the University finds a replacement. This week, Koehler joined her departing colleagues and announced her resignation.
In her time at GW, Koehler was instrumental in redesigning freshman orientation into a single session in the fall. Before the academic year began, she also oversaw a reconstruction of the University’s enrollment and student affairs divisions. Koehler and Solomou worked hand-in-hand on these initiatives, and now the University is losing both of the officials who created them.
The Hatchet’s Editorial Board has noted time after time the concerning turnover among top officials, but more worrisome is the direction of the admissions, student experience and enrollment offices without its senior leaders. Both Koehler and Solomou spearheaded new-student orientation mere months ago, and now they will leave before seeing the project through. GW has also admitted an increasingly diverse student body since the pair have been at the helm, and officials must ensure they hire replacements with the same focus on diversity as their predecessors.
It is difficult for the University to prioritize certain vacancies over others, but ensuring that Koehler is swiftly replaced will continue and improve upon the projects she will leave behind. From overhauling the financial aid office to dropping standardized test scores, Koehler took steps forward that improved GW, and leaving her seat empty might cause the University to go in reverse.
Kiran Hoeffner-Shah, a sophomore majoring in political science and psychology, is the Hatchet opinions editor.”

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Professor to become first African author to pen Nelson Mandela biography
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 13, 2019
“Sociology professor and author Xolela Mangcu will be the first African author to write a Nelson Mandela biography, according to a Columbian College of Arts and Sciences release Wednesday.
Mangcu’s multivolume biography will focus on Mandela’s political activism during the Apartheid era, a period of institutionalized racial segregation in South Africa that ended in 1994, and his term as president of South Africa, according to the release. Mangcu said that he respects Mandela, whom he met with regularly during his presidency, but will not refrain from criticizing the revered leader in his book.
“The first obligation of the biographer is to the truth,” he said in the release.
Mangcu has authored nine books, including “ Biko: A Life ,” which chronicles the life of anti-Apartheid activist Stephen Biko, the release states. He said students must continue to learn from the “lessons” of Apartheid even 25 years later.  
“Our challenge as educators is to help our students see politics, freedom and justice as global concepts,” Mangcu said. “We have to get our students to think and know more about the world – because knowledge leads to action.””

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Man arrested for unlawful entry into Marvin Center
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 12, 2019
“Metropolitan Police Department officers arrested a man in the Marvin Center Tuesday for unlawfully entry on University property.
At about 9:15 a.m. MPD officers arrested Kenneth Mcleary next to the GWorld card office after he was previously barred from GW property, the report states.
The case was cleared by arrest, according to the report.”

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Senior student affairs, enrollment official to resign in August
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 12, 2019
“Senior Vice Provost for Enrollment and the Student Experience Laurie Koehler will step down in August, according to a University release Tuesday.
Koehler will leave on Aug. 7 to serve as the vice president for marketing and enrollment strategy at Ithaca College. Provost Forrest Maltzman will manage her responsibilities until a replacement is found during a search beginning this fall, the release states.
“While leaving GW is hard, I am excited to join the Ithaca College community,” Koehler said in the release. “I am energized by their commitment to access, diversity and inclusion, as well as their innovative thinking about the future of the college.”
Koehler was hired in 2013 as the associate provost for enrollment management, tasked with integrating the financial aid, registrar and admissions offices. Within months of starting her position, the admissions office came under fire for falsely claiming a need-blind admissions policy.
Over the past year, Koehler oversaw the restructuring of the student affairs and enrollment divisions and helped to redesign freshman orientation into a single session in the fall instead of multiple summer sessions. She also headed an overhaul of the financial aid office, assigning students with a financial aid adviser and launching a council for students to advise officials of financial aid concerns.
Koehler had a hand in officials’ decision go test-optional in 2015, contributing to a spike in applications the following year. Officials have also accepted more students each year since the switch, only falling this spring.
She also aimed to attract a more diverse student body, setting out on recruitment trips to target students from historically marginalized and international communities. Last academic year, the undergraduate student population was its most diverse in recent memory.
The University has recently lost Dean of Admissions Costas Solomou, who announced his resignation late last month. Maltzman, the provost who will oversee the student affairs office while officials search for Koehler’s successor, will also step down from his post once a replacement is found.
“I am grateful for the many contributions that Laurie made to GW and for how much her team, and I personally, have learned from her,” Maltzman said in the release. “We are all better leaders who take a more collaborative, student-centered and comprehensive view because of her. She will be missed.””

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Summer courses give students a more intimate class experience
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 08, 2019
“While many of my friends went home for the summer, I decided to commute from my home in Maryland to GW to take summer classes.
It is daunting to take fast-paced, six- week-long summer classes, but enrolling in fewer summer courses allows me to focus on the quality of learning rather than the quantity. I also have more time to talk with my professor because he is juggling fewer students, and there is much more time to manage a heavy workload, even with an internship on my plate and a bucket list of activities I would like to do in D.C.
While class registration for GW’s first session of summer classes has closed, there is another opportunity toward the end of the summer for students to weigh taking a class. Students who want a smaller, more intimate class that does not take up too much free time should enroll in a summer course.
As a student studying English and pre-medicine, enrolling in a couple of summer courses within my major has left room for fall and spring electives in topics of interest. Last summer, I took Organic Chemistry 2, a challenging prerequisite for medical school. I could go through chemistry problems step-by-step with my professor because fewer students were rushing to office hours over the summer. The individual attention from the professor helped me better understand the material and prepared me for exams and assignments.
But summer classes do not need to be about getting major requirements out of the way. I am also taking anthropology and digital humanities, which allows me to explore courses outside my major with some extra time on my hands.
Summer classes also give me the opportunity to study with new people from around the globe. I have visiting classmates from different countries like Dubai and Qatar who are participating in the GW Summer Program , which brings international students to campus for the summer semester. In an already small class, the international students offer diverse perspectives during discussions. Some of them are also just visiting the city for the first time, so I can show them around D.C. during our free time.
But taking summer classes is not affordable for everyone. A summer credit at GW costs $1,575, and GW  accepts  only nine credits from classes at local community colleges or public institutions, limiting students in the number of credits they can take off campus.
Despite the financial burden, there are opportunities GW offers to offset the cost of summer housing and class. The Columbian College of Arts and Sciences offers CCAS students a summer scholarship if they submitted the Free Application for Student Federal Aid, have financial aid and are taking CCAS courses. Summer staffing positions for GW Housing and jobs assisting the pre-college program for high school students also comes with a free housing bonus. These opportunities can help mitigate the cost of living in the District, especially for students who do not have the luxury of commuting to and from school.
Some students might not want to stay at school over the summer, but in my experience there is plenty to do in the District. Although I enjoy taking classes and learning, I also use time to decompress and focus on self-care. D.C. offers several cultural events during the summer, like  Smorgasburg  – a popular food market from Brooklyn, N.Y. – a Sesame Street Festival and extended summer hours at the U.S. Botanic Garden. Students can take advantage of these opportunities they might not get with a full course load during a busy academic year.
Summer classes in D.C. may sound boring and expensive, but there are ways to mitigate the cost and spend time relaxing and enjoying D.C. Students should take advantage of small class sizes and more time with professors during summer classes for a break from the packed school year. Foggy Bottom may be quiet because many students are not on campus, but it is still busy with visiting students and interns you can meet during your summer class.
Jina Park, a junior majoring in English, is an opinions writer.”

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Weekend Outlook — Celebrate Pride month at the Capital Pride Parade
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 06, 2019
“Liven up your weekend with some local jazz Friday, followed by an annual parade celebrating LGBTQ pride Saturday. Then head to Underground Comedy at the Wonderland Ballroom to finish off the weekend with laughs.
Friday
D.C. Jazz Festival
In one night, you can watch three different jazz performances held by the nonprofit D.C. Jazz Festival. All-women D.C. jazz orchestra Shannon Gunn and the Bullettes will play at the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden at 5 p.m., and The Kent Miller Quartet will follow with a performance a t the Anacostia Busboys and Poets at 6 p.m. The Anat Cohen Quartet, which has  earned  kudos from the New York Times, will wrap up the evening with an 8 p.m. show at The Hamilton. 
National Gallery of Art, Constitution Ave. NW, 5 p.m., free.
Busboys and Poets, 2004 Martin Luther King Jr Ave. SE, 6 p.m., tickets are $20.
The Hamilton, 600 14th St. NW, 8pm, tickets start at $29.75.
Saturday
Capital Pride Parade
The annual Capital Pride Parade invites LGBTQ individuals and allies to celebrate their identities and legal rights. The parade will begin at 4:30 p.m. at 21st and P streets, located near the Dupont Circle Metro stop, and will conclude at the U Street Metro stop. Grand marshals include Earline Budd, a transgender activist and the co-founder of Transgender Empowerment Inc., and Matt Easton, the Brigham Young University valedictorian who came out as gay during his graduation speech. This year’s pride parade also commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall riots, a series of protests during the 1960s gay liberation movement.
Capital Pride Parade, Dupont Circle Metro Stop, 21st and P St., NW, 4:30 to 8 p.m.
Sunday
Underground Comedy at Wonderland Ballroom
If you’re in the mood for some laughs, check out Underground Comedy at the Wonderland Ballroom. The show features a lineup of both seasoned and amateur stand up comedians from the D.C. area every Sunday in Columbia Heights. The neighborhood spot, which has hosted comedians like Ramy Youssef and Chris Reddis, is two stories high and decorated with retro posters, stickers and street signs.
Wonderland Ballroom, 1101 Kenyon St. NW, 8 p.m., 21+”

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Importance
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Bowser creates group to improve access to health care
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 06, 2019
“A new commission created by Mayor Muriel Bowser Monday will develop and issue recommendations to improve health care access at D.C. hospitals.
A 27-member Commission on Healthcare Systems Transformation will seek to increase the health care system’s capacity to treat patients and boost access to care, particularly in communities east of the Anacostia River, according to a release . The group’s formation comes after plans for GW to build a medical facility in Ward 8  stagnated  amid tensions over details of the agreement.
The University  halted  its plans to build an East End hospital in December after a back-and-forth between D.C. councilmembers and community leaders about  speeding up the facility’s construction.
“While our city is resource-rich in the kinds of health care we can offer residents, utilization of and access to those resources is not equitable,” Bowser said in the release. “Together, with the support of this commission, we’re going to change that and ensure that Washingtonians in every corner of D.C. are getting the care they need to live healthy, happy lives.”
Kimberly Russo, GW Hospital’s chief executive officer and managing director, will serve as a voting member on the commission, according to the release. Other members include hospital executives, city officials and community leaders.
The commission will present its recommendations to Bowser later this year, the release states.”

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Importance
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Watchdog accuses GW research center of political bias
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 06, 2019
“A watchdog organization released a report Monday criticizing one of the University’s research centers for its alleged right-wing bias.
The report , released by Public Citizen, a progressive consumer rights advocacy group, accused the GW Regulatory Studies Center, housed in the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, of working to promote an anti-regulatory political agenda. Taylor Lincoln, the report’s author, analyzed the RSC’s research findings, the backgrounds of the center’s researchers and the political affiliations of several of the center’s major donors to arrive at his conclusion.
“The RSC is the Fox News of the regulatory policy world, except it still clings to the fiction that it is fair and balanced,” Lincoln, the research director for Public Citizen’s Congress Watch division, said in a release .
Lincoln’s report condemns the RSC for its lack of disclosure about its donors, which Lincoln claims include anti-regulatory trade associations and nonprofits funded by conservative billionaires. “Key funders” of the center include the Charles Koch Foundation, a libertarian-leaning nonprofit, and the ExxonMobil Foundation, both of which have donated more than $1 million to the center, the report states.
The report also denounces the conservative bias of RSC researchers, noting that 96 percent of public comments submitted to federal agencies by RSC members between 2013 and 2018 recommended less stringent regulations. In the report, Lincoln singles out RSC Director Susan Dudley, a distinguished professor of practice in the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration, for the anti-regulation stances she adopted during her tenure in President George W. Bush’s administration from 2007 to 2009.
Lincoln’s report urges officials to disclose donors to the RSC and to ensure that donor gifts do not improperly influence the RSC’s research by adopting a “robust” policy on institutional conflicts of interest. Administrators should take these steps to ensure the RSC “is not merely serving as a cog in an industry-backed campaign to attack regulation” or shut down the center, the report states.
University spokesman Jason Shevrin told Washingtonian that the RSC “receives support for its activities from governments, foundations, companies, and individuals” but “does not accept funding that is conditioned on hiring, or retaining, particular individuals, nor that influences the content or conclusions of its work.””

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Importance
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Officials appoint new Trachtenberg School director
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 03, 2019
“An Ohio State University professor will be the next director of the Trachtenberg School of Public Policy and Public Administration, according to a University release Monday.
Mary Tschirhart, a professor of organizational theory and nonprofit management in the John Glenn College of Public Affairs at OSU, will take over as head of the Trachtenberg School at the beginning of August, the release states. Officials said Tschirhart’s experience “will give her perspective on the needs and interests of the Trachtenberg School’s stakeholders.”
“I look forward to working with Dr. Tschirhart to build upon the Trachtenberg School’s strong foundation and advance its academic programs and research,” Paul Wahlbeck, the interim dean of the Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, said in the release.
The school’s current director, Kathryn Newcomer, will return to a full-time teaching position, according to the release.
Tschirhart, who formerly worked at Indiana, North Carolina State and Syracuse universities, is the past president of the Association for Research on Nonprofit and Voluntary Action, the release states. She has authored more than 60 publications and serves on the editorial boards for several academic journals, according to the release.
Tschirhart said in the release that the school’s diversity of degrees and breadth of faculty research attracted her to the position. She added that she wants to use GW’s location to “connect community members to life beyond the classroom.”
“The strength of the staff and faculty is amazing – not just the expertise, but also the passion, dedication and true commitment to the mission of the school,” Tschirhart said. “There is a great diversity in interests, experiences and backgrounds, and I look forward to being part of this community.””

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Nursing school to offer new policy-focused program
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 01, 2019
“Nursing professionals interested in health policy can apply for a policy-focused doctor of nursing practice program the University will offer for the first time this fall.
The 42-credit program, which will teach nurses how to formulate health policy solutions and influence health care policy, will be headed by David Keepnews, a professor of nursing and health policy. The goal of the program is to increase patients’ access to better and more affordable health care, according to a nursing school release Thursday.
Graduates of the program will be prepared to work for public, private and academic organizations that handle health policy, the release states. Admissions for the program are rolling until the start of the fall semester.
“There are many very serious health care issues facing our country in terms of cost, access and quality, and nurses need to bring their knowledge of population needs and effective interventions into the policy discussion to improve our health system and provide safer, higher-quality care,” former nursing school Dean Jean Johnson said in the release.
 ”

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Officials announce new SEAS dean
by The GW Hatchet
Jun 01, 2019
“A University of Virginia professor will serve as the School of Engineering and Applied Science’s next dean, officials  announced Friday.
John Lach, a professor of electrical and computer engineering and the engineering director of cross-cutting initiatives at UVA, will lead SEAS starting August 15, almost a year after former SEAS Dean David Dolling departed the school. The hire concludes a monthslong dean search during which officials sought a candidate who could improve the school’s undergraduate gender balance, boost faculty retention and work with federal agencies to increase research grants.
“I am thrilled to join GW and the SEAS community,” Lach said in the release. “I look forward to working with students, faculty and staff to establish SEAS as a world-class engineering school that addresses the grand challenges of the mid-21st century by creating knowledge and educating leaders with a trans-disciplinary, impact-driven approach.”
During his tenure at UVA, Lach won an All-University Teaching Award and a School of Engineering and Applied Science Distinguished Faculty Award. Lach previously served as chair of UVA’s electrical and computer engineering department from 2012 to 2017.
Officials said in the release that Lach will also be recommended for a position as a tenured professor of electrical and computer engineering.
“John has an impressive track record not only as an educator and researcher but also as an academic leader, especially in collaborating with faculty across the sciences and other disciplines,” Provost Forrest Maltzman said in the release. “He will lead a school that is clearly on an excellent trajectory, and I look forward to watching its continual evolution.”
Maltzman also thanked SEAS Interim Dean Rumana Riffat for her service to the school this academic year. Riffat has  served in the position since Dolling’s departure.
“Rumana really stepped up to the plate when asked to serve as interim dean,” Maltzman said in the release. “I have enjoyed partnering with her and really appreciate her leadership during this transition period. I also appreciate the work by the faculty, students, alumni and trustees who served as members of the search committee.””

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New study finds offensive mascots reduce donations
by The GW Hatchet
May 31, 2019
“A new study suggests  that university mascots deemed offensive by students can negatively impact donations and the student experience.
Researchers at Yale University found that repeated exposure to Native American mascots and other mascots perceived by many as offensive can reduce students’ sense of belonging at a university, Inside Higher Ed  reported Thursday. The study – published earlier this month in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology – highlights that feelings of isolation have a larger impact on students of color.
“I think you could think of a mascot as sending a signal about what this place is going to be like and whether it’s going to be welcoming and whom it’s going to be welcoming to,” said Michael Kraus, a co-author of the study and an assistant professor of organizational behavior at Yale, in a press release.
An unnamed Midwestern university, which Inside Higher Ed identified as the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, was the subject of study. Researchers found the school’s unofficial mascot , the Chief, emblazoned on 50 percent of campus spaces and 10 percent of students’ clothing and noted a correlation between higher levels of prejudice toward Native Americans and an increased sense of belonging on campus.
Kraus said the presence of offensive mascots on campus shows students that officials value the stereotype or caricature more than its students.
“When you don’t replace the mascot, what other imagery do you have to show your school spirit or link up to sporting events?” he said in a press release. “Then it takes on a normative place in the community.”
The study’s authors also found that individuals are 5.5 percent less likely to donate to universities with offensive mascots. Study participants were asked to divide a sum of money between several universities, some of which had potentially offensive mascots.
The study comes amid controversy at GW over removing and replacing the Colonials nickname, which some students and faculty have found offensive, citing the term’s association with imperialism and white supremacy.
A narrow majority of students, 54 percent,  voted to change the nickname in a referendum held in March after a group of students launched a petition to remove the moniker. Officials have not taken an official stance on the issue.
Conservative student organizations like GW’s chapter of Young America’s Foundation and GW College Republicans urged students to vote against changing the moniker before the election and continue to oppose the change.”

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